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                                                      Calendar No. 481
115th Congress     }                                    {       Report
                                 SENATE
 2d Session        )                                    {      115-283

======================================================================



 
       DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY APPROPRIATIONS BILL, 2019
                                _______
                                

                 June 21, 2018.--Ordered to be printed

                                _______
                                

          Mrs. Capito, from the Committee on Appropriations, 
                        submitted the following

                                 REPORT

                         [To accompany S. 3109]

     The Committee on Appropriations reports the bill (S. 3109) 
making appropriations for the Department of Homeland Security 
for the fiscal year ending September 30, 2019, and for other 
purposes, reports favorably thereon and recommends that the 
bill do pass.



Total obligational authority, fiscal year 2019

Total of bill as reported to the Senate................. $57,190,844,000
Amount of 2018 appropriations........................... 116,252,357,000
Amount of 2019 budget estimate..........................  55,824,438,000
Bill as recommended to Senate compared to--
     2018 appropriations................................ -59,061,513,000
    2019 budget estimate................................  +1,366,406,000





































                                CONTENTS

                              ----------                              
                                                                   Page
Overview and Summary of the Bill.................................     4
References.......................................................     7
Title I:
    Departmental Management, Operations, Intelligence, and 
      Oversight:
        Office of the Secretary and Executive Management.........     8
            Operations and Support...............................     8
        Management Directorate...................................    15
            Operations and Support...............................    16
            Procurement, Construction, and Improvements..........    20
            Research and Development.............................    20
        Analysis and Operations..................................    20
            Operations and Support...............................    21
        Office of Inspector General..............................    22
            Operations and Support...............................    22
    Title I: Administrative Provisions...........................    23
Title II:
    Security, Enforcement, and Investigations:
        U.S. Customs and Border Protection:
            Operations and Support...............................    25
            Procurement, Construction, and Improvements..........    40
        U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement:
            Operations and Support...............................    43
            Procurement, Construction, and Improvements..........    53
        Transportation Security Administration:
            Operations and Support...............................    54
            Procurement, Construction, and Improvements..........    57
            Research and Development.............................    59
        Coast Guard:
            Operations and Support...............................    61
            Environmental Compliance and Restoration.............    65
            Procurement, Construction, and Improvements..........    65
            Research and Development.............................    71
            Health Care Fund Contribution........................    71
            Retired Pay..........................................    71
        United States Secret Service:
            Operations and Support...............................    73
            Procurement, Construction, and Improvements..........    76
            Research and Development.............................    76
    Title II: Administrative Provisions..........................    78
Title III:
    Protection, Preparedness, Response, and Recovery:
        National Protection and Programs Directorate:
            Operations and Support...............................    80
            Federal Protective Service...........................    85
            Procurement, Construction, and Improvements..........    86
            Research and Development.............................    87
        Office of Health Affairs:
            Operations and Support...............................    88
        Federal Emergency Management Agency:
            Operations and Support...............................    89
            Procurement, Construction, and Improvements..........    92
            Federal Assistance...................................    92
            Disaster Relief Fund.................................    95
            National Flood Insurance Fund........................    96
            Disaster Assistance Direct Loan Program Account......    97
    Title III: Administrative Provisions.........................    98
Title IV:
    Research and Development, Training, and Services:
        United States Citizenship and Immigration Services:
            Operations and Support...............................    99
            Procurement, Construction, and Improvements..........   100
        Federal Law Enforcement Training Centers:
            Operations and Support...............................   101
            Procurement, Construction, and Improvements..........   102
        Science and Technology:
            Operations and Support...............................   103
            Research and Development.............................   105
        Domestic Nuclear Detection Office:
            Operations and Support...............................   113
            Procurement, Construction, and Improvements..........   113
            Research and Development.............................   113
            Federal Assistance...................................   114
    Title IV: Administrative Provisions..........................   116
Title V: General Provisions......................................   117
Program, Project, and Activity...................................   120
Compliance With Paragraph 7, Rule XVI of the Standing Rules of 
  the 
  Senate.........................................................   121
Compliance With Paragraph 7(c), Rule XXVI of the Standing Rules 
  of the Senate..................................................   122
Compliance With Paragraph 12, Rule XXVI of the Standing Rules of 
  the Senate.....................................................   122
Budgetary Impact of Bill.........................................   124
Comparative Statement of New Budget Authority....................   125











                    OVERVIEW AND SUMMARY OF THE BILL

    This is just the 16th annual appropriations cycle for the 
Department of Homeland Security, which is the youngest 
department in the Federal Government. The Department's creation 
in November 2002 brought together 22 different agencies from 
across the Federal Government under one management structure.
    Each agency brought with it unique processes, cultures, and 
relationships with Congress. These agencies have evolved into 
the components of the Department of Homeland Security and 
include Customs and Border Protection, Immigration and Customs 
Enforcement, the Transportation Security Administration, the 
Coast Guard, the Secret Service, the National Protection and 
Programs Directorate, the Federal Emergency Management Agency, 
Citizenship and Immigration Services, the Federal Law 
Enforcement Training Centers, the Science and Technology 
Directorate, and the Countering Weapons of Mass Destruction 
office.
    The Department is the third largest cabinet agency by 
personnel, with nearly 250,000 employees. The management and 
oversight challenges inherent to such a large and maturing 
government organization are compounded by a complex and 
volatile threat environment and an unprecedented demand on the 
services the Department provides.
    The Committee expects the Department to continue gaining 
management and cost efficiencies by consolidating cross-
component efforts while also allowing components the 
flexibility necessary to respond quickly to changing or 
emergent threats. The Committee remains frustrated that the 
Department is often unable to translate data, whether related 
to an internal activity or an external activity, into trends or 
metrics useful for critical decisionmaking.
    The Committee has again included a provision prohibiting 
the Department from reorganizing without Congressional action. 
The Committee believes the Department could gain efficiencies 
through further reorganization but expects the Department to 
develop any proposal for reorganization in cooperation with the 
appropriate Congressional Committees. The Committee will 
consider, in conjunction with the authorizing committees of 
jurisdictions as appropriate, any proposal to reorganize the 
Department that is included as part of a future budget request.

                         BILL FUNDING PRIORITIES
                        [In thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                            Fiscal year 2019
                               -----------------------------------------
                                                          Committee
                                      Request           recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Title I--Departmental                     1,603,800            1,499,475
 Management Operations........
Title II--Security,                      38,412,342           38,683,627
 Enforcement, and
 Investigations...............
Title III--Protection,                   12,841,850           13,763,652
 Preparedness, Response, and
 Recovery.....................
Title IV--Research,                       1,526,602            1,641,718
 Development, Training, and
 Services.....................
Title V--General Provisions...             -300,000             -137,472
                               -----------------------------------------
      Total, new budget                  54,084,594           55,451,000
       (obligational
       authority).............
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    The Committee recommends a total appropriation of 
$57,190,844,000 for the Department of Homeland Security for 
fiscal year 2019, which is $1,366,406,000 above the budget 
request amount. Of this amount, $55,451,000,000 is for 
discretionary programs, including $165,000,000 for Coast Guard 
overseas contingency operations and $6,652,000,000 for the 
Disaster Relief Fund designated by the Congress as disaster 
relief pursuant to Public Law 112-25.
    The Department's most indispensable assets are the people 
it employs, and this bill recommends the funds necessary to 
support the ability of the Department's men and women to carry 
out their missions. The Department requested funding to 
increase the number of personnel in many of its components. A 
portion of these personnel cannot feasibility be hired or 
retained in fiscal year 2019, even under the most optimistic 
projections. The bill instead recommends funding levels for 
salaries and benefits that are more realistic based on hiring 
and attrition rates. In order to mitigate challenges related to 
hiring and attrition, the bill recommends funds that will 
continue to improve the Department's ability to hire and retain 
qualified personnel. The Committee remains adamant, however, 
that the increasing requirements for personnel must be balanced 
with other investments that enable the Department's employees 
to operate more effectively and efficiently. Therefore, the 
Committee recommends significant capital investments to ensure 
that the Department can work smarter in its allocation of 
personnel, technology, and infrastructure to reduce security 
risks more efficiently.
    The bill recommends increases above the fiscal year 2018 
enacted level for border security, law enforcement, and 
aviation security. Additionally, the bill does not recommend 
fee increases proposed in the budget request, and it preserves 
a historic commitment to building capacity among State, Local, 
Tribal, and Territorial first responders and emergency 
personnel by denying the significant grant program reductions 
proposed in the budget request. The bill also supports the 
Department's ability to innovate in order to maintain knowledge 
and technical advantages over those who seek to harm the 
homeland by recommending significantly higher investments in 
research and development than were proposed by the budget 
request.
    The recommendation continues significant funding for 
securing U.S. borders and provides an increase for customs and 
immigration law enforcement. The recommendation includes all 
funding requested for physical barriers along the southwest 
border and recognizes that physical impedance and denial of 
access can be an efficient and effective form of border 
security in high traffic areas with short vanishing times. The 
funding recommended will allow U.S. Border Patrol to deploy 
personnel and technology strategically and safely.
    Transnational criminal organizations are driven by profit, 
and the Committee recognizes that smugglers will improvise and 
adapt as necessary to move illicit people and goods into the 
United States. Therefore, the Committee recommendation includes 
funding for additional Customs and Border Protection and Coast 
Guard assets for surveillance of the land and maritime borders 
of the United States as well as the offshore waters used to 
access U.S. borders. The Committee is disappointed that the 
Department has not submitted a comprehensive border security 
plan to address known security gaps. Until the Department 
transmits such a plan, as required by Public Law 115-31, the 
Committee will continue to recommend funding only for 
adequately justified investments.
    For aviation security, funds are recommended above the 
requested level to continue the Committee's commitment to the 
safety and security of aircraft and the people and institutions 
that depend on them. In response to aviation security threats 
that have recently heightened security standards for aircraft 
and airports, the Committee has recommended funding 
enhancements to many of the Transportation Security 
Administration's layers of security, including Transportation 
Security Officers, screening canines, local law enforcement 
assistance, Visible Intermodal Prevention and Response teams, 
and next generation checkpoint screening technology.
    The Committee's recommendation strongly supports the role 
of the Coast Guard to enforce Federal laws on the high seas, to 
preserve life and property at sea, to assist in navigation, to 
protect the marine environment, and to maintain a state of 
defense readiness. The men and women of the Coast Guard are its 
most important asset, and the bill recommends robust resources 
to enhance recruiting, retain current force levels, and support 
retirement and healthcare costs. Due in large part to the 
Committee's efforts, the Coast Guard's surface and air fleets 
are in the midst of unprecedented modernization. With the 
expansion of the National Security Cutter fleet, continuation 
of Fast Response Cutter production, beginning of the Offshore 
Patrol Cutter acquisition, and initiation of the first Heavy 
Polar Icebreaker acquisition in more than four decades, the 
Coast Guard's cutter fleet is growing into a state-of-the-art 
force adaptable to any mission.
    The bill also recommends a significant level of investment 
in cybersecurity, including significant funding for election 
security to help States and localities guard against electronic 
tampering with elections. Through the National Protection and 
Programs Directorate [NPPD] and its partner components, the 
Department plays a central role in securing civilian Federal 
networks by providing overarching services, capabilities, and 
best practices that are deployed across agencies' information 
technology infrastructure. These funds are in addition to the 
funds that Federal departments and agencies, including the 
Department, themselves invest in protecting and upgrading their 
systems.
    The Committee notes the efforts of the men and women of 
Federal Emergency Management Agency [FEMA] in responses to the 
recent natural disasters including hurricanes, flooding, 
volcanic activity, and wildfires. FEMA deployed nearly 80 
percent of its workforce to support responses in 2017 and will 
remain in support of the recovery for years to come. The 
dedication of emergency managers in a unique and challenging 
situation demonstrates the broad-sweeping and cultural changes 
that have occurred in the past decade throughout FEMA. The 
Committee recommendation rejects proposals to make deep and 
unjustified cuts to the Department's grant programs intended to 
build security and disaster response capacity within State, 
Local, Tribal, and Territorial governments.
    The bill continues critical investments in the future of 
Homeland Security by recommending significant restoration of 
research and development [R&D;] capabilities across the 
Department. These capabilities ensure the Department is able to 
keep pace with evolving risks, reduce interference with 
legitimate commerce, and maintain a technological advantage 
over those seeking to harm the United States. The recommended 
funding level places the Science and Technology Directorate at 
the center of the Department's R&D; activities, with regard to 
both investment and coordination.

                               References

    This report refers to several Public Laws by short title as 
follows: the Budget Control Act of 2011, Public Law 112-25, is 
referenced as the BCA; Implementing Recommendations of the 9/11 
Commission Act of 2007, Public Law 110-53, is referenced as the 
9/11 Act; and the Robert T. Stafford Disaster Relief and 
Emergency Assistance Act, Public Law 93-288, is referenced as 
the Stafford Act.
    Any reference in this report to the Secretary shall be 
interpreted to mean the Secretary of Homeland Security.
    Any reference to the Department or DHS shall be interpreted 
to mean the Department of Homeland Security.
    Any reference to a departmental component shall be 
interpreted to mean offices, components, directorates or other 
organizations within the Department of Homeland Security.
    Any reference to the budget request or the request shall be 
interpreted to mean the budget of the U.S. Government, fiscal 
year 2019 and addendum that was proposed to Congress on 
February 12, 2018.
    Any reference to CAS shall mean common appropriations 
structure.
    Any reference to FTE shall mean full-time equivalents.
    Any reference to PPA shall mean program, project, and 
activity. Any reference to HSPD shall mean Homeland Security 
Presidential Directive.
    Any reference to GAO shall mean the Government 
Accountability Office.
    Any reference to OIG shall mean the Office of the Inspector 
General of the Department of Homeland Security.
    Any reference to IT shall mean information technology.
    Any reference to SLTT shall mean State, Local, Tribal, and 
Territorial.

                    DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY

                                TITLE I

    DEPARTMENTAL MANAGEMENT, OPERATIONS, INTELLIGENCE, AND OVERSIGHT

            Office of the Secretary and Executive Management

    The Office of the Secretary and Executive Management 
supports the Department by providing direction, management, and 
policy guidance to operating components. The specific 
activities funded by this appropriation include: the Office of 
the Secretary; the Office of Policy; the Office of Public 
Affairs; the Office of Legislative Affairs; the Office of 
Partnership and Engagement; the Office of General Counsel; the 
Office for Civil Rights and Civil Liberties; the Office of the 
Citizenship and Immigration Services Ombudsman; and the Privacy 
Office.

                         OPERATIONS AND SUPPORT

Appropriations, 2018....................................    $139,602,000
Budget estimate, 2019...................................     128,860,000
Committee recommendation................................     132,904,000

                       COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS

    The Committee recommends $132,904,000 for Operations and 
Support [O&S;], which is $4,044,000 above the budget request 
amount and $6,698,000 below the amount provided in fiscal year 
2018. Of this amount, not more than $41,731,000 is for non-pay. 
Of the total amount, the Committee recommends not to exceed 
$30,000 for official reception and representation expenses.
    The following table summarizes the Committee's 
recommendation as compared to fiscal year 2018 enacted and 
budget request levels:

                                             OPERATIONS AND SUPPORT
                                            [In thousands of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                            Fiscal year 2018  Fiscal year 2019      Committee
                                                                 enacted       budget request    recommendations
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Office of the Secretary...................................            18,846            17,874            17,874
Office of Policy..........................................            40,524            34,683            35,097
Office of Public Affairs..................................             5,123             5,085             5,085
Office of Legislative Affairs.............................             5,000             4,992             4,992
Office of Partnership & Engagement........................            13,373            12,656            13,475
Office of General Counsel.................................            18,501            19,463            18,419
Office for Civil Rights and Civil Liberties...............            23,571            20,825            23,717
Office of Citizenship & Immigration Services Ombudsman....             6,200             5,879             5,879
Privacy Office............................................             8,464             7,403             8,366
                                                           -----------------------------------------------------
    Total, Operations and Support.........................           139,602           128,860           132,904
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Quarterly Obligation Reports.--The Department shall 
continue to submit quarterly obligation reports to the 
Committee for all reception and representation expenses as 
required in prior years. The Department shall refrain from 
using funds available for reception and representation expenses 
to purchase unnecessary collectibles or memorabilia.
    Adequate Budget Justifications.--The Committee expects the 
Department to provide complete justification materials with the 
fiscal year 2020 budget request and to provide details for each 
office and program, clearly describing and accounting for 
current services, transfers, adjustments to base, and program 
changes.
    Joint Requirements Council.--The Committee remains pleased 
with the progress made by the Joint Requirements Council [JRC] 
since 2015 to unify and enhance departmental and component-
specific requirements development processes. The Committee 
supports JRC efforts to improve the Department's ability to 
acquire appropriate assets by clarifying component capability 
gaps, defining asset performance metrics, and identifying 
cross-component requirement commonalities. Maintaining 
separation and tension between the requirements development and 
acquisition processes makes the Department a more accountable 
buyer. The Department is directed to continue to provide 
quarterly briefings on the JRC and shall brief the Committees 
on any reorganization of headquarters organizational units not 
later than 60 days before any such reorganization takes place.
    Public Reporting of Operational Statistics.--The Committee 
continues its requirement that the Department submit quarterly 
Border Security Status reports and data on the deportation of 
the parents of U.S.-born children semiannually, as in prior 
years.
    Public Access to Federally Funded Research.--The Committee 
commends the Department for issuing its Plan to Support 
Increased Public Access to the Results of Research Funded by 
the Federal Government on December 27, 2016. The Committee 
urges the Department to continue its efforts toward full 
implementation of the plan and directs that the Department 
provide an update on progress made in materials accompanying 
its fiscal year 2020 budget request.
    The Department's Mission in Rural Areas.--Rural communities 
support the homeland security mission through contributions to 
border security, infrastructure protection, arresting illicit 
behavior, and preparing and responding to disasters, among 
other activities. The Department's grant programs that aid SLTT 
governments in these efforts must account for the unique nature 
of homeland security efforts in rural areas. The Secretary is 
directed to review the effectiveness and proportionality of the 
Department's grant activity in rural areas and to provide 
recommendations to improve the Department's practices not later 
than 90 days after the date of enactment of this act.
    Cooperation with Central American Nations.--The Committee 
notes that illegal border crossings into the United States by 
Guatemalans, El Salvadorians, and Hondurans is continuing at or 
near historic highs during fiscal year 2018. The Committee 
believes that the United States, in conjunction with the 
Government of Mexico, should continue efforts aimed at securing 
the southern border of Mexico while working with these Central 
American nations to improve their civil law enforcement 
capabilities to address criminal activities, which should have 
a net positive impact on crime in Central America as well as 
the United States. As part of these efforts, the United States 
should continue to facilitate information sharing among these 
nations regarding criminal history and prior orders of removal 
or immigration enforcement actions.
    State Police and Crime Labs.--The work of Customs and 
Border Protection [CBP], Immigration and Customs Enforcement 
[ICE], the Coast Guard, and the Secret Service includes 
investigations and operations in communities throughout the 
United States. As a result, the Department often shares 
capabilities and relies upon cooperation with SLTT and foreign 
law enforcement agencies, including State police crime labs. 
These labs provide the Department with a number of critical 
capabilities, including fingerprint, drug, and cellular 
telephone analysis. Likewise, these capabilities are the same 
services shared among SLTT and foreign law enforcement 
agencies. Coordination among these agencies not only ensures 
efficient use of resources, it also improves public safety 
outcomes. To that end, the Department should continue to work 
with State crime labs where available, particularly in areas 
not adequately served by Department labs or other Federal 
facilities. The Department should also continue to provide any 
assistance that is appropriate to State police crime labs to 
ensure Federal requirements do not burden State resources. 
Moreover, in areas where the Department frequently relies on 
State crime labs, additional support may be appropriate to 
prevent the accumulation of backlogs that can slow 
investigations. The Department shall report annually on its use 
of, and partnerships with, State crime labs, including funds 
associated with such partnerships, and should fully reimburse 
State crime labs for services they provide to the Department.
    REAL ID.--The REAL ID program improves the security of 
State identification materials. The Secretary has the 
discretion to grant a State additional time to meet the 
required minimum standards if the State provides adequate 
justification for delayed compliance and demonstrates 
continuing progress in meeting REAL ID standards. States should 
have the opportunity to consider methods of compliance 
consistent with individual State values and traditions.
    Sourcing of Personal Equipment.--A well-equipped workforce 
is critical to the Department fulfilling its mission, and U.S.-
sourced protective equipment can enhance the Department's 
personnel security. A November 2017 report by the Government 
Accountability Office (GAO-18-116) found that of the 
$164,600,000 used to purchase uniform items by the Department 
in recent years, 58 percent was paid to foreign sources. Many 
of these items could have been furnished by U.S. sources. 
Policies that protect national security by ensuring that 
sensitive equipment and clothing is manufactured domestically 
and that also strengthen the U.S. industrial base should be 
pursued to the highest degree. The Secretary shall continue to 
seek to increase the share of American-made products in the 
Department's procurement of personnel-related clothing and 
equipment.
    Wildlife Trafficking.--As noted in prior reports, the 
Committee is concerned by the high level of illegal 
international trade in wildlife and wildlife products. The 
Committee expects the Department to work in partnership with 
the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to improve cooperative 
efforts to better address wildlife trafficking. The Committee 
remains frustrated that the Department has failed to produce 
some specific reports on these activities, as required. Such 
reports should be provided to the Committee without delay. 
Further, as outlined in the explanatory statements accompanying 
Public Laws 114-113, 115-31, and 115-141 a similar report shall 
be provided for fiscal year 2019 not later than 45 days after 
the end of fiscal year 2019.
    Biometric Exit.--The Committee considers implementation of 
biometric exit a priority and worked to provide dedicated 
funding for this purpose through Public Law 114-113. The 
Department is directed to provide a spend plan for H-1B and L-1 
fee revenues and any other resources being applied to biometric 
exit implementation not later than 30 days after the date of 
enactment of this act. The Committee understands that shared 
U.S.-Mexico entry and exit data exchange programs are not yet 
in place, due primarily to the lack of border infrastructure in 
Mexico. The Committee encourages the Secretary to continue 
emphasizing the importance of joint U.S.-Mexico technology 
infrastructure that would support entry and exit data exchange 
with the Government of Mexico in the future. The Committee 
further directs the Department to brief the Committee within 
180 days of the date of enactment of this act to detail ongoing 
efforts to address entry and exit data collection and exchange 
in the land border environment.
    Visa Overstays.--The Committee remains concerned that the 
large number of annual in-country alien overstays threatens 
national security and the integrity of legal immigration. 
Pursuant to 8 U.S.C. 1376, the Department is required to 
collect data on nonimmigrant aliens who have overstayed their 
visas and to report annual estimates to Congress. Biometric 
exit remains a top priority for the Committee, even as the 
Department's data systems are not linked adequately and fail to 
operate in a person-centric fashion. The Committee continues to 
make investments in immigration data improvements and in 
underlying IT capabilities that shall be applied to enhance 
information for operations, management needs, and the next 
overstay report. The Committee expects that the Department will 
provide the report on an annual basis. As such, the bill again 
includes language directing submission of the overstay report 
and withholding $13,000,000 from obligation for the Office of 
the Secretary and Executive Management until this report has 
been submitted. Moreover, the Committee also continues 
$10,000,000 in funding dedicated to ICE enforcement efforts 
related to visa overstays. As previously required in the 
explanatory statement accompanying Public Law 115-141, the 
Department shall submit an updated report outlining its 
comprehensive strategy for overstay enforcement and deterrence 
not later than 180 days after the date of enactment of this 
act. The report shall detail the steps being taken to identify 
aliens who have overstayed their visas, including those 
necessary to improve the capabilities to report such 
information; notify aliens of their required departure dates in 
advance; track such overstays for enforcement action; refuse or 
revoke current and future visas and travel authorization; and 
otherwise deter violations or take enforcement action. The 
report shall also outline the conditions under which an alien 
is admitted to the United States for ``duration of status'' and 
assess changes to such admission, since the required departure 
requirement is vague and complicates enforcement.
    Border Apprehension Report.--The Administration's policy 
directing that criminal charges pursuant to 8 U.S.C. 1325 be 
brought against adults apprehended at the border between the 
ports of entry has resulted in the separation of family units. 
The American Academy of Pediatrics and the American Medical 
Association both oppose the separation of families while in 
immigration proceedings. The Department is directed to provide 
the Committee with a monthly report, which will be made public 
on the Department's website, documenting when and where all 
family separations occur, the ages of all minors being 
separated from their family units, the nature of administrative 
or criminal charges filed against adult family members, as well 
as how often family units apprehended together are detained in 
ICE custody, referred to the Department of Health and Human 
Services Office of Refugee Resettlement [ORR], and/or deported 
separately. The report shall also detail plans on the 
reunification of family units. Bill language is included 
withholding funds from the Office of the Secretary and 
Executive Management until submission of the first monthly 
report on family separation.
    Transfers.--The Committee expects that the Department will, 
consistent with assessments that it is in the best interest of 
the child, and whenever possible, ensure that separated family 
units are reunited prior to removal, release from CBP or Bureau 
of Prisons custody or transferred together upon transfer to ICE 
or ORR custody. The Committee understands that law enforcement 
officers will make decisions on a case-by-case basis and may 
opt for the use of the full spectrum of alternatives to 
detention, including release on parole or recognizance or, if 
needed, enrollment into a community-based alternative to 
detention program, over the detention of family members in 
separate facilities or in family detention facilities. The 
Committee expects the Department to ensure that individuals 
being transferred from CBP to ICE custody, currently in ICE 
custody, or under ICE supervision, have opportunities to report 
family separation incidents; to verify the status, location, 
and disposition of family members; and to regularly communicate 
by telephone with one another. The Department shall also ensure 
that agents and officers are properly trained in child welfare 
screening for child victims of trafficking, in accordance with 
the Trafficking Victims Protection Reauthorization Act of 2008.
    Ending Online Child Exploitation.--The Department is 
engaged in a number of commendable efforts to end human 
trafficking and child exploitation. The Committee looks forward 
to the briefing required in the in the Explanatory Statement 
accompanying Public Law 115-141 and directs the Department to 
brief the Committee semiannually on all of the required data 
pertaining to Department wide efforts to combat human 
trafficking and child exploitation.
    Records Management.--The Committee expects the Department 
to maintain records and respond to records requests, consistent 
with the requirements of section 552 of title 5, United States 
Code, for information related to all detainees in the custody 
of the Department, regardless of whether such detainees are 
housed in a Federal or non-Federal detention facility. The 
Committee further notes that the Department should not withhold 
records from disclosure unless the Department reasonably 
foresees that disclosure would harm an interest protected by an 
exemption described in section 552(b) of title 5, United States 
Code or is otherwise prohibited by law.
    Competitive Pistol Procurement.--The Committee is concerned 
that CBP could be failing to leverage existing and available 
acquisition vehicles in a way that is consistent with the 
Federal Acquisition Regulation for certain procurements. It is 
critically important that CBP's acquisition efficiently provide 
agents and officers with the best available equipment at a 
reasonable cost. The Committee encourages CBP and the 
Department to review this acquisition strategy to avoid 
duplicative acquisition efforts. The Department, in conjunction 
with CBP, shall brief the Committee, within 120 days of 
enactment of this act, detailing whether CBP's procurement 
strategies fully utilize existing contracts, when applicable 
and cost-effective.
    Executive Order 13780 Reports.--The Committee directs the 
Secretary of Homeland Security to submit to the Committee on 
Appropriations any report submitted to the President under 
section 4 of Presidential Proclamation 9645.

                            OFFICE OF POLICY

    A total of $35,097,000 is provided for the Office of 
Policy, which is $414,000 above the budget request amount and 
$5,427,000 below the fiscal year 2018 enacted level. This 
amount includes funding for personnel the budget request 
proposed be appropriated to the newly established Countering 
Weapons of Mass Destruction [CWMD] office. Under the 
recommendation, activities that are being carried out in the 
manner established during creation of the CWMD office are 
funded through their legacy appropriations structure. The 
recommendation includes $600,000 for the Immigration Data 
Initiative, instead of the $1,200,000 proposed, due to 
repricing of full time equivalent personnel cost.

                 OFFICE OF PARTNERSHIPS AND ENGAGEMENT

    A total of $13,475,000 is provided for the Office of 
Partnerships and Engagement, which is $819,000 above the budget 
request amount and $102,000 above the fiscal year 2018 enacted 
level.
    Blue Campaign.--The Blue Campaign, a department-wide 
initiative to combat human trafficking, has historically been 
operated by personnel detailed from components and funded 
through end-of-year contributions from components, an approach 
that is not appropriate for the program's long-term 
sustainment. Public Law 115-141 included direct funding of 
$819,000 for the Blue Campaign to continue support of dedicated 
personnel and to begin transitioning the program away from 
reliance on component contributions. Unfortunately, the fiscal 
year 2019 request proposed no direct funding for the program. 
This recommendation again includes $819,000, the full level 
authorized under Public Law 115-125, in continued direct 
funding for personnel. The Department is directed to sustain 
the program at not less than its total fiscal year 2016 level 
of $5,150,000 in fiscal year 2019 using component contributions 
to cover non-personnel program costs. Should the Department 
continue to propose less than full, direct funding for the 
program, a complete justification shall be included in future 
budget submissions, as directed in the explanatory statement 
accompanying Public Law 115-31.

                         OFFICE GENERAL COUNSEL

    A total of $18,419,000 is provided for the Office of 
General Counsel [OGC], which is $1,044,000 below the budget 
request amount and $82,000 below the fiscal year 2018 enacted 
level. No funding is provided for additional attorneys as 
proposed in the budget request.
    Budget and Impoundment Control Act.--The Committee directs 
the Chief Counsel to provide a report, not later than 90 days 
after enactment of this act, that identifies any instance since 
October 1, 2016 when the Department violated Section 1012 or 
Section 1013 of the Budget and Impoundment Control Act of 1974 
(2 U.S.C. 684 and 685) or Code of Federal Regulations Part 550. 
For each instance of violation identified, the report should 
include the Department's justification for the violation and 
specific actions the OGC will take to improve its understanding 
of the Budget and Impoundment Control Act of 1974. The report 
shall include a plan for strengthening internal controls 
necessary to avoid violations of the Budget and Impoundment 
Control Act of 1974 or regulations included in Code of Federal 
Regulations Part 550. Further, the Chief Counsel, in 
cooperation with the Office of Management and Budget and the 
Government Accountability Office, is directed to develop 
training on the Budget and Impoundment Control Act of 1974 and 
regulations included in Code of Federal Regulations Part 550 
and to deliver the training annually to the Office of General 
Counsel, the Office of the Chief Financial Officer, and the 
Chief Counsel and Chief Financial Officer of each component.

              OFFICE FOR CIVIL RIGHTS AND CIVIL LIBERTIES

    A total of $23,717,000 is provided for the Office for Civil 
Rights and Civil Liberties [OCRCL], which is $2,892,000 above 
the budget request amount and $146,000 above the fiscal year 
2018 enacted level. The funding above the budget request is to 
accommodate the increased workload expected in fiscal year 2019 
resulting from recent executive orders and changes to 
immigration policies and programs. OCRCL shall maintain its 
independence and oversight functions, which are vital to 
monitoring and investigating complaints.

                             PRIVACY OFFICE

    A total of $8,366,000 is provided for the Privacy Office, 
which is $963,000 above the budget request amount and $98,000 
below the fiscal year 2018 enacted level. The funding above the 
budget request is to accommodate an increased workload in 
fiscal year 2019 resulting from recent executive orders and 
changes to immigration policies and programs. Further, the 
additional funds are available to ensure information released 
by the Department does not reveal the identity or personally 
identifiable information of non-citizens who may be survivors 
of domestic violence, sexual assault, stalking, human 
trafficking, or other crimes. The Privacy Office must ensure 
the Department's actions do not violate the Privacy Act, the 
Violence Against Women Act, or other laws. The Privacy Office 
is directed to provide an updated briefing to the Committees 
within 60 days of the date of enactment of this act on the 
measures the Department will take to ensure all record systems 
properly restrict information related to survivors of domestic 
violence, sexual assault, stalking, human trafficking, and 
other crimes. The Committee directs the Privacy Office to 
evaluate the effectiveness and efficiency of current 
regulations governing Privacy Act release requests and to 
provide recommendations for changes in policy that could 
streamline processes for both requestors and the Department 
while preserving privacy protections.

                         Management Directorate

    The Management Directorate has responsibility for oversight 
of the management and operations of the Department. The 
specific activities funded by this appropriation include the 
Immediate Office of the Under Secretary for Management [USM], 
the Office of the Chief Readiness Support Officer, the Office 
of the Chief Human Capital Officer, the Office of the Chief 
Security Officer, the Office of the Chief Procurement Officer, 
the Office of the Chief Financial Officer, and the Office of 
the Chief Information Officer.

                       COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS

    The Committee recommends $944,095,000 for the Management 
Directorate, which is $139,223,000 below the budget request 
amount and $201,684,000 above the fiscal year 2018 enacted 
level. A significant portion of the increase above fiscal year 
2018 is associated with $105,432,000 in the consolidation of 
work currently performed by the components into the Management 
Directorate. The Committee continues to support the 
Department's efforts to bring greater transparency to the cost 
of management operations and to eliminate an inefficient, 
circular reimbursement process. Of amounts recommended, the 
Committee includes not to exceed $2,000 for official reception 
and representation expenses.
    Each year, the department floods the final days of the 
fiscal year with contracts to frenetically spend funds due to 
expire and be returned to the Treasury at the end of the fiscal 
year. These contracts have been used to address needs that were 
included in the upcoming fiscal year's budget request and 
creates a vicious cycle of double-funding projects yet to be 
considered by the Committee. In the interest of eliminating 
duplication and waste wherever practicable, a general provision 
is included requiring the Department to find savings, 
particularly those derived from contracts that used fiscal year 
2018 appropriations to fund activities planned for fiscal year 
2019.
    The following table summarizes the Committee's 
recommendation as compared to the fiscal year 2018 and budget 
request levels:

                                             MANAGEMENT DIRECTORATE
                                            [In thousands of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                            Fiscal year 2018  Fiscal year 2019      Committee
                                                                 enacted       budget request    recommendations
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Operations and Support....................................           710,297           834,704           824,479
Procurement, Construction, and Improvements...............            29,569           246,069           117,071
Research and Development..................................             2,545             2,545             2,545
                                                           -----------------------------------------------------
      Total, Management Directorate.......................           742,411         1,083,318           944,095
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

                         OPERATIONS AND SUPPORT

Appropriations, 2018....................................    $710,297,000
Budget estimate, 2019...................................     834,704,000
Committee recommendation................................     824,479,000

                       COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS

    The Committee recommends $824,479,000 for Operations and 
Support [O&S;], which is $10,225,000 below the budget request 
amount and $114,182,000 above the fiscal year 2018 enacted 
level. Of this amount, not more than $539,495,000 is for non-
pay.
    The following table summarizes the Committee's 
recommendation as compared to the fiscal year 2018 and budget 
request levels:

                                             OPERATIONS AND SUPPORT
                                            [In thousands of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                            Fiscal year 2018  Fiscal year 2019      Committee
                                                                 enacted       budget request    recommendations
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Immediate Office of the USM...............................             6,770             7,730             7,730
Office of the Chief Readiness Support Officer.............            71,105            90,413            90,618
Office of the Chief Human Capital Officer.................            71,052           107,606            98,391
Office of the Chief Security Officer......................            74,963            78,868            78,868
Office of the Chief Procurement Officer...................           102,615           103,197           103,197
Office of the Chief Financial Officer.....................            63,734            64,873            64,873
Office of the Chief Information Officer...................           320,058           382,017           380,802
                                                           -----------------------------------------------------
      Total, Operations and Support.......................           710,297           834,704           824,479
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Component Obligation Plans.--The Department shall continue 
submitting obligation plans to the Committee on a quarterly 
basis, consistent with direction provided in the explanatory 
statement accompanying Public Law 114-113 and shall ensure that 
the obligation plans are connected to activity-level details in 
the budget justification materials. The Committee expects these 
plans to be delivered in a timely manner.
    Department Personnel Funding.--The budget request continues 
to include funding for the pay and benefits of personnel that 
do not align with hiring projections or actual FTE in the 
previous fiscal year. When the Department is appropriated 
funding for personnel, as requested, and then falls far short 
of hiring projections, the funding appropriated for pay and 
benefits is often realigned and obligated for non-pay 
expenditures. This results in a loss of transparency between 
actual pay and non-pay requirements. Non-pay expenditures 
entered into using under-executed pay funding can mask 
structural deficiencies in component budgets that, when 
uncovered, require significant modifications to budget 
authority to meet current services. While in some instances 
these non-pay expenditures may address legitimate and unfunded 
needs, realigning under-executed funding appropriated for pay 
without notification undermines the Committee's ability to 
holistically understand the Department's true O&S; requirements 
by pay and non-pay categories. In some instances, components 
have used well over $100,000,000 in funding appropriated for 
pay for non-pay purposes without notification. Therefore, the 
Committee includes report language within O&S; appropriations 
for each component, limiting the amount available for non-pay 
purposes.

                 OFFICE OF THE CHIEF READINESS OFFICER

    The Committee recommends $90,618,000 for the Office of the 
Chief Readiness Officer [OCRO], which is $205,000 above the 
budget request amount and $19,513,000 above the fiscal year 
2018 enacted level. The amount provided above the request is to 
enable OCRO to keep pace with hiring expected in fiscal year 
2019.

               OFFICE OF THE CHIEF HUMAN CAPITAL OFFICER

    A total of $98,391,000 is provided for the Office of the 
Chief Human Capital Officer [OCHCO], which is $9,215,000 below 
the budget request amount and $27,339,000 above the fiscal year 
2018 enacted level. This amount does not include funding for 
personnel the budget request proposes be funded in the newly 
established CWMD office. Under the recommendation, activities 
that are being carried out in the manner established during 
creation of the CWMD office are funded through their legacy 
appropriations structure.
    Hiring in Rural Communities.--The components continue to 
face challenges with filling vacant positions and providing for 
public safety in non-contiguous and rural States. Challenges in 
recruiting and retaining Federal employees has exacerbated 
chronic staffing problems at U.S. ports of entry and other 
areas critical to public safety. The Department is urged to 
examine how small businesses--including Native American, Alaska 
Native, and Native Hawaiian small businesses--could help the 
Department fill its unmet needs in communities and encouraged 
to explore existing opportunities to fill vacancies where 
possible. Not later than 90 days after enactment of this act, 
the Department is directed to provide a report to the Committee 
on the challenges it faces recruiting and retaining Federal 
employees in non-contiguous and rural States. The report shall 
include a clear description of the obstacles related to using 
small businesses, information about rates of attrition, the 
number of unfilled positions, and the duration of time those 
positions have remained vacant. The report shall also provide 
an assessment of the effect these vacancies have on the ability 
of components to accomplish their statutory and administrative 
responsibilities.

                 OFFICE OF THE CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER

    The Committee recommends $64,873,000 for Office of the 
Chief Financial Officer, as requested, which is $1,139,000 
above the fiscal year 2018 enacted level. The Chief Financial 
Officer is directed to ensure that fiscal year 2020 budget 
justification materials for classified and unclassified budgets 
of all components are submitted, concurrent with the 
President's budget submission to the Congress.
    The justifications shall include:
  --Detailed data and explanatory descriptions for each request 
        and for each PPA, including offices that have been 
        identified as PPAs, reflected in the table at the end 
        of this report. Information should be presented in 
        quantifiable terms with specific breakdowns of the 
        funding.
  --Tables that compare prior year actual appropriation and 
        obligations, estimates of current year appropriations 
        and obligations, and the projected budget year 
        appropriations and obligations for all PPAs, sub-PPAs, 
        and FTE, including identifying each adjustment to base, 
        transfer, program increase, program decrease and 
        staffing change proposed in fiscal year 2020.
  --Year-to-year changes described in terms that are clear and 
        unambiguous, excluding nonspecific terms such as 
        ``technical adjustment'' or ``administrative change'' 
        unless accompanied by a detailed explanation. 
        Explanations of adjustments to base funding, whether 
        increases or decreases, should be specific and compared 
        to prior year activity level, not just the entire PPA 
        level. All requested increases shall be justified with 
        measurable outcomes above the current baseline of 
        activity. If the Department does not have a current 
        measure of such baseline activity, the Department shall 
        establish one before requesting an increase.
  --For each operations and support PPA or sub-PPA reflected in 
        the table at the end of this report, a breakdown, for 
        fiscal year 2019 enacted amounts and fiscal year 2020 
        requested amounts, of pay and non-pay amounts.
  --For investment end items with severable unit costs in 
        excess of $250,000 or a lifecycle cost in excess of 
        $300,000,000, the project description, justification, 
        total cost, and scope; key acquisition milestones from 
        the prior year, year of execution, and budget year; the 
        funding history by fiscal year, to include prior 
        enacted appropriations, obligations, and expenditures; 
        contract information to include contract number, 
        contractor, type, award date, start date, end date, 
        earned value management potential in the contract, and 
        total contract value; and significant changes to the 
        prior year enacted budget, project schedule, and 
        estimated time to completion.
  --For severable end items, the quantity of each item by prior 
        years, current year, budget year, and out-year; the 
        quantity of units delivered on contract, funded but not 
        yet on contract, and planned but unfunded; and the 
        delivery schedule by quarter for the end item, 
        delineated by fiscal year funding.
  --Information by appropriation and PPA on all reimbursable 
        agreements and significant uses of the Economy Act for 
        each fiscal year.
  --An accurate, detailed table identifying the last year that 
        authorizing legislation was enacted into law for each 
        appropriation, including the amount of the 
        authorization, when the authorization expires, and the 
        appropriation in the last year of authorization.
  --The text and citation of all Department appropriations 
        provisions enacted to date that are permanent law.
  --Explanations and justifications for all proposed 
        legislative changes, whether they are new or amend 
        existing law and whether they are substantive or 
        technical in nature, with an annotated comparison of 
        proposed versus existing language.
  --A report on the status of overdue Committee-required 
        reports, plans, or briefings for each of fiscal years 
        2018 and 2019.
    Any significant new activity that has not been explicitly 
justified to the Committee or for which funds have not been 
provided in appropriations acts requires the submission of a 
reprogramming or transfer request.
    Counter-Unmanned Aerial Systems.--The Committee is pleased 
that numerous components are undertaking efforts to mitigate 
the threat of hostile unmanned aerial systems [UAS] and directs 
the Department to include an estimate of Department-wide 
counter-UAS funding within the request, by PPA, in the 
justification materials accompanying the fiscal year 2020 
budget request. In addition, within 60 days of the date of 
enactment of this act, the Department shall brief the Committee 
on its estimated funding needs, including those not addressed 
within the fiscal year 2020 budget request, for fiscal years 
2020 through 2024 to research, test, acquire, and deploy 
counter-UAS capabilities.

                OFFICE OF THE CHIEF INFORMATION OFFICER

    The Office of the Chief Information Officer [OCIO] is 
responsible for oversight of information technology [IT] 
systems and infrastructure development, acquisitions oversight, 
including that at Data Center 1 [DC1] and Data Center 2 [DC2], 
to support the missions and activities of the Department. The 
Committee recommends $380,802,000 for OCIO Operations and 
Support which is $1,215,000 below the budget request amount and 
$60,744,000 above the fiscal year 2018 enacted level.
    Data Center Consolidation.--The Committee is pleased with 
OCIO's continued leadership in data center consolidation, which 
is enhancing the effectiveness, efficiency, and security of the 
Department's IT enterprise. Further, the Committee commends 
OCIO for its efforts to collaborate with the National 
Aeronautics and Space Administration to gain efficiencies by 
establishing IT operations centers at DC1 and by encouraging 
other Federal partners to co-locate with the Department at its 
data centers. The Committee shares OCIO's concerns with 
attracting, developing, and maintaining a qualified IT and 
cybersecurity workforce and looks forward to collaborating to 
develop workforce pipelines and workforce retention incentives. 
In addition to budget justification materials and obligation 
plans, OCIO shall provide semiannual briefings to the Committee 
on the execution of its major initiatives and investment areas. 
Such briefings shall include details regarding cost, schedule, 
and the transfer of systems to or from Department data centers 
or external hosts.
    Joint Wireless Program Management Office.--The Committee 
supports the activities of the Joint Wireless Program 
Management Office and provides $543,000 for this purpose, which 
is $1,215,000 below the request due to repricing of full time 
equivalent personnel costs.

              PROCUREMENT, CONSTRUCTION, AND IMPROVEMENTS

Appropriations, 2018....................................     $29,569,000
Budget estimate, 2019...................................     246,069,000
Committee recommendation................................     117,071,000

                       COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS

    The Committee recommends $117,071,000 for Procurement, 
Construction, and Improvements [PC&I;], which is $128,998,000 
below the budget request amount and $87,502,000 above the 
fiscal year 2018 enacted level. A general provision in title V 
of the bill includes $39,000,000 for Financial Systems 
Modernization, which was proposed under this appropriation in 
the budget request.
    The following table summarizes the Committee's 
recommendation as compared to the fiscal year 2018 enacted and 
fiscal year 2019 budget request levels:

                                   PROCUREMENT, CONSTRUCTION, AND IMPROVEMENTS
                                            [In thousands of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                            Fiscal year 2018  Fiscal year 2019      Committee
                                                                 enacted       budget request    recommendations
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Construction and Facility Improvements....................  ................           171,149            81,151
Mission Support Assets and Infrastructure.................            29,569            74,920            35,920
                                                           -----------------------------------------------------
      Total, Procurement, Construction, and Improvements..            29,569           246,069           117,071
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    DHS Headquarters Consolidation.--The recommendation 
includes $81,151,000 for development at St. Elizabeths. This 
amount is $89,998,000 below the budget request amount. The 
Committee notes that the budget request is inconsistent with 
the most recent master plan for St. Elizabeths provided to the 
Committee. Within 30 days of the date of enactment of this act, 
the Department shall provide the Committee with an updated 
master plan for St. Elizabeths certified by the Secretary or 
with a report detailing the rationale for submitting a budget 
request for activities inconsistent with its current master 
plan.

                        RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT

Appropriations, 2018....................................      $2,545,000
Budget estimate, 2019...................................       2,545,000
Committee recommendation................................       2,545,000

                       COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS

    The Committee recommends $2,545,000 for Research and 
Development [R&D;], as requested, which is the same as the 
fiscal year 2018 enacted level.

                        Analysis and Operations

    The Analysis and Operations appropriation supports 
activities to improve the analysis and sharing of threat 
information and includes activities of the Office of 
Intelligence and Analysis [I&A;] and the Office of Operations 
Coordination.

                         OPERATIONS AND SUPPORT

Appropriations, 2018....................................    $245,905,000
Budget estimate, 2019...................................     253,253,000
Committee recommendation................................     254,476,000

    Please reference the classified Analysis and Operations 
annex for further information.

                       COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS

    The Committee recommends $254,476,000 for Operations and 
Support [O&S;], which is $1,223,000 above the budget request 
amount and $8,571,000 above the fiscal year 2018 enacted level. 
Of this amount, not more than $128,356,000 is for non-pay. The 
details of these recommendations are included in a classified 
annex accompanying this report. This amount includes funding 
for personnel the budget proposed be appropriated to the newly 
established CWMD office. Under the recommendation, activities 
that are being carried out in the manner established during 
creation of the CWMD office are funded through their legacy 
appropriations structure.
    The following table summarizes the Committee's 
recommendation as compared to the fiscal year 2018 and budget 
request levels:

                                             OPERATIONS AND SUPPORT
                                            [In thousands of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                            Fiscal year 2018  Fiscal year 2019      Committee
                                                                 enacted       budget request    recommendations
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Operations and Support....................................           245,905           253,253           254,476
                                                           -----------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Operations and Support....................           245,905           253,253           254,476
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Annual Budget Justification Materials.--The Committee 
directs that the fiscal year 2020 budget justification 
materials for the classified budget shall include the same 
level of detail required for other appropriations and PPAs.
    Intelligence Expenditure Plan.--The Department's Chief 
Intelligence Officer is directed to brief the Committee on the 
I&A; expenditure plan for fiscal year 2019 within 180 days of 
the date of enactment of this act. The plan shall include the 
following:
  --fiscal year 2019 expenditures and staffing allotted for 
        each program as compared to fiscal years 2016 through 
        2018;
  --all funded versus on-board positions, including FTE, 
        contractors, and reimbursable and non-reimbursable 
        detailees;
  --a plan for all programs and investments, including dates or 
        timeframes for achieving key milestones;
  --allocation of funding within each PPA for individual 
        programs and a description of the desired outcomes for 
        fiscal year 2019; and
  --items outlined in the classified annex accompanying this 
        report.
    State and Local Fusion Centers.--The Committee is 
encouraged by the Department's previous reporting that 
commended the outreach of the Kansas Intelligence Fusion Center 
[KIFC] to critical infrastructure operators and encourages the 
Department to continue collaboration with KIFC. The KIFC 
mission and unique partnerships should continue to be leveraged 
as a State-based Center of Excellence for multi-agency, multi-
discipline public-private partnership that enhances threat 
information sharing and collaboration. Not later than 60 days 
after the date of enactment of this act, the Department shall 
brief the committee on KIFC's timely intelligence reporting at 
the Top Secret and Secret classification levels on threat 
detection, metrics that quantitatively demonstrate which 
reporting and at what levels KIFC's reporting was utilized by 
the Intelligence Community [IC] at the IC member level, and the 
Department's long-term strategy for prioritizing deployed field 
personnel to the KIFC for the purpose of Intelligence 
Information Report production in keeping with KIFC's mission. 
Upon conclusion of the assessment, the Committee directs the 
Department to work with KIFC senior leadership to address these 
issues proactively.

                      Office of Inspector General

    The OIG conducts audits, inspections, investigations, and 
other reviews of the Department's programs and operations. OIG 
promotes economy, efficiency, and effectiveness of the 
Department, with the goal of preventing and detecting fraud, 
waste and abuse.

                         OPERATIONS AND SUPPORT

Appropriations, 2018....................................    $168,000,000
Budget estimate, 2019...................................     138,369,000
Committee recommendation................................     168,000,000

                       COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS

    The Committee recommends $168,000,000 for Operations and 
Support [O&S;], which is $29,631,000 above the budget request 
and the same as the fiscal year 2018 enacted level.
    The following table summarizes the Committee's 
recommendation as compared to the fiscal year 2018 and budget 
request levels:

                                             OPERATIONS AND SUPPORT
                                            [In thousands of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                            Fiscal year 2018  Fiscal year 2019      Committee
                                                                 enacted       budget request    recommendations
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Operations and Support....................................           168,000           138,369           168,000
                                                           -----------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Operations and Support....................           168,000           138,369           168,000
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Inspectors General across the government, including the 
Department's OIG, perform a critical function in behalf of the 
Congress and the American public. OIG estimates that its work 
to deter waste, fraud, and abuse saves the Department $10.80 
for every $1.00 appropriated to support OIG operations.
    Expenditure Plan.--The Joint Explanatory Statement 
accompanying the Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2018 and 
previous reports required that OIG submit a detailed 
expenditure plan with its fiscal year 2019 budget justification 
documents. The Committee expects that the information 
accompanying OIG's fiscal year 2020 budget request shall 
include information that breaks down proposed expenditures by 
focus area and activity type.
    Acquisition Fraud.--The Committee shares OIG's concern with 
the increasing sophistication of those seeking to commit 
acquisition fraud. Advanced analytical capabilities are needed 
to carry out highly complex investigations into acquisition 
fraud, which could involve corruption within the Department. 
For these reasons, the Committee continues funding for 
combatting increased sophistication in acquisition fraud.
    Custody Operations Reporting.--OIG shall continue its 
program of unannounced inspections of immigration detention 
facilities. OIG shall publish its final report regarding the 
inspections within 180 days of the date of enactment of this 
act. The Secretary shall ensure that the results of the 
inspections, and other reports and notifications related to 
custody operations activities are posted on a publicly 
available website.

              TITLE I--ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISIONS--THIS ACT

    Section 101. The Committee continues a provision requiring 
the Chief Financial Officer to submit monthly budget execution 
and staffing reports within 30 days after the close of each 
month.
    Section 102. The Committee continues a provision regarding 
grants or contracts awarded by means other than full and open 
competition and requires OIG to review them and report the 
results to the Committee.
    Section 103. The Committee continues a provision requiring 
the Secretary to link all contracts that provide award fees to 
successful acquisition outcomes.
    Section 104. The Committee continues a provision requiring 
the Secretary, in conjunction with the Secretary of Treasury, 
to notify the Committees of any proposed transfers from the 
Department of Treasury Forfeiture Fund to any agency at the 
Department.
    Section 105. The Committee continues a provision related to 
official travel costs of the Secretary and Deputy Secretary.
    Section 106. The Committee continues a provision requiring 
the Secretary to submit reports on visa overstay data and to 
post border security metrics on its website.

                                TITLE II

               SECURITY, ENFORCEMENT, AND INVESTIGATIONS

                   U.S. Customs and Border Protection

    U.S. Customs and Border Protection [CBP] is responsible for 
enforcing laws regarding the admission of foreign-born persons 
into the United States and for ensuring that all goods and 
persons entering and exiting the United States do so legally.

                       COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS

    The Committee recommends $14,256,394,000 for CBP, which is 
$31,262,000 above the budget request amount and $238,872,000 
above the fiscal year 2018 enacted level. The budget request 
assumed CBP would retain $157,484,000 in additional collections 
for the Electronic System for Travel Authorization [ESTA] to 
offset costs for CBP activities. Assuming this fee proposal in 
advance of its authorization allowed the budget request to 
propose programmatic growth that is not founded in reality. The 
Committee cannot afford the luxury of this assumption and is 
required to fill this gap.
    The following table summarizes the Committee's 
recommendation as compared to the fiscal year 2018 enacted and 
fiscal year 2019 budget request levels:

                                       U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION
                                            [In thousands of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                            Fiscal year 2018  Fiscal year 2019      Committee
                                                                 enacted        budget request   recommendations
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Operations and Support....................................        11,485,164        12,119,643        11,963,581
    Small Airport User Fee................................             9,001             8,941             8,941
    Columbia Free Trade Collections.......................           242,000           255,000           255,000
Procurement, Construction, and Improvements...............         2,281,357         1,841,548         2,028,872
                                                           -----------------------------------------------------
      Total, Customs and Border Protection................        14,017,522        14,225,132        14,256,394
                                                           =====================================================
Estimated fee collections:
    Immigration inspection user fee.......................           732,834           769,636           769,636
    Immigration enforcement fines.........................             1,000               676               676
    ESTA..................................................            62,480           218,900            61,417
    Land border inspection fee............................            48,476            53,512            53,512
    COBRA fee.............................................           562,151           594,978           594,978
    APHIS inspection fee..................................           534,515           539,325           539,325
    Global entry user fee.................................           159,000           165,961           165,961
    Puerto Rico Trust Fund................................            92,500            31,941            31,941
    Virgin Island fee.....................................            11,170             7,795             7,795
    Customs Unclaimed Goods...............................             5,992             1,461             1,461
    9/11 Response and Biometric Account...................            90,550            71,000            71,000
                                                           -----------------------------------------------------
      Total, Estimated fee collections....................         2,300,668         2,455,185         2,297,702
                                                           =====================================================
Reimbursable Preclearance.................................            39,000            39,000            39,000
                                                           -----------------------------------------------------
      Total, U.S. Customs and Border Protection, available        14,017,522        14,225,132        14,256,394
       funding............................................
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Opioid Enforcement Activities.--The Committee notes CBP's 
key role in stopping the flow of opioids into the United 
States. Office of Field Operations [OFO] and U.S. Border Patrol 
[USBP] personnel seizures of illicit fentanyl, which is a 
particularly potent opioid, have increased significantly from 
approximately 2 lbs. seized in fiscal year 2013 to 
approximately 1,131 lbs. seized in fiscal year 2017. These 
seizures have been aided by enhancements to both personnel and 
technology enabled by this Committee, and these investments 
have resulted in approximately 1,218 lbs. of fentanyl seizures 
in so far in fiscal year 2018. In furtherance of CBP's efforts, 
the recommendation includes a total of $98,400,000 for opioid 
enforcement activities, including $68,400,000 within the 
Operations and Support appropriation and $30,000,000 within the 
Procurement, Construction, and Improvements appropriation. 
These are described in further detail under each of those 
headings.

                         OPERATIONS AND SUPPORT

Appropriations, 2018.................................... $11,485,164,000
Budget estimate, 2019...................................  12,119,643,000
Committee recommendation................................  11,963,581,000

    The CBP Operations and Support [O&S;] appropriation provides 
funds for border security, immigration, customs, agricultural 
inspections, regulating and facilitating international trade, 
collecting import duties, and enforcing U.S. trade laws. In 
addition to directly appropriated resources, fee collections 
are available for the operations of CBP from the following 
sources:
    Immigration Inspection User Fee.--CBP collects user fees to 
fund the costs of international inspections activities at 
airports and seaports, as authorized by the Immigration and 
Nationality Act (8 U.S.C. 1356).
    Electronic System for Travel Authorization Fee.--CBP 
collects fees to cover the cost of operating and implementing a 
system to pre-screen visitors from countries participating in 
the Visa Waiver Program prior to their arrival in the United 
States to avoid security risks, as authorized by section 
711(h)(3)(B) of the Implementing Recommendations of the 9/11 
Act (Public Law 110-53).
    Immigration Enforcement Fine.--CBP collects fines from 
owners of transportation lines and from other persons for 
unauthorized landing of aliens, as authorized by the 
Immigration and Nationality Act (8 U.S.C. 1356).
    Land Border Inspection Fee.--CBP collects fees for 
processing applications for the Dedicated Commuter Lanes 
program, the Automated Permit Ports program, Canadian Border 
Boat Landing permits, Mexican Non-Resident Alien Border 
Crossing Cards, FAST, SENTRI and NEXUS application fees, as 
authorized by the Immigration and Nationality Act (8 U.S.C. 
1356).
    Public-Private Partnership Reimbursements.--CBP is 
authorized by the Cross Border Trade Enforcement Act of 2015 
(Public Law 114-279) to enter into mutually beneficial 
agreements with stakeholders at select ports of entry whereby 
CBP is reimbursed for enhanced customs and agricultural 
processing, border security, and immigration inspection-related 
services.
    Consolidated Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act [COBRA] 
Fee.--CBP collects fees for inspection services involving 
customs-related functions. The COBRA user fee statutory 
authority (19 U.S.C. 58c) specifies the types of covered 
expenses.
    Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service Inspection 
Fee.--CBP receives as a transfer a distribution of agriculture 
inspection fees collected by the U.S. Department of 
Agriculture. The user fees, as authorized by the Food, 
Agriculture, Conservation, and Trade Act of 1990 (21 U.S.C. 
136), are charged to offset costs for the services related to 
the importation, entry, or exportation of animals and animal 
products.
    Global Entry User Fee.--CBP collects fees to cover the cost 
of a registered traveler program to expedite screening and 
processing of international passengers as authorized under 
section 565(3)(B) of the Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2008.
    U.S. Virgin Islands Fee Fund.--The U.S. Virgin Islands 
[USVI] are an unincorporated territory of the United States, 
and although a U.S. territory, the USVI is expressly excluded 
from the definition of customs territory of the United States. 
The importation of goods into the USVI is governed by Virgin 
Islands law. CBP collects duties on behalf of the USVI and 
deposits them into the USVI Fee Fund. The account is managed 
annually as a reimbursable account with any remaining funds 
remitted back to the USVI at the conclusion of the fiscal year.
    Puerto Rico Trust Fund.--Customs duties, taxes, and fees 
collected in Puerto Rico by CBP are deposited in the Puerto 
Rico Trust Fund. After providing for the expenses of 
administering CBP activities in Puerto Rico, the remaining 
amounts are transferred to the Treasurer of Puerto Rico 
pursuant to sections 740 and 795 of title 48, U.S. Code.
    Small Airport User Fee.--The User Fee Airports Program 
under section 58b of title 19, United States Code and 
administered under section 58c(b)(9)(A](i) of Title 19, United 
States Code authorizes inspection services to be provided to 
participating small airports on a fully reimbursable basis. The 
fees charged under this program are set forth in memoranda of 
agreement between small airport facilities and CBP and may be 
adjusted annually as costs and requirements change.
    Unclaimed Goods.--Any goods entered or un-entered 
merchandise (except merchandise under section 557 of the Tariff 
Act of 1930, as amended, (19 U.S.C. 1557), but including 
merchandise entered for transportation in bond or for 
exportation) that remain in Customs custody for 6 months from 
the date of importation or a lesser period for special 
merchandise as provided by section 127.28(c), (d), and (h) of 
title 19, United States Code, and without all estimated duties 
and storage or other charges having been paid, are considered 
unclaimed and abandoned. This account represents the proceeds 
from the liquidation of that account.
    Preclearance Reimbursements.--The authorization of 
preclearance activities under the Trade Facilitation and Trade 
Enforcement Act of 2015 (Public Law 114-125), included 
authority for CBP to both collect and spend reimbursements, 
including spending in anticipation of reimbursements.
    9/11 Response and Biometric Exit Account.--Title III of the 
Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2016 (Public Law 114-113) 
authorized amounts of up to $1,000,000,000 to be collected 
through fee surcharges over a period of 10 years for the 
implementation of a biometric exit program.

                       COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS

    The Committee recommends $11,963,581,000 for O&S;, which is 
$156,062,000 below the budget request amount and $478,417,000 
above the fiscal year 2018 enacted level. Of this amount, not 
more than $3,888,968,000 is for non-pay. The total includes 
$3,274,000 from the Harbor Maintenance Trust Fund and 
$2,548,000,000 from the merchandise processing fee. Reductions 
to the requested pay adjustments due to the under-execution of 
planned hiring in fiscal year 2018 are reflected in the 
appropriate PPAs.
    The following table summarizes the Committee's 
recommendation as compared to the fiscal year 2018 enacted and 
fiscal year 2019 budget request levels:

                                             OPERATIONS AND SUPPORT
                                            [In thousands of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                          Fiscal year 2018   Fiscal year 2019      Committee
                                                              enacted         budget request    recommendations
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Border Security Operations:
    U.S. Border Patrol:
        Operations.....................................         3,706,547          3,987,892          3,820,785
        Assets and Support.............................           625,151            708,952            646,082
        Office of Training and Development.............            64,145             82,263             61,947
                                                        --------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Border Security Operations.............         4,395,843          4,779,107          4,528,814
 
Trade and Travel Operations:
    Office of Field Operations:
        Domestic Operations............................         2,818,122          2,780,958          2,932,276
        International Operations.......................           130,270            156,669            150,213
        Targeting Operations...........................           211,797            253,492            248,029
        Assets and Support.............................           870,657            876,866            902,174
    Office of Trade....................................           234,201            272,118            267,687
    Office of Training and Development.................            49,195             47,268             50,093
                                                        --------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Trade and Travel Operations............         4,314,242          4,387,371          4,550,472
 
Integrated Operations:
    Air and Marine Operations:
        Operations.....................................           291,479            310,176            305,290
        Assets and Support.............................           535,046            531,231            525,867
        Air and Marine Operations Center...............            38,149             45,846             37,637
    Office of International Affairs....................            35,176             44,244             41,677
    Office of Intelligence.............................            53,794             64,696             65,693
    Office of Training and Development.................             6,110              5,633              5,706
    Operations Support.................................           106,225            109,762            120,622
                                                        --------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Integrated Operations..................         1,102,491          1,111,588          1,102,492
 
Mission Support:
    Enterprise Services................................         1,426,209          1,508,632          1,471,764
        (Harbor Maintenance Trust Fund)................            (3,274)            (3,274)            (3,274)
    Office of Professional Responsibility..............           182,131            224,871            202,692
    Executive Leadership and Oversight.................           100,760            108,074            107,347
                                                        --------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Mission Support........................         1,709,100          1,841,577          1,781,803
                                                        ========================================================
        Total, Operations and Support..................        11,485.164         12,119,643         11,963,581
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Resource Prioritization.--The Committee notes that the 
majority of CBP's seizures of currency, opioids, and 
methamphetamines continue to occur at the ports of entry [POE], 
and that transnational criminal organizations will likely 
continue to attempt to conceal high value contraband amongst 
flows of legitimate commerce because CBP cannot possibly 
perform secondary screening on every person and vehicle 
crossing U.S. borders. The Committee recognizes that the Office 
of Field Operations [OFO] has a robust workload staffing model. 
Despite the Committee's requesting similar analyses for several 
years, Air and Marine Operations [AMO] and USBP have not 
completed such analyses. The budget's request for new Border 
Patrol agents was not supported by a CBP-wide or Department-
wide, let alone Federal Government-wide, review of workload and 
capability gaps that would be necessary to evaluate the 
benefits of the proposal as weighed against adding staff at the 
POEs. CBP-wide analyses should inform daily decision-making, 
and longer-term resource planning at CBP. The Committee directs 
CBP to brief the Committee quarterly on efforts to evaluate 
CBP-wide workload, capabilities, and gaps, and to use the 
results of the quarterly analyses to support the fiscal year 
2020 budget request.
    Recruitment, Hiring and Retention.--The Committee has 
invested heavily in efforts to enhance the hiring and retention 
of CBP law enforcement personnel, both by recommending direct 
funding for specific requested enhancements and by enabling CBP 
to reallocate unused salary funding to a new human resources 
contract. The Committee recognizes CBP's continued hiring 
challenges and recommends $28,600,000 of the human resource 
enhancements requested within the Mission Support PPA but notes 
that CBP must continually evaluate the efficacy of all lines of 
effort to determine which are worth continuing, which should be 
modified, and which should be terminated in favor of activities 
that are more effective. CBP entered into a substantial new 
hiring contract in 2017 and has indicated that offering 
retention and relocation benefits as well as targeted digital 
advertising provide the greatest returns on investment. 
However, it remains unclear to the Committee whether these 
discrete efforts are truly components of a larger strategy. 
Within 120 days of the date of enactment of this act, CBP shall 
brief the Committee on a comprehensive recruitment and 
retention strategy, including an assessment of the costs and 
outcomes from each major line of effort as well as options to 
address human capital requirements.
    CBP continues to struggle to hire and retain funded levels 
of agents and officers, particularly in rural and remote 
locations along the northern and southern borders. CBP is 
directed to work with the Office of Personnel Management, as 
necessary, to utilize available incentives to recruit, 
relocate, and retain employees in these locations and to 
evaluate the potential impact of offering additional career 
path enhancements to personnel who choose these locations. CBP 
is encouraged to work with community, local, and Tribal 
colleges to assist with recruitment efforts. In addition, CBP 
should continue collaborating with the Department of Defense, 
as required by the Border Jobs for Veterans Act (Public Law 
114-68), to facilitate the recruitment of personnel exiting the 
military.
    The Committee notes that it remains critically important 
that staffing levels be determined by border security risks and 
needs. Prior to completion of a workforce staffing model, CBP 
is directed to maintain its previously determined minimal 
staffing presence of 2,212 agents along the northern border. 
CBP is expected to increase the number of agents along the 
northern border based on risk, threats, and trade and tourism 
trends.
    High-Speed Internet Access.--High-speed Internet has become 
a basic utility for families across the United States. Distance 
learning, retail purchases, and basic functions of daily life 
now depend on functioning high-speed Internet. Increasingly 
relevant to the recruitment and retention of CBP officers and 
Border Patrol agents is the availability of schools, family 
activities, and quality of life. While most households across 
the United States have access to affordable and reliable high-
speed Internet, many CBP personnel located in remote locations 
along U.S. borders do not always have access to affordable, 
reliable high-speed Internet. In some cases, reliable high-
speed Internet is available to surrounding communities, but not 
to CBP personnel in their homes. The Committee requests that 
CBP seek to increase recruitment and retention efforts for CBP 
officials by conducting a cost and feasibility study of high-
speed Internet availability at CBP-owned residential 
properties. For this study, CBP shall prioritize particularly 
remote locations along the northern and southern borders and 
shall provide the Committee with an analysis of currently 
available high-speed Internet options, nearby high-speed 
Internet availability, and any locations with no nearby high-
speed Internet providers. CBP shall consult with residents and 
their families throughout the course of the study.
    Law Enforcement Suitability Analysis.--The Committee 
appreciates CBP's progress in evaluating the Test for 
Espionage, Sabotage, and Corruption, a screening tool designed 
for the intelligence community that focuses on serious crimes, 
and that CBP believes meets its needs for pre-employment 
screening for law enforcement personnel. The Committee 
appreciates that polygraph tests administered by CBP continue 
to elicit admissions of serious criminal conduct by prospective 
CBP law enforcement employees but remains concerned with the 
higher-than-average polygraph failure rate for potential CBP 
hires. Within 120 days of the date of enactment of this act, 
CBP shall provide a report to the Committee on the 
effectiveness of polygraph tests. The report shall include data 
comparing CBP's failure rates to those of other Federal law 
enforcement agencies; a list of admissions elicited during 
polygraph tests since CBP implemented a mandatory polygraph 
test requirement and details regarding the total and annualized 
number of such admissions and types of admissions; 
recommendations on whether modifications to CBP's current 
polygraph waiver authority are warranted; and an analysis of 
how any such modifications could be implemented without 
lowering the standards expected for all new hires. The 
recommendation includes requested enhancements, including pre-
employment screenings certified by the National Center for 
Credibility Assessment, for the Office of Professional 
Responsibility to help uphold the highest standards for both 
new hires and current personnel.
    Northern Border.--The Committee remains concerned about the 
northern border and notes that the northern border threat 
analysis required by Public Law 114-267 provided information on 
how best to deploy resources along the northern border, but it 
lacked specificity regarding the targeted deployment of 
personnel and resources. The Committee notes the Department 
submitted the results of its close review of the northern 
border threat analysis, which states it will develop a northern 
border strategic implementation plan within 180 days, on June 
12, 2018. The Committee looks forward to reviewing that 
implementation plan and expects the fiscal year 2020 budget 
request will detail specific northern border staffing 
requirements and will request funding for implementation of 
planned northern border enforcement initiatives.
    The Committee recognizes that CBP has experienced 
significant challenges in hiring and retaining agents along the 
northern border. Moreover, the Committee recognizes the 
employment challenges facing certain Native American military 
veterans who return to their communities. Whereas certain 
northern border Tribal communities have intergovernmental 
agreements, arrangements, and memoranda of understanding 
currently unavailable to Federal law enforcement that affords 
them unique access to public lands and National Parks, the 
Committee seeks to explore employment opportunities for 
returning Native American military veterans, including within 
the ranks of CBP. The Committee directs the Undersecretary for 
Management [USM] to conduct a feasibility study for a program 
unique to Native American veterans, including a possible 
Tribal-specific branch of the Border Patrol, to make use of the 
potential for unique authorities across Tribal-controlled areas 
of the northern border. In conducting this study, the USM 
should solicit input from Tribes located along the northern 
border. The results of this study shall be submitted to the 
Committee as soon as they become available.
    Advanced Training Center.--CBP's Advanced Training Center 
[ATC] in Harpers Ferry, West Virginia, trains and educates CBP 
personnel and agency partners through the delivery of mission-
specific programs designed to meet emerging tactical and 
strategic homeland security challenges at and beyond U.S. 
borders. The ATC campus facilities were used to train more than 
6,300 students in fiscal year 2017 and include classrooms and 
scenario-based training venues that incorporate operational 
environments that CBP Officers and Agents are exposed to in the 
field. More than 16,500 students and visitors, including local, 
State and Federal law enforcement officers, will have utilized 
the ATC by the end of fiscal year 2018. The ATC also provides 
access to firearms and tactical ranges along with business and 
leadership meeting space. The Committee understands that CBP's 
future training requirements will likely necessitate continued 
growth of the ATC campus and supports efforts to ensure the ATC 
adequately meets CBP's training needs.

                       BORDER SECURITY OPERATIONS

    The Committee recommends $4,528,814,000 for Border Security 
Operations, which is $250,293,000 below the budget request 
amount and $132,971,000 above the fiscal year 2018 enacted 
level. This total includes the funding required to hire 375 new 
Border Patrol agents. The budget request assumed the employment 
of hundreds of agents the Border Patrol was unable to onboard 
in fiscal year 2018 due to continued challenges with hiring and 
retention, and the Committee's recommendation reduces the 
request to match current staffing. To help support the Border 
Patrol's efforts to address its workforce challenges, the 
recommendation includes $45,098,000, the same as the budget 
request amount, for Border Patrol recruitment and retention 
enhancements and directs the Border Patrol to continue the 
retention program funded in fiscal year 2018.
    Land Mobile Radio Coverage.--The Committee encourages the 
Border Patrol to efficiently and expeditiously modernize its 
land mobile radio equipment to address coverage and 
interoperability gaps on both the northern and southern 
borders. Further, the Committee encourages CBP to ensure that 
it leverages the full range of available, proven commercial 
capabilities, including secure use of the long term evolution 
wireless spectrum, the high frequency spectrum, and commercial 
satellite networks when more efficient than other 
infrastructure, and to evaluate the costs and benefits of 
deploying proven commercial mobile spectrum management and 
secure communications infrastructure to high-priority areas 
with inadequate radio coverage. The recommendation includes 
$24,793,000 for Tactical Air, Land, and Marine Enterprise 
Communication.
    Border Patrol Staffing Model.--A Border Patrol Staffing 
model has yet to be completed. Senate Report 114-264 and the 
Joint Explanatory Statement accompanying the Consolidated 
Appropriations Act, 2017 (Public Law 115-31) directed the 
development of a workforce staffing model to validate 
requirements for all U.S. borders, and the Joint Explanatory 
Statement accompanying Public Law 115-141 noted that the model 
had not been completed. A robust workforce staffing model is 
needed to support any necessary changes, and as such, the 
Committee directs CBP to brief weekly on efforts to develop and 
utilize a Border Patrol workforce staffing model and to 
continue these briefings until the model is mature and used to 
allocate personnel.
    Border Access.--The Committee urges CBP to analyze the 
needs of specialty units, including those utilizing horses and 
off-road vehicles, along the U.S.-Mexico border to better 
disperse resources or identify additional needs. The Committee 
further urges CBP to work with counties along the U.S.-Mexico 
border to identify unimproved county roads that are used 
predominantly by Border Patrol and that provide critical access 
to the border region for the purpose of maintaining security. 
The Committee further urges CBP to incorporate the maintenance 
and repair of the identified high-priority access roads into 
its Tactical Infrastructure Maintenance and Repair program.
    Border Patrol Assets and Support.--The recommendation 
continues robust funding of $60,000,000 for replacement of 
patrol vehicles, and the Committee encourages the Border Patrol 
to evaluate the benefits of operating more rugged and capable 
vehicles and to consider entire life-cycle costs when 
recapitalizing vehicles. The recommendation includes 
$44,367,000, as requested, for Border Patrol Enforcement 
Systems [BPES]. BPES consist of critical systems, services and 
equipment, all of which are in the operations and maintenance 
phase, that are used to effectively manage resources and to 
detect, deter, identify, classify, and resolve illegal border 
activity.
    Temporary Facilities.--The Committee reminds CBP that its 
temporary shelter facilities, including POEs and Border Patrol 
stations, while not designed for nor intended to be used as 
longer term shelters, must meet all appropriate care standards 
for special populations, especially children. Within 60 days of 
the date of enactment of this act, CBP shall report to the 
Committee on the number of detainees currently being held by 
CBP for longer than 48 hours and for longer than 72 hours in 
these facilities. The list should be updated monthly and should 
include a list of all CBP facilities used for holding 
detainees, including the year-to-date average daily population 
and the daily population at these facilities at the time of 
publication.
    Roving Patrol Stops.--The Committee directs CBP to provide 
the Committee with data pertaining to the number and efficacy 
of roving patrol stops and to release this data publicly on a 
semiannual basis. All personally identifiable information about 
specific individuals shall be redacted from these reports. The 
report shall include a description of CBP policies governing 
enforcement actions of this nature; the total number of roving 
patrol stops made by CBP personnel, including the number 
resulting in arrest; and the date, location, duration, type of, 
and reason for each roving patrol stop and each resulting 
arrest.

        TRADE AND TRAVEL OPERATIONS--OFFICE OF FIELD OPERATIONS

    The Committee recommends $4,232,692,000 for the Office of 
Field Operations, which is $164,707,000 above the budget 
request amount and $201,846,000 above the fiscal year 2018 
enacted level. This total includes funding above the request to 
hire 375 new OFO officers and provides enhancements to help 
stop the flow illicit drugs and other dangerous items through 
POEs.
    Opioid Enforcement.--The Committee supports OFO's opioid 
enforcement activities, and the recommendation includes a total 
of $68,400,000 within O&S; specifically targeted to these 
activities. The Committee expects OFO to enhance both law 
enforcement and scientific staffing and to deploy technology at 
POEs as required to help stop the flow of opioids into the 
United States. Of this total, $2,000,000 is for 15 additional 
canine teams and $13,700,000 is to enhance laboratory staffing 
and scientific equipment under the Integrated Operations, 
Operations and Support PPA.
    International Mail and Express Consignment Facilities.--
While most illicit drug smuggling attempts occur at southern 
land border POEs, the smuggling of illicit narcotics through 
international mail facilities [IMFs] and express consignment 
carrier [ECC] locations poses a significant threat. In fiscal 
year 2017, CBP made 118 seizures of illicit fentanyl totaling 
approximately 240 lbs. in the ECC environment and 227 seizures 
totaling approximately 92 lbs. of illicit fentanyl at IMFs. The 
majority of illicit fentanyl at IMFs and ECC locations is 
shipped in purities of over 90 percent, whereas the majority of 
fentanyl seized within the land border environment is seized in 
purities of less than 10 percent. The Committee supports CBP's 
efforts to reduce the entry of illicit drugs via IMFs and 
encourages continued collaboration with the U.S. Postal Service 
and the Food and Drug Administration [FDA]. Within the total 
recommended, $30,000,000 is to improve CBP capacity in support 
of enforcement activities at international IMFs and ECC 
locations by enhancing scientific and laboratory staffing, 
increasing law enforcement staffing and canines, improving 
facilities, deploying technology to locate targeted packages, 
enhancing detection and testing equipment, and improving 
interoperability with FDA detection equipment.
    Field Operations Staffing.--The Committee recommendation 
includes $48,885,000 for 375 new OFO officers. Funding for the 
new officers will help address unmet workload staffing 
requirements and is recommended in recognition of wait times at 
certain POEs as well as the volume of illicit drugs passing 
through POEs.
    Targeting.--The Committee supports pre-arrival targeting 
activities, as effective targeting results in frontline 
officers focusing on the highest threat people and cargo. 
Targeting occurs at the National Targeting Center and at POEs 
throughout the United States. Targeting activities at CBP have 
grown at a rapid pace over the last several fiscal years, and 
the Committee is pleased that CBP has begun to quantify the 
benefits of targeting. The recommendation includes enhancements 
as requested for targeting and directs CBP to prioritize new 
activities and facilities enhancements based on risk and in 
coordination with other components. The Committee directs CBP 
to brief the Committee within 90 days of the date of enactment 
of this act on current and proposed targeting metrics and 
milestones, impacts on frontline staffing requirements, and the 
proposed end state for these activities.
    Northern Border Land Ports of Entry.--The Committee 
encourages CBP to continue to work with the General Services 
Administration and the Office of Management and Budget on the 
annual 5-year land border POE modernization plan, which is 
based on CBP's operational priorities and should include plans 
to complete the modernization of pre-9/11 POEs along the 
northern border. Specific attention shall be paid to the 
health, safety, and welfare needs of CBP Field Operations 
Officers. Additionally, the Committee encourages CBP to 
increase the use of NEXUS at land POEs where the program is in 
use at the companion Canadian POE around the clock. Further, 
the Committee expects CBP to examine ways to increase awareness 
and enrollment in the NEXUS program, including through special 
enrollment events and the deployment of signage in 
collaboration with State agencies of transportation. The 
Committee anticipates expansion of this program and directs CBP 
to consider projected volume at land POEs when developing the 
5-year plan for port modernization projects. CBP shall report 
to the Committee within 120 days of the date of enactment of 
this act on an assessment of staffing resources and funding 
that would be needed to expand NEXUS operations at land POEs 
along the northern border where NEXUS lanes are only staffed 
part-time. The report should include assessments for staffing 
NEXUS operations for 12 hour, 16 hour, and 24 hour periods.
    Maritime Ports of Entry.--The Committee continues to 
support robust staffing levels at both cargo and passenger 
seaports and strongly encourages CBP to work with seaports and 
associated stakeholders to improve clearance operations. The 
Committee notes that scanning equipment at maritime ports is 
reaching its expected normal performance life and that CBP 
should provide as much information about equipment replacement 
events as practicable to port owners and operators so that 
recapitalization can be performed in a consistent and 
transparent manner. CBP's requirements for space in new 
facilities can add significant costs to projects, and the 
Committee directs CBP to engage thoughtfully with ports when 
negotiating agreements with port owners and operators.
    Scheduling Efficiency and Effectiveness.--CBP's fiscal year 
2013 Resource Optimization Report described that implementing 
automated scheduling and timekeeping solutions could return CBP 
Officers and Agricultural Specialists to their frontline 
inspectional and law enforcement duties. With OFO's current 
Resource Optimization Report noting the need for additional 
Officers and Agricultural Specialists, it is unclear why CBP 
has not taken steps to automate this activity. The Committee 
directs CBP to continue to evaluate commercially-available 
automated scheduling tools and to deploy such solutions if it 
is determined that the benefits of a solution outweigh the 
costs.
    Technology and Personnel at Ports of Entry.--The Committee 
has repeatedly noted that license plate reader [LPR] equipment 
used to analyze vehicular traffic crossing U.S. land borders is 
nearing the end of its life cycle and should be improved. The 
Committee continues to direct CBP to utilize the latest, most 
effective, and most accurate LPR technology within CBP's 
Integrated Travel Initiative program in order to improve 
situational awareness, facilitate efficient cross-border 
commerce and travel, and improve CBP's operational efficiency 
at land POEs.
    The Committee recognizes that CBP is taking steps to 
improve the efficiency and effectiveness of its automated cargo 
processing system for tractor-trailers crossing U.S. land 
borders, including by launching a proof-of-concept pilot at the 
Laredo Juarez-Lincoln POE. The Committee praises CBP's efforts 
to utilize the most accurate and effective technology available 
to reduce cross-border wait times for tractor trailers without 
compromising security or customs enforcement. The Committee 
urges CBP to continue efforts to eliminate inefficient manual 
processes and directs CBP to provide the Committee with a 
briefing on its efforts to improve automated cargo processing 
for tractor trailers at land-based POEs not later than 120 days 
after the date of enactment of this act.
    Large Airport Staffing Requirements.--Border security 
efforts must not be limited to the contiguous United States, 
and effective border security cannot be achieved without an 
appropriate focus on all POEs, including those at airports. CBP 
should assess and ensure that hiring practices and procedures 
reflect and meet the needs of large U.S. international airports 
in States that do not share a contiguous land border with 
Mexico or Canada to ensure that such airports are appropriately 
staffed. In doing so, CBP should consider the per capita number 
of international tourist passenger enplanements each year. Not 
later than 60 days after the date of enactment of this act, CBP 
shall submit to the Committee a workload staffing model 
detailing the process and criteria used to determine the number 
of personnel assigned to POEs at all airports and shall include 
specific information relevant to determinations at large U.S. 
international airports in States that do not share a contiguous 
land border with Mexico or Canada. In addition, CBP shall brief 
the Committee if legislation is necessary to improve hiring and 
retention at these airports.
    The Committee is concerned by multiple reports that CBP's 
airport staffing decisions are opaque and artificially 
constrain growth at airports. The Committee directs CBP to 
brief the Committee within 90 days of the date of enactment of 
this act regarding ways it is improving the staffing model or 
otherwise ensuring that agency staffing decisions are 
impartial, predictable, and allow for growth at airports with 
opportunities to expand into new international air passenger 
markets.
    Small Airport Inspection Services.--The Committee is 
concerned that rigid CBP policies are precluding many small 
airports that lack a business case for constructing a Federal 
Inspection Station from adding international flights, despite 
the existence of secure General Aviation Facilities already 
used by CBP for intermittent international clearance of 
corporate and private aircraft. Accordingly, the Committee 
encourages CBP to consider modifying relevant policies and 
operations and to work creatively with such airports, including 
Green Bay-Austin Straubel International Airport in Wisconsin, 
to facilitate international service in a manner consistent with 
CBP security and resource requirements and informed by 
airports' fiscal constraints and existing facilities.
    Agricultural Inspections.--The Committee is concerned that 
delay in the pest inspection process at POEs, particularly 
those on the southwest border, can result in perishable goods 
expiring while steps are being taken to identify pests and 
seeds and implement remediation options for when these threats 
to U.S. agriculture are suspected to be present in cargo. The 
Committee understands that CBP has worked with the U.S. 
Department of Agriculture to develop more timely analysis of 
these goods and directs CBP to continue efforts to further 
enhance this collaboration and brief the Committee within 180 
days of the enactment of the act on these efforts.
    Illicit Movement of Financial Instruments and Firearms.--
The Committee is concerned that monetary instruments and 
firearms continue to be smuggled from the United States into 
Mexico, fueling transnational criminal organization activities, 
including drug trafficking and violent crime. One effective 
means to combat trafficking is to stop the flow of resources 
that enable illicit activity. The Committee encourages CBP to 
continue to collaborate with domestic and international 
partners to identify and apprehend smugglers and directs CBP to 
brief the Committee not later than 90 days after the date of 
enactment of this act if frontline law enforcement personnel 
need additional authorities or resources to improve the 
efficacy of enforcement operations.
    Land Ports of Entry Hours of Operation.--The Committee is 
concerned that reducing hours of operation at land POEs could 
unduly impede cross-border travel and negatively affect local 
and regional economic activity. The Committee directs CBP to 
refrain from reducing the hours of operation at any POE unless 
CBP can demonstrate that the reduction in hours will benefit 
regional commerce without impeding local resident traffic and 
has consulted with elected officials at all levels, community 
members, and industry prior to making changes to hours of 
operation. CBP shall notify the Committee 30 days in advance of 
any proposed changes.
    Jones Act Enforcement.--The Committee notes improvements to 
CBP's enforcement of the Jones Act on the Outer Continental 
Shelf. However, the Committee urges CBP to take more aggressive 
enforcement action and to issue swift, transparent, and 
meaningful penalties to deter violations. The Committee again 
directs CBP to continue tracking Jones Act violation data, 
including findings of fact, parties determined to be at fault, 
amounts of penalty assessments, and status of collections, and 
to make information available to the public and the Committee 
on a quarterly basis. Additionally, CBP must establish specific 
timeframes for internal review and actions, cooperate with the 
industry to investigate potential violations, and dedicate 
adequate resources to vigorously enforcing the Jones Act on the 
Outer Continental Shelf. The Committee recognizes the need for 
uniform application and enforcement of the coastwise laws 
across the United States and directs CBP to continue to 
dedicate additional resources to its Jones Act Division of 
Enforcement in New Orleans. An administrative provision is 
continued prohibiting funds from being used to issue future 
waivers related to a release from the Strategic Petroleum 
Reserve until the Secretary has consulted with the Departments 
of Energy and Transportation and representatives of the 
maritime industry and taken adequate steps to ensure 
enforcement of the Jones Act. The Secretary shall notify the 
Committee within 2 business days of any request for a Jones Act 
waiver. The Committee shall be informed on a timely basis of 
the disposition of each waiver request.
    Preclearance.--The Department shall prioritize successful 
implementation of expanded preclearance operations, as outlined 
in the Department's Beyond the Border Action Plan, between the 
United States and Canada for land, marine, rail, and air 
entries. The Committee appreciates progress on efforts to 
establish preclearance to the mutually agreed upon sites of 
Billy Bishop Toronto City Airport, Quebec City Jean Lesage 
International Airport, Montreal Rail, and Rocky Mountaineer, 
with the understanding that such expansion is contingent upon 
each site meeting all terms and conditions of the agreement. 
The Committee directs CBP to continually evaluate the security 
benefits of both existing and prospective preclearance 
agreements.
    The Committee encourages CBP to meet the objectives for 
preclearance activities, including obligations in advance of 
reimbursement, as authorized by the Trade Facilitation and 
Trade Enforcement Act of 2015 [TFTEA], and provides the funding 
necessary to both collect and expend reimbursements, including 
spending in anticipation of reimbursements, for preclearance 
activities. With Canada's adoption of companion legislation, 
CBP is expected to make progress in negotiations with the 
Canada Border Services Agency, Transport Canada, and Public 
Safety Canada on expanding preclearance activities in Canada.
    Electronic Visa Update System [EVUS].--EVUS allows certain 
non-immigrant visa holders to provide updated biographic and 
travel-related information through a public website and enables 
CBP to facilitate admissibility determinations after issuance 
of a visa but before passengers initiate travel to the United 
States. The non-visa immigrant visa holders who benefit from 
this program, not U.S. taxpayers, should pay for the operation 
and maintenance of EVUS.
    Improved International Travel Data.--The Committee notes 
that the release of international visitor data by the 
Department of Commerce was suspended in April 2018 because of 
anomalies in the data, and the Committee expects CBP to assist 
the Department of Commerce in developing a report on the cause 
of the anomalies as well as a timeline and course of action for 
correcting the data. Once the anomalies are addressed, the 
Committee expects CBP to continue providing timely, accurate 
data to the Department of Commerce, categorized by the 
residency of the traveler, as opposed to citizenship of the 
traveler, unless otherwise agreed upon with the Department of 
Commerce's National Travel & Tourism Office and the U.S. Travel 
& Tourism Advisory Board.

              TRADE AND TRAVEL OPERATIONS--OFFICE OF TRADE

    The Committee recommends $267,687,000 for the Office of 
Trade, which is $4,431,000 below the budget request amount and 
$33,486,000 above the fiscal year 2018 enacted level. The 
Committee supports continued hiring of additional staff 
necessary to implement TFTEA mandates in a timely manner and 
recommends the continuation of data integration programs 
initiated in fiscal year 2018.
    Antidumping and Countervailing Duties.--The Committee 
directs CBP to continue reporting on antidumping and 
countervailing duties, as required in Senate Report 114-264. 
The Committee recognizes that CBP ranks second among Federal 
agencies with regard to revenue collection, and the Committee 
is concerned about uncollected antidumping duties. The 
Committee also recognizes that the United States is the only 
major user of antidumping and countervailing duties that 
processes payments in a retrospective manner. The Committee 
directs GAO to conduct a study and report to the Committee 
within 180 days of the date of enactment of this act, on the 
advantages and disadvantages of this retrospective duty system 
in comparison to the advantages and disadvantages of a 
prospective duty system, with the goal of minimizing 
uncollected duties.
    The Committee notes that, in Executive Order 13785, the 
President directed CBP to focus on collecting long due 
antidumping and countervailing duties [AD/CVD]. According to 
CBP data, the majority of these uncollected duties are owed on 
imports from China of honey, canned mushrooms, crawfish tail-
meat, and fresh garlic. Under U.S. law, much of the revenue 
from these duties and the interest on them is passed on to 
domestic producers. The Committee again reminds CBP of its 
obligation to collect these duties.
    The Committee is concerned that the intent of Congress 
under the Continued Dumping and Subsidy Act [CDSOA] is being 
diluted by CBP's requests that domestic industries that 
received prior, incorrect payments of collected duties under 
CDSOA return those payments due to CBP's various collections 
litigation setbacks, settlements, or administrative errors. As 
most of these payments were made several years ago and have 
been reinvested by the recipients as CDSOA intended, the 
Committee views this policy as counter to the clear intent of 
the statute. By recouping revenue paid to domestic companies, 
and assessing interest charges, CBP is counteracting the intent 
to allow industries the opportunity to rehire and reinvest. The 
Committee instructs CBP to determine the impact of this 
practice on U.S. producers and to notify the Committee prior to 
recouping such payments or reducing future payments. The 
Committee further directs CBP to develop strategies that will 
allow for more accurate payment of CDSOA benefits and that will 
provide domestic companies with alternative payment options 
where incorrect payments have occurred.
    Coordination to Combat Trade Fraud and Duty Evasion.--The 
Committee remains focused on the need for all Federal agencies 
involved in international trade to enforce existing trade laws 
aggressively. Government analysis provides strong evidence that 
trade fraud and duty evasion are widespread in many commodity 
sectors, especially steel and aluminum. There are specific 
actions that CBP and ICE, together with the Departments of 
Commerce, Justice, and State, the U.S. International Trade 
Commission, the U.S. Trade Representative, and other agencies, 
can take now. The Committee directs CBP to coordinate with the 
International Trade Commission and other agencies, as 
appropriate, and report to the Committee if legislative 
remedies are required to support a U.S. Government-wide 
strategy to combat trade fraud and evasion. These unfair trade 
practices are harmful to the U.S. economy and can be 
devastating to small and rural communities that are facing 
economic hardship.
    Combatting Transshipment.--The Committee is aware of the 
efforts by some foreign traders to circumvent U.S. trade laws 
and evade duty payments by transshipping products through third 
party countries. This practice causes lasting damage to U.S. 
companies, which are forced to dedicate significant resources 
to initiating subsequent trade cases while foreign companies 
continue evasion. Therefore, the Committee directs CBP to 
modify targeting criteria and make other changes necessary to 
provide CBP with better information and the administrative 
flexibility required to identify transshipped products.
    Section 232 Tariffs.--Beginning on March 8, 2018, several 
proclamations were issued adjusting imports of steel and 
aluminum into the United States, under section 232 of the Trade 
Expansion Act of 1962, as amended (19 U.S.C. 1862). The 
Committee recognizes the difficulty of implementing immediate 
import tariffs on a wide range of steel and aluminum products 
from numerous countries and understands that physical 
inspections are the only truly effective means of preventing 
certain fraudulent activities, like festooning shipments with 
falsified Harmonized Tariff Schedule codes. CBP shall submit a 
report, not later than 180 days after the enactment of this 
act, on the resources needed to effectively implement new 
section 232 steel and aluminum tariffs. The report shall 
include estimates on any increased demands on manpower and 
system infrastructure resulting from the additional inspections 
and any other recommendations on how to ensure the effective 
implementation of the section 232 tariffs.
    Customs Data Integration Pilot.--The Committee understands 
that CBP has piloted the use of a platform that integrates and 
synthesizes Customs data with external data sources. The pilot 
is designed to provide CBP with a complete picture of the 
history, operations, credit, and security risk of regulated 
parties. It has enabled the Office of Trade to improve Importer 
of Record oversight, to protect fair trade by combatting forced 
labor and the AD/CVD collections and enforcement gap, and to 
foster an environment conducive to U.S. innovation through the 
enforcement of intellectual property rights. The recommendation 
includes $16,000,000 to continue the pilot.
    Live Entry Summaries.--U.S. industry, including paper and 
forest products producers, suffers as a result of transshipment 
and mislabeling of foreign products to avoid the payment of AD/
CVD. In order to address this issue, the Committee recommends 
that CBP allocate funds as necessary to require live entry 
summaries for imports of all targeted products, including paper 
and forest products, currently subject to AD/CVD duty orders in 
instances where CBP has reason to believe or suspect that the 
country listed as the country of origin for the imported 
product does not produce the product or the imported product 
has been misclassified, misidentified, or mislabeled. The entry 
summaries shall include documentation of the country of origin 
of the product.
    Shrimp Safety.--The Committee directs CBP to continue 
coordinating with the FDA, including through the Commercial 
Targeting and Analysis Center to improve the safety of shrimp 
imports into the United States by enhancing shrimp-related 
targeting and inspection processes. The Committee directs CBP 
to brief the Committee semiannually on the outcomes of these 
efforts.
    Automated Commercial Environment [ACE].--The Committee 
directs CBP to cooperate with the private sector, through the 
Commercial Customs Operations Advisory Committee and other 
channels, to prioritize ACE enhancements and further directs 
CBP to work with Partner Government Agencies to establish a 
sustainable cost-sharing process for ACE and International 
Trade Data System enhancements.

                         INTEGRATED OPERATIONS

    Air and Marine Operations.--The recommendation includes 
requested funding for depot level maintenance of two P-3 
aircraft and $3,000,000 to continue AMO hiring and retention 
efforts. The Committee strongly supports ensuring that CBP's 
aircraft and vessels based near the northern border are fully 
capable of operating in all northern border weather conditions.
    Unmanned Aerial Systems [UAS].--The Committee is concerned 
that CBP lacks sufficient capacity to provide airborne border 
surveillance and that, due to a lack of qualified pilots, CBP's 
existing fleet of unmanned aircraft remains under-utilized. The 
recommendation includes $10,000,000 above the request to 
augment CBP's existing unmanned aerial border surveillance 
capabilities with contractor instructor pilots and two mobility 
ground control stations for its current fleet. The Committee 
directs CBP to analyze the cost of its UAS operations and to 
analyze whether contractor-owned, contractor-operated aircraft 
can further augment CBP surveillance requirements and report on 
the results of this analysis to the Committee within 180 days 
of the date of enactment of this act.
    Marine Operations.--The Committee directs CBP to continue 
collaboration with Canada in areas along the northern border 
with large numbers of recreational boaters. Detecting smuggling 
in heavily-trafficked waterways can be particularly challenging 
when using radar and vessel tracking technologies based only in 
the United States. Canada has invested significant resources in 
vessel tracking technology and smuggling detection analytics, 
and AMO may benefit from access to such capabilities. The 
Committee supports the deployment of improved vessel tracking 
radar systems and encourages CBP to work with Canada to explore 
such opportunities to improve U.S. law enforcement on these 
waterways.

              PROCUREMENT, CONSTRUCTION, AND IMPROVEMENTS

Appropriations, 2018....................................  $2,281,357,000
Budget estimate, 2019...................................   1,841,548,000
Committee recommendation................................   2,028,872,000

                       COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS

    The Committee recommends $2,028,872,000 for Procurement, 
Construction, and Improvements [PC&I;], which is $187,324,000 
above the budget request amount and $252,485,000 below the 
fiscal year 2018 enacted level.
    The following table summarizes the Committee's 
recommendation as compared to the fiscal year 2018 enacted and 
fiscal year 2019 budget request levels:

                                   PROCUREMENT, CONSTRUCTION, AND IMPROVEMENTS
                                            [In thousands of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                            Fiscal year 2018  Fiscal year 2019      Committee
                                                                 enacted        budget request   recommendations
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Border Security Assets and Infrastructure.................         1,741,701         1,647,304         1,652,304
Trade and Travel Assets and Infrastructure................           263,640            44,237           182,690
Integrated Operations Assets and Infrastructure:
    Airframes and Sensors.................................           190,035            83,241           112,612
    Watercraft............................................             8,573  ................            14,500
    Other Systems and Assets..............................             1,200  ................  ................
Construction and Facility Improvements....................            59,775            48,222            48,222
Mission Support Assets and Infrastructure.................            16,433            18,544            18,544
                                                           -----------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Procurement, Construction, and                     2,281,357         1,841,548         2,028,872
       Improvements.......................................
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Physical Barriers and Tactical Infrastructure.--Border 
security is critically important to the national security of 
the United States, and the Committee is committed to providing 
appropriations to secure U.S. borders. On January 25, 2018, the 
President directed the Department to develop long-term 
requirements to improve border security, including through the 
construction of physical barriers along parts of the southern 
border, and to prepare corresponding budget requests. The 
recommendation includes $1,600,000,000, the amount included in 
the budget request, for approximately 65 miles of pedestrian 
fencing in the Rio Grande Valley Sector in Texas. As a physical 
barrier is but one component of a border security system, the 
Committee believes it is imperative to integrate appropriate 
sensor technology, including fiber optics and camera systems, 
with the barrier system.
    The Committee continues to believe that a detailed plan is 
necessary to accurately estimate future costs of a physical 
barrier along parts of the southern border and includes bill 
language requiring an updated risk-based plan for improving 
security along the borders of the United States. In addition, 
the Committee directs CBP to provide, within 180 days of the 
date of enactment of the act, a detailed plan describing how to 
secure each border sector, including any updates to the 
estimated costs and types of physical barrier or technology 
necessary for each mile of the border.
    Border Security Technology.--The recommendation includes 
continued funding for border security technology to increase 
situational awareness along the northern and southern borders. 
The recommendation includes $1,977,000 for Integrated Fixed 
Towers Systems, $43,727,000 for Remote Video Surveillance 
Systems, and $1,600,000 for Mobile Video Surveillance Systems.
    In addition, the Committee is aware of the successful 
delivery and performance of the Mobile Surveillance Capability 
[MSC]. The MSC provides CBP with a mobile surveillance tower 
that includes integrated radar and an infrared camera, which 
improve detection and provide greater situational awareness, 
particularly in rugged terrain. Given the success of this 
program, the Committee directs CBP to expand the surveillance 
capability of MSCs by integrating Small Unmanned Aircraft 
Systems [SUAS], which could allow for the distribution of real-
time aerial surveillance data to agents in the field. The 
recommendation includes $4,000,000 above the request to conduct 
a technical demonstration of and develop requirements and a 
concept of operations for an MSC with integrated SUAS 
capabilities.
    Border Technology Evaluation and Metrics.--In line with 
GAO's recommendations included in GAO-17-765T, the Committee 
again directs CBP to develop complete performance metrics for 
all technologies deployed, to begin using data to evaluate the 
individual and collective contributions of specific 
technologies, to assess its progress in implementing planned 
technologies, and to determine when mission benefits have been 
fully realized. CBP must complete this effort in order to 
assess its progress in deploying technology and to determine 
when mission benefits have been fully realized.
    Cross Border Tunnel Threat.--The recommendation includes 
$1,000,000 above the budget request amount for the Cross Border 
Tunnel Threat program. This initiative should involve continued 
collaboration with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Engineer 
Research and Development Center.
    Non-Intrusive Inspection.--The recommendation includes 
$174,237,000 for recapitalization and acquisition of non-
intrusive inspection [NII] and related equipment. The Committee 
is encouraged by the Department's ongoing efforts to enhance 
border security and to promote the efficient flow of legitimate 
commerce at U.S. land POEs and consequently recommends a 
$130,000,000 funding increase above the budget request amount 
for advanced detection equipment and technology to maintain 
robust cargo, commercial conveyance, and vehicle inspection 
regimes at land POEs. The Committee stresses the importance of 
deploying innovative large and small scale NII equipment at the 
highest-volume POEs to support the detection and prevention of 
illicit drugs, currency, weapons, radioactive materials, and 
other illegal contraband from entering the United States. The 
Committee directs CBP to allocate not less than $30,000,000 for 
equipment necessary to identify opioids at POEs.
    Automated Commercial Environment [ACE].--The recommendation 
includes $8,453,000 for CBP to continue ACE program 
enhancements in fiscal year 2019, and the Committee directs CBP 
to provide details related to engagement with industry and 
other stakeholders to prioritize the projects funded with the 
enhancement recommended in this act.
    Aircraft Recapitalization.--The Committee understands that 
CBP is developing documentation supporting the recapitalization 
of the light enforcement helicopter fleet and notes that the 
procurement of a common airframe would allow CBP to avoid 
duplicating significant costs associated with training, 
tooling, publications, and non-recurring costs for the 
development of new supplemental type certificates for the 
unique CBP mission.
    The Committee notes that CBP intends to optimize the 
remaining twelve Multi-Role Enforcement Aircraft [MEA] within 
the current program of record for air-to-ground surveillance. 
The Committee strongly supports this effort and directs CBP to 
ensure that the next six MEA aircraft procured in the air-to-
ground configuration are equipped with an appropriate air-to-
ground radar. Within 120 days of enactment of this act, CBP 
shall submit to the Committee a report outlining CBP's plan to 
accelerate the MEA air-to-ground capability. The recommendation 
includes $86,112,000 to procure three MEA aircraft and 
integrate one vehicle and dismount exploitation radar on an 
aircraft.
    The Committee also recommends requested aircraft sensor 
upgrades, Federal Aviation Administration Next Generation 
equipment, and cost associated with Prototype Integration 
Facility labor to complete the updated UH-60 helicopter 
configuration, including non-recurring engineering services as 
performed under the interagency agreement with the U.S. Army.
    Coastal Interceptor Vessel [CIV].--The recommendation 
includes $14,500,000 above the budget request amount to 
transition the CIV from low rate initial production to full 
rate production and to stay on pace to meet the 52-vessel CIV 
acquisition objective. Further, the Committee encourages the 
Department to request additional funding in fiscal year 2020 to 
maintain full rate production levels and achieve the CIV 
acquisition objective prior to fiscal year 2021.
    Border Patrol and OFO Facilities.--The recommendation 
includes $33,400,000 for the Freer Station, as requested, and 
$14,775,000 for other OFO facilities.
    Revenue Modernization.--The recommendation includes 
$18,544,000 for revenue modernization. Within 120 days of the 
date of enactment of this act, CBP shall provide the Committee 
with estimated costs and a timeline for the elimination of cash 
transactions at POEs.

                U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement

    U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement [ICE] is the 
principal investigative agency within the Department of 
Homeland Security. ICE is responsible for securing the Nation's 
borders, enforcing U.S. immigration laws, and safeguarding 
cyberspace through the enforcement of Federal laws that govern 
trade and travel, including but not limited to narcotics 
enforcement, financial crimes, child exploitation, and human 
smuggling.

                       COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS

    The Committee recommends total appropriations of 
$7,210,273,000 for ICE, which is $1,080,783,000 below the 
budget request amount and $134,399,000 above the fiscal year 
2018 enacted level. This amount is in addition to estimated fee 
collections of $318,000,000.
    The following table summarizes the Committee's 
recommendation as compared to the fiscal year 2018 enacted and 
fiscal year 2019 budget request levels:

                                       IMMIGRATION AND CUSTOMS ENFORCEMENT
                                            [In thousands of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                            Fiscal year 2018  Fiscal year 2019      Committee
                                                                 enacted        budget request   recommendations
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Operations and Support....................................         6,993,975         8,220,625         7,139,842
Procurement, Construction, and Improvements...............            81,899            70,431            70,431
                                                           -----------------------------------------------------
      Total...............................................         7,075,874         8,291,056         7,210,273
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

                         OPERATIONS AND SUPPORT

Appropriations, 2018....................................   6,993,975,000
Budget estimate, 2019...................................   8,220,625,000
Committee recommendation................................   7,139,842,000

    The ICE Operations and Support [O&S;] appropriation provides 
for the enforcement of immigration and customs laws, related 
intelligence activities, and the detention and removal of 
illicit people and goods. In addition to directly appropriated 
resources, funding is derived from the following offsetting 
collections:
    Immigration Inspection User Fee.--ICE derives funds from 
user fees to support the costs of detention and removals in 
connection with international inspection activities at airports 
and seaports, as authorized by the Immigration and Nationality 
Act (8 U.S.C. 1356).
    Student Exchange Visitor Program Fee.--ICE collects fees 
from foreign students, exchange visitors, schools, and 
universities to certify, monitor and audit participating 
exchange programs.
    Immigration Breached Bond/Detention Fund.--ICE derives 
funds from the recovery of breached cash and surety bonds in 
excess of $8,000,000, as authorized by the Immigration and 
Nationality Act (8 U.S.C. 1356), and from a portion of fees 
charged under section 245(i) of the that act to support the 
cost of the detention of aliens.

                       COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS

    The Committee recommends $7,139,842,000 for O&S;, which is 
$1,080,783,000 below the budget request amount and $145,867,000 
above the fiscal year 2018 enacted level. The recommendation 
includes funding levels needed to continue services provided 
for in fiscal year 2018 and makes necessary adjustments to 
salaries and other expenses required to comport with the 
routine evolution of ongoing operations.
    The following table summarizes the Committee's 
recommendation as compared to the fiscal year 2018 enacted and 
fiscal year 2019 budget request levels:

                                             OPERATIONS AND SUPPORT
                                            [In thousands of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                            Fiscal year 2018  Fiscal year 2019      Committee
                                                                 enacted        budget request   recommendations
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Homeland Security Investigations:
    Domestic Investigations...............................         1,898,542         1,385,777         1,621,187
    International Investigations..........................           169,178           150,691           167,330
    Intelligence..........................................            85,042            73,799            74,144
                                                           -----------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Homeland Security Investigations..........         2,152,762         1,610,267         1,862,661
 
Enforcement and Removal Operations:
        Custody Operations................................         3,075,686         3,519,932         2,897,534
        Fugitive Operations...............................           158,805           255,864           138,520
        Criminal Alien Program............................           319,440           619,109           258,492
        Alternatives to Detention.........................           187,205           184,446           176,009
        Transportation and Removal Program................           369,201           511,058           366,686
                                                           -----------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Enforcement and Removal Operations........         4,110,337         5,090,409         3,837,241
 
Mission Support...........................................           458,558         1,214,436         1,187,760
Office of Principal Legal Advisor.........................           272,318           305,513           252,180
                                                           -----------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Operations and Support....................         6,993,975         8,220,625         7,139,842
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Immigration Data Improvements.--The Committee commends ICE 
for its efforts to continue to develop and execute an 
enterprise data management strategy in accordance with the 
Comprehensive Plan for Immigration Data Improvements and 
recommends $6,000,000 to continue these activities. The 
Committee supports ICE's data governance pilot, which includes 
participants from multiple Enforcement and Removal Operations 
[ERO] program offices, ICE's Office of the Chief Information 
Officer, the Department's Office of Immigration Statistics, 
U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services [USCIS], and the 
United States Border Patrol. The Committee encourages ICE to 
make useful, incremental system improvements rather than 
adopting risky, costly, complex, enterprise-wide solutions. As 
ICE improves data collection, the Committee directs ICE to 
collect data on enforcement activities both along the borders 
and in the interior of the United States in an effort to 
improve operational transparency and resource allocation 
decisions.

                    HOMELAND SECURITY INVESTIGATIONS

    The Committee recommends $1,862,661,000 for Homeland 
Security Investigations [HSI], which is $252,394,000 above the 
budget request amount and $290,101,000 below the fiscal year 
2018 enacted level. ICE is directed to sustain enhancements for 
programs of ongoing congressional interest, as described in the 
Joint Explanatory Statement accompanying the Consolidated 
Appropriations Act, 2018 (Public Law 115-141).
    Opioid Investigations.--HSI performs an essential role in 
detecting, investigating, and preventing the sale and 
distribution of opioids via the Internet, which is the key 
domain facilitating the trafficking of the most potent opioids, 
including fentanyl, and the Committee recommends $41,000,000 
above the budget request amount to enhance those activities. 
With its cyber analytics and trained cyber investigators and 
analysts, HSI has the ability to uncover the identities of 
entire supply chains from manufacturer to distributor, and, in 
many cases, to the end user. The Committee recognizes that HSI 
is leading cyber investigations to uncover online marketplaces, 
including those on the ``dark web,'' that facilitate the 
purchase and illicit shipment of opioids to the United States. 
HSI also leverages its many Border Enforcement Security 
Taskforces [BESTs] as the primary platforms to investigate 
international opioid and methamphetamine manufacturing, 
smuggling, and distribution. BESTs are HSI-led multi-agency 
task forces situated at key international ports of entry that 
exploit the various authorities of their respective members to 
investigate and interdict transnational criminal organizations 
at and near the border. In direct response to increasing opioid 
overdoses, HSI established new BESTs at international mail 
facilities and express consignment carrier facilities where 
they can more closely target opioid shipments and more 
regularly attempt controlled deliveries. The recommendation 
includes $2,000,000 to continue the operations of 10 BESTs at 
international mail facilities and enhance HSI's counter-opioid 
capacity.
    Cyber Crime Investigative Capabilities and Staff 
Development.--The Committee understands the importance of 
enhancing HSI's and its partners' capacity to investigate 
opioid-related criminal activity on the Internet to combat 
opioids by hiring additional data scientists, cyber 
investigators, and intelligence research specialists; to train 
State and local law enforcement personnel in opioid cyber 
investigations; and to establish educational capacity in key 
regions. The Committee directs that not less than $3,000,000 of 
the amount prescribed in the previous paragraph for this 
purpose shall be for HSI to establish a partnership with a 
university co-located with a state law enforcement agency 
serving in an area disproportionately affected by the opioid 
crisis. The purpose of this partnership shall be to cultivate 
expertise in ``dark web'' investigative capabilities, including 
training, technology assessment, as well as a co-op program for 
students to build investigative research skills and technical 
expertise on targeting the ``dark web'' opioid trafficking 
networks. Graduates from the program could transition to HSI or 
other law enforcement agencies that are working to combat 
opioid trafficking. Further, the Committee directs HSI to work 
with the university or educational institution to develop 
training for State and local law enforcement personnel on 
``dark web'' opioid investigative tactics and strategies to be 
used in conjunction with ICE cybercrime centers. HSI shall 
brief the Committee not later than 120 days after the date of 
enactment of this act on these activities.
    Child Exploitation Investments.--The recommendation 
continues enhancements provided in fiscal year 2018, including 
$5,000,000 for the Child Exploitation Investigations Unit at 
the Cyber Crimes Center.
    International Investigations and Visa Security Program.--
The recommendation annualizes growth to overseas operations 
funded in fiscal year 2018, because the Committee understands 
the benefits of interrupting the illicit movement of people and 
goods prior to their arrival in the United States. The 
Committee looks forward to reviewing HSI's modeling of the 
costs and benefits of adding or redeploying staff and directs 
HSI to ensure staff distribution is right-sized by workload and 
by location.
    International Megan's Law.--The recommendation includes the 
$5,000,000 enhancement provided in fiscal year 2018 to continue 
ICE's implementation of International Megan's Law. In fiscal 
year 2017, a total of 2,060 Angel Watch referrals were sent to 
more than 80 countries as a preemptive notification to foreign 
law enforcement in the fight to stop child sex tourism. These 
referrals resulted in 1,276 denials of entry to these 
countries. For fiscal year 2018, the Angel Watch Center is on 
pace to send approximately 3,200 referrals to more than 100 
countries with approximately 1,600 denials of entry and to 
refer over 1,000 registered child sex offenders to the 
Department of State.
    Gang Member Information Sharing.--The recommendation 
includes $3,000,000 to bridge current information gaps by 
providing cross-jurisdictional information sharing capabilities 
among ICE, CBP, and other Federal agencies to improve 
investigations. The Committee believes doing so will enhance 
collaboration among Federal, State, and local law enforcement 
entities and enable them to better understand gangs and gang 
sets, their relationships, trafficking patterns, incidents, 
arrests, incarcerations, locations, vehicles, weapons, and any 
other entity that is associated with members.
    Human Exploitation Rescue Operative.--The recommendation 
includes not less than $4,400,000 for Human Exploitation Rescue 
Operative [HERO] Child-Rescue Corps, a partnership among HSI, 
U.S. Special Operations Command, and the National Association 
to Protect Children. The Committee directs ICE to sustain prior 
year enhancements for dedicated personnel and funding for the 
HERO program and related computer forensic analyst positions 
focused on child exploitation investigations. In addition, at a 
minimum, ICE should continue to train at least one class of 
HEROs annually through the program and should employ HERO 
graduates at ICE or should help place them with other agencies 
or organizations with related missions as deemed appropriate by 
ICE. The Committee continues to support the concept of 
instituting a paid apprenticeship in lieu of the current unpaid 
internship for HERO participants and directs ICE to brief the 
Committee not later than 180 days after the date of enactment 
of this act on options for establishing paid apprenticeships.
    Intellectual Property Rights Enforcement.--The 
recommendation includes $15,000,000 for intellectual property 
enforcement through the work of HSI and the National IPR 
Center. ICE shall also ensure that the National IPR Center is 
adequately staffed with both ICE and interagency staff in order 
to facilitate continued enforcement actions against theft, 
particularly via the Internet, of U.S. intellectual property. 
Based on a new wave of digital copyright piracy involving 
devices and software that connect consumers' televisions 
directly to illicit websites, the Committee directs ICE to 
increase investigation and enforcement to thwart illegal 
streaming that involves media boxes and televisions.
    Forced Child Labor.--The recommendation includes not less 
than $15,770,000 for investigations and other activities 
related to forced labor law violations, to include forced child 
labor. ICE shall submit to the Committee an annual report on 
the expenditures and performance metrics associated with forced 
labor law enforcement activities.
    International Mobile Subscriber Identity Catchers.--As 
required by Senate Report 114-264, a report is due detailing 
the number of times International Mobile Subscriber Identity 
[IMSI] Catchers and similar technology devices have been 
deployed, how many individuals have been apprehended using 
these types of devices, and how many times IMSI Catchers and 
related technologies have been used to gather evidence relevant 
to a case against apprehended individuals. The Committee 
expects the Department to submit this report immediately.
    Investigative Support Staff.--The Committee is concerned 
that HSI could lack adequate staff to support the number of 
onboard special agents. The Committee directs ICE to brief the 
Committee not later than 90 days of the date of enactment of 
this act on the current ratio of support staff to agents and to 
present this data in comparison to the ratios at other large 
Federal law enforcement agencies.
    Human Rights Violators.--There are reports that ICE has 
devoted insufficient resources to hold suspected foreign human 
rights violators accountable. The Committee directs ICE to 
continue its efforts to investigate, remove, and prosecute 
individuals who have committed human rights abuses, including 
persecution, genocide, severe violations of religious freedom, 
torture, extrajudicial killing, use or recruitment of child 
soldiers, crimes against humanity, or war crimes. For this 
purpose, the recommendation includes not less than $5,300,000 
for hiring additional personnel in the Office of the Principle 
Legal Advisor's Human Rights Law Section and Human Rights 
Violators and War Crimes Unit and for their training, 
transportation, and other related activities.
    Gulf Coast Coordination.--The Committee is aware of the 
ongoing efforts to develop ICE's Tactical Intelligence Center 
[TIC] into a Regional Intelligence Integration Center that 
includes other Federal and non-Federal entities in the region. 
Additional collection, reporting, and dissemination capacity at 
this location will interrupt the illicit movement of people and 
goods into the United States through the Gulf of Mexico region, 
and the Committee directs the Department to report on efforts 
to enhance the TIC's capacity within 90 days of the date of 
enactment of this act.

                   ENFORCEMENT AND REMOVAL OPERATIONS

    Efficiency and Coordination.--The Committee understands 
that significant detention bed space is required for the 
processing, adjudication, and removal of aliens but is 
concerned that Enforcement and Removal Operations [ERO] and its 
partners along the immigration enforcement continuum have done 
little to improve throughput, which could reduce the average 
length of stay of detainees and reduce detention capacity 
requirements. Recent changes to immigration enforcement 
policies will likely modify ICE's detention space requirements, 
but it is unclear whether such changes were contemplated with 
interagency partners prior to making such changes. The 
Committee directs ICE to work with Federal partners, including 
those within the Department of Justice and Department of Health 
and Human Services, to ensure that aliens are treated fairly 
while expeditiously moving through the immigration enforcement 
process and to jointly brief the Committees quarterly on 
process improvements and coordination efforts.
    Custody Operations.--The recommendation includes 
$2,897,534,000 for Custody Operations, which is the level 
required to maintain ICE's fiscal year 2018 funded average 
daily population [ADP] throughout fiscal year 2019. The 
Committee notes ICE's progress in developing and refining its 
ADP forecast model. The model analyzes time series data from 
which it extracts meaningful patterns, including moving 
averages, seasonality, and trends. It also uses patterns that 
it aggregates into a final daily population to forecast the 
detained population derived from all major CBP and ICE 
arresting programs. Should the ADP level included in the fiscal 
year 2020 budget request deviate from the level suggested by 
the forecast model, ICE shall provide the Committee with a 
detailed explanation and justification for the difference.
    The Committee notes that on April 6, 2018, the Department 
of Justice announced a change in policy relative to the 
implementation of section 1325 of title 8, United States Code 
that changed presumptive charges against those who are caught 
crossing U.S. borders between ports of entry from 
administrative to criminal. This change in policy will cause 
changes to requirements for detention across the Federal 
government, including for ICE, the Department of Justice, and 
the Department of Health and Human Services. To date, ICE has 
not responded to the Committee's requests for a detailed 
analysis of how this policy, which was announced after the 
submission of the budget request, will change the detention 
requirements outlined in that request. Absent updated 
information, the Committee is unable to make a recommendation 
for detention capacity that incorporates the most recent and 
relevant analysis.
    The Committee expects that funding made available to ICE 
shall be used to maintain the number of detention beds needed 
to detain those individuals who are considered a flight risk or 
danger to the community, based on an individualized assessment 
which fully considers less-costly custody alternatives. ICE is 
directed to continue to evaluate the efficacy of the use of 
alternatives to detention as a means to reducing costs and 
better managing resources. The Committee stresses the 
importance of fiscal discipline and ensuring there is 
sufficient transparency in the way ICE obligates and expends 
its appropriations. It must operate within the funding levels 
provided by the Congress. The Committee notes that ICE is 
currently well above the ADP funded in fiscal year 2018 and 
above the ADP level at the time that bill was enacted. While 
operating requirements can certainly change, it is clear that 
ICE does not view as binding the funding levels provided in 
law. The Committee worked diligently in preparing the fiscal 
year 2018 appropriation to provide ICE with a significant 
increase over fiscal year 2017 just to maintain its current 
level of services, yet ICE continues to spend at an 
unsustainable rate. In light of the Committee's persistent and 
growing concerns about ICE's lack of fiscal discipline, whether 
real or manufactured, and its inability to manage detention 
resources within the appropriations made by law without the 
threat of anti-deficiency, the Committee strongly discourages 
transfer or reprogramming requests to cover ICE's excesses. The 
Committee will only consider such requests if they are 
accompanied by transparent and publically-available evidence 
that the need for contingency funds results from circumstances, 
like a presidentially-declared immigration emergency, that are 
truly beyond ICE's control. The Committee will continue to 
evaluate whether ICE is prudently using the authorities enabled 
under section 503 of this act. The Committee directs ICE to 
continue the policy of fully reimbursing the costs and expenses 
associated with agreements entered into with other entities, 
including Federal agencies, to house ICE detainees.
    Detention Standards.--The Committee reiterates direction 
provided in the Joint Explanatory Statement accompanying the 
Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2017 (Public Law 115-31) 
regarding detention standards and understands that ICE intends 
to increase the percentage of detainees held in facilities 
meeting the most recent Performance Based National Detention 
Standards [PBNDS] and requirements under PREA. The Committee 
directs ICE to develop a timeline detailing steps the agency 
will take to recruit additional contracting personnel required 
for negotiating detention contracts and to brief the Committee 
on its plan not later than 60 days after the enactment of this 
act.
    The Committee further directs ICE to post on its website, 
within 60 days of enactment of this act, a schedule for 
achieving 100 percent compliance with PREA requirements and 
PBNDS 2011, as revised in 2016 and which were in effect on 
January 1, 2017, for all detainees. The Committee further 
directs ICE to post on its website, within 60 days of enactment 
of this act, the results of completed PREA audits, an 
assessment of whether the standards are effective in protecting 
vulnerable populations, and all reports to the Committee 
required under the Joint Explanatory Statement accompanying, 
the Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2071 (Public Law 115-31), 
regarding contracting and detention standards. The report shall 
also identify the resource requirements needed to achieve PREA 
compliance for the facilities that are currently not PREA 
compliant but have PBNDS 2011, Standard 2.11, or PBNDS 2008 
protections.
    Reporting Requirements.--ICE is directed to make public all 
final detention facility inspection reports within 60 days of 
inspection; complete and make public an initial report 
regarding any in-custody death within 30 days of such death, 
with subsequent reporting to be completed and released within 
60 days of the initial report unless additional time is 
required for redacting personally identifiable information; 
make public a full list, updated monthly, of all facilities in 
use for detention of adults or children, including the average 
daily population, the type of contract, the governing detention 
standards, and the complement of on-board medical and mental 
health personnel; ensure that non-governmental organizations 
are provided with independent and timely access to all 
facilities for the purpose of providing representation, legal 
education, and programming, and for purposes of monitoring and 
visitation; and update detainee location information in the ICE 
Detainee Online Locator system within 48 hours of detention and 
24 hours of completion of any transfer.
    Pregnant Women.--The Committee notes that ICE has ended the 
presumption of release, absent extraordinary circumstances, for 
pregnant women apprehended by or transferred to ICE. The 
Committee directs ICE to conduct a weekly review of all 
pregnant and postpartum women who remain in detention. 
Additionally, the Committee directs ICE to provide semiannual 
reports on the total number of pregnant women in ICE custody, 
including detailed justification of the circumstances 
warranting each pregnant detainee's continued detention and the 
length of her detention. These anonymized reports should be 
made publically available on the ICE website.
    Criminality Reporting.--ICE shall provide quarterly reports 
to the Committee on the levels of criminality for its detained 
population, including the number and percentage of the detainee 
population who are gang members and the number and percentage 
of the detainee population who are members of MS-13.
    Cost of Providing Healthcare to Immigrants in Detention.--
Recognizing the increasing cost of providing healthcare in 
general, the Committee directs ICE to provide an annual report 
on the cost of administering healthcare in the detention 
system. The report shall include the number of instances that 
detainees were transported to hospitals, emergency rooms, or 
other healthcare facilities and shall note instances of serious 
medical or mental health conditions, pregnancy, or disability. 
Further, the report shall detail the number and type of 
position of medical and mental health staff at each ICE 
detention facility and note any position that has been vacant 
for 30 or more days.
    Deportation of Parents of U.S. Citizen Children.--The 
Committee continues its requirement that the Department submit 
data on the deportation of parents of U.S. citizen children 
semiannually, as in prior years.
    Mobile Criminal Alien Teams.--The Committee directs ICE to 
continue operating Mobile Criminal Alien Teams and to brief the 
Committee not later than 90 days after the date of enactment of 
this act if additional such teams are required to identify and 
remove violent criminal aliens.
    Visa Overstay Enforcement.--The Committee directs ICE to 
continue to direct $10,000,000 to investigative and support 
activities required to identify and remove aliens who have 
overstayed their visas and to brief the Committee semiannually 
on the results of these efforts.
    Law Enforcement Support Center.--The recommendation 
includes $34,500,000 to support an authorized level of 257 
full-time law enforcement specialists and officers at the Law 
Enforcement Support Center [LESC], which serves a critical 
function in the Federal government's efforts to identify and 
locate undocumented immigrants with serious felony records. In 
order to promote efficiency, the Committee directs ICE to take 
steps to ensure that current operations performed by the LESC 
remain centralized at the LESC facility in Williston, Vermont 
and that these operations are not unnecessarily duplicated 
elsewhere. The Committee looks forward to receiving immediately 
the report required by the Joint Explanatory Statement 
accompanying the Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2018 
regarding LESC funding, operations, and staffing. The 
Department is also directed to submit for Committee approval 
the reallocation of any resources currently intended for LESC 
operations in Vermont. It is expected that no such reallocation 
will be made without Committee concurrence.
    The Committee notes that, despite an increasing workload 
and the availability of recruitment and retention incentives, 
the LESC has not hired to authorized position levels. The 
Committee directs ICE to ensure that the LESC has the resources 
and approvals necessary to fully utilize its recruitment 
incentives program and to include details about this program in 
the spend plan it is required to provide to the Committee. The 
LESC is also encouraged to utilize hiring campaigns, education, 
and outreach, including coordination with nearby community, 
technical, and State colleges and universities. Further, LESC 
is encouraged to utilize available direct hire authorities to 
accelerate the hiring of qualified applicants.
    Sex Offender Release Notifications.--The Committee 
understands that ICE is currently notifying law enforcement 
authorities and State regulatory organizations through the Sex 
Offender Registration and Notification Act exchange portal when 
ICE releases into their jurisdictions individuals who have a 
registration requirement. The Committee recommends $2,000,000 
to continue to identify any potential information gaps within 
this system and to address these gaps in a manner that ensures 
that data on ICE detainees with sex or violent offender records 
are provided in real time to jurisdictions where such detainees 
will reside.
    Kiosks for Non-Detained Appearances.--The Committee is 
concerned about the size of ICE's non-detained docket and 
directs ICE to continue its pilot project to enable certain 
aliens on the non-detained docket to report via self-service 
kiosks at ERO field offices. The recommendation includes 
$3,000,000 for this pilot and directs ICE to evaluate the 
potential of expanding these activities if it is found that the 
pilot reduces the time and resources that deportation officers 
devote to managing encounters and recurring check-ins with 
applicable aliens.
    Alternatives to Detention.--The recommendation includes 
$176,009,000 for Alternatives to Detention [ATD] as requested, 
and directs ICE to ensure they are used as effectively as 
possible. ICE shall brief the Committee on its discussions with 
the contractors handling the ATD--ISAP III contract, about 
implementing a ``Know Your Rights'' [KYR] program for new 
participants. The brief shall indicate whether these 
discussions determined whether a KYR program was deemed 
reasonable to be provided at the time of the initial full 
enrollment or orientation or as soon as reasonably possible 
after that time. ICE shall continue exploring the use of 
available ATD models on an ongoing basis, shall prioritize the 
use of such detention alternatives for immigrant children and 
their families, where appropriate, and shall seek the release 
of individuals and their family members who pass credible fear 
screening and do not present a public safety or flight risk.
    The ATD program shall evaluate the efficacy and cost-
benefit of continuing the type of case management services 
provided under the Family Case Management Pilot [FCMP]. Given 
the pilot's high compliance rates, the Committee believes 
exploring the potential benefits of a program similar to the 
FCMP pilot or an equivalent ATD program that facilitates access 
to social and legal services for enrollees. To promote 
transparency and further understanding of ATD, the Committee 
directs ICE to publish annually the following policies and data 
relating to ATD: guidance for referral, placement, escalation 
and de-escalation decisions; enrollment by Field Office; 
information on the length of enrollment broken down by type of 
ATD; and a breakdown of enrollment by type and point of 
apprehension.
    Within 60 days of the date of enactment of this act, the 
Secretary shall submit a report to the Committee providing 
analysis of each active program within the last 5 years under 
the Alternatives to Detention account. This report shall 
include compliance with court appearances, immigration 
appointments, and removal orders, cost per individual served, 
response times to requests for legal counsel, family contact, 
and medical treatment (including mental health services).
    287(g) Agreements.--The Committee observes that OIG 
recommended ICE collect data on the race and ethnicity of 
individuals arrested or apprehended under the 287(g) program, 
but in 2010 ICE declined to accept this recommendation, 
claiming that the program does not raise concerns about racial 
profiling. The Committee directs ICE to publish applications 
for new or renewed 287(g) agreements on its website eight weeks 
prior to entering into any such agreement. ICE shall ensure 
thorough vetting of 287(g) applicants in an effort to minimize 
detention conditions that do not fully comply with the PBNDS 
and PREA standards.
    The Committee directs ICE to provide its officers with 
guidance and training for engaging with victims of crime and 
witnesses of crime and to clarify policy guidance on 
enforcement actions in sensitive locations, including 
courthouses. The Committee directs ICE, not later than 180 days 
after the date of enactment of this act, to report on steps 
taken to minimize the effect immigration enforcement activity 
has on victims of crime and witnesses of crime and to provide 
monthly notifications to the Committee on enforcement actions 
that take place in sensitive locations, including courthouses.
    Privacy Waivers.--The Committee recognizes that Federal 
agencies are prohibited from releasing information concerning 
an individual to a third party under the Privacy Act of 1974. 
However, the Committee is concerned by reports that detainees, 
their attorneys, and their family members have faced difficulty 
receiving and submitting the ICE ``Privacy Waiver Authorizing 
Disclosure to a Third Party'' form. Without this form, members 
of Congress cannot make successful inquiries in behalf of their 
constituents. The Committee advises ICE to provide every 
detainee, upon entering ICE custody, with a copy of the 
``Privacy Waiver Authorizing Disclosure to a Third Party'' form 
in order to facilitate Congressional inquiries.
    Public Access.--ICE is directed to report to the Committee 
within 120 days after the date of enactment of this act 
detailing how it complies with Federal law requiring equal 
public access to Federal buildings where ICE offices are 
located. Specifically, ICE is directed to detail its policy for 
determining when it permanently denies an individual or group's 
entrance to a public Federal building or portion thereof, what 
specific security concerns or other criteria it uses to justify 
each denial and what procedures ICE field officers must follow 
to ensure compliance with this policy. ICE is further directed 
to include in this report an analysis of how its Boston Field 
Office has implemented this policy over the past 18 months to 
include each instance of denied entry, to whom entry was 
denied, and what security or other justifications were used as 
the denial's basis.

              PROCUREMENT, CONSTRUCTION, AND IMPROVEMENTS

Appropriations, 2018....................................     $81,899,000
Budget estimate, 2019...................................      70,431,000
Committee recommendation................................      70,431,000

                       COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS

    The Committee recommends $70,431,000 for Procurement, 
Construction, and Improvement [PC&I;], which is the same as the 
budget request amount and $11,468,000 below the fiscal year 
2018 enacted level.
    The following table summarizes the Committee's 
recommendation as compared to the fiscal year 2018 enacted and 
fiscal year 2019 budget request levels:

                                   PROCUREMENT, CONSTRUCTION, AND IMPROVEMENTS
                                            [In thousands of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                            Fiscal year 2018  Fiscal year 2019      Committee
                                                                 enacted        budget request   recommendations
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Operational Communications/Information Technology.........            21,839            30,859            30,859
Construction and Facility Improvements....................            29,000            34,872            34,872
Mission Support Assets and Infrastructure.................            31,060             4,700             4,700
                                                           -----------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Procurement, Construction, and                        81,899            70,431            70,431
       Improvements.......................................
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    The recommendation supports significant information system 
enhancements across ICE, to include the migration to 
Consolidated ICE Financial Solution from the current 
proprietary financial system and improve efficiency for ICE and 
its customers. Additionally, ICE will invest in Critical 
Foundational Infrastructure to perform a technical refresh of 
ICE mission critical and mission essential IT assets that 
reached the end of their useful life. The Committee recognizes 
that funding requested for some of these efforts could be 
obligated more slowly than was assumed in materials provided to 
the Committee in support of the budget request. The Committee 
directs ICE to provide a briefing on proposed PC&I; spending 
plans not later than 60 days after the date of enactment of 
this act.

                 Transportation Security Administration

    The Transportation Security Administration [TSA] is charged 
with ensuring security across U.S. transportation systems, 
including aviation, railways, highways, pipelines, and 
waterways; and safeguarding the freedom of movement of people 
and commerce.

                       COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS

    The Committee recommends a total of $8,002,563,000 and a 
net of $4,842,678,000 for TSA.
    The following table summarizes the Committee's 
recommendation as compared to the fiscal year 2018 enacted and 
fiscal year 2019 budget request levels:

                                     TRANSPORTATION SECURITY ADMINISTRATION
                                            [In thousands of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                          Fiscal year 2018   Fiscal year 2019      Committee
                                                              enacted         budget request    recommendations
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Operations and Support.................................         7,207,851          7,075,950          7,302,455
Aviation Passenger Security Fees.......................        (2,470,000)        (2,670,000)        (2,670,000)
                                                        --------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Operations and Support (net)...........         4,737,851          3,885,950          4,632,455
 
Procurement, Construction, and Improvements............           167,314            139,629            189,629
Research and Development...............................            20,190             20,594             20,594
                                                        --------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Fee Funded Programs....................           240,559            239,885            239,885
                                                        --------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Transportation Security Administration....         4,925,355          4,046,173          4,842,678
          (Discretionary Funding)......................         4,925,355          4,046,173          4,842,678
              (Discretionary Appropriation)............         7,395,355          7,236,173          7,512,678
              (Offsetting Collections).................        (2,470,000)        (2,670,000)        (2,670,000)
              (Offsetting Collections, Legislative       .................          (520,000)  .................
               Proposals)..............................
Aviation Security Capital Fund (Mandatory).............           250,000            250,000            250,000
Fee Funded Programs....................................           240,559            239,885            239,885
                                                        --------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Transportation Security Administration          7,885,914          7,726,058          8,002,563
       (gross).........................................
                                                        --------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Transportation Security Administration          4,925,355          4,046,173          4,842,678
       (net)...........................................
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

                         OPERATIONS AND SUPPORT

Appropriations, 2018....................................  $4,737,851,000
Budget estimate, 2019...................................   3,885,950,000
Committee recommendation................................   4,632,455,000

                       COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $7,302,455,000 
for Operations and Support [O&S;], which is $226,505,000 above 
the budget request amount and $94,604,000 above the fiscal year 
2018 enacted level. This amount is partially offset by 
$2,670,000 in estimated aviation security fee collections that 
are credited to this appropriation, as authorized, resulting in 
net discretionary appropriation of $4,632,455,000. Of this 
amount, not more than $2,099,814,000 is for non-pay.
    The Committee understands that TSA will submit a request to 
the appropriate Congressional authorizing committees for 
legislative changes to the aviation security fee structure. The 
Committee directs TSA to once again heed Committee guidance to 
avoid submitting budget requests that assume revenues that have 
not been authorized by law.
    The following table summarizes the Committee's 
recommendation as compared to the fiscal year enacted 2018 and 
fiscal year 2019 budget request levels:

                                             OPERATIONS AND SUPPORT
                                            [In thousands of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                          Fiscal year 2018   Fiscal year 2019      Committee
                                                              enacted         budget request    recommendations
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Aviation Screening Operations:
    Screening Workforce:
        Screening Partnership Program..................           184,936            181,382            188,382
        Screener Personnel, Compensation, and Benefits.         3,229,026          3,191,783          3,294,783
        Screener Training and Other....................           232,985            218,738            220,738
    Airport Management.................................           646,053            647,541            649,951
    Canines............................................           151,764            152,226            162,404
    Screening Technology Maintenance...................           397,882            382,927            382,927
    Secure Flight......................................           106,856            113,882            113,882
                                                        --------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Aviation Screening Operations..........         4,949,502          4,888,479          5,013,067
 
Other Operations and Enforcement:
    Inflight Security:
        Federal Air Marshals...........................           779,000            779,210            779,210
        Federal Flight Deck Officer and Crew Training..            19,514             19,539             19,539
        Aviation Regulation............................           218,535            171,905            218,185
        Air Cargo......................................           102,721            103,572            103,572
        Intelligence and TSOC..........................            79,790             79,524             79,524
        Surface Programs...............................           129,316             73,818            129,455
        Vetting Programs...............................            60,215             52,770             52,770
                                                        --------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Other Operations and Enforcement.......         1,389,091          1,280,338          1,382,255
 
Mission Support........................................           869,258            907,133            907,133
                                                        --------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Operations and Support (gross).........         7,207,851          7,075,950          7,302,455
Aviation Passenger Security Fees.......................        (2,470,000)        (2,670,000)        (2,670,000)
Offsetting Collections, Legislative Proposals..........  .................          (520,000)  .................
                                                        --------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Operations and Support (net)...........         4,737,851          3,885,950          4,632,455
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Screening Partnership Program.--The recommendation 
maintains necessary funds for security at airports where 
private screening contracts are in place and includes 
$7,000,000 above the request to accommodate increases in 
airport screening costs.
    The Committee acknowledges that the Screening Partnership 
Program [SPP] provides TSA airports with an alternative to 
request private screening support instead of Federal screeners. 
Commensurate with the Committee's interest in this program, TSA 
shall notify the Committee within 10 days of any change to a 
private screening contract, including any new award under the 
SPP or any transition from privatized screening into Federal 
screening.
    Screener Personnel, Compensation, and Benefits.--The 
recommendation includes $103,000,000 above the budget request, 
which is made up of $26,000,000 to fund an additional 360 front 
line screener personnel to support an increase in passenger 
volume and $77,00,000 to continue exit lane staffing in 
accordance with section 603 of Public Law 114-74. The Committee 
supports and encourages TSA to continue efforts to develop and 
install appropriate exit-lane monitoring technology where 
feasible and appropriate. With regard to remodeling and 
modernization efforts undertaken by airports at existing exit 
lanes that TSA was responsible for monitoring on December 1, 
2013, TSA shall continue to be responsible for monitoring those 
exit lanes after the remodeling or modernization efforts are 
completed.
    Airport Management.--The recommendation includes funding 
for: the workforce to support TSA Federal Security Directors; 
Bomb Appraisal Officers; Explosives Security Specialists; the 
Transportation Security Operations Center; airport rent and 
furniture; a vehicle fleet; airport parking; and employee 
transit benefits.
    The Committee recognizes that Transportation Security 
Officers [TSO] are the front line for aviation security and 
their proficiency at screening carry-on baggage at airport 
checkpoint can have a direct impact on the safety of the 
public. The Committee encourages TSA to continue to develop and 
field adaptive x-ray baggage screening training tools to 
improve TSO performance on existing screening systems and of 
the next generation of Computed Tomography [CT] systems.
    Canines.--The recommendation includes $162,404,000 for the 
National Explosives Detection Canine Team Program [NEDCTP], 
which will support 1,097 teams led by local law enforcement and 
TSA. Within this amount, $10,178,000 is included above the 
budget request amount to establish 50 new NEDCTP teams for 
passenger screening. Passenger screening canine teams provide 
an effective layer of security against explosive threats. These 
additional canine teams will not only enhance security 
effectiveness inside and outside secure areas of airports, but 
will also increase passenger screening efficiency. TSA shall 
use risk-based methodology to allocate the additional teams to 
the highest risk airports. In addition, TSA is to consider 
strategies to extend canine explosive screening capabilities to 
medium and small airports and shall brief the Committee not 
later than 60 days after the date of enactment of this act on 
the feasibility of implementing such a strategy.
    Even with these additional canine teams, the Committee 
urges TSA to continue to evaluate and pursue means of meeting 
additional demand. In doing so, TSA should consider, among 
other strategies, increasing the throughput of the canine teams 
at the canine training center at Joint Base San Antonio-
Lackland.

                    OTHER OPERATIONS AND ENFORCEMENT

    Federal Air Marshals.--The recommendation includes 
$779,210,000 for the Federal Air Marshal Service [FAMS], which 
is the same as the budget request amount. This amount includes 
funding for FAMS to continue protection of the air 
transportation system against terrorist threats, sabotage, or 
other acts of violence.
    The Committee directs TSA to continue submitting quarterly 
reports on FAMS mission coverage, staffing levels, and hiring 
rates as it has done in prior years.
    Federal Flight Deck Officer and Flight Crew Training 
Programs.--The recommendation includes $19,539,000 for the 
Federal Flight Deck Officer and Flight Crew Training programs, 
which is the same as the budget request amount.
    Law Enforcement Reimbursement Program.--The recommendation 
includes $46,280,000 for the Law Enforcement Officer [LEO] 
Reimbursement Program. The Committee recognizes the important 
role that the LEO reimbursement program has played in helping 
airports meet federally mandated airport security requirements. 
The Committee directs TSA to maintain and fund the LEO Program.
    Visible Intermodal Prevention Response [VIPR] Teams.--The 
recommendation includes $55,637,000 to maintain 31 Visible 
Intermodal Prevention Response teams. VIPR teams work in 
collaboration with Federal, State, and local transportation 
stakeholders to prevent and deter acts of terrorism against 
transportation systems, including commercial aviation, air 
cargo, general aviation, mass transit, maritime, freight rail, 
highway, and pipeline systems.
    Risk-Based Security [RBS] Initiatives.--The Committee 
continues to support TSA's screening evolution from one-size-
fits-all security to an intelligence-driven, risk-based 
approach that focuses limited security resources on unknown 
travelers and baggage while increasing the throughput of known 
travelers. In particular, the Committee expects TSA to continue 
cooperating with OIG to address vulnerabilities in the RBS and 
PreCheck programs.

              PROCUREMENT, CONSTRUCTION, AND IMPROVEMENTS

Appropriations, 2018....................................    $167,314,000
Budget estimate, 2019...................................     139,629,000
Committee recommendation................................     189,629,000

                       COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS

    The Committee recommends $189,629,000 for Procurement, 
Construction, and Improvements [PC&I;], which $50,000,000 above 
the budget request amount and $22,315,000 above the fiscal year 
2018 enacted level.
    The following table summarizes the Committee's 
recommendation as compared to the fiscal year 2018 enacted and 
fiscal year 2019 budget request levels:

                                   PROCUREMENT, CONSTRUCTION, AND IMPROVEMENTS
                                            [In thousands of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                          Fiscal year 2018   Fiscal year 2019      Committee
                                                              enacted         budget request    recommendations
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Aviation Screening Infrastructure:
    Checkpoint Support.................................            68,019             74,422             74,422
    Checked Baggage....................................            83,004             35,367             85,367
Infrastructure for Other Operations:
    Vetting Programs...................................            16,291             29,840             29,840
                                                        --------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Procurement, Construction, and                    167,314            139,629            189,629
       Improvements....................................
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Checkpoint Support.--Funds provided for Checkpoint Support 
will be used to continue field-testing and deploying equipment 
for passenger screening, carry-on baggage screening, checkpoint 
reconfiguration, electronic surveillance of checkpoints, and 
operational integration of systems. Currently deployed 
technologies include walk-through metal detectors, explosives 
trace detection machines, bottled liquid scanners, chemical 
analysis devices, advanced technology systems, and Advanced 
Imaging Technology [AIT]. Purchases of equipment with a unit 
cost of less than $250,000 will continue to be made with 
Operations and Support funds.
    The Committee is aware of AIT in use internationally since 
2015. TSA is directed to report, not later than 90 days after 
the date of enactment of this act, on the suitability of this 
technology for use in U.S. airports and on any plans to test 
and evaluate the technology, which shall include a timeline 
toward qualification for procurement.
    Advanced Integrated Screening Technologies.--TSA is 
directed to submit a detailed report on passenger and baggage 
screening technologies not later than 180 days after the date 
of enactment of this act. The report shall include a useful 
description of existing and emerging technologies capable of 
detecting threats concealed on passengers and in baggage, as 
well as projected funding levels for each technology identified 
in the report for the next five fiscal years.
    Quarterly Briefings.--TSA is to provide quarterly briefings 
on its investment plans for checkpoint security and Explosives 
Detection Systems [EDS] refurbishment, procurement, and 
installation on an airport-by-airport basis. These briefings 
shall include information on specific technologies for 
purchase, program schedules, major milestones, obligation 
schedules, recapitalization priorities, status of operational 
testing for each passenger screening technology under 
development, and a table detailing actual versus anticipated 
unobligated balances at the close of the fiscal year. These 
briefings shall also include details on checkpoint screening 
pilot programs and public-private partnerships that are in 
progress or being considered for implementation. Information in 
this portion of the briefing is to include for each pilot 
program or public-private partnership: a summary; a description 
of its goals; potential capabilities and benefits of the 
program; the airports where the pilots or partnerships will 
take place; funding commitments; and plans for future 
expansion. The Committee expects these briefings to include 
detailed program schedules for passenger screening 
technologies, and these schedules should include all milestones 
from the issuance of a request for proposal to deployment.
    Computed Tomography.--The recommendation includes 
$71,500,000 for the purchase and installation of 145 CT 
machines for passenger checkpoints at the highest-risk airports 
in the United States. This effort is part of a larger effort to 
recapitalize aging screening equipment, add detection 
capabilities, and improve performance in order to mitigate 
emerging threats to aviation security. The Committee encourages 
TSA to remain innovative in its efforts to enhance threat 
detection.
    Explosives Detection Systems.--The recommendation includes 
$85,367,000 for EDS, including $50,000,000 for TSA to continue 
reimbursement of airports that incurred costs associated with 
the development of a partial or completed in-line baggage 
system prior to August 3, 2007. As directed in the Joint 
Explanatory Statement accompanying Public Law 114-113 and 
Public Law 115-141, TSA has validated project cost information 
submitted by airports to determine allowable and allocable 
expenses. TSA is directed to brief the Committee on its updated 
timeline and allocation plan for these funds not later than 60 
days after the date of enactment of this act. The brief shall 
include a plan for how TSA will address the remaining balance 
of reimbursement claims in future budget requests.

                        RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT

Appropriations, 2018....................................     $20,190,000
Budget estimate, 2019...................................      20,594,000
Committee recommendation................................      20,594,000

                       COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS

    The Committee recommends $20,594,000 for Research and 
Development, which is the same as the budget request amount and 
$404,000 above the fiscal year 2018 enacted level.
    The following table summarizes the Committee's 
recommendation as compared to the fiscal year 2018 enacted and 
fiscal year 2019 budget request levels:

                                            RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT
                                            [In thousands of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                          Fiscal year 2018   Fiscal year 2019      Committee
                                                              enacted         budget request    recommendations
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Research and Development...............................            20,190             20,594             20,594
                                                        --------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Research and Development...............            20,190             20,594             20,594
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Innovation Task Force [ITF].--The Committee supports TSA's 
efforts to develop and deploy next generation screening 
solutions rapidly to assist screeners in detecting and 
deterring threats to aviation security.
    TSA established the ITF to foster innovation in aviation 
security, address the threat landscape, improve the passenger 
screening experience, and deliver a next-generation curb-to-
gate screening capability. The Committee encourages the ITF to 
engage with industry in pursuit of future capabilities that can 
support TSA's mission.

                              Coast Guard

    The primary responsibilities of the Coast Guard include: 
the enforcement of all applicable Federal laws on the high seas 
and other waters subject to the jurisdiction of the United 
States; promotion of safety of life and property at sea; 
assistance to navigation; protection of the marine environment; 
and maintenance of a state of readiness to function as a 
specialized service of the Navy in time of war, as authorized 
by sections 1 and 2 of title 14, U.S. Code. The Commandant of 
the Coast Guard reports directly to the Secretary of Homeland 
Security.

                       COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS

    The Committee recommends $11,934,411,000 for the Coast 
Guard, which is $496,210,000 above the budget request amount 
and $173,313,000 below the fiscal year 2018 enacted level. When 
costs for Overseas Contingency Operations [OCO] are excluded, 
the recommendation for the Coast Guard is $11,769,411,000. The 
bill adopts new appropriations accounts for the Coast Guard, 
which more closely align its funding structure with that of the 
other components. For purposes of consistency, fiscal year 2018 
enacted levels are displayed using the new appropriations 
accounts in the following manner: ``Operating Expenses'' is now 
displayed as ``Operations and Support''; ``Acquisition, 
Construction, and Improvements'' is now displayed as 
``Procurement, Construction, and Improvements''; and 
``Research, Development, Test, and Evaluation'' is now 
displayed as ``Research and Development''. Activities funded 
within the ``Reserve Training'' account are realigned to the 
``Operations and Support'' [O&S;] account. The recommendation 
does not reflect the proposed realignment of ``Environmental, 
Compliance, and Restoration'' [EC&R;] functions into the O&S; 
account, because the current authorization for these functions 
(14 U.S.C. 692) requires that any funding appropriated for them 
to be transferred into an EC&R; account, regardless of the 
account to which such funds are appropriated.
    The following table summarizes the Committee's 
recommendation as compared to the fiscal year 2018 enacted and 
fiscal year 2019 budget request levels:

                                                   COAST GUARD
                                            [In thousands of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                            Fiscal year 2018  Fiscal year 2019      Committee
                                                                 enacted       budget request    recommendations
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Operations and Support....................................         7,373,313         7,579,709         7,792,409
Environmental Compliance and Restoration\1\...............            13,397            13,429            13,429
Procurement, Construction, and Improvements...............         2,694,745         1,886,750         2,169,260
Research and Development..................................            29,141            19,109            20,109
Health Care Fund Contribution (Permanent Indefinite                  204,136           199,360           199,360
 Appropriations)..........................................
Retired Pay...............................................         1,676,117         1,739,844         1,739,844
                                                           -----------------------------------------------------
      Total, Coast Guard..................................        12,107,724        11,438,201        11,934,411
                                                           -----------------------------------------------------
      (Defense, less OCO).................................           340,000           340,000           340,000
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
\1\Environmental Compliance and Restoration funding was requested within Operations and Support but is not
  recommended within the Operations and Support account and is shown separately for comparability

                         OPERATIONS AND SUPPORT

Appropriations, 2018....................................  $7,373,313,000
Budget estimate, 2019...................................   7,579,709,000
Committee recommendation................................   7,792,409,000

    The O&S; appropriation provides funds for the salaries and 
benefits of both military and civilian personnel and the 
operation and maintenance of multipurpose vessels, aircraft, 
and shore units strategically located along the coasts and 
inland waterways of the United States and in selected areas 
overseas. The program activities of this appropriation include: 
search and rescue; aids to navigation; marine safety; marine 
environmental protection; enforcement of laws and treaties; 
Arctic and Antarctic operations; and defense readiness.

                       COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS

    The Committee recommends $7,792,409,000 for O&S;, which is 
$212,700,000 above the budget request amount and $419,096,000 
above the fiscal year 2018 enacted level. Of this amount, not 
more than $3,352,112,000 is for non-pay. The total includes 
$24,500,000 from the Oil Spill Liability Trust Fund and 
$505,000,000 for Coast Guard defense-related activities, of 
which $165,000,000 is for OCO. The Committee has also 
recommended funding to meet the air facility operation 
obligations laid out in section 676a of title 14, United States 
Code.
    Based on recent reporting pursuant to Public Law 94-254, 
the Committee is aware of increasing Coast Guard costs that 
will result in diminished resources for other statutory 
missions. The Coast Guard shall appropriately account for these 
needs in its fiscal year 2020 budget request.
    The following table summarizes the Committee's 
recommendation as compared to the fiscal year 2018 enacted and 
fiscal year 2019 budget request levels:

                                             OPERATIONS AND SUPPORT
                                            [In thousands of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                            Fiscal year 2018  Fiscal year 2019      Committee
                                                                 enacted       budget request    recommendations
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Military Pay and Allowances...............................         3,716,444         3,851,095         3,866,095
Civilian Pay and Benefits.................................           847,678           929,385           929,385
Training and Recruiting...................................           191,015           187,991           188,338
Operating Funds and Unit Level Maintenance................           897,171           907,894           925,447
Centrally Managed Accounts................................           142,788           143,641           165,441
Intermediate and Depot Level Maintenance..................         1,415,217         1,442,048         1,435,048
Reserve Training..........................................           114,875           117,655           117,655
Overseas Contingency Operations...........................           163,000  ................           165,000
                                                           -----------------------------------------------------
      Total, Operations and Support.......................         7,373,313         7,579,709         7,792,409
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Arctic Program Office.--Recognizing the growing national 
security imperatives for an enhanced U.S. presence in the 
Arctic, the Committee is pleased that the Coast Guard has 
established an Arctic Strategy, an Arctic Strategy 
Implementation Plan, and an Arctic Program Office. This office 
has furthered the Nation's national defense and security 
interests in the Arctic through its extensive participation, 
coordination, and collaboration with other international, 
Federal, and SLTT partners to improve awareness, broaden 
partnerships, and modernize governance in the Arctic. Most 
recently, the office supported the completion of the Bering 
Strait Port Access Route Study, a study that resulted in a 
joint recommendation by the United States and the Russian 
Federation to the International Maritime Organization [IMO] to 
establish a common vessel traffic measure. Recently approved by 
the IMO, the traffic measure is the first IMO-approved measure 
for navigation safety in polar waters. The Coast Guard is to 
report to the Committee if additional resources are needed for 
the Arctic Program Office to further its important mission.
    Military Personnel.--The recommendation includes 
$15,000,000 above the request for 250 additional military 
personnel to bolster the Coast Guard's workforce and to help 
carry out the its 11 statutory missions. This increase is 
reflective of the Coast Guard's most recent personnel 
projections, which indicates significant improvements in 
military accessions.
    Crew Rotation Concept.--The request assumed $31,700,000 in 
savings associated with the elimination of the Crew Rotation 
Concept [CRC] and the recommendation reflects these savings. 
The Committee believes the concept disproportionately increased 
operational costs while providing only marginal increases in 
time on station. Continuing the CRC would have significant 
negative impacts on cutter crews and maintenance while 
increasing requirements for capital investments at certain 
ports.
    Small Boats.--The Committee understands that the Coast 
Guard plans to purchase 15 additional small response boats in 
fiscal year 2019 and notes that the bill includes long-standing 
language to allow O&S; funds to be used for the purchase or 
lease of small boats for contingent and emergent requirements.
    Child Care Subsidy.--The Committee recognizes that the 
availability of childcare is critically important for Coast 
Guard families, especially those living in high cost-of-living 
areas. The recommendation includes $2,000,000 to increase 
childcare subsidy availability and $500,000 to complete a 
survey of personnel, required by the Joint Explanatory 
Statement accompanying the Consolidated Appropriations Act, 
2018, regarding the cost and availability of childcare and 
their effects on retention.
    Fishing Safety Training.--The Committee supports an 
agreement between the Coast Guard and the National Institute of 
Occupational Safety and Health [NIOSH] to efficiently 
administer Fishing Safety Training and Research Grant Programs. 
The Committee notes that a small percentage of the funds 
appropriated for these grant programs may be used, if 
necessary, to cover the Federal costs associated with NIOSH's 
administration of the programs. The recommendation includes 
$6,000,000 to continue these grants in fiscal year 2019, and 
the Committee recognizes the need to consult with relevant 
fishing safety training experts in the development of program 
guidelines.
    Minor Shore Infrastructure.--The bill includes long-
standing language to allow funds for operations to be used for 
the sustainment, repair, replacement, and maintenance of shore 
infrastructure projects, including projects to correct 
deficiencies in code compliance or to mitigate against threats 
to life, health, or safety, with costs not exceeding 50 percent 
of a building's or structure's replacement value. Additionally, 
Operations and Support funds can be used for contingent, 
emergent, or other unspecified minor construction projects, 
which include new construction, procurement, development, 
conversion, rebuilding, improvement, or an extension of any 
facility not exceeding $1,000,000 in total cost at any location 
for planned or unplanned operational needs.
    Minor construction projects funded from the O&S; 
appropriation can be combined with depot level maintenance 
projects for the sake of administrative and economic 
efficiency. The Coast Guard is to provide a report to the 
Committee not later than 45 days after the date of enactment of 
this act detailing such projects and any fiscal year 2019 
sustainment, repair, replacement, or maintenance projects 
costing more than $1,000,000. For fiscal year 2020, such 
information shall be included in the justification materials 
accompanying the budget request. The recommendation includes 
requested funding to complete shore facility follow-on, as 
detailed in the Coast Guard's justification materials.
    Coast Guard Yard.--The Committee has urged the Coast Guard 
to expedite planning for facility and equipment upgrades 
necessary for service life extensions of the Fast Response 
Cutter [FRC] and other vessels at the Coast Guard Yard at 
Curtis Bay in Baltimore, Maryland. The nearest travel lift of 
sufficient size and capacity to service the FRC is in Hampton 
Roads, Virginia. Transporting the travel lift between Hampton 
Roads and Baltimore is a costly and time consuming procedure 
that removes the lift from service during transport. The 
recommendation includes funding within the PC&I; appropriation 
to acquire necessary equipment and make physical modifications 
to wharves or other parts of the Coast Guard Yard facility to 
accommodate FRCs and other vessels.
    Bridge Review.--Currently, the single lane bridge over Lake 
Pend Oreille, Idaho does not sufficiently accommodate its 
traffic volume. During peak agricultural and harvest times, 
shipments of U.S. agriculture come to a stop as they wait for 
clearance to cross this bridge. The Committee believes that the 
current proposal to construct a second bridge over Lake Pend 
Oreille would provide a significant reduction to this 
congestion. The Committee urges the Coast Guard to work closely 
with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and all local and state 
stakeholders to conduct a thorough and timely review and 
analysis of this proposal.
    Executive Transportation Aircraft.--The Coast Guard is 
directed to notify the Committee prior to making any changes to 
the type, number, or flight hours of command and control 
aircraft.
    Asset Colocation.--In establishing homeports for new 
vessels in the northeast United States, the Coast Guard is 
directed to partner with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric 
Administration and the U.S. Navy to leverage existing assets 
and new investments at Naval Station Newport.
    Coast Guard Museum.--The recommendation includes $5,000,000 
for the National Coast Guard Museum, which is authorized under 
section 98(b) of title 14, United States Code. Funds may be 
used to preserve and protect Coast Guard artifacts, or for the 
design, fabrication, or installation of exhibits or displays 
for these artifacts.
    Wind Energy.--The Coast Guard shall continue to consult and 
collaborate with the Department of the Interior and other 
maritime stakeholders to minimize areas of incompatibility 
between maritime navigation and offshore energy development.
    Maritime Asset Protection.--The Committee recognizes that 
waterborne threats pose a significant challenge to protecting 
Coast Guard assets in port. Waterborne marine barrier systems 
play an important role in securing waterfront and offshore 
facilities from these threats. Not later than 180 days after 
the date of enactment of this act, the Coast Guard shall submit 
to the Committee a report detailing the capabilities of current 
waterborne marine barrier systems at Coast Guard facilities and 
shall include an assessment of their ability to adequately 
deter and defend against a waterborne attack.
    Maritime Law Enforcement.--The Coast Guard shall report to 
the Committee within 180 days of the enactment of this act with 
an assessment of the Coast Guard's ability to conduct maritime 
law enforcement activities on the high seas in support of 
international partners. Specifically, the assessment should 
address the following elements of the Coast Guard's current 
capabilities, capacity, and legal authority to conduct maritime 
law enforcement activities outside of United States territorial 
waters: human trafficking; forced labor; illegal, unreported, 
or unregulated fishing; and other illicit activity at sea. The 
report should detail: technical coordination with partner 
nations, non-governmental organizations, and the U.S. Navy to 
improve tracking and detection of vessels engaged in such 
activities; Coast Guard requirements, including materiel, 
personnel, logistic, and administrative requirements, for 
support from the U.S. Navy (either direct support requests, or 
through Geographic Combatant Commanders and the Global Force 
Management process) and partner nations, specifying any unmet 
resource demands; any limiting factors that constrain the Coast 
Guard's ability to fully resource this mission, including legal 
authorities; and legislative proposals for mitigating these 
limitations.
    Alternative Planning Criteria.--The Committee is concerned 
that the Coast Guard is taking too long to approve Alternative 
Planning Criteria plans as required by regulations promulgated 
under the Oil Pollution Act of 1990 (33 U.S.C. 2701 et seq.) 
for the Captain of the Port Zone that includes the Arctic. The 
Committee encourages the Coast Guard to quickly approve 
Alternative Planning Criteria plans to ensure that all vessels 
transiting the Captain of the Port Zone that includes the 
Arctic and required to have a vessel response plan are covered 
when transiting in the Zone. Furthermore, the Committee 
encourages the Coast Guard to consider approved Alternative 
Planning Criteria plans for the Captain of the Port Zone that 
includes the Arctic to be valid for a period of not less than 3 
years from the date of approval.
    Jupiter Island Property Disposition.--The Committee 
understands that the Coast Guard property in Jupiter Island, 
Florida is being considered for inclusion in Hobe Sound 
National Wildlife Refuge and directs the Coast Guard to work 
expediently with both Federal and non-Federal partners to 
evaluate the potential costs and benefits of this transaction.

                    OVERSEAS CONTINGENCY OPERATIONS

    The Committee recommends $165,000,000 for Coast Guard 
operations in support of OCO. While funding for these 
activities is requested in the Department of Defense budget for 
the U.S. Navy, the Committee adopted a practice, beginning in 
fiscal year 2009, of recommending these amounts be appropriated 
directly to the Coast Guard.
    The Coast Guard shall brief the Committee, not later than 
30 days after the date of enactment of this act, on any changes 
to OCO amounts expected during fiscal year 2019 and on 
projected transition costs expected in fiscal year 2020 to 
support OCO.

                ENVIRONMENTAL COMPLIANCE AND RESTORATION

Appropriations, 2018....................................     $13,397,000
Budget estimate, 2019...................................      13,429,000
Committee recommendation................................      13,429,000

    The EC&R; appropriation provides funds to address 
environmental problems at former and current Coast Guard units 
as required by applicable Federal, State, and local 
environmental laws and regulations. Uses for these funds 
include: major upgrades to petroleum and regulated substance 
storage tanks; restoration of contaminated ground water and 
soils; remediation efforts at hazardous substance disposal 
sites; and initial site surveys and actions necessary to bring 
Coast Guard shore facilities and vessels into compliance with 
environmental laws and regulations.

                       COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS

    The Committee recommends $13,429,000 for EC&R; as requested. 
The Committee notes that EC&R; funding cannot be readily 
executed within the O&S; account, as requested, due to 
requirements under section 692 of title 14 United States Code 
related to the period of funding availability for the program. 
The Coast Guard is directed to include in its annual budget 
justification materials a list of the activities projected to 
be funded via the EC&R; appropriation.

              PROCUREMENT, CONSTRUCTION, AND IMPROVEMENTS

Appropriations, 2018....................................  $2,694,745,000
Budget estimate, 2019...................................   1,886,750,000
Committee recommendation................................   2,169,260,000

    This appropriation supports the Procurement, Construction, 
and Improvement [PC&I;] of vessels, aircraft, information 
management resources, shore facilities, aids to navigation, and 
military housing required to execute the Coast Guard's missions 
and achieve its performance goals.

                       COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS

    The Committee recommends $2,169,260,000 for PC&I;, which is 
$282,510,000 above the budget request amount and $525,485,000 
below the fiscal year 2018 enacted level. The recommendation 
includes $20,000,000 from the Oil Spill Liability Trust Fund.
    The following table summarizes the Committee's 
recommendation as compared to the fiscal year 2018 enacted and 
fiscal year 2019 budget request levels:

                                   PROCUREMENT, CONSTRUCTION, AND IMPROVEMENTS
                                            [In thousands of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                            Fiscal year 2018  Fiscal year 2019      Committee
                                                                 enacted       budget request    recommendations
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Vessels:
    Survey and Design--Vessel and Boats...................             4,500               500             5,500
    In-Service Vessel Sustainment.........................            60,500            63,250            63,250
    National Security Cutter..............................         1,241,000            65,000            72,600
    Offshore Patrol Cutter................................           500,000           400,000           400,000
    Fast Response Cutter..................................           340,000           240,000           240,000
    Cutter Boats..........................................             1,000             5,000             5,000
    Polar Ice Breaking Vessel.............................            19,000           750,000           750,000
    Inland Waterways and Western Rivers Cutter............            26,100             5,000             5,000
    Polar Sustainment.....................................  ................            15,000            15,000
                                                           -----------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Vessels...................................         2,192,100         1,543,750         1,556,350
 
Aircraft:
    HC-144 Conversion/Sustainment.........................  ................            17,000            17,000
    HC-27J Conversion /Sustainment........................            70,000            80,000            80,000
    HC-130J Acquisition/Conversion/Sustainment............           100,600  ................  ................
    HH-65 Conversion/Sustainment..........................            22,000            20,000            20,000
    MH-60T Sustainment....................................             2,500            25,000           175,000
    Small Unmanned Aircraft Systems.......................               500             6,000             6,000
                                                           -----------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Aircraft..................................           195,600           148,000           298,000
 
Other Acquisition Programs:
    Other Equipment and Systems...........................             4,000             3,500             3,500
    Program Oversight and Management......................            15,000            20,000            20,000
    C4ISR.................................................            22,000            23,300            23,300
    CG-Logistics Information Management System............             9,800            13,200            13,200
                                                           -----------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Other Acquisition Programs................            50,800            60,000            60,000
 
Shore Facilities and Aids to Navigation:
    Major Construction, ATON, and Survey and Design.......            42,400            30,000            74,510
    Major Acquisition Systems Infrastructure..............            87,100           100,000           175,400
    Minor Shore...........................................             5,000             5,000             5,000
                                                           -----------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Shore Facilities and Aids to Navigation...           134,500           135,000           254,910
 
Personnel and Related Support                                        121,745  ................  ................
                                                           =====================================================
      Total, Procurement, Construction, and Improvements..         2,694,745         1,886,750         2,169,260
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Capital Investment Plan.--The Coast Guard continues to 
struggle with the timely submission of a Capital Investment 
Plan [CIP]. The CIP is essential for the Committee to carry out 
its oversight of the Coast Guard, especially at a time when 
recapitalization of aging assets has become so critical for the 
service. Therefore, bill language is continued requiring the 
CIP submission with the annual budget request, and the 
Committee retains a withholding of O&S; funds in order to 
facilitate timeliness. The information required by the 
Committee is in accordance with the Coast Guard's Major Systems 
Acquisition Manual or applicable Departmental management 
directives. The fiscal year 2020-2024 CIP is to be submitted 
with the fiscal year 2020 budget justification materials.
    Quarterly Acquisition Briefings.--The Coast Guard is to 
continue to brief the Committee quarterly on all major 
acquisitions. In addition to the information normally provided 
for each asset, these briefings shall include: the top five 
risks for each acquisition; the objective for operational hours 
the Coast Guard expects to achieve with each acquisition; the 
gap between that objective, current capabilities, and stated 
mission requirements; and how the acquisition of the specific 
asset closes those gaps. The information presented at these 
briefings shall also include a discussion of how the Coast 
Guard calculated the operational hours, an explanation of risks 
to mission performance associated with the current shortfall, 
and the operational strategy to mitigate such risks. Finally, 
the briefings are to include a chart listing the status of all 
shore construction projects that have not been completed. For 
each construction project, the chart is to include the 
project's status with regard to funding, design, procurement, 
and construction.
    Drug Interdiction.--The Committee is concerned that cocaine 
overdose deaths in the United States increased by more than 52 
percent between 2015 and 2016. The Committee is further 
concerned with the use of the maritime domain to traffic 
cocaine, which typically originates in Colombia, into the 
United States. Despite interdicting a record 224 metric tons of 
cocaine in 2017, the Coast Guard is only able to respond to a 
fraction of the intelligence it receives, largely due to a lack 
of vessels and aircraft. The recommendation includes 
significant funding to enhance the Coast Guard's ability to 
pursue additional interdiction missions.
    Full-Funding Policy.--The Committee again directs an 
exception to the administration's current acquisition policy 
that requires the Coast Guard to attain the total acquisition 
cost for a vessel, including long lead time materials [LLTM], 
production costs, and post-production costs, before a 
production contract can be awarded. This policy has the 
potential to make shipbuilding less efficient, to force delayed 
obligation of production funds, and to require post-production 
funds far in advance of when they will be used. The Department 
should position itself to acquire vessels in the most efficient 
manner within the guidelines of strict governance measures. The 
Committee expects the administration to adopt a similar policy 
for the acquisition of the Offshore Patrol Cutter [OPC] and 
heavy polar icebreaker.
    Domestic Content.--To the maximum extent practicable, the 
Coast Guard is directed to utilize components that are 
manufactured in the United States when contracting for new 
vessels. Such components include: auxiliary equipment, such as 
pumps for shipboard services; propulsion equipment including 
engines, reduction gears, and propellers; shipboard cranes; and 
spreaders for shipboard cranes.
    National Maritime Center.--The Committee applauds the work 
of the National Maritime Center in issuing credentials to 
qualified mariners in the most effective way. The Committee is 
eager to learn how systems modernization, if beneficial, could 
enhance and improve the capabilities for its workforce.

                                VESSELS

    Survey and Design--Vessels and Boats.--To enhance 
icebreaking capacity on the Great Lakes, the Committee 
continues to support the acquisition of an icebreaker that is 
at least as capable as USCGC MACKINAW (WLBB-30). Therefore, the 
Committee includes $5,000,000 above the budget request amount 
to continue survey and design work for this vessel.
    National Security Cutter.--Legend Class National Security 
Cutters [NSCs] are replacing the legacy High Endurance Cutters, 
built between 1967 and 1972. In fiscal year 2017, the Coast 
Guard interdicted 2,512 illegal migrants and removed 224 metric 
tons of cocaine with an estimated street value of over 
$6,600,000,000, which surpassed the previous record amount of 
cocaine removal set the previous fiscal year. Of the 224 metric 
tons of cocaine removed, four NSCs interdicted 72.6 metric tons 
of cocaine with an estimated street value of $2,144,000,000. In 
a single deployment, the USCGC JAMES (WMSL-754) removed 16.8 
metric tons of uncut cocaine with a street value in excess of 
$496,000,000. The Committee recommends $72,600,000 for the NSC 
program including $7,600,000 for advance purchase of several 
systems for the tenth and eleventh NSCs, including wind 
indicating and measurement systems, homing beacons for 
aircraft, and navigation and sensor data distribution systems. 
The Committee worked diligently to ensure resources were 
provided by the Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2018 to 
construct a tenth and eleventh NSC. The Committee is pleased 
that the Coast Guard has indicated that contracts for these 
NSCs are on track to be awarded on time. The Committee 
continues to believe that the Coast Guard's fleet of twelve 
High Endurance Cutters should be replaced with twelve NSCs. The 
Committee intends to continue to work with the Coast Guard to 
understand the costs, operational benefits of, and recommended 
schedule for acquisition of a twelfth NSC.
    Offshore Patrol Cutter.--The OPC will replace the fleet of 
Medium Endurance Cutters and further enhance the Coast Guard's 
layered security strategy. The recommendation includes 
$400,000,000 for the OPC program. This funding will provide for 
production of a second OPC, LLTM for a third OPC, program 
activities, test and evaluation, government furnished 
equipment, and training aids. The Committee encourages the 
Coast Guard to evaluate the requirements for a sensitive 
compartmented information facility and a multimodal radar 
system onboard the OPC and determine whether and when these 
requirements should be incorporated into revised design and 
construction.
    Fast Response Cutter.--The Committee recommends 
$240,000,000 to acquire four FRCs, as requested.
    Polar Ice Breaking Vessel.--The recommendation includes 
$750,000,000, as requested, to maintain the accelerated 
acquisition schedule for a new class of heavy polar icebreakers 
that was established in fiscal year 2018. These funds will be 
used to request proposals and award contracts for detail design 
and construction near the beginning of fiscal year 2020. Heavy 
polar icebreakers are essential to securing the national 
security and economic interests of the United States in the 
Arctic and Antarctic. To ensure the United States is able to 
achieve this objective in the most expeditious and efficient 
manner possible, the Coast Guard should explore block buy 
pricing for the heavy polar icebreakers. Not later than 180 
days after the date of the enactment of this act, the Coast 
Guard shall submit a report to the Committee on the feasibility 
of block buy contracting for the acquisition of heavy polar 
icebreakers.
    Polar Star.--The recommendation includes $15,000,000 to 
carry out a service life extension program [SLEP] for the POLAR 
STAR to extend its service life so that it remains operational 
until the delivery of the second new heavy polar icebreaker. 
The Coast Guard's two existing heavy polar icebreakers are over 
45 years old and well past their planned service life. 
Currently, only one heavy polar icebreaker is in active service 
[POLAR STAR], and the other vessel [POLAR SEA] is in an 
inactive status serving to provide specialty parts to help 
sustain POLAR STAR. Continued funding for its SLEP will ensure 
the POLAR STAR can meet and support national interests and 
provide assured surface presence in the Arctic and Antarctic.
    Inland Waterways and Western River Tenders.--The Committee 
continues to be concerned with the Coast Guard's fleet of 
inland river tenders which help ensure the integrity of the 
structures, beacons and buoys that support the United State's 
Marine Transportation System. In addition to age concerns and 
equipment obsolesce issues, the fleet is unable to accommodate 
mixed-gender crews and presents other challenges, including 
crew health. The recommendation includes $5,000,000, the same 
as the budget request, to continue accelerating the Inland 
Waterways and Western River Tenders acquisition. The Department 
is directed to provide, not less than 90 days after the 
enactment of this act, the Committee an acquisition plan and 
requirements document that detail the Coast Guard's plans to 
acquire new vessels to replace the current fleet.
    52-Foot Heavy Weather Boats.--The Committee is concerned 
that there is not a recapitalization plan for the Coast Guard's 
52-Foot Heavy Weather Boats, which are all over 50 years old. 
The Committee directs the Coast Guard to submit a report to the 
Committee, not 180 days after the enactment of this act, that 
analyzes acquisition timeline for replacing the 52-Foot Heavy 
Weather Boat and that includes an assessment of the capacity of 
other active small boat assets to meet the Coast Guard's 
extreme heavy weather requirements.

                                AIRCRAFT

    HC-130J Acquisition/Conversion/Sustainment.--The fiscal 
year 2019 CIP outlines a total need of 22 HC-130J's, yet the 
administration routinely fails to include these aircraft in its 
budget requests. The Committee continues to support the 
recapitalization of this fleet and expects funds for additional 
aircraft to be included in future budget requests.
    Coast Guard MH-60 Recapitalization.--The Committee strongly 
supports efforts to sustain the Coast Guard's MH-60 rotary wing 
aircraft. The Committee recognizes that the Coast Guard MH-60 
fleet has more flight hours per aircraft than any other U.S. 
MH-60 fleet in service. As such, the Committee does not support 
risky, experimental options being considered by the Coast Guard 
as a means to extend fleet service life. The recommendation 
instead includes $175,000,000 for the safest and most reliable 
feasible option for extending MH-60 service life until the 
Coast Guard can receive planned deliveries from of the joint 
Future Vertical Lift program. The chosen option must present 
the least risk to operational flight hours during the service 
life extension period. In addition, MH-60 recapitalization 
options must be considered in the context of the Coast Guard's 
aging rotary wing fleet, which includes the MH-65. More robust 
service life extension options that could yield 20,000 total 
flight hours for each MH-60 would allow for a staggered 
approach to recapitalization, with MH-65 fleet replacement 
occurring in the mid-2030s, followed by MH-60 fleet replacement 
thereafter.

                SHORE FACILITIES AND AIDS TO NAVIGATION

    Unfunded Priorities List [UPL].--The Committee directs the 
Coast Guard to provide to the Committee, at the time of the 
fiscal year 2020 budget request submission, a list of approved 
but unfunded Coast Guard priorities and the funds needed for 
each.
    Shore Construction.--The recommendation includes funding 
above the budget request amount for the two highest priorities 
on the Coast Guard's UPL that will support operational assets 
and maritime commerce. These include the highest priority 
realignment of aids to navigation, and the replacement of an 
outdated pier. In addition, the recommendation includes funding 
for utility upgrades required to support a previously funded 
hangar, which is the top priority on the Coast Guard's UPL for 
addressing facility deficiencies.
    Shore Construction Report.--The Committee understands the 
Coast Guard is drafting a report on shore-side infrastructure 
improvements required in Alaska, as required by the Joint 
Explanatory Statement accompanying the Consolidated 
Appropriations Act, 2018, and expects that the report will 
detail any dock improvements needed to accommodate Coast Guard 
cutters and any housing construction or improvements needed to 
appropriately accommodate new cutters' crew members and their 
families. Further, the report shall include a timeline for when 
funding is needed to implement these improvements.
    Alaska Maritime Communications.--The Committee expects the 
report required by the Joint Explanatory Statement accompanying 
the Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2018 on plans to provide 
communications throughout the entire Coastal Western Alaska 
Captain of the Port Zone will also articulate the costs of 
implementing the plans.
    Critical Major Acquisition Systems Infrastructure [MASI] 
Investments.--The recommendation includes funding above the 
budget request amount for the three highest priority MASI 
projects on the Coast Guard's UPL. These include construction 
of a cutter maintenance building, an FRC maintenance travel 
lift, and floating piers for FRC homeports. The Committee 
recommendation also includes $5,000,000 for survey and design 
work associated with the Coast Guard's top UPL aircraft 
facility priority.
    Homeport of New Vessels.--The Committee supports the 
current and planned homeport locations for National Security 
Cutters. However, the Committee recognizes the challenges that 
replacing the 378-foot Hamilton-class cutter with 418-foot NSCs 
has imposed on Coast Guard facilities where waterfront space is 
limited and reiterates the importance of pier availability for 
Coast Guard cutters and other surface vessels to minimize 
operational delays or other unnecessary costs that would 
undermine the Coast Guard's ability to conduct its missions. 
Therefore, not later than 180 days after enactment of this act, 
the Coast Guard shall report to the Committee on infrastructure 
requirements associated with the homeporting of new vessels. At 
a minimum, the Coast Guard shall assess if major acquisition 
system infrastructure is required, identify associated funding 
needs, and provide a plan to address these requirements to the 
Committee.

                        RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT

Appropriations, 2018....................................     $29,141,000
Budget estimate, 2019...................................      19,109,000
Committee recommendation................................      20,109,000

    The Coast Guard's Research and Development [R&D;] 
appropriation provides funds to develop techniques, methods, 
hardware, and systems that contribute directly to increasing 
the productivity and effectiveness of the Coast Guard's 
operational missions. This appropriation also provides funds to 
operate and maintain the Coast Guard Research and Development 
Center.

                       COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS

    The Committee recommends $20,109,000 for R&D;, which is the 
same as the budget request amount and $9,032,000 below the 
fiscal year 2018 enacted level.
    Bromine-Free Water Purification Systems.--The Committee 
remains concerned with the continued use of bromine for 
shipboard water purification on certain classes of cutter, as 
bromine is toxic and requires special hazardous material 
handing processes that are time consuming and expensive. The 
Committee urges the Coast Guard to explore the use of water 
purification processes that do not require the use of bromine, 
including those used by the U.S. Navy. The Committee notes that 
newer, less hazardous technology has recently been scaled to 
support ships that are the size of Coast Guard cutters and 
includes $1,000,000 to evaluate these systems and support a 
pilot demonstration of bromine-free systems aboard the NSC, 
FRC, or OPC.

                     HEALTH CARE FUND CONTRIBUTION

Appropriations, 2018....................................    $204,136,000
Budget estimate, 2019...................................     199,360,000
Committee recommendation................................     199,360,000

    According to estimates by the Congressional Budget Office, 
the Coast Guard will pay $199,360,000 in fiscal year 2019 to 
the Medicare-Eligible Retiree Health Care Fund for the costs of 
military Medicare-eligible health benefits earned by its 
uniformed service members. The contribution is funded by 
permanent indefinite discretionary authority pursuant to Public 
Law 108-375.

                              RETIRED PAY

Appropriations, 2018....................................  $1,676,117,000
Budget estimate, 2019...................................   1,739,844,000
Committee recommendation................................   1,739,844,000

    The Retired Pay account provides for: the pay of retired 
military personnel of the Coast Guard, Coast Guard Reserve, and 
members of the former Lighthouse Service; annuities payable to 
beneficiaries of retired military personnel under the retired 
serviceman's family protection plan (10 U.S.C. 1431-1446) and 
survivor benefit plan (10 U.S.C. 1447-1455); payments for 
career status bonuses under the National Defense Authorization 
Act; continuation pay, and payments for medical care of retired 
personnel and their dependents under the Dependents Medical 
Care Act (10 U.S.C., ch. 55).

                       COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS

    The Committee recommends $1,739,844,000 for Retired Pay as 
requested, which is $63,727,000 above the fiscal year 2018 
enacted level.

                      United States Secret Service

    The United States Secret Service's [USSS] appropriation 
provides funds for: the protection of the President, the Vice 
President, and other dignitaries and designated individuals; 
enforcement of laws relating to obligations and securities of 
the United States; enforcement of laws relating to financial 
crimes, that include, but are not limited to, access device 
fraud, financial institution fraud, identity theft, and 
computer fraud; mitigation against computer-based attacks on 
financial, banking, and telecommunications infrastructure; and 
protection of the White House and other buildings within the 
Washington, DC metropolitan area. The agency also provides 
support for investigations related to missing and exploited 
children and for digital forensics investigative training for 
State and local cybersecurity task forces.

                       COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS

    The Committee recommends $2,179,715,000 for USSS, which is 
$28,091,000 above the budget request amount and $173,191,000 
above the fiscal year 2018 enacted level.
    The Committee recognizes the successes of USSS in the face 
of persistent protection requirements and increasing global 
investigations. The Committee continues to be pleased with the 
agency's reinvigorated approach to hiring new personnel, but 
work remains to ensure the agency is properly staffed, 
especially during Presidential election cycles, and to return 
the agency to its expected level of mission effectiveness.
    The Committee understands that the protection mission often 
yields unexpected expenses, but the Committee continues to be 
concerned with the level of detail contained within USSS budget 
justification documents. USSS must improve its ability to plan, 
track, and report employee-level cost allocations and 
obligations across both the protection and investigative 
missions in order to achieve an optimal workforce.
    The following table summarizes the Committee's 
recommendation as compared to the fiscal year 2018 and budget 
request levels:

                                          UNITED STATES SECRET SERVICE
                                            [In thousands of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                            Fiscal year 2018  Fiscal year 2019      Committee
                                                                 enacted       budget request    recommendations
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Operations and Support....................................         1,915,794         2,084,308         2,093,684
Procurement, Construction, and Improvements...............            90,480            64,816            83,531
Research and Development..................................               250             2,500             2,500
                                                           -----------------------------------------------------
      Total, USSS.........................................         2,006,524         2,151,624         2,179,715
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

                         OPERATIONS AND SUPPORT

Appropriations, 2018....................................  $1,915,794,000
Budget estimate, 2019...................................   2,084,308,000
Committee recommendation................................   2,093,684,000

                       COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS

    The Committee recommends $2,093,684,000 for Operations and 
Support [O&S;], which is $9,376,000 above the budget request 
amount and $177,890,000 above the fiscal year 2018 enacted 
level. Of this amount, not more than $698,100,000 is for non-
pay.
    The following table summarizes the Committee's 
recommendation as compared to the fiscal year 2018 enacted and 
fiscal year 2019 budget request levels:

                                             OPERATIONS AND SUPPORT
                                            [In thousands of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                            Fiscal year 2018  Fiscal year 2019      Committee
                                                                 enacted       budget request    recommendations
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Protective Operations:....................................
    Protection of Persons and Facilities..................           711,227           747,201           734,961
    Protective Countermeasures............................            46,862            55,309            55,903
    Protective Intelligence...............................            47,814            48,239            48,239
    Presidential Campaigns and National Security Special               4,500            28,500            28,500
     Events...............................................
                                                           -----------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Protective Operations.....................           810,403           879,249           867,603
Field Operations:
    Domestic and International Field Operations...........           596,478           627,687           627,687
    Support for Missing and Exploited Children                         6,000             6,000             6,000
     Investigations.......................................
    Support for Computer Forensics Training...............            18,778             4,000            25,022
                                                           -----------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Field Operations..........................           621,256           637,687           658,709
Basic and In-Service Training and Professional Development            64,212           101,854           101,854
Mission Support...........................................           419,923           465,518           465,518
      Subtotal, Operations and Support....................         1,915,794         2,084,308         2,093,684
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

                         PROTECTIVE OPERATIONS

    Protection of Persons and Facilities.--The Committee 
recommends $734,961,000, which is 12,240,000 below the budget 
request amount and $23,734,000 above the fiscal year 2018 
enacted level. The reduction of $12,240,000 is reflective of a 
vehicle recapitalization funded instead under Procurement, 
Construction, and Improvements [PC&I;]. While USSS Special 
Agents provide protection of permanent protectees, the 
Uniformed Division is authorized to protect any building in 
which Presidential offices are located. The uneventful visits 
and safe departures of Federal employees and USSS protectees do 
not go unnoticed by the Committee.
    Protective Countermeasures.--The Committee recommends 
$55,903,000 for Protective Countermeasures, including amounts 
above the budget request to perform deferred maintenance at the 
White House complex, and for enhancements to capabilities to 
protect the President and Vice President against emerging 
explosive, chemical, biological, radiological, and cyber 
threats. The Committee has a long history of supporting these 
enhancements, including its support for advanced protective 
countermeasures designed to address both established and 
evolving threats.
    Protective Intelligence.--The Committee recommends 
$48,239,000, which is the same as the budget request amount. 
This level of funding will ensure that protective intelligence 
processes, policies, and systems provide quality information 
and services, including counter-intelligence investigations of 
individuals, groups, or activities that pose threats to 
protectees and protected events.
    Presidential Campaigns and National Security Special 
Events.--The Committee recommends $28,500,000, as requested, 
which is $24,000,000 above the fiscal year 2018 enacted level, 
to support currently planned and unanticipated National 
Security Special Events [NSSE], many of which could be related 
to the 2020 presidential campaign. The Committee directs the 
USSS to provide semiannual briefings to the Committee on the 
use of these funds, with the first briefing to occur not later 
than 180 days after the date of enactment of this act. The 
Committee notes that on May 16, 2018, the Secretary designated 
the 73rd United Nations General Assembly as a NSSE. The 
Committee appreciates the Secretary making such designations as 
far in advance as is practicable. Also included in the 
recommendation is a general provision prohibiting funds from 
being used to reimburse any Federal department or agency for 
its participation in an NSSE.

                            FIELD OPERATIONS

    Domestic and International Field Operations.--The Committee 
recommends $627,687,000 for Domestic and International Field 
Operations, which is the same as the budget request amount and 
$31,209,000 above the fiscal year 2018 enacted level. In 
addition to directly supporting the Department's strategic goal 
to protect critical infrastructure, which includes protecting 
U.S. currency and financial systems from threats originating 
abroad, the USSS investigates violations of laws related to the 
counterfeiting of obligations and securities of the United 
States. This mission involves investigating and coordinating a 
comprehensive international response to threats to the 
integrity of U.S. currency and to other transnational financial 
crimes, including financial institution fraud, identity theft, 
access device fraud, and money laundering. As criminals develop 
and exploit new technologies, USSS field operations must adjust 
to meet the changing threat.
    Support for Missing and Exploited Children 
Investigations.--The recommendation includes $6,000,000 for 
grants in support of missing and exploited children. The 
National Center for Missing and Exploited Children [NCMEC] was 
created in 1984 to serve as a national resource on missing and 
sexually exploited children. USSS has provided grant funding, 
which is currently responsible for approximately 17 percent of 
the organization's Federal funding, to NCMEC since 1997 and 
currently provides support for NCMEC's forensics unit. NCMEC 
provides assistance to law enforcement for: long-term missing 
persons cases; identification of signs of facial reconstruction 
procedures; outreach and prevention programs for children, 
their families, and the public; assistance to victims of child 
sex trafficking and child sexual exploitation; and other 
critical operations.
    Support for Computer Forensics Training.--The Committee 
recommends $25,022,000, which is $21,022,000 above the budget 
request amount and $6,244,000 above the fiscal year 2018 
enacted level, to continue training in computer forensics and 
to expand in response to unmet training needs. These resources 
are in support of the National Computer Forensics Institute, 
which trains State and local law enforcement and legal and 
judicial professionals in computer forensics and cyber 
investigations. This training is critical to bolstering State 
and local cyber capabilities and supports USSS Electronic 
Crimes Task Forces.

       BASIC AND IN-SERVICE TRAINING AND PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT

    USSS hiring improvements have resulted in additional 
training requirements at its Rowley Training Center [RTC] and 
at the Federal Law Enforcement Training Centers' [FLETC] 
campuses in Glynco, Georgia and Artesia, New Mexico. Therefore, 
the Committee fully funds the necessary FLETC training courses 
and RTC courses, including the 20 Special Agent training 
courses, 12 Uniformed Division training courses, and 2 Mixed 
Basic training courses, planned for fiscal year 2019.

                            MISSION SUPPORT

    The Committee continues to be concerned with the prolonged 
workforce affects stemming from USSS reliance on overtime pay 
to fill personnel gaps between protective and investigative 
operations. The effects of this reliance stem from the 
extensive 2016 presidential campaign and a subsequent increase 
in provisional and non-provisional protectees. The USSS must 
institute long-term policy and management techniques to reach 
benchmarks of 7,150 employees in fiscal year 2019 and 7,600 
employees in fiscal year 2020.
    Operational Mission Support.--Operational Mission Support 
[OMS] underpins nearly every USSS protective mission, from the 
screening of people and vehicles to physical infrastructure 
improvements, including vehicle barriers, cameras and the White 
House fence. OMS is also responsible for the Next Generation 
Presidential Limousine. The Committee directs the USSS to 
provide the Committee with quarterly updates on the contract 
progress for this acquisition and to detail progress in efforts 
to meet agreed upon delivery deadlines. The Committee further 
directs a briefing on all sensor technologies, including fiber 
optics, in use or otherwise under consideration for perimeter 
or other security.
    Strategic Human Capital Plan.--Not later than 180 days 
after the date of enactment of this act, USSS shall brief the 
Committee on its strategic human capital plan for 2020 through 
2023. This plan shall address how USSS is progressing against 
hiring goals, particularly with respect to Special Agents and 
Uniformed Division officers. The plan shall also address the 
annual cost of and participation rate in various hiring and 
retention initiatives, including the Uniformed Division 
Retention Bonus.

              PROCUREMENT, CONSTRUCTION, AND IMPROVEMENTS

Appropriations, 2018....................................     $90,480,000
Budget estimate, 2019...................................      64,816,000
Committee recommendation................................      83,531,000

                       COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS

    The Committee recommends $83,531,000 for Procurement, 
Construction, and Improvements, which is $18,715,000 above the 
budget request amount and $6,949,000 below the fiscal year 2018 
enacted level. This amount includes $6,475,000 for deferred 
maintenance and investments at the White House complex and 
$12,240,000 for vehicle recapitalization requested under O&S.;
    The following table summarizes the Committee's 
recommendation as compared to the fiscal year 2018 enacted and 
fiscal year 2019 budget request levels:

                                   PROCUREMENT, CONSTRUCTION, AND IMPROVEMENTS
                                            [in thousands of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                            Fiscal year 2018  Fiscal year 2019      Committee
                                                                 enacted       budget request    recommendations
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Protection Assets and Infrastructure......................            65,462            52,971            71,686
Operational Communications/Information Technology.........            25,018             8,845             8,845
Construction and Facility Improvements....................  ................             3,000             3,000
                                                                 ...........
                                                           -----------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Procurement, Construction, and                        90,480            64,816            83,531
       Improvements.......................................
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Not later than 30 days after the date of enactment of this 
act, the USSS shall brief the Committee on the rationale behind 
requesting fully armored vehicle recapitalization within O&S; 
instead of PC&I.;

                        RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT

Appropriations, 2018....................................        $250,000
Budget estimate, 2019...................................       2,500,000
Committee recommendation................................       2,500,000

                       COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS

    The Committee recommends $2,500,000 for Research and 
Development for innovations that mitigate threats to U.S. 
financial systems, critical infrastructure, and persons and 
facilities protected by USSS. This amount is the same as the 
budget request amount and $2,250,000 above the fiscal year 2018 
enacted level.
    The following table summarizes the Committee's 
recommendation as compared to the fiscal year 2018 enacted and 
fiscal year 2019 budget request levels:

                                            RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT
                                            [in thousands of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                            Fiscal year 2018  Fiscal year 2019      Committee
                                                                 enacted       budget request    recommendations
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Research and Development..................................               250             2,500             2,500
                                                           -----------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Research and Development..................               250             2,500             2,500
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


                                TITLE II

                       ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISIONS

    Section 201. The Committee continues a provision regarding 
overtime compensation.
    Section 202. The Committee continues a provision allowing 
CBP to sustain or increase operations in Puerto Rico with 
appropriated funds.
    Section 203. The Committee continues a provision regarding 
the availability of Consolidated Omnibus Budget Reconciliation 
Act of 1985 fee revenue.
    Section 204. The Committee continues and modifies a 
provision allowing CBP access to certain reimbursements for 
preclearance activities.
    Section 205. The Committee continues a provision regarding 
the importation of prescription drugs by an individual for 
personal use.
    Section 206. The Committee continues a provision regarding 
waivers of the Jones Act.
    Section 207. The Committee continues a provision 
prohibiting the establishment of a new border crossing fee.
    Section 208. The Committee continues a provision allowing 
the Secretary to reprogram funds within and transfer funds to 
``U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement--Operations and 
Support'' to ensure the detention of aliens prioritized for 
removal.
    Section 209. The Committee continues a provision 
prohibiting the use of funds provided under the heading ``U.S. 
Immigration and Customs Enforcement--Operations and Support'' 
for a 287(g) program agreement if the terms of the agreement 
governing the delegation of authority have been materially 
violated.
    Section 210. The Committee continues a provision 
prohibiting the use of funds provided under the heading ``U.S. 
Immigration and Customs Enforcement--Operations and Support'' 
to contract for detention services provided by a facility that 
receives less than ``adequate'' ratings in two consecutive 
performance evaluations.
    Section 211. The Committee continues a provision clarifying 
that certain elected and appointed officials are not exempt 
from Federal passenger and baggage screening.
    Section 212. The Committee continues a provision requiring 
risk-based TSA awards for EDS.
    Section 213. The Committee continues a provision 
authorizing TSA to use funds from the Aviation Security Capital 
Fund for the procurement and installation of EDS or for other 
purposes authorized by law.
    Section 214. The Committee continues a provision 
prohibiting TSA from requiring airports to finance exit point 
monitoring at additional locations.
    Section 215. The Committee continues a provision 
prohibiting the use of funds made available by this act under 
the heading ``Coast Guard--Operations and Support'' for 
recreational vessel expenses, except to the extent fees are 
collected from owners of yachts and credited to this 
appropriation.
    Section 216. The Committee continues a provision allowing 
up to $10,000,000 to be reprogrammed to or from Military Pay 
and Allowances within ``Coast Guard--Operations and Support''.
    Section 217. The Committee continues a provision requiring 
the Coast Guard submit a future years capital investment plan.
    Section 218. The Committee continues a provision 
prohibiting funds from being used to reduce the staff or 
mission at the Coast Guard's Operations Systems Center.
    Section 219. The Committee continues a provision 
prohibiting the Coast Guard from performing an Office of 
Management and Budget Circular A-76 study at the Coast Guard 
National Vessel Documentation Center.
    Section 220. The Committee continues a provision 
prohibiting the Coast Guard from reducing operations within the 
Civil Engineering program.
    Section 221. The Committee continues a provision allowing 
Overseas Contingency and Global War on Terror funding to be 
reallocated without regard to Department-wide reprogramming 
restrictions.
    Section 222. The Committee continues a provision allowing 
USSS to obligate funds in anticipation of reimbursement to 
personnel receiving training.
    Section 223. The Committee continues a provision 
prohibiting the use of funds made available to USSS for the 
protection of the head of a Federal agency other than the 
Department of Homeland Security, unless the Director has 
entered into a reimbursable agreement for such protection 
services.
    Section 224. The Committee continues a provision providing 
flexibility to address travel anomalies as a result of 
protective travel.
    Section 225. The Committee continues a provision allowing 
for funds made available for ``United States Secret Service--
Operations and Support'' to be available for travel of 
employees on protective missions without regard to limitations 
on such expenditures in this or any other act after 
notification to the Committees on Appropriations.

                               TITLE III

            PROTECTION, PREPAREDNESS, RESPONSE, AND RECOVERY

              National Protection and Programs Directorate

    The National Protection and Programs Directorate [NPPD] 
aims to foster better integration of national approaches among 
strategic homeland security programs, to facilitate 
infrastructure protection, to ensure broad emergency 
communications capabilities, and to safeguard Federal buildings 
and facilities.

                       COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS

    The Committee recommends a total program level of 
$3,476,732,000, including offsetting fee collectives totaling 
$1,527,110,000, for NPPD, which is $128,471,000 above the 
budget request amount and $89,275,000 above the amount provided 
in fiscal year 2018. The Committee recognizes that NPPD works 
with many other Federal agencies on needed projects but is 
concerned that some projects are not properly validated. NPPD 
is directed to ensure that all programs and projects completed 
in conjunction with other Federal agencies undergo a 
requirements assessment and are clearly justified to the 
Committees to ensure only the highest priority projects are 
funded.
    The following table summarizes the Committee's 
recommendation as compared to the fiscal year 2018 enacted and 
fiscal year 2019 budget request levels:

                                  NATIONAL PROTECTION AND PROGRAMS DIRECTORATE
                                            [in thousands of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                          Fiscal year 2018   Fiscal year 2019      Committee
                                                              enacted         budget request    recommendations
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Operations and Support.................................         1,482,165          1,470,340          1,568,718
Federal Protective Service.............................        (1,476,055)        (1,527,110)        (1,527,110)
Procurement, Construction, and Improvements............           414,111            302,964            369,778
Research and Development...............................            15,126             47,847             11,126
                                                        --------------------------------------------------------
      Total, National Protection and Programs                  (3,387,457)        (3,348,261)        (3,476,732)
       Directorate (gross).............................
 
(Offsetting Collections)...............................        (1,476,055)        (1,527,110)        (1,527,110)
                                                        --------------------------------------------------------
      Total, National Protection and Programs                   1,911,402          1,821,151          1,949,622
       Directorate.....................................
 
(Defense)..............................................        (1,621,793)        (1,505,620)        (1,613,621)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

                         OPERATIONS AND SUPPORT

Appropriations, 2018....................................  $1,482,165,000
Budget estimate, 2019...................................   1,470,340,000
Committee recommendation................................   1,568,718,000

                       COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS

    The Committee recommends $1,568,718,000 for Operations and 
Support [O&S;], which is $98,378,000 above the budget request 
amount and $86,553,000 above the fiscal year 2018 enacted 
level. Of this amount, not more than $1,197,973,000 is for non-
pay.
    The following table summarizes the Committee's 
recommendation as compared to the fiscal year 2018 enacted and 
fiscal year 2019 budget request levels:

                                             OPERATIONS AND SUPPORT
                                            [In thousands of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                          Fiscal year 2018   Fiscal year 2019      Committee
                                                              enacted         budget request    recommendations
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Cybersecurity:
    Cyber Readiness and Response.......................           243,992            224,396            279,981
    Cyber Infrastructure Resilience....................            46,243             30,059             42,443
    Federal Cybersecurity..............................           432,673            458,600            467,029
                                                        --------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Cybersecurity..........................           722,908            713,055            789,453
 
Infrastructure Protection:
    Infrastructure Capacity Building...................           121,776            129,182            135,224
    Infrastructure Security Compliance.................            72,440             76,853             76,853
                                                        --------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Infrastructure Protection..............           194,216            206,035            212,077
 
Emergency Communications:
    Emergency Communications Preparedness..............            54,501             51,785             53,785
    Priority Telecommunications Services...............            63,955             63,911             63,911
                                                        --------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Emergency Communications...............           118,456            115,696            117,696
 
Integrated Operations:
    Cyber and Infrastructure Analysis..................            56,410             44,683             54,921
    Critical Infrastructure Situational Awareness......            21,222             23,429             23,429
        (Defense)......................................           (19,312)           (21,320)           (21,320)
    Stakeholder Engagement and Requirements............            50,583             45,127             48,827
        (Defense)......................................           (45,525)           (40,614)           (43,944)
    Strategy, Policy and Plans.........................            14,448             13,931             13,931
        (Defense)......................................            (9,536)            (9,194)            (9,194)
                                                        --------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Integrated Operations..................           142,663            127,170            141,108
 
Office of Biometric Identity Management:
    Identity and Screening Program Operations..........            68,826             69,590             69,590
    IDENT/Homeland Advanced Recognition Technology.....           150,603            160,691            160,691
                                                        --------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Office of Biometric Identity Management           219,429            230,281            230,281
 
Mission Support........................................            84,493             78,103             78,103
    (Defense)..........................................           (26,193)           (24,212)           (24,212)
                                                        --------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Operations and Support.................         1,482,165          1,470,340          1,568,718
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

                             CYBERSECURITY

    The recommendation includes $789,453,000 for Cybersecurity, 
which is $76,398,000 above the budget request amount and 
$66,545,000 above the fiscal year 2018 enacted level. The total 
amount for cybersecurity recommended in fiscal year 2019 for 
NPPD, including in Operations and Support; Procurement, 
Construction, and Improvements; and Research and Development, 
is $1,076,488,000, which is $86,391,000 above the budget 
request amount and $13,282,000 below the fiscal year 2018 
enacted level.
    The fiscal year 2019 budget request proposes an increase of 
$36,721,000 for NPPD cybersecurity research and development 
while concurrently reducing Science & Technology [S&T;] 
cybersecurity research by nearly $60,000,000. Without this de 
facto transfer, the fiscal year 2019 request for cybersecurity 
operations represents a $28,000,000 net decrease from the 
fiscal year 2018 request. While the Committee believes S&T; must 
more closely align its cybersecurity research efforts with NPPD 
requirements, the Committee is disappointed the Department, in 
coordination with Office of Management and Budget, would 
request such a drastic shift to obfuscate real costs and stoke 
intra-Departmental jurisdictional squabbles rather than develop 
a serious strategy to manage a serious national security 
challenge.
    Election Security.--The Committee includes a total of 
$33,000,000 above the request, across several PPAs as described 
in this report, to provide as-needed assistance to States and 
localities in their efforts to secure electronic 
infrastructure.
    Cyber Readiness and Response.--The recommendation includes 
$279,981,000 for the National Cybersecurity and Communications 
Integration Center [NCCIC], of which $186,776,000 is for 
Computer Emergency Response Teams.
    Of the total, $29,379,000 is for election security through 
NCCIC activities, including vulnerability scans and incident 
detection and response.
    Of the total provided, $3,000,000 is for the continuation 
of pilot programs to explore and evaluate the most effective 
methods for cybersecurity information sharing, focusing on 
regional information sharing; communications and outreach; 
training and education; and research and development for the 
improvement of SLTT government capabilities and capacity. NPPD 
is directed to provide a report on the results of each pilot 
not later than 270 days after its completion.
    The NCCIC is directed to continue providing technical 
assistance to other Federal agencies, upon request, on 
preventing and responding to data breaches involving 
unauthorized access to personally identifiable information.
    Cybersecurity Education.--The recommendation includes a 
total of $14,393,000 for cybersecurity education and awareness, 
which is $4,291,000 above the budget request amount and the 
same as the fiscal year 2018 enacted level. The Committee notes 
the critical and growing shortages of qualified national 
cybersecurity professionals and remains concerned about the 
development of the current and future cybersecurity workforce. 
The recommendation includes $4,300,000 for the Cybersecurity 
Education and Training Assistance Program and rejects the 
proposed elimination of the program. The Committee encourages 
the Department to emphasize scalability through delivery of 
education via the Internet and through the development of 
industry-proven training techniques that may be deployed 
nationwide to engage industry partners, K-12 students, 
teachers, counselors, and post-secondary institutions. This 
effort would encourage students to pursue degrees and careers 
in cybersecurity. As stated in previous years, any proposed 
reductions to cybersecurity education will not be considered 
unless NPPD provides a clear plan for how the previously funded 
activities would be fully realigned within other agencies in a 
manner that sustains the objectives of this critical effort.
    Federal Cybersecurity.--The recommendation includes 
$467,029,000 for Federal Cybersecurity, including the 
Continuous Diagnostics and Mitigation [CDM] program and the 
National Cybersecurity Protection System [NCPS], including 
EINSTEIN.
    The Committee is concerned with the lack of progress in 
developing EINSTEIN into a more dynamic, adaptive network 
intrusion detection tool capable of keeping up with constantly 
evolving threats. The Committee encourages NPPD to thoroughly 
review innovative capabilities deployed by other government and 
commercial entities to determine how best to upgrade, 
supplement, or supplant EINSTEIN's intrusion detection 
capability.
    NPPD is directed to brief the Committee on the updated 
timeline and acquisition strategy of the CDM Program, including 
the accelerated deployment of Phase 4 data protection 
capabilities (Digital Rights Management, Data Masking, Micro-
Segmentation, Enhanced Encryption, Mobile Device Management) 
across all ``.gov'' civilian agencies. Of the total amount 
recommended, $3,600,000 above the budget request amount is 
included for 22 positions and necessary activities to expedite 
implementation of CDM.
    Within the total, an additional $4,829,000 above the budget 
request amount is included for the Federal Protective Service 
to expedite and implement urgent cyber and physical assessments 
regarding the security of networks in Federal buildings 
connected to industrial control systems.
    State, Local, Tribal, and Territorial Support.--The 
Committee notes the role of the National Guard and State 
Critical Infrastructure Assessment teams in cybersecurity 
initiatives. NPPD is encouraged to work with both to disrupt 
attacks on the continuity of State governments.

                       INFRASTRUCTURE PROTECTION

    The recommendation includes $212,077,000 for Infrastructure 
Protection, which is $6,042,000 above the budget request amount 
and $17,861,000 above the fiscal year 2018 enacted level. Of 
the total, $1,121,000 is for election security activities, 
including establishment of information sharing protocols and 
routine operations.
    Office of Bombing Prevention.--The recommendation includes 
$16,842,000 for the Office of Bombing Prevention [OBP], which 
is $2,090,000 above the budget request amount. Amounts 
recommended above the request will sustain needed training, 
information sharing, and awareness for State, local, and 
private sector entities about how terrorists use explosives. 
The additional amount will also provide for needed analysis of 
counter-explosives requirements, capabilities, and gaps. The 
Committee is aware of OBP's efforts to work with the National 
Guard on training and encourages OBP to analyze efficiencies 
that could be gained through further coordination with the 
National Guard.

                        EMERGENCY COMMUNICATIONS

    The recommendation includes $117,696,000 for Emergency 
Communications, which is $2,000,000 above the budget request 
amount and $760,000 below the fiscal year 2018 enacted level. 
The Office of Emergency Communications provides essential 
public safety communications technical assistance to State and 
local agencies to help them implement best practices for the 
use of new technologies. The increase above the request is for 
elections security activities, including communications 
products for stakeholders.

                         INTEGRATED OPERATIONS

    The recommendation includes $141,108,000 for Integrated 
Operations [IO], which is $13,938,000 above the budget request 
amount and $1,555,000 below the fiscal year 2018 enacted level. 
The IO program ensures domain and situational awareness in 
support of multiple mission programs.
    The Committee encourages the Department to continue sharing 
declassified information in a timely manner with U.S. critical 
infrastructure owners and operators, who interface with NPPD 
through Information Sharing and Analysis Centers in order to 
make more informed and impactful decisions.
    Within the total and above the request, $500,000 is to 
better understand the risk related to election security, 
$1,700,000 is for NPPD's software assurance program, and 
$2,000,000 is to continue efforts to ensure the integrity of 
supply chains.
    National Infrastructure Simulation and Analysis Center.--Of 
the total amount recommended for IO, not less than $18,650,000 
is for the National Infrastructure Simulation and Analysis 
Center [NISAC], which is $9,738,000 above the budget request 
amount and the same as the fiscal year 2018 enacted level. 
NISAC plays an important role in the Department's understanding 
of the potential impact and cascading effects of infrastructure 
failures and disruptions. The Committee recognizes the 
important mission of NISAC and encourages NPPD to ensure that 
the NISAC remains mission-focused with a vision toward the 
future and an ability to articulate return on investment.

                OFFICE OF BIOMETRIC IDENTITY MANAGEMENT

    The recommendation includes $230,281,000 for the Office of 
Biometric Identity Management [OBIM], which is the same as the 
budget request amount and $10,852,000 above the fiscal year 
2018 enacted level. OBIM is an enterprise-level biometric 
identity service provider that has cross-cutting responsibility 
to serve and coordinate with the components and other Federal 
agencies. The Committee is aware of proposals that would 
transfer OBIM to the Management Directorate, and the Committee 
would be supportive of such a transfer should it be authorized 
by law.
    Semi-Annual Briefings.--OBIM is directed to continue 
briefing the Committee on a semiannual basis on its workload, 
service levels, staffing, modernization efforts, and other 
operations.
    Homeland Advanced Recognition Technology [HART] 
Acquisition.--As development of the HART system continues, OBIM 
is expected to develop a system that is truly useful to the 
Department and its partners. OBIM is expected to work with the 
components and other agencies, including the Management 
Directorate, the Office of Policy, TSA, CBP, and the Department 
of Defense, as requirements are refined and executed. OBIM 
shall brief the Committee monthly on the outcomes of this 
coordination until it is clear to the Committee that this 
coordination is robust and fruitful.
    The Department is encouraged to work cooperatively with the 
Departments of Justice, Defense, and State to standardize and 
share biometric information. The Committee directs OBIM to 
continue to brief the Committee semiannually on progress toward 
integrating systems, including Unique Identity, across these 
agencies. The briefings should describe capability gaps and 
strategies to close them. Further, the Committee encourages 
OBIM to continue to improve data sharing and connectivity with 
the Intelligence Community.

                       FEDERAL PROTECTIVE SERVICE

Appropriations, 2018....................................  $1,476,055,000
Budget estimate, 2019...................................   1,527,110,000
Committee recommendation................................   1,527,110,000

    The Federal Protective Service [FPS] is responsible for: 
the security and protection of Federal property under the 
control of the General Services Administration [GSA]; the 
enforcement of laws pertaining to the protection of persons and 
designated property; the prevention of breaches of peace; and 
enforcement of any rules and regulations made and promulgated 
by the GSA Administrator or the Secretary. The FPS authority 
can also be extended by agreement to any area with a 
significant Federal interest. The FPS account provides funds 
for the salaries, benefits, travel, training, and other 
expenses of the program.

                       COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS

    The Committee recommends $1,527,110,000 for FPS, as 
requested, and these amounts are offset by collections paid by 
GSA tenants and credited to the account.
    The following table summarizes the Committee's 
recommendation as compared to the fiscal year 2018 enacted and 
fiscal year 2019 budget request levels:

                                           FEDERAL PROTECTIVE SERVICE
                                            [In thousands of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                          Fiscal year 2018   Fiscal year 2019      Committee
                                                              enacted         budget request    recommendations
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
FPS Operations.........................................           360,079            359,196            359,196
Countermeasures........................................         1,115,976          1,167,914          1,167,914
                                                        --------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Federal Protective Service.............         1,476,055          1,527,110          1,527,110
 
Offsetting fee collections.............................        (1,476,055)        (1,527,110)        (1,527,110)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Federal Protective Service Data System.--FPS relies on fee 
collection for funding. In January 2017, an NPPD risk 
assessment found that the data system FPS uses to assess and 
collect fees presents an unacceptable level of risk to agency 
operations. Not later than 30 days after the date of enactment 
of this act, FPS shall brief the Committee on this assessment 
and its strategy to address these concerns.

              PROCUREMENT, CONSTRUCTION, AND IMPROVEMENTS

Appropriations, 2018....................................    $414,111,000
Budget estimate, 2019...................................     302,964,000
Committee recommendation................................     369,778,000

                       COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS

    The Committee recommends $369,778,000 for Procurement, 
Construction, and Improvements [PC&I;], which is $66,814,000 
above the budget request amount and $44,333,000 below the 
fiscal year 2018 enacted level.
    The following table summarizes the Committee's 
recommendation as compared to the fiscal year 2018 enacted and 
fiscal year 2019 budget request levels:

                                   PROCUREMENT, CONSTRUCTION, AND IMPROVEMENTS
                                            [in thousands of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                          Fiscal year 2018   Fiscal year 2019      Committee
                                                              enacted         budget request    recommendations
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Cybersecurity:
    Continuous Diagnostics and Mitigation..............           246,981            125,548            172,262
    National Cybersecurity Protection System...........           115,186            110,078            110,078
                                                        --------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Cybersecurity..........................           362,167            235,626            282,340
 
Emergency Communications:
    Next Generation Networks Priority Services.........            48,905             42,551             42,551
                                                        --------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Emergency Communications...............            48,905             42,551             42,551
 
Biometric Identity Management:
    IDENT/Homeland Advanced Recognition Technology.....  .................            20,000             40,100
                                                        --------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Biometric Identity Management..........  .................            20,000             40,100
 
Integrated Operations Assets and Infrastructure:
    Modeling Capability Transition Environment.........               500   .................  .................
                                                        --------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Integrated Operations Assets and                      500   .................  .................
       Infrastructure..................................
 
Infrastructure Protection:
    Infrastructure Protection [IP] Gateway.............             2,539              4,787              4,787
                                                        --------------------------------------------------------
    Subtotal, Infrastructure Protection................             2,539              4,787              4,787
                                                        --------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Procurement, Construction, and                    414,111            302,964            369,778
       Improvements....................................
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    The recommendation includes $46,714,000 above the budget 
request amount to support evolving requirements to include 
acceleration of CDM capabilities, concurrent work across all 
CDM phases, and increased agency adoption. Additional funds 
will also improve usability and effectiveness of the CDM 
dashboard, expand CDM Phase 1 and 2 capabilities to all 
agencies currently not participating in the program, and 
accelerate cloud and mobile asset management capabilities by 
one full year.
    The recommendation also includes $20,100,000 above the 
budget request amount to reinvigorate the HART acquisition due 
to a delay in the overall program schedule in fiscal year 2018.

                        RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT

Appropriations, 2018....................................     $15,126,000
Budget estimate, 2019...................................      47,847,000
Committee recommendation................................      11,126,000

                       COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS

    The Committee recommends $11,126,000 for Research and 
Development [R&D;], which is $36,721,000 below the budget 
request amount and $4,000,000 below the fiscal year 2018 
enacted level.
    The following table summarizes the Committee's 
recommendation as compared to the fiscal year 2018 enacted and 
fiscal year 2019 budget request levels:

                                            RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT
                                            [in thousands of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                            Fiscal year 2018  Fiscal year 2019      Committee
                                                                 enacted       budget request    recommendations
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Cybersecurity.............................................             4,695            41,416             4,695
Infrastructure Protection.................................             6,431             2,431             2,431
Integrated Operations.....................................             4,000             4,000             4,000
                                                           -----------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Research and Development..................            15,126            47,847            11,126
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

                             CYBERSECURITY

    As requested, the Committee recommends funding for 
development and use of standards to ensure reliable, 
interoperable, and effective technologies and processes in 
close cooperation with cybersecurity partners and standard 
setting organizations. The Committee notes NPPD's role in 
addressing cybersecurity challenges by collaborating with the 
private sector, Federal departments and agencies, and SLTT 
governments to address cybersecurity risks, opportunities, and 
solutions. As noted under O&S;, the recommendation does not 
include the significant increase to cybersecurity research and 
development proposed by the budget request. Instead, it 
requires that S&T; refine its approach to cybersecurity to 
better meet NPPD requirements and requires that S&T; devote no 
less than the increase suggested by the budget request for NPPD 
cybersecurity research to this purpose.

                       INFRASTRUCTURE PROTECTION

    As requested, the Committee recommends funding to support 
research, development, and application of innovative 
technologies for community-based critical infrastructure 
protection and the protection of critical infrastructure 
against terrorist attacks and other emergencies.

                         INTEGRATED OPERATIONS

    As requested, the Committee recommends funding to develop 
capabilities to model, simulate, and conduct other advanced 
analytics of disruptions to cyber and infrastructure networks.

                        Office of Health Affairs


                         OPERATIONS AND SUPPORT

Appropriations, 2018....................................    $121,569,000
Budget estimate, 2019...................................................
Committee recommendation................................     121,569,000

                       COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS

    The Committee recommends $121,569,000 for Operations and 
Support, the same amount that was provided in fiscal year 2018. 
Of this amount, not more than $104,376,000 is for non-pay. The 
Committee recognizes that the Department used authorities under 
section 872 of the Homeland Security Act of 2002 (Public Law 
107-296) to establish a Countering Weapons of Mass Destruction 
[CWMD] office, which largely represents a consolidation of 
Domestic Nuclear Detection Office [DNDO] and the OHA. The 
Committee supports efforts to gain efficiencies and improve the 
Department's biological, radiological, chemical, and nuclear 
defense posture. The Committee notes, however, that the CWMD 
office has yet to be explicitly authorized by law. As such, the 
Committee recommends funding some activities being carried out 
by CWMD through the legacy OHA appropriations and PPA structure 
and includes a general provision that would provide the 
Department with significant flexibility to transfer funds from 
the OHA appropriation to CWMD accounts if the office is 
authorized. Regardless of such authorization, the Committee is 
committed to working with the Department to enable CWMD to 
execute its missions via the current appropriations and PPA 
structure. To this end, the Committee directs the Department to 
provide a report, not later than 30 days after the date of 
enactment of this act that details the links between legacy 
DNDO and OHA appropriations and PPA structures to the account 
structure proposed for CWMD by the budget request. This report 
should specify how activities funded under the legacy 
structures will be enhanced, improved, or made more efficient 
under the proposed account structure.
    The following table summarizes the Committee's 
recommendation as compared to the fiscal year 2018 enacted and 
fiscal year 2019 budget request levels:

                                             OPERATIONS AND SUPPORT
                                            [In thousands of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                              Fiscal year 2019
                                                            Fiscal year 2018       budget           Committee
                                                                 enacted         request\1\      recommendations
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Chemical and Biological Readiness.........................            79,130  ................            79,130
Health and Medical Readiness..............................             4,620  ................             4,620
Integrated Operations.....................................             9,400  ................             9,400
Mission Support...........................................            28,419  ................            28,419
                                                           -----------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Operations and Support....................           121,569  ................           121,569
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
\1\Funding for OHA activities was requested for CWMD office and is not comparable to prior years.

                  Federal Emergency Management Agency

    The primary mission of the Federal Emergency Management 
Agency [FEMA] is to reduce the loss of life and property and to 
protect United States from all hazards, including natural 
disasters, acts of terror, and other manmade disasters, through 
a risk-based, comprehensive emergency management system of 
preparedness, protection, response, recovery, and mitigation.

                       COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS

    The Committee recommends $11,692,461,000 for FEMA, which is 
$671,762,000 above the budget request amount and $616,578,000 
below the fiscal year 2018 enacted level.
    The following table summarizes the Committee's 
recommendation as compared to the fiscal year 2018 enacted and 
fiscal year 2019 budget request levels:

                                       FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY
                                            [in thousands of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                          Fiscal year 2018   Fiscal year 2019      Committee
                                                              enacted         budget request    recommendations
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Operations and Support.................................         1,030,135          1,036,282          1,054,838
Procurement, Construction, and Improvements............            85,276            103,349            128,349
Federal Assistance.....................................         3,293,932          2,644,733          3,272,939
Disaster Relief Fund (regular).........................         7,900,720          7,234,000          7,234,000
    Base...............................................          (534,720)          (582,000)          (582,000)
    Disaster Relief Cap................................        (7,366,000)        (6,652,000)        (6,652,000)
    (transfer to Office of Inspector General)..........  .................           (24,000)  .................
National Flood Insurance Fund..........................           203,500            201,691            201,691
                                                        --------------------------------------------------------
Disaster Assistance Direct Loan Program................  .................             3,000              3,000
Radiological Emergency Preparedness Program............            (1,024)              (665)              (665)
                                                        --------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Federal Emergency Management Agency.......        12,512,539         11,198,390         11,692,461
 
Offsetting Fee Collections.............................          (203,500)          (201,691)          (201,691)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

                         OPERATIONS AND SUPPORT

Appropriations, 2018....................................  $1,030,135,000
Budget estimate, 2019...................................   1,036,282,000
Committee recommendation................................   1,054,838,000

                       COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS

    The Committee recommends $1,054,838,000 for Operations and 
Support [O&S;], which is $18,556,000 above the budget request 
amount and $24,703,000 above the amount provided in fiscal year 
2018. Of this amount, not more than $499,872,000 is for non-
pay.
    The following table summarizes the Committee's 
recommendation as compared to the fiscal year 2018 enacted and 
fiscal year 2019 budget request levels:

                                             OPERATIONS AND SUPPORT
                                            [In thousands of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                          Fiscal year 2018   Fiscal year 2019      Committee
                                                              enacted         budget request    recommendations
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Regional Operations....................................           156,417            158,439            158,439
Mitigation.............................................            36,141             36,011             36,011
Preparedness and Protection............................           131,981            132,823            132,823
Response...............................................           182,893            174,337            182,893
    (Urban Search and Rescue)..........................           (35,180)           (27,513)           (35,180)
Recovery...............................................            46,694             49,010             49,010
Mission Support........................................           476,009            485,662            495,662
                                                        --------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Operations and Support.................         1,030,135          1,036,282          1,054,838
 
          (Defense)....................................           (42,945)           (42,213)           (42,213)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    The Committee notes that SLTT emergency management programs 
in the United States vary in size, scope, and approach. 
Improvements and a comprehensive understanding of capability 
can be gained when these programs are evaluated and recognized 
for compliance with voluntary standards. FEMA, in coordination 
with its stakeholders, is directed to brief the Committee not 
later than 180 days after the date of enactment of this act on 
the utilization of existing assessment programs, the potential 
for development of new tools, and the obstacles to using such 
programs.
    FEMA is directed to provide a report to the Committee, not 
later than 365 days after the date of enactment of this act, 
regarding its plans to support disaster relief and resiliency 
in the event of catastrophic storms on islands. This report 
should include a plan to address communications challenges and 
guidance on long-term housing solutions, as well as best 
practices for strong coordination between Federal agencies and 
SLTT governments.

                               MITIGATION

    Of the total recommendation for Mitigation, not less than 
$8,765,000 is for the National Earthquake Hazards Reduction 
Program. Additionally, within the total, not less than 
$9,188,000 is for the National Dam Safety Program, which 
provides assistance to states to prevent dam failures and 
improve their dam safety programs through training and 
implementation of best practices.

                      PREPAREDNESS AND PROTECTION

    A permanent provision included in Public Law 113-6 requires 
the inclusion of the Governors of the State of West Virginia 
and the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania in the decision-making 
process for mass evacuations of the National Capital Region. 
However, concerns remain that planning for the evacuation of 
the National Capital Region during a disaster has not 
incorporated all of the appropriate officials from the affected 
States and local communities, including counties and 
municipalities along evacuation routes and their tributaries. 
The Office of National Capital Region Coordination, in 
conjunction with State and local partners, shall brief the 
Committee on the status of evacuation planning not later than 
30 days after the date of enactment of this act.
    FEMA shall develop criteria and a process for ensuring that 
SLTT governments improve participation in Integrated Public 
Alert and Warning System [IPAWS]. In developing these criteria, 
FEMA shall consider the hardware and software that such 
governments use to originate alerts and warnings to the public; 
training of emergency management professionals on initiation of 
alerts and warnings to the public; the cyber security 
vulnerability of IPAWS-related hardware and software; the 
ability to plan and exercise protective action plans specific 
to alerts and warnings sent to the public; and any costs of 
associated improvements.
    The Committee encourages FEMA to increase communications, 
including communications with national and regional Tribal 
emergency management organizations, about training 
opportunities for Tribal communities through FEMA's Regional 
Tribal Liaisons and Tribal Consultation Coordinators. The 
Committee directs FEMA, in consultation with the National 
Tribal Affairs Advisor, Regional Tribal Liaisons, and Tribal 
Consultation Coordinators, to develop recommendations and 
guidelines to assist emergency responders working with Tribal 
responders and Tribal governments.
    The Committee encourages FEMA to evaluate the need for new 
technologies, including an inventory of atmospheric water 
generation machines, to better prepare for a disaster response.

                         RESPONSE AND RECOVERY

    FEMA shall review its reimbursement policy, including in 
relation to Small Business Loans, for expenses incurred as a 
result of a major disaster or emergency by self-employed or 
freelance workers for tool repair or replacement, specialized 
or protective clothing, or other required equipment, for 
fairness in relation to other reimbursement policies. The 
review shall include a cost estimate that assumes such 
reimbursements were eligible for disasters that have occurred 
in the last 3 years. The Committee expects a report on the 
review not later than 90 days after the date of enactment of 
this act.

                            MISSION SUPPORT

    The Committee recommends $495,662,000 for mission support, 
which is $10,000,000 above the budget request amount. Funding 
recommended above the budget request is to expedite FEMA's 
Grants Management Modernization [GMM] program. FEMA processes 
over $10,000,000,000 in grant funding through more than 40 
programs each year and is in need of a modern system to manage 
this funding and ensure taxpayers' dollars are not wasted.
    As detailed in OIG-16-10, serious concerns exist about the 
long-term consequences of FEMA's aging information technology 
across all programs. The Committee encourages FEMA to quickly 
implement OIG's findings and to incorporate information 
technology improvements in its 2018-2022 strategic plan.

              PROCUREMENT, CONSTRUCTION, AND IMPROVEMENTS

Appropriations, 2018....................................     $85,276,000
Budget estimate, 2019...................................     103,349,000
Committee recommendation................................     128,349,000

                       COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS

    The Committee recommends $128,349,000 for Procurement, 
Construction, and Improvements [PC&I;], which is $25,000,000 
above the budget request amount and $43,073,000 above the 
fiscal year 2018 enacted level.
    The following table summarizes the Committee's 
recommendation as compared to the fiscal year 2018 enacted and 
fiscal year 2019 budget request levels:

                                   PROCUREMENT, CONSTRUCTION, AND IMPROVEMENTS
                                            [In thousands of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                          Fiscal year 2018   Fiscal year 2019      Committee
                                                              enacted         budget request    recommendations
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Operational Communications/Information Technology......            12,018             11,670             11,670
Construction and Facility Improvements.................            44,519             46,996             71,996
Mission Support, Assets, and Infrastructure............            28,739             44,683             44,683
                                                        --------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Procurement, Construction, and                     85,276            103,349            128,349
       Improvements....................................
 
          (Defense)....................................           (53,262)           (57,166)           (62,166)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Of the amount recommended, $20,000,000 above the request is 
for capital improvements at the Center for Domestic 
Preparedness and $5,000,000 above the request is for capital 
improvements at the Mount Weather Emergency Operations Center.

                           FEDERAL ASSISTANCE

Appropriations, 2018....................................  $3,293,932,000
Budget estimate, 2019...................................   2,644,733,000
Committee recommendation................................   3,272,939,000

                       COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS

    The Committee recommends $3,272,939,000 for Federal 
Assistance, which is $628,206,000 above the budget request 
amount and $20,993,000 below the fiscal year 2018 enacted 
level. Of the recommended amount, $228,000,000 is derived by 
transfer. Of this amount, $150,000,000 is for the Predisaster 
Mitigation Fund and $78,000,000 is for Flood Hazard Mapping and 
Risk Analysis.
    The following table summarizes the Committee's 
recommendation as compared to the fiscal year 2018 enacted and 
fiscal year 2019 budget request levels:

                                               FEDERAL ASSISTANCE
                                            [in thousands of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                          Fiscal year 2018   Fiscal year 2019      Committee
                                                              enacted         budget request    recommendations
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Grants:
    State Homeland Security Grant Program..............           507,000            349,362            512,000
        (Operation Stonegarden)........................           (85,000)  .................           (90,000)
        (Non-Profit Security)..........................           (10,000)  .................           (10,000)
    Urban Area Security Initiative.....................           630,000            448,844            605,000
        (Non-Profit Security)..........................           (50,000)  .................           (25,000)
    Public Transportation Security Assistance..........           100,000             36,358            100,000
        (Amtrak Security)..............................           (10,000)  .................           (10,000)
        (Over-the-Road Bus Security)...................            (2,000)  .................            (2,000)
    Port Security Grants...............................           100,000             36,358            100,000
    Assistance to Firefighter Grants...................           350,000            344,344            350,000
    Staffing for Adequate Fire and Emergency Response             350,000            344,344            350,000
     [SAFER] Grants....................................
    Emergency Management Performance Grants............           350,000            279,335            350,000
    Competitive Preparedness Grants Program............  .................           522,000   .................
    Predisaster Mitigation Fund........................           249,200             39,016            250,000
    Flood Hazard Mapping and Risk Analysis Program                262,531            100,000            250,000
     [RiskMAP].........................................
    Regional Catastrophic Preparedness.................  .................  .................            15,000
    High Risk Dam Safety...............................  .................  .................            15,000
    Emergency Food and Shelter.........................           120,000   .................           100,000
                                                        --------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Grants.................................         3,018,731          2,499,961          2,997,000
 
Education, Training, and Exercises:
    Center for Domestic Preparedness...................            63,939             63,756             65,939
    Center for Homeland Defense and Security...........            18,000   .................            18,000
    Emergency Management Institute.....................            20,569             18,876             21,000
    U.S. Fire Administration...........................            42,900             43,493             44,000
    National Domestic Preparedness Consortium..........           101,000   .................           101,000
    Continuing Training Grants.........................             8,000   .................             8,000
    National Exercise Program..........................            20,793             18,647             18,000
                                                        --------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Education, Training, and Exercises.....           275,201            144,772            275,939
                                                        ========================================================
      Total, Federal Assistance........................         3,293,932          2,644,733          3,272,939
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    New technology has the potential to significantly reduce 
the loss of life and property by contributing to predisaster 
mitigation in natural and built environments. In developing 
grant criteria and making grant awards, FEMA shall ensure 
barriers do not exist for applicants to use grant funds for 
proven technology, including artificial intelligence 
capabilities, cloud computing solutions, audio sensing and 
alerting technologies, and other technologies.
    The Committee expects to receive the report required by the 
Joint Explanatory Statement accompanying the Consolidated 
Appropriations Act, 2018 regarding the factors and data 
included in the FEMA Preparedness grant formula, methods for 
anticipating future threats in financial assistance 
distribution, and specific processes for adjudicating formula 
concerns expressed by applicants as required in fiscal year 
2018 without delay.
    FEMA shall continue to consult with stakeholders on the 
Threat Hazard Identification Risk Assessment process and on 
providing clear, descriptive reasoning for disaster declaration 
denials.
    The Committee encourages FEMA, in conjunction with NPPD, to 
support community organized water and wastewater emergency 
response activities and mutual aid networks as part of its 
wider, focus on improving the security, resilience, response, 
and recovery capabilities of critical utilities. Water and 
wastewater systems would also benefit from NPPD's vulnerability 
assessments and technical assistance. Such engagements could 
inform enhancements to facility-level and system-level security 
and resilience plans for these systems.
    When awarding grants, the Administrator shall consider the 
needs of emergency medical services facilities along evacuation 
routes, especially those where high traffic congestion is 
likely.
    FEMA is encouraged to provide assistance, when requested, 
to States in updating mitigation plans, to ensure such plans 
take into account the needs of communities with multiple recent 
Presidentially declared disasters.
    The Committee urges FEMA to maximize support available 
through Federal Assistance for demonstration projects focused 
on improved emergency planning for elderly, disabled, and 
homeless individuals and to develop best practices that can be 
implemented nationwide using lessons learned, including those 
from the 2017 fast-moving wildfires.
    Urban Area Security Initiative [UASI] Risk Assessment.--The 
Implementing Recommendations of the 9/11 Act requires FEMA to 
conduct a risk assessment of the 100 most populous metropolitan 
areas in the United States on an annual basis. All such areas 
are eligible for UASI funding based on threat, vulnerability, 
and consequence. FEMA shall therefore justify all funding 
decisions on the basis of risk.
    Predisaster Mitigation.--Predisaster mitigation is 
important to prevent the loss of life and protect property. 
From low frequency, high consequence areas like the Cascadia 
Subduction Zone and the New Madrid Seismic Zone to areas that 
experience more regular disaster activity, mitigation grants 
can aid in reducing the impact of the consequences.
    Regional Catastrophic Preparedness Grant Program.--The 
Committee recognizes that natural and man-made catastrophes 
continue to pose significant risks that need to be mitigated at 
the regional level. FEMA's Regional Catastrophic Preparedness 
Grant Program, last funded in fiscal year 2011, provided a 
unique and valuable means of promoting a more cohesive approach 
to catastrophic planning by a region's relevant SLTT, non-
profit, and private sector partners. The recommendation 
includes $15,000,000 for the Regional Catastrophic Preparedness 
Grant Program. In carrying out this program, FEMA is directed 
to: prioritize funding for efforts that capitalize on existing 
working groups or incentivize the formalization of new working 
to continue effective coordination; ensure synchronization of 
plans and shared best practices; implement citizen and 
community preparedness campaigns; or pre-position needed 
commodities and equipment. FEMA is further directed to take 
into account the needs of both the area at risk of natural and 
man-made catastrophe and likely host communities for evacuees.
    Rehabilitation of High Hazard Potential Dams.--The 
Committee recommends $15,000,000 for this newly authorized 
program enacted in the Water Infrastructure Improvements for 
the Nation Act of 2016, Public Law 114-322.
    Center for Domestic Preparedness.--The Committee is aware 
that on August 26, 2017, FEMA's Office of Response and Recovery 
established a Personnel Mobilization Center [PMC] operation at 
the Center for Domestic Preparedness in response to the 2017 
hurricanes and wildfires, which allowed 1,434 FEMA Responders 
and 3,870 Surge Capacity Force [SCF] volunteers to be 
processed, trained, and subsequently deployed to support field 
operations. The Committee notes that section 763a of Title 6, 
United States Code requires CDP to ensure that Federal training 
programs do not have a deleterious effect on the capacity of 
CDP to provide its usual suite of training opportunities for 
our Nation's first responders, emergency management 
professionals, law enforcement officers, and health care 
professionals. The Committee expects the Office of Response and 
Recovery to be mindful of this statutory requirement of CDP.
    Center for Homeland Defense and Security.--The 
recommendation includes full funding for this Center and 
rejects the budget request proposal to eliminate the program. 
The Committee notes the Center's critical mission to provide 
leadership development curriculum to improve how public safety 
officials view an increasingly complex homeland security 
mission.
    Emergency Management Institute.--The recommendation 
includes $21,000,000, an increase of $431,000 above the fiscal 
year 2018 amount, for the Institute to keep pace with training 
demands of emergency managers across the United States.
    United States Fire Academy [USFA].--The recommendation 
includes $44,000,000 for USFA, which is $507,000 above the 
budget request amount, to ensure the Academy can fulfill its 
mission of providing training and professional development 
without reducing its ability to carry out other important 
responsibilities. FEMA is directed to continue its traditional 
funding for the congressionally mandated National Fallen 
Firefighters Memorial.
    National Exercise Program.--The recommendation includes 
$18,000,000, which is $2,793,000 below the fiscal year 2018 
enacted level.
    Ensuring Rail Security.--The Committee recognizes 
challenges faced by rural and volunteer emergency responders in 
preparing for rail accidents involving crude oil or other 
hazardous materials. When distributing Federal Assistance, FEMA 
should consider the unique needs of first responders in meeting 
these challenges.

                          DISASTER RELIEF FUND

Appropriations (regular), 2018..........................  $7,900,720,000
Budget estimate, 2019...................................   7,234,000,000
Committee recommendation................................   7,234,000,000

                       COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS

    The Committee recommends $7,234,000,000 for the Disaster 
Relief Fund [DRF], of which $6,652,000,000 is provided under 
the disaster relief adjustment pursuant to Public Law 112-25. 
The recommendation continues to include bill language regarding 
the monthly spending reporting requirements set forth in Public 
Law 144-4.
    FEMA is directed to review its assessment and Public 
Assistance eligibility determination processes with regard to 
subsurface infrastructure, which can be affected during 
disasters, including wildfires. FEMA shall provide a briefing 
on its findings to the Committee not later than 180 days after 
the date of enactment.
    The Joint Explanatory Statement accompanying the 
Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2018 directed FEMA to brief 
the Committees on policy changes under consideration related to 
the criteria that determine declarations pursuant to section 
401 of the Stafford Act. In that briefing, FEMA shall outline 
the weight given to State population when evaluating disaster 
impact and how certain data is accounted for in such 
declarations. Such data should include: the local assessable 
tax base; the local sales tax; the median income as it compares 
to that of the State; the poverty rate of the local affected 
area as it compares to that of the State; and the economy of 
the State, including factors such as the unemployment rate of 
the State as compared to the unemployment rate of the United 
States.

                     NATIONAL FLOOD INSURANCE FUND

Appropriations, 2018....................................    $203,500,000
Budget estimate, 2019...................................     201,691,000
Committee recommendation................................     201,691,000

                       COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS

    The Committee recommends $201,691,000 for National Flood 
Insurance Fund [NFIF] activities related to floodplain 
management, flood mapping and mitigation, and flood insurance 
operations.
    Community Rating System.--Since 1990, the Community Rating 
System [CRS] has encouraged voluntary community flood plain 
management activities in excess of NFIP minimum standards. As a 
community takes mitigation actions, local residents become 
eligible for NFIP policy discounts. In recent years, the 
Committee has repeatedly provided direction to FEMA to utilize 
existing partnerships with public-private, higher education, 
not-for-profit, and other institutions with expertise in the 
CRS program to provide technical assistance to communities and 
to ensure that all affected communities are aware of its 
benefits. The Committee encourages FEMA to consider how to 
better leverage these partnerships through competitive grant 
programs or other incentives.
    The Committee notes the importance of the long-term 
financial stability of the NFIF and recognizes FEMA's recent 
efforts to publish a quarterly ``Watermark'' report on the 
NFIF's finances. The Committee encourages FEMA to continue its 
commitment to quarterly reporting on the NFIF in a public and 
transparent manner while complying with other reporting 
requirements in statute.
    The Committee urges FEMA to implement the final 
recommendations and goals of recent Technical Mapping Advisory 
Council's annual reports. These recommendations and goals 
include: transitioning to current and future condition risk 
scores, analyzing structure-specific flood risk, incorporating 
high-resolution topographic data into flood risk maps, and 
better communicating current and future direct and residual 
flood risk to property owners. FEMA should coordinate with 
state agencies and other entities with mapping and modeling 
expertise that may be useful in FEMA's efforts to better 
predict future conditions.

            DISASTER ASSISTANCE DIRECT LOAN PROGRAM ACCOUNT

Appropriations, 2018....................................................
Budget estimate, 2019...................................      $3,000,000
Committee recommendation................................       3,000,000

    The Committee recommends $3,000,000 for administrative 
expenses to carry out the disaster assistance direct loan 
program.

                               TITLE III

                       ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISIONS

    Section 301. The Committee continues a provision limiting 
expenses for the administration of grants.
    Section 302. The Committee continues a provision specifying 
time frames for grant applications and awards.
    Section 303. The Committee continues a provision requiring 
five day advance notification for certain grant awards under 
``FEMA--Federal Assistance''.
    Section 304. The Committee continues a provision that 
addresses the availability of certain grant funds for the 
installation of communications towers.
    Section 305. The Committee continues a provision requiring 
a report on the expenditures of the DRF.
    Section 306. The Committee continues a provision providing 
for the receipt and expenditure of fees collected for the 
Radiological Emergency Preparedness Program, as authorized by 
Public Law 105-276.

                                TITLE IV

             RESEARCH, DEVELOPMENT, TRAINING, AND SERVICES

           United States Citizenship and Immigration Services

    United States Citizenship and Immigration Services [USCIS] 
carries out activities necessary for the administration of laws 
and the provision of services related to people seeking to 
enter, reside, work, and naturalize in the United States. In 
addition to directly appropriated resources, fee collections 
are available for the operations of USCIS.
    Immigration Examinations Fees.--USCIS collects fees from 
persons applying for immigration benefits to support the 
adjudication of applications, as authorized by the Immigration 
and Nationality Act (8 U.S.C. 1356).
    H-1B and L Fraud Prevention and Detection Fees.--USCIS 
collects fees from petitioners seeking a beneficiary's initial 
grant of H-1B or L nonimmigrant classification or those 
petitioners seeking to change a beneficiary's employer within 
those classifications (Public Law 108-447).
    H-1B Nonimmigrant Petitioner Fees.--USCIS collects fees 
from petitioners under the H-1B program (Public Law 108-447).

                       COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS

    The Committee recommends total appropriations of 
$131,919,000 for USCIS, which is the same as the budget request 
amount and $594,000 above the fiscal year 2018 enacted level.
    The following table summarizes the Committee's 
recommendation as compared to the fiscal year 2018 enacted and 
fiscal year 2019 budget request levels:

                               UNITED STATES CITIZENSHIP AND IMMIGRATION SERVICES
                                            [In thousands of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                            Fiscal year 2018  Fiscal year 2019      Committee
                                                                 enacted        budget request   recommendations
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Operations and Support....................................           108,856           109,081           109,081
Procurement, Construction, and Improvements...............            22,657            22,838            22,838
                                                           -----------------------------------------------------
      Total...............................................           132,513           131,919           131,919
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

                         OPERATIONS AND SUPPORT

Appropriations, 2018....................................    $108,856,000
Budget estimate, 2019...................................     109,081,000
Committee recommendation................................     109,081,000

    The Operations and Support [O&S;] appropriation provides for 
ongoing operations, mission support, and management and 
administration costs for the Employment Status Verification [E-
Verify] program, which allows businesses to determine the 
eligibility of their employees to work in the United States.

                       COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS

    The Committee recommends $109,081,000 in discretionary 
funding for O&S;, which is the same amount as the budget request 
amount and $225,000 above the fiscal year 2018 enacted level. 
Of this amount, not more than $61,414,000 is for non-pay.
    The following table summarizes the Committee's 
recommendation as compared to the fiscal year 2018 enacted and 
fiscal year 2019 budget request levels:

                                             OPERATIONS AND SUPPORT
                                            [In thousands of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                            Fiscal year 2018  Fiscal year 2019      Committee
                                                                 enacted        budget request   recommendations
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Employment Status Verification............................           108,856           109,081           109,081
                                                           -----------------------------------------------------
      Total...............................................           108,856           109,081           109,081
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    H-2B Visa Distribution.--The Committee is concerned that 
the current semiannual distribution of H-2B visas on April 1 
and October 1 of each year unduly disadvantages employers that 
need H-2B workers to begin work later in a semiannual period 
than other employers participating in that period. The 
Committee directs the Department, in consultation with the 
Department of Labor, to review options to ameliorate this 
problem consistent with the H-2B provisions of the Immigration 
and Nationality Act and to report to the Committee on these 
options not later than 120 days after the date of enactment of 
this act.
    Processing Backlogs.--The Committee is concerned about the 
prolonged delays at USCIS processing centers. Therefore, the 
Committee directs USCIS to provide a briefing to the Committee 
on specific actions, if any, that the agency is taking to 
reduce the backlog of asylum applications while ensuring that 
asylum applicants are properly reviewed for security purposes.
    Fee Study.--As USCIS undertakes its biennial fee study, the 
Committee urges the agency to determine, and to include in its 
final report and in publications to the Federal Register, 
information regarding the total revenue or appropriations 
needed to clear backlogs of applications for temporary status, 
adjustment of status, and naturalization, and to limit future 
wait times from submission to initial adjudication to no more 
than 1 year for all petitions and applications processed by the 
agency.

              PROCUREMENT, CONSTRUCTION, AND IMPROVEMENTS

Appropriations, 2018....................................     $22,657,000
Budget estimate, 2019...................................      22,838,000
Committee recommendation................................      22,838,000

    The Procurement, Construction, and Improvements [PC&I;] 
appropriation provides for the planning and acquisition costs 
of the E-Verify program. The growth in E-Verify use by 
employers has significantly increased from fewer than 25,000 
employers in fiscal year 2007 to more than 790,800 in fiscal 
year 2018, with an average of more than 1,540 new employers 
enrolling per week. E-Verify processed more than 36 million 
queries in fiscal year 2017, a more than nine-fold increase 
from the 4.0 million cases processed in fiscal year 2007. In 
fiscal year 2018, E-Verify processed more than 26.6 million 
cases, as of May 2018.

                       COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS

    The Committee recommends $22,838,000 for PC&I;, which is the 
same as the budget request amount and $181,000 above the fiscal 
year 2018 enacted level.
    The following table summarizes the Committee's 
recommendation as compared to the fiscal year 2018 enacted and 
fiscal year 2019 budget request levels:

                                   PROCUREMENT, CONSTRUCTION, AND IMPROVEMENTS
                                            [In thousands of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                            Fiscal year 2018  Fiscal year 2019      Committee
                                                                 enacted        budget request   recommendations
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Verification Modernization................................            22,657            22,838            22,838
                                                           -----------------------------------------------------
      Total...............................................            22,657            22,838            22,838
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    The recommendation includes additional funding requested to 
support system design enhancements, including enhanced 
authentication technology, required to prepare the E-Verify 
system for use by additional employers.

                Federal Law Enforcement Training Centers

    The Federal Law Enforcement Training Centers [FLETC] serve 
as an interagency law enforcement training organization for 
more than 90 Federal agencies and certain SLTT and 
international law enforcement agencies on a space-available 
basis.

                         OPERATIONS AND SUPPORT

Appropriations, 2018....................................    $254,000,000
Budget estimate, 2019...................................     296,557,000
Committee recommendation................................     275,666,000

                       COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS

    The Committee recommends $275,666,000 for Operations and 
Support [O&S;], which is $21,666,000 above the fiscal year 2018 
enacted level and $20,891,000 below the request. Of this 
amount, not more than $139,318,000 is for non-pay.
    The following table summarizes the Committee's 
recommendation as compared to the fiscal year 2018 enacted and 
fiscal year 2019 budget request levels:

                                             OPERATIONS AND SUPPORT
                                            [In thousands of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                            Fiscal year 2018  Fiscal year 2019      Committee
                                                                 enacted        budget request   recommendations
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Law Enforcement Training..................................           225,966           267,749           246,858
Mission Support...........................................            28,034            28,808            28,808
                                                           -----------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Operations and Support....................           254,000           296,557           275,666
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Funding above the fiscal year 2018 enacted level is 
provided to meet a projected increase in basic training 
requirements. The Committee expects FLETC to maintain training 
at or near facility capacity before entering into new leases or 
establishing new partnerships with training organizations. To 
that end, the Committee directs FLETC to provide a cost 
analysis detailing, at minimum, each training center's maximum 
instructional capacity by course and measured against its 
annual student occupancy.

              PROCUREMENT, CONSTRUCTION, AND IMPROVEMENTS

Appropriations, 2018....................................................
Budget estimate, 2019...................................     $85,577,000
Committee recommendation................................      85,577,000

                       COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS

    The Committee recommends $85,577,000 for Procurement, 
Construction, and Improvements [PC&I;], which is the same as the 
budget request amount and $85,577,000 above the fiscal year 
2018 enacted level.
    The following table summarizes the Committee's 
recommendation as compared to the fiscal year 2018 enacted and 
fiscal year 2019 budget request levels:

                                   PROCUREMENT, CONSTRUCTION, AND IMPROVEMENTS
                                            [In thousands of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                            Fiscal year 2018  Fiscal year 2019      Committee
                                                                 enacted        budget request   recommendations
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Construction and Facility Improvements....................  ................            85,577            85,577
                                                           -----------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Procurement, Construction, and              ................            85,577            85,577
       Improvements.......................................
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Funding is provided for identified facility construction, 
expansion, and renovation efforts, including modular 
classrooms, skid ranges, shooting ranges, and training centers 
on various campuses necessary to meet training increases.

                         Science and Technology

    The mission of Science and Technology [S&T;] is to conduct, 
stimulate, and enable homeland security research, development, 
and testing and to facilitate the timely transition of 
capabilities to the Department's components and, as 
practicable, to other Federal and SLTT end users.

                       COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS

    The Committee recommends $813,116,000 for S&T;, which is 
$229,833,000 above the budget request amount and $27,827,000 
below the fiscal year 2018 enacted level.
    The following table summarizes the Committee's 
recommendation as compared to fiscal year 2018 enacted and 
budget request levels:

                                             SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY
                                            [In thousands of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                            Fiscal year 2018  Fiscal year 2019      Committee
                                                                 enacted        budget request   recommendations
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Operations and Support....................................           331,113           271,803           308,520
Research and Development..................................           509,830           311,480           504,596
                                                           -----------------------------------------------------
      Total, Science and Technology.......................           840,943           583,283           813,116
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

                         OPERATIONS AND SUPPORT

Appropriations, 2018....................................    $331,113,000
Budget estimate, 2019...................................     271,803,000
Committee recommendation................................     308,520,000

    The Operations and Support [O&S;] appropriation funds the 
management functions necessary to facilitate the research and 
development mission of S&T.;

                       COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS

    The Committee recommends $308,520,000 for O&S;, which is 
$36,717,000 above the budget request amount and $22,593,000 
below the fiscal year 2018 enacted level. This level of funding 
will continue support for fiscal year 2018 personnel levels and 
enable S&T; to hire 25 new FTE, representing the first time in 
many years S&T; will be able to hire a significant number of new 
FTEs. Not more than $221,448,000 shall be for non-pay. Of the 
amount provided, the Committee recommends not to exceed $20,000 
for official reception and representation expenses. Funds 
provided in excess of the amount provided in fiscal year 2018 
for this purpose are to accommodate S&T;'s increasing engagement 
with international partners.
    The following table summarizes the Committee's 
recommendation as compared to fiscal year 2018 enacted and 
fiscal year 2019 budget request levels:

                                             OPERATIONS AND SUPPORT
                                            [In thousands of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                            Fiscal year 2018  Fiscal year 2019      Committee
                                                                 enacted        budget request   recommendations
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Laboratory Facilities.....................................           150,116           110,519           121,952
Acquisition and Operations Analysis.......................            46,245            42,552            48,510
Mission Support...........................................           134,752           118,732           138,058
                                                           -----------------------------------------------------
      Total Operations and Support........................           331,113           271,803           308,520
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

                         LABORATORY FACILITIES

    The recommendation includes $121,952,000 for Laboratory 
Facilities operations, which is $11,433,000 above the budget 
request amount and $28,164,000 below the fiscal year 2018 
enacted level.
    Reductions to the fiscal year 2018 level reflect a 
realignment of National Bio and Agro-Defense Facility 
operations to the United States Department of Agriculture 
[USDA], as requested, and a partial realignment of funding for 
the National Biodefense Analysis and Countermeasures Center 
[NBACC] operations to the Federal Bureau of Investigation, as 
requested. The Committee notes that funding provided in fiscal 
year 2018 for NBAF operations remains unobligated and 
acknowledges the Department's ongoing contribution to NBAF 
operations as it works to complete construction of the 
facility. While the budget request suggested discontinuing the 
operations of the Chemical Security and Analysis Center [CSAC] 
and the National Urban Security Technology Laboratory [NUSTL], 
the recommendation fully funds the operations of these 
facilities by including $1,900,000 for CSAC operations and 
$3,400,000 for NUSTL operations. The recommendation also 
includes a total of $28,689,000 for NBACC operations the 
Department's full share.
    National Bio and Agro-Defense Facility [NBAF].--The 
Department will maintain responsibility for construction of 
NBAF through its full operational capability, scheduled for 
December 31, 2022. Upon its completion, NBAF will serve as the 
Nation's primary research facility to counter foreign animal 
diseases and will enable the phase out of the Plum Island 
Animal Disease Center [PIADC]. The budget request suggested 
transferring operations of NBAF to the USDA. In fiscal year 
2018, the Committee directed the Department to maintain the 
ability to readily execute a management, operations, and 
research support contract through the end of fiscal year 2018 
should the Department or USDA determine that such a contract's 
utilization would expedite or enhance NBAF's ability to be 
fully operational by December 31, 2022. While the Committee 
appreciates that a transition team comprised of representatives 
from the Department and USDA has identified and scheduled key 
transition milestones needed to address all requirements for 
the timely operational capability of NBAF, the Committee is 
concerned that some key transition questions remained 
unanswered. Specifically, the Committee remains concerned that 
ongoing indecision is introducing unnecessary risk related to 
certain mission-critical hiring and commissioning milestones 
scheduled for the first quarter of fiscal year 2019. As such, 
the Committee recommendation permits the Department to either 
obligate or transfer to USDA remaining for fiscal year 2018 
balances NBAF operations funding for the purpose of reducing 
these risks through existing construction or operations 
contracts modifications or the execution of a new support 
contract. S&T; shall notify the Committee on its planned use of 
these balances prior to obligation or transfer.

                  ACQUISITION AND OPERATIONS ANALYSIS

    The Committee recommends $48,510,000 for Acquisition 
Operations and Analysis, which is $5,958,000 above the budget 
request amount and $2,265,000 above the amount provided in 
fiscal year 2018.
    Requirements Development.--The Committee is pleased with 
S&T;'s continued support of the Joint Requirements Council 
[JRC]. The Committee encourages S&T; to continue to make its 
Department-wide perspective and technical expertise available 
to the JRC and USM to support efforts to determine component 
capability gaps, the maturity of technologies that could fill 
such gaps, and the feasibility of cross-component solutions. To 
support these activities, the Committee recommendation includes 
$3,773,000 for JRC Support and $2,396,000 for Operational Test 
and Evaluation, the same as the amounts provided in fiscal year 
2018.
    Systems Engineering.--The Committee is encouraged with the 
Department's efforts to establish systems engineering policies 
and processes to improve its acquisition programs through 
systems engineering research and development. The 
recommendation includes $5,364,000 for Systems Engineering, and 
the Committee encourages S&T; to continue to leverage 
partnerships with Federal entities with expertise in this area.
    Standards.--The recommendation includes $5,000,000 for 
Standards. This level of funding will enable S&T; to update 
aging standards and to develop new standards in a manner that 
enables quality, consistency, and certainty to researchers, 
developers, manufacturers and consumers across the Homeland 
Security Enterprise. During fiscal year 2019, the Committee 
expects S&T; will utilize these funds for planned standards 
development related to robotics, explosives, screening 
equipment, and technology to combat the flow of opioids.
    Knowledge Management and Tech Foraging.--The recommendation 
does not include funding for Knowledge Management and Tech 
Foraging, as this activity is provided for via the Research and 
Development appropriation's new Innovative Industry 
Collaboration and Outreach effort, which is a cornerstone of 
S&T;'s recent revitalization plan.
    SAFETY Act.--The recommendation includes $10,000,000 for 
the Support Anti-Terrorism by Fostering Effective Technologies 
[SAFETY] Act program. This program encourages anti-terrorism 
preparedness and mitigation by providing liability protections 
for technologies or processes the program certifies or 
designates as meeting certain anti-terrorism standards. 
Applications for certification and designation are rising by an 
estimated 15 percent annually, and applications increased by 36 
percent between fiscal years 2015 and 2016 alone. This 
recommended level of funding will allow S&T; to hire 3 FTE to 
help manage this increasing workload for the program.

                        RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT

Appropriations, 2018....................................    $509,830,000
Budget estimate, 2019...................................     311,480,000
Committee recommendation................................     504,596,000

    S&T; supports the mission of the Department through basic 
and applied research, fabrication of prototypes, R&D; to 
mitigate the effects of weapons of mass destruction, and 
acquiring and field testing equipment.

                       COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS

    The Committee recommends $504,596,000 for R&D;, which is 
$193,116,000 above the budget request amount and $5,234,000 
below the fiscal year 2018 enacted level.
    The Committee directs S&T; to continue to prioritize applied 
research activities that provide innovative solutions to the 
Department, its components, and their most integral 
stakeholders. Despite the inclusion of R&D; appropriations for 
each component under the CAS, S&T; should be the central 
component for departmental R&D;, including R&D; for other 
components. Ensuring that S&T; is the principle R&D; component 
will contribute to the goal of departmental unity of effort, a 
goal shared by the Committee and the Department. Therefore, the 
Committee directs the Secretary to notify the Committee not 
less than 60 days in advance of any reduction, discontinuation, 
or transfer from the custody of the Undersecretary for Science 
and Technology, any research and development activity that is 
being carried out by S&T; as of the date of enactment of this 
act.
    The following table summarizes the Committee's 
recommendation as compared to the fiscal year 2018 enacted and 
fiscal year 2019 budget request levels.

                                            RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT
                                            [In thousands of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                            Fiscal year 2018  Fiscal year 2019      Committee
                                                                 enacted        budget request   recommendations
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Research, Development, and Innovation.....................           469,330           289,734           464,096
University Programs.......................................            40,500            21,746            40,500
                                                           -----------------------------------------------------
      Total...............................................           509,830           311,480           504,596
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

                 RESEARCH, DEVELOPMENT, AND INNOVATION

    Apex Engines.--The recommendation includes funding to 
continue all Apex Engines funded in fiscal year 2018, including 
the new Biometrics Technology Engine and Chemical and 
Biological Characterization Engine. Apex Engines provide S&T; 
with a persistent, multi-program, baseline repository of 
research and development expertise and capability. The 
recommendation includes $4,500,000 for the Biometrics 
Technology Engine, and the Committee directs S&T; to utilize 
funding above the budget request for this engine to leverage 
existing biometric expertise by developing a long-term 
cooperative relationship with a research entity that has a 
history of successfully collaborating with other Federal 
agencies that utilize biometrics and that offers degrees in 
biometric systems. These types of cooperative relationships can 
be leveraged to assist S&T; and the Office of Biometric Identity 
Management in making use of the latest advances in technology 
to improve and adapt Homeland Advanced Recognition Technology 
to the needs of the Homeland Security Enterprise. Additionally, 
the Committee is pleased with S&T;'s work and cooperation with 
the other components in social media and open source analytics, 
which have the potential of significantly increasing the 
Department's capabilities across its mission areas including 
screening, vetting, soft target defense, infrastructure 
monitoring, disaster preparedness & response, and other 
critical homeland security missions. The recommendation 
includes $5,211,337 for the Data Analytics Engine, and the 
Committee encourages S&T; to seek strategic partnerships to 
advance the Department's technical capabilities and mature this 
practice area.
    Apex Next Generation Cyber Infrastructure.--The 
recommendation includes $8,000,000 for the Apex Next Generation 
Cyber Infrastructure program. The Committee notes S&T;'s 
cooperation with the private sector through this program and 
that use of cyber-event gaming tools for the financial sector 
has improved cybersecurity among key operators and decision-
makers. The Committee directs that not less than $3,000,000 of 
amounts provided for Apex Next Generation Cyber Infrastructure 
shall be used to expand simulation-based cyber event gaming 
tools for the financial sector into the transportation sector.
    Cargo and Port-of-Entry Security.--The Committee supports 
continued development and deployment of technologies to ensure 
the safety and integrity of cargo shipments. Therefore, the 
Committee recommendation includes not less than $31,705,000 to 
continue Cargo Security and Port of Entry programs. The 
Committee is aware of Presidential Determination No. 2017-09, 
which identifies a critical item shortfall of industrial 
capacity related to secure composite shipping containers, and 
concurs with this determination. To remedy this shortfall, the 
Committee encourages S&T; to continue its work with the Defense 
Production Act Title III program to develop thermoplastic 
composite materials that reduce costs and improve intrusion 
sensor integration and includes $2,000,000 for this purpose. In 
addition, the Committee continues to understand the important 
role S&T; can play in improving the data analytics and 
visualization tools available to the Department to track and 
inspect cargo entering and exiting the United States. 
Therefore, the recommendation for Cargo Security includes 
$6,000,000 to develop algorithms for cargo imaging equipment 
and to pursue advanced analytics for targeting and determining 
criminal networks on the basis of cargo movement.
    Air Based Technologies.--The recommendation includes 
$12,878,963 for Air Based Technologies. The Committee 
recognizes that air domain awareness along the northern border 
is an important border security challenge, as identified by the 
Northern Border Threat Analysis, and that existing surveillance 
systems often fail to detect low, and often slow, flying 
aircraft that are facilitating illegal cross-border migration 
and smuggling, particularly in unpopulated and remote areas. 
The Committee believes that S&T;, adhering to the requirements 
of CBP Air and Marine Operations, can play a critical role in 
developing solutions in this area and directs S&T; to prioritize 
continued testing and evaluation of technology solutions, 
including those enabled by the Federal Aviation 
Administration's Spectrum Efficient National Surveillance Radar 
[SENSR] program, that can improve air domain awareness along 
all borders. Therefore, within amounts for Air Based 
Technologies, the recommendation includes $6,000,000 for 
deployment of an operational array of sensors and associated 
test events along the northern border that will enable 
operational testing, including within mountainous and rugged 
terrains. The purpose of these operational tests shall be to 
validate the suitability of available sensor technologies and 
provide measurable results that can inform future operations 
and investments. The Committee encourages S&T; to collaborate 
with qualified research universities as it carries out these 
efforts.
    Port and Coastal Surveillance.--The recommendation includes 
$16,750,000 for Port and Coastal Surveillance. The Committee is 
aware of threats posed by submersible and semisubmersible 
watercraft and concerned with the technical challenges 
associated of maintaining persistent maritime domain awareness 
in a scalable and affordable manner. The Committee is also 
aware of an ongoing analysis of alternatives that will inform 
S&T;'s understanding of meeting these challenges. Within the 
amount included for Port and Coastal Surveillance, the 
Committee includes $8,000,000 for research, development, test, 
and evaluation of existing unmanned, self-powered maritime 
sensor platforms capable of detecting surface and subsurface 
threats. In carrying out this activity, S&T; shall consider how 
multiple such platforms could be operationally deployed and 
shall strongly consider the current and future requirements of 
the Coast Guard. Within 60 days of enactment of this act, S&T; 
shall brief the Committee on its plan to implement this 
directive.
    Opioid/Fentanyl Detection.--Transnational criminal 
organizations are trafficking deadly heroin, fentanyl, and 
other opioids across U.S. borders, through U.S. ports of entry, 
and via mail shipments, distributing them across a 
sophisticated transportation network, and pushing them onto the 
streets of American communities. The Department is working to 
slow the flow of these substances domestically, at the borders, 
and internationally, but the substances and the networks that 
distribute them can be difficult to detect using current 
technology. In its fiscal year 2018 appropriations bill, the 
Committee worked successfully to provide funding dedicated 
specifically to opioid and fentanyl detection, for the first 
time. This funding is being used to develop new tools for the 
Department and its partners to use to improve their capability 
to stop the flow of opioids. This recommendation includes 
$8,500,000, an increase of $2,500,000 over fiscal year 2018, to 
continue this effort in fiscal year 2019. This recommendation 
also includes $41,000,000 above the budget request amount under 
Immigration and Customs Enforcement's Operations and Support 
appropriation to improve Homeland Security Investigations' 
[HSIs] capacity to disrupt the criminal networks that are 
trafficking opioids, including by partnering with an 
appropriate university. Within amounts provided for Opioid/
Fentanyl Detection, $1,500,000 is for S&T; to collaborate with 
HSI and its university partner in this effort by developing 
opioid-related investigative, training, analytical, and other 
capabilities.
    Laboratory Facilities Research and Development.--In 
addition to including full funding to continue the operations 
of NBACC, CSAC, and NUSTL, the recommendation also includes 
sufficient funding to wholly continue research and development 
activities at these laboratories. Specifically, the 
recommendation includes: $3,099,000 for Multifunction 
Detectors; $18,427,000 for Bio-Threat Characterization; 
$4,393,000 for CSAC Research and Development; $5,682,000 for 
Bio-Forensics Research and Development; and $5,000,000 for 
Explosives and Radiation/Nuclear Attack Resiliency.
    Detection Canine.--The recommendation includes not less 
than $12,269,000 for Detection Canine, whose purpose is to 
collaborate with end users to provide a central focal point for 
the Department's canine research and development and test and 
evaluation; promote intra-Department and interagency 
coordination to drive the development of canine technologies 
with broad application for the whole of the Homeland Security 
Enterprise; and provide a specific focus on the Person Borne 
Improvised Explosive Device [PBIED] detection canine. Within 
the amount provided for this purpose, not less than $7,000,000 
is to continue scientifically validated canine mobile sensing 
technology for explosives detection, to be developed in 
collaboration with academia, that integrates best scientific 
practices in genetics, genomics, breeding, olfaction, behavior, 
training, physiology, and metrology.
    Soft Target and Crowded Places.--The Committee recognizes 
the evolving nature of terrorist threats and believes that S&T; 
should continue its focus on funding for Soft Target and 
Crowded Places research. The Committee notes that the 
Department's May 2018 Soft Targets and Crowded Places Security 
Plan Overview, called for research and development to identify 
novel ways to develop and transition to operational use 
affordable and scalable technologies that reduce risk and that 
work within a free and open society that values individual 
rights and privacy. This could include enhanced detection, 
screening, and countermeasures. The recommendation includes 
$7,000,000 for this activity in fiscal year 2019, a $2,000,000 
increase over the fiscal year 2018 enacted level, to allow S&T;, 
in collaboration with NPPD, to address identified needs and 
requirements for soft target protection.
    Explosives Threat Assessment.--Within the amount 
recommended, not less than $18,200,000 is for Explosives Threat 
Assessment. The Committee is aware of S&T;'s robust and ongoing 
partnership with the Federal Bureau of Investigation's 
Terrorist Explosive Device Analysis Center to better understand 
and characterize home made explosives and encourages S&T; to 
continue to seek ways to fully utilize and expand this 
important partnership. The Committee is also pleased with S&T;'s 
outreach to other Federal research laboratories, including 
those operated by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, that have 
relevant expertise in high performance computing, computer-
aided and interdisciplinary engineering, computer science, and 
instrumentation systems.
    Counter-Unmanned Aerial Systems.--The Committee strongly 
supports continued investments in research, development, 
testing, and evaluation of Counter-Unmanned Aerial Systems 
[Counter-UAS] technology. However, the Committee is extremely 
disappointed that the Department is unable to carry out many 
such activities because it does not currently have the 
necessary legal authorities to do so. The recommendation 
includes $13,000,000 for Counter-UAS, but the Committee is 
committed to recommending enhancements to this amount should 
the Department be granted these authorities.
    Enabling Unmanned Aerial Systems.--The Committee is pleased 
that S&T; has established and is utilizing a common site for 
demonstration and research of small unmanned aircraft systems 
[SUAS demonstration site]. In January 2018, the Coast Guard 
utilized the site for a maritime sensor demonstration. In April 
and May 2018, Customs and Border Protection utilized the site 
for a border sensor demonstration. The Committee is pleased 
further demonstrations are planned for the coming months and is 
pleased S&T; has made the SUAS demonstration site available to 
other Federal partners. Of the amount recommended, not less 
than $4,000,000 shall be for Enabling UAS Technologies, of 
which not less than $2,000,000 shall be to test sensors as 
parts of systems to solve more complex maritime problems. To 
the greatest extent practicable, these funds should be used to 
harness the resources and expertise at the SUAS demonstration 
site and the Federal Aviation Administration [FAA] UAS Center 
of Excellence.
    Silicon Valley Innovation Program.--While the Committee 
worked to extend and improve the Department's Other Transaction 
Authority in fiscal year 2018, which enables innovation through 
non-traditional government contracting, the Committee is 
concerned with the output of the Silicon Valley Innovation 
Program, which benefits from this authority. While the program 
has been touted as a streamlined means to deliver innovative 
products to the Department's operators, approximately 
$9,900,000 has been expended by the program to date, and only 1 
awardee has reached its final phase of development. None have 
reached the Department's operators. The Committee expects this 
program to deliver rapid results with fiscal year 2018 funds 
and recommends $5,000,000 for fiscal year 2019. Not later than 
90 days after the date of enactment of this act, S&T; shall 
brief the Committee on the program's current and projected 
return on investment.
    Cybersecurity Research.--The Committee notes that the 
budget request sought to eliminate a vast majority, nearly 
$60,000,000, in S&T; cybersecurity research, including research 
performed under Apex Programs and Network and System Security 
and Investigations. Concurrently, the budget request suggested 
increasing cybersecurity research performed by the Department's 
operational cyber security component, the National Protection 
and Programs Directorate [NPPD], by $36,721,000, or nearly 800 
percent. While the Committee strongly believes that S&T; should 
refocus its cybersecurity research to align much more closely 
with NPPD requirements, the Committee does not believe that the 
Department should limit its cybersecurity research to NPPD 
requirements alone, nor does the Committee believe that de 
facto transfers of research and development resources from S&T; 
to operational components contribute to an efficient or unified 
Department. Therefore, the Committee directs that not less than 
$70,000,000 of amounts provided for research and development 
under Apex Programs, Network and System Security and 
Investigations, and Natural Disaster Resiliency be for 
cybersecurity research. Additionally, the Committee directs 
that not less than $36,721,000 of this amount shall be carried 
out in response to NPPD cybersecurity requirements, including 
support for NCPS Cybersecurity Architecture Analysis to assist 
NPPD's efforts to secure the .gov space. The Committee also 
directs S&T; to continue Software Assurance research and that 
not less than $3,000,000 shall be for self-adapting security 
mechanisms that utilize data analytics-driven scoring to 
measure weaknesses in software design.
    Natural Disaster Resiliency.--The recommendation includes a 
total of $105,194,990 for Natural Disaster Resiliency projects. 
Within this amount, $5,000,000 is for S&T; to enter into an 
Educational Partnership Agreement with the U.S. Army Corps of 
Engineers and one or more educational institutions with 
expertise in sedimentation and experience with collaborating 
with relevant Federal agencies, including U.S. Department of 
Agriculture's Natural Resources Conservation Service [NRCS], 
for the purpose of developing capabilities for maintaining and 
improving the integrity U.S. levee and dams systems.
    Cyber Physical Systems.--The recommendation includes not 
less than $6,165,000 for Cyber Physical Systems. Of this 
amount, not less than $1,582,000 shall be for S&T; to continue 
collaborating with the Department of Energy on Cybersecurity of 
Energy Delivery Systems, which utilizes critical large scale 
electric power transmission test facilities and relies on 
active cooperation and integration with operational utility 
providers. The Committee expects that the technologies 
developed through this program will ultimately be transitioned 
to industry for commercialization and deployment of more 
resilient electric grid components and systems.
    Partnership Intermediary Agreements.--The Committee 
supports the Department's efforts to establish Partnership 
Intermediaries, as defined under section 3715 of title 15, 
United States Code, to support its ability to seek out, assess, 
and engage non-traditional small business vendors for the 
Department's development and acquisition efforts. The Committee 
provides $7,000,000 for Partnership Intermediary Agreements. 
These funds will enable components across the Department to 
engage immediately on technology transfer and transition 
activities with Partnership Intermediaries. The Committee 
expects the Department to include similar funding for 
Partnership Intermediaries in future budget submissions.
    Binational Cooperative Pilot.--The Committee is pleased 
that S&T; has been engaged in a three-year binational research 
and development pilot. The recommendation includes $2,000,000 
for continuation of this pilot. The pilot should continue its 
focus on border security, maritime security, biometrics, 
cybersecurity, and video analytics among other topics. Within 
180 days of the enactment of this act, S&T; shall provide a 
report to the Committee on the results of each grant awarded 
through the pilot and on any commercialization or transition to 
practice that has resulted from the pilot's projects.
    Technology Transfer.--The Committee supports S&T;'s efforts 
to promote the transfer of innovative technologies to the 
commercial market in order to address major areas of focus 
within the department, including explosives, border security, 
cybersecurity, biological and chemical defense, and first 
responders. S&T; should coordinate with the Office of University 
Programs to accelerate the transition and commercialization of 
technologies developed in support of the components at the 
university-based Centers of Excellence.
    Work for Others.--The Committee fully supports the budget 
request's proposal to expand the Work for Others [WFO] program 
within NBACC. The Committee directs S&T; to provide a briefing 
within 30 days of enactment of this act and annually hereafter, 
on the process established to document, streamline and approve 
WFO projects to include the following performance metrics: 
number of projects and total revenue generated for each of the 
next 5 fiscal years.

                          UNIVERSITY PROGRAMS

    The recommendation includes $40,500,000 for University 
Programs, of which $37,103,562 is for Centers of Excellence. 
The Committee recognizes the importance of the Centers of 
Excellence program to generate basic and applied research that 
delivers innovative technologies to the homeland security 
enterprise. The recommendation wholly maintains the established 
plan for Centers of Excellence despite the budget request's 
suggestion to reduce their funding by more than half to 
$18,349,562.

                   Domestic Nuclear Detection Office


                       COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS

    The Committee recommends $335,440,000 for DNDO, the same 
amount that was provided in fiscal year 2018. The Committee 
recognizes that the Department used authorities under section 
872 of the Homeland Security Act of 2002 (Public Law 107-296) 
to establish a Countering Weapons of Mass Destruction office 
[CWMD], which largely represents a consolidation of DNDO and 
the Office of Health Affairs [OHA]. The Committee supports 
efforts to gain efficiencies and improve the Department's 
biological, radiological, chemical, and nuclear defense 
posture. The Committee notes, however, that the CWMD office has 
yet to be explicitly authorized by law. As such, the Committee 
recommends funding some activities being carried out by CWMD 
through the legacy DNDO appropriations and PPA structure and 
includes a general provision that would provide the Department 
with significant flexibility to transfer funds from DNDO 
appropriations to CWMD accounts if the office is authorized. 
Regardless of such authorization, the Committee is committed to 
working with the Department to enable CWMD to execute its 
missions via the current appropriations and PPA structure. To 
this end, the Committee directs the Department to provide a 
report, not later than 30 days after the date of enactment of 
this act, that details the links between legacy DNDO and OHA 
appropriations and PPA structures to the account structure 
proposed for CWMD by the budget request. This report should 
specify how activities funded under the legacy structures will 
be enhanced, improved, or made more efficient under the 
proposed account structure.
    The following table summarizes the Committee's 
recommendation as compared to the fiscal year 2018 enacted and 
fiscal year 2019 budget request levels:

                                        DOMESTIC NUCLEAR DETECTION OFFICE
                                            [In thousands of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                              Fiscal year 2019
                                                            Fiscal year 2018        budget          Committee
                                                                 enacted         request\1\      recommendations
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Operations and Support....................................            54,664  ................            54,664
Procurement, Construction, and Improvements...............            89,096  ................            89,096
Research and Development..................................           145,661  ................           145,661
Federal Assistance........................................            46,019  ................            46,019
                                                           -----------------------------------------------------
      Total, Domestic Nuclear Detection Office............           335,440  ................           335,440
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
\1\Funding for DNDO operations and support activities was requested for the CWMD office and not comparable to
  prior years.

                         OPERATIONS AND SUPPORT

Appropriations, 2018....................................     $54,664,000
Budget estimate, 2019...................................................
Committee recommendation................................      54,664,000

                       COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS

    The Committee recommends $54,664,000 for Operations and 
Support, which is $54,664,000 above the budget request amount 
and the same as the fiscal year 2018 enacted level. Of this 
amount, not more than $29,535,000 is for non-pay.

              PROCUREMENT, CONSTRUCTION, AND IMPROVEMENTS

Appropriations, 2018....................................     $89,096,000
Budget estimate, 2019...................................................
Committee recommendation................................      89,096,000

                       COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS

    The Committee recommends $89,096,000 for Procurement, 
Construction, and Improvements, which is $89,096,000 above the 
budget request amount and the same as the fiscal year 2018 
enacted level.
    The following table summarizes the Committee's 
recommendation as compared to the fiscal year 2018 enacted and 
fiscal year 2019 budget request levels:

                                   PROCUREMENT, CONSTRUCTION, AND IMPROVEMENTS
                                            [In thousands of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                              Fiscal year 2019
                                                            Fiscal year 2018        budget          Committee
                                                                 enacted         request\1\      recommendations
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Large Scale Detection Systems.............................            64,524  ................            64,524
Human Portable Rad/Nuc Systems............................            24,572  ................            24,572
                                                           -----------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Procurement, Construction, and                        89,096  ................            89,096
       Improvements.......................................
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
\1\Funding for DNDO procurement, construction, and improvements activities was requested for the CWMD office and
  not comparable to prior years.

                        RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT

Appropriations, 2018....................................    $145,661,000
Budget estimate, 2019...................................................
Committee recommendation................................     145,661,000

                       COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS

    The Committee recommends $145,661,000 for Research and 
Development, which is $145,661,000 above the budget request 
amount and the same as the fiscal year 2018 enacted level.
    The following table summarizes the Committee's 
recommendation as compared to the fiscal year 2018 enacted and 
fiscal year 2019 budget request levels:

                                            RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT
                                            [In thousands of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                              Fiscal year 2019
                                                            Fiscal year 2018        budget          Committee
                                                                 enacted         request\1\      recommendations
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Architecture Planning and Analysis........................            15,937  ................            15,937
Transformational Research and Development.................            62,081  ................            62,081
Detection Capability Development..........................            15,155  ................            15,155
Detection Capability Assessments..........................            34,127  ................            34,127
Nuclear Forensics.........................................            18,361  ................            18,361
                                                           -----------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Research and Development..................           145,661  ................           145,661
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
\1\Funding for DNDO research and development activities was requested for the CWMD office and not comparable to
  prior years.

                           FEDERAL ASSISTANCE

Appropriations, 2018....................................     $46,019,000
Budget estimate, 2019...................................................
Committee recommendation................................      46,019,000

                       COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS

    The Committee recommends $46,109,000 for Federal 
Assistance, which is $46,019,000 above the budget request 
amount and the same as the fiscal year 2018 enacted level.
    The following table summarizes the Committee's 
recommendation as compared to the fiscal year 2018 enacted and 
fiscal year 2019 budget request levels:

                                               FEDERAL ASSISTANCE
                                            [In thousands of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                              Fiscal year 2019
                                                            Fiscal year 2018        budget          Committee
                                                                 enacted         request\1\      recommendations
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Federal, State, Local, Territorial, and Tribal Support....            24,884  ................            24,884
Securing the Cities.......................................            21,135  ................            21,135
                                                           -----------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Federal Assistance........................            46,019  ................            46,019
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
\1\Funding for DNDO Federal assistance activities was requested for the CWMD office and not comparable to prior
  years.

    Active Interrogation Systems.--The Committee is aware of 
the limits of passive detection systems to effectively detect 
special nuclear material, conventional explosives, and 
narcotics that can be smuggled though ports and transportation 
hubs and therefore recommends $1,500,000 for DNDO for research 
and development of an active neutron interrogation system.
    Semiconductor Materials.--The Committee recognizes the 
importance of radiation detection technology in emergency 
response to enhance mission performance and save lives. The 
Committee understands that the development and deployment of 
highly efficient radiation detectors is necessary to adequately 
support proper identification and interdiction of radiological 
and nuclear threats. Therefore, the recommendation includes 
funding be continued for research and development of new 
generation semiconductor materials.

                                TITLE IV

                       ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISIONS

    Section 401. The Committee continues a provision allowing 
USCIS to acquire, operate, equip, and dispose of up to five 
vehicles under certain scenarios.
    Section 402. The Committee continues a provision 
prohibiting USCIS from granting immigration benefits unless the 
results of background checks are completed prior to the 
granting of the benefit and the results do not preclude the 
granting of the benefit.
    Section 403. The Committee continues a provision limiting 
the use of A-76 competitions by USCIS.
    Section 404. The Committee continues a provision making 
immigration examination fee collections explicitly available 
for immigrant integration grants, which are not to exceed 
$10,000,000, in fiscal year 2019.
    Section 405. The Committee continues a provision 
authorizing FLETC to distribute funds for incurred training 
expenses.
    Section 406. The Committee continues a provision directing 
the FLETC Accreditation Board to lead the Federal law 
enforcement training accreditation process to measure and 
assess Federal law enforcement training programs, facilities, 
and instructors.
    Section 407. The Committee continues and modifies a 
provision establishing the ``Federal Law Enforcement Training 
Centers--Procurement, Construction, and Improvements'' 
appropriation, and allowing for the acceptance of transfers 
from government agencies into this appropriation.
    Section 408. The Committee continues a provision 
classifying FLETC instructor staff as inherently governmental 
for certain considerations.
    Section 409. The Committee includes a provision permitting 
the Department to transfer unobligated funds for the operations 
of the National Bio and Agro-defense Facility to the U.S. 
Department of Agriculture.

                                TITLE V

                      GENERAL PROVISIONS--THIS ACT

             (INCLUDING RESCISSIONS AND TRANSFERS OF FUNDS)

    Section 501. The bill includes a provision stipulating that 
no part of any appropriation shall remain available for 
obligation beyond the current fiscal year unless expressly 
provided.
    Section 502. The bill includes a provision stipulating that 
unexpended balances of prior appropriations may be merged with 
new appropriations accounts and used for the same purpose, 
subject to reprogramming guidelines.
    Section 503. The bill includes a provision that provides 
authority to reprogram appropriations within an account and to 
transfer up to 5 percent between accounts with 15-day advance 
notification to the Committees on Appropriations. A detailed 
funding table identifying each Congressional control level for 
reprogramming purposes is included at the end of this 
statement. These reprogramming guidelines shall be complied 
with by all departmental components funded by this act.
    The Committee expects the Department to submit 
reprogramming requests on a timely basis and to provide 
complete explanations of the reallocations proposed, including 
detailed justifications of the increases and offsets, and any 
specific impact the proposed changes will have on the budget 
request for the following fiscal year and future-year 
appropriations requirements. Each request submitted to the 
Committees should include a detailed table showing the proposed 
revisions at the account, program, project, and activity level 
to the funding and staffing FTE levels for the current fiscal 
year and to the levels required for the following fiscal year.
    The Committee expects the Department to manage its programs 
and activities within the levels appropriated. The Committee 
reminds the Department that reprogramming or transfer requests 
should be submitted only in the case of an unforeseeable 
emergency or a situation that could not have been predicted 
when formulating the budget request for the current fiscal 
year. When the Department submits a reprogramming or transfer 
request to the Committees on Appropriations and does not 
receive identical responses from the House and Senate, it is 
the responsibility of the Department to reconcile the House and 
Senate differences before proceeding, and if reconciliation is 
not possible, to consider the reprogramming or transfer request 
unapproved.
    The Department shall not propose a reprogramming or 
transfer of funds after June 30 unless there are extraordinary 
circumstances that place human lives or property in imminent 
danger. To the extent that any reprogramming proposals are 
required, the Department is strongly encouraged to submit them 
well in advance of the June 30 deadline.
    Section 504. The bill includes a provision relating to the 
Department's Working Capital Fund [WCF] that: extends the 
authority of the WCF in fiscal year 2019; prohibits funds 
appropriated or otherwise made available to the Department from 
being used to make payments to the WCF, except for the 
activities and amounts allowed in the budget request; makes WCF 
funds available until expended; ensures departmental components 
are only charged for direct usage of each WCF service; makes 
funds provided to the WCF available only for purposes 
consistent with the contributing component; and requires the 
WCF to be paid in advance or reimbursed at rates that will 
return the full cost of each service. The WCF table included in 
the justification materials accompanying the budget request 
shall serve as the control level for quarterly execution 
reports submitted to the Committee not later than 30 days after 
the end of each quarter. These reports shall identify any 
activity added or removed from the fund.
    Section 505. The bill includes a provision stipulating that 
not to exceed 50 percent of unobligated balances recorded not 
later than June 30 from appropriations made for salaries and 
expenses in fiscal year 2019 shall remain available through 
fiscal year 2020, subject to reprogramming.
    Section 506. The bill includes a provision providing that 
funds for intelligence activities are specifically authorized 
during fiscal year 2019 until the enactment of an act 
authorizing intelligence activities for fiscal year 2019.
    Section 507. The bill includes a provision requiring 
notification to the Committees 3 business days before any grant 
allocation, grant award, contract award (including Federal 
Acquisition Regulation-covered contracts), other transaction 
agreement, a task or delivery order on a DHS multiple award 
contract, letter of intent, or public announcement of the 
intention to make such an award totaling in excess of 
$1,000,000. If the Secretary determines that compliance would 
pose substantial risk to health, human life, or safety, an 
award may be made without prior notification, but the 
Committees shall be notified within 5 full business days after 
such award or letter is issued. Additionally, FEMA is required 
to brief the Committees 5 full business days prior to 
announcing publicly the intention to make an award under 
certain grant programs. The 3-day notification requirement also 
pertains to task or delivery order awards greater than 
$10,000,000 from multi-year funds as well as for any sole-
source grant awards.
    Section 508. The bill includes a provision stipulating that 
no agency shall purchase, construct, or lease additional 
facilities for Federal law enforcement training without the 
advance approval of the Committees on Appropriations of the 
Senate and the House of Representatives.
    Section 509. The bill includes a provision stipulating that 
none of the funds provided by this act may be used for any 
construction, repair, alteration, or acquisition project for 
which a prospectus, if required under chapter 33 of title 40, 
United States Code, has not been approved. The bill excludes 
funds that may be required for development of a proposed 
prospectus.
    Section 510. The bill includes a provision that 
consolidates and continues by reference prior-year statutory 
bill language into one provision. These provisions concern 
contracting officers' training and Federal building energy 
performance.
    Section 511. The bill includes a provision stipulating that 
none of the funds provided by this act may be used in 
contravention of the Buy American Act.
    Section 512. The bill includes a provision prohibiting 
funds from being used to amend the oath of allegiance required 
under section 337 of the Immigration and Nationality Act (8 
U.S.C. 1448).
    Section 513. The bill includes a provision prohibiting 
funds from being used to carry out section 872 of the Homeland 
Security Act of 2002.
    Section 514. The bill includes a provision prohibiting 
funds from being used to plan, test, pilot, or develop a 
national identification card.
    Section 515. The bill includes a provision directing that 
any official required by this act to report or certify to the 
Committees on Appropriations of the Senate and the House of 
Representatives may not delegate such authority unless 
expressly authorized to do so in this act.
    Section 516. The bill includes a provision extending 
current law concerning individuals detained at the Naval 
Station, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba.
    Section 517. The bill includes a provision prohibiting 
funds provided by this act to be used for first-class travel.
    Section 518. The bill includes a provision prohibiting 
funds provided by this act to be used to employ workers in 
contravention of section 274A(h)(3) of the Immigration and 
Nationality Act.
    Section 519. The bill includes a provision prohibiting 
funds appropriated or otherwise made available by this act to 
pay for award or incentive fees for contractors with below 
satisfactory performance or performance that fails to meet the 
basic requirements of the contract.
    Section 520. The bill includes a provision prohibiting 
funds appropriated or otherwise made available by this act for 
the Department to enter into a Federal contract unless the 
contract meets requirements of the Federal Property and 
Administrative Services Act of 1949 or chapter 137 of title 10, 
United States Code, and the Federal Acquisition Regulation, 
unless the contract is otherwise authorized by statute without 
regard to this section.
    Section 521. The bill recommends $39,000,000 for financial 
systems modernization and includes a provision allowing the 
Secretary to transfer these funds between appropriations for 
the same purpose after notifying the Committees 15 days in 
advance.
    Section 522. The bill includes a provision requiring the 
Secretary to reduce administrative expenses from certain 
accounts.
    Section 523. The bill includes a provision regarding 
restrictions on electronic access to pornography.
    Section 524. The bill includes a provision regarding the 
transfer of an operable firearm by a Federal law enforcement 
officer to an agent of a drug cartel.
    Section 525. The bill includes language regarding the 
number of employees permitted to attend international 
conferences.
    Section 526. The bill includes a provision prohibiting 
funds made available by this act to reimburse any Federal 
department or agency for its participation in an NSSE.
    Section 527. The bill includes a provision on structural 
pay reform that affects more than 100 full-time positions or 
costs more than $5,000,000 in a single year.
    Section 528. The bill includes a provision directing the 
Department to post on a public website reports required by the 
Committees on Appropriations of the Senate and the House of 
Representatives unless public posting compromises homeland or 
national security or contains proprietary information.
    Section 529. The bill continues a provision allowing 
Operations and Support funding to be used for certain 
activities.
    Section 530. The bill includes a provision related to the 
Arms Trade Treaty.
    Section 531. The bill includes a provision related to 
schooling for certain overseas dependents.
    Section 532. The bill includes a provision related to user 
fee proposals that have not been enacted into law prior to 
submission of the budget request.
    Section 533. The bill includes a new provision providing 
authority for the Department to establish new programs, 
projects, and activities for the CWMD office, but only 
subsequent to the enactment of legislation explicitly 
authorizing the establishment of such office.
    Section 534. The bill rescinds unobligated balances from 
prior year appropriations.
    Section 535. The bill permanently rescinds $120,000,000 
from the unobligated balances in the Department of the Treasury 
Forfeiture Fund.

                     PROGRAM, PROJECT, AND ACTIVITY

    In fiscal year 2018, for purposes of the Balanced Budget 
and Emergency Deficit Control Act of 1985 (Public Law 99-177), 
as amended, the following information provides the definition 
of the term ``program, project, and activity'' for the 
components of the Department of Homeland Security under the 
jurisdiction of the Homeland Security Subcommittee of the 
Committee on Appropriations. The term ``program, project, and 
activity'' shall include the most specific level of budget 
items identified in the Department of Homeland Security 
Appropriations Act, 2018, the House and Senate Committee 
reports, and the conference report and the accompanying Joint 
Explanatory Statement of the managers of the committee of 
conference.
    If a percentage reduction is necessary, in implementing 
that reduction, components of the Department of Homeland 
Security shall apply any percentage reduction required for 
fiscal year 2018 to all items specified in the justifications 
submitted to the Committees on Appropriations of the Senate and 
the House of Representatives in support of the fiscal year 2018 
budget estimates, as amended, for such components, as modified 
by congressional action.

  COMPLIANCE WITH PARAGRAPH 7, RULE XVI OF THE STANDING RULES OF THE 
                                 SENATE

    Paragraph 7 of rule XVI requires that Committee reports 
accompanying general appropriations bills identify each 
recommended amendment which proposes an item of appropriation 
which is not made to carry out the provisions of an existing 
law, a treaty stipulation, or an act or resolution previously 
passed by the Senate during that session.
    The Committee recommends funding for the following programs 
or activities which currently lack authorization for fiscal 
year 2019:
    Analysis and Operations: Operations and Support.
    U.S. Customs and Border Protection: Operations and Support; 
and Procurement, Construction, and Improvements.
    U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement: Operations and 
Support; and Procurement, Construction, and Improvements.
    Transportation Security Administration: Operations and 
Support; Procurement Construction and Improvements; and 
Research and Development.
    Coast Guard: Operations and Support; Procurement 
Construction and Improvements; and Research and Development; 
and Retired Pay.
    National Protection and Programs Directorate: Operations 
and Support; Procurement Construction and Improvements; and 
Research and Development.
    Federal Emergency Management Agency: Operations and 
Support; Procurement, Construction and Improvements; and 
Federal Assistance Programs.

COMPLIANCE WITH PARAGRAPH 7(c), RULE XXVI OF THE STANDING RULES OF THE 
                                 SENATE

    Pursuant to paragraph 7(c) of rule XXVI, on June 21, 2018, 
the Committee ordered favorably reported an original bill (S. 
3109) making appropriations for the Department of Homeland 
Security for the fiscal year ending September 30, 2019, and for 
other purposes, provided that the bill be subject to amendment 
and that the bill be consistent with its budget allocation, and 
provided that the Chairman of the Committee or his designee be 
authorized to offer the substance of the original bill as a 
Committee amendment in the nature of a substitute to the House 
companion measure, by a recorded vote of 26-5, a quorum being 
present. The vote was as follows:
        Yeas                          Nays
Chairman Shelby                     Mrs. Feinstein
Mr. McConnell                       Mr. Durbin
Mr. Alexander                       Mr. Udall
Ms. Collins                         Mr. Merkley
Ms. Murkowski                       Mr. Schatz
Mr. Graham
Mr. Blunt
Mr. Moran
Mr. Hoeven
Mr. Boozman
Mrs. Capito
Mr. Lankford
Mr. Daines
Mr. Kennedy
Mr. Rubio
Mrs. Hyde-Smith
Mr. Leahy
Mrs. Murray
Mr. Reed
Mr. Tester
Mrs. Shaheen
Mr. Coons
Ms. Baldwin
Mr. Murphy
Mr. Manchin
Mr. Van Hollen

 COMPLIANCE WITH PARAGRAPH 12, RULE XXVI OF THE STANDING RULES OF THE 
                                 SENATE

    Paragraph 12 of rule XXVI requires that Committee reports 
on a bill or joint resolution repealing or amending any statute 
or part of any statute include ``(a) the text of the statute or 
part thereof which is proposed to be repealed; and (b) a 
comparative print of that part of the bill or joint resolution 
making the amendment and of the statute or part thereof 
proposed to be amended, showing by stricken-through type and 
italics, parallel columns, or other appropriate typographical 
devices the omissions and insertions which would be made by the 
bill or joint resolution if enacted in the form recommended by 
the committee.''
    In compliance with this rule, changes in existing law 
proposed to be made by the bill are shown as follows: existing 
law to be omitted is enclosed in black brackets; new matter is 
printed in italic; and existing law in which no change is 
proposed is shown in roman.

 DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY APPROPRIATIONS ACT, 2015, PUBLIC LAW 
                                 114-4


                               TITLE III


            PROTECTION, PREPAREDNESS, RESPONSE, AND RECOVERY


                  Federal Emergency Management Agency


                          DISASTER RELIEF FUND

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

    For necessary expenses in carrying out the Robert T. 
Stafford Disaster Relief and Emergency Assistance Act (42 
U.S.C. 5121 et seq.), $7,033,464,494, to remain available until 
expended, of which $24,000,000 shall be transferred to the 
Department of Homeland Security Office of Inspector General for 
audits and investigations related to disasters: Provided, That 
the Administrator of the Federal Emergency Management Agency 
shall submit to the Committees on Appropriations of the Senate 
and the House of Representatives the following reports, 
including a specific description of the methodology and the 
source data used in developing such reports:
            (1) an estimate of the following amounts shall be 
        submitted for the budget year at the time that the 
        President's budget proposal for [fiscal year 2016] 
        fiscal year 2020 is submitted pursuant to section 
        1105(a) of title 31, United States Code:

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

            (2) an estimate or actual amounts, if available, of 
        the following for the current fiscal year shall be 
        submitted not later than the fifth business day of each 
        month, and shall be published by the Administrator on 
        the Agency's Web site not later than the fifth day of 
        each month:

                        BUDGETARY IMPACT OF BILL


  PREPARED IN CONSULTATION WITH THE CONGRESSIONAL BUDGET OFFICE PURSUANT TO SEC. 308(a), PUBLIC LAW 93-344, AS
                                                     AMENDED
                                            [In millions of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                               Budget authority                 Outlays
                                                         -------------------------------------------------------
                                                            Committee    Amount  in     Committee    Amount  in
                                                           allocation       bill       allocation       bill
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Comparison of amounts in the bill with the subcommittee
 allocation for 2019: Subcommittee on Homeland Security:
    Mandatory...........................................        1,740         1,740         1,736      \1\1,736
    Discretionary.......................................       48,334        55,151        58,138     \1\58,598
        Security........................................        2,058         2,223            NA            NA
        Nonsecurity.....................................       46,276        52,928            NA            NA
 
Projection of outlays associated with the
 recommendation:
    2019................................................  ............  ............  ............    \2\32,655
    2020................................................  ............  ............  ............        9,350
    2021................................................  ............  ............  ............        6,483
    2022................................................  ............  ............  ............        2,376
    2023 and future years...............................  ............  ............  ............        5,023
Financial assistance to State and local governments for            NA         3,557            NA        \2\208
 2019...................................................
 
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
\1\Includes outlays from prior-year budget authority.
\2\Excludes outlays from prior-year budget authority.
 
NA: Not applicable.
 
NOTE.--Consistent with the funding recommended in the bill for disaster funding and for overseas contingency
  operations and in accordance with subparagraphs (D) and (A)(ii) of section 251(b)(2) of the BBEDCA of 1985,
  the Committee anticipates that the Budget Committee will provide a revised 302(a) allocation for the Committee
  on Appropriations reflecting an upward adjustment of $6,817,000,000 in budget authority plus associated
  outlays.


  COMPARATIVE STATEMENT OF NEW BUDGET (OBLIGATIONAL) AUTHORITY FOR FISCAL YEAR 2018 AND BUDGET ESTIMATES AND AMOUNTS RECOMMENDED IN THE BILL FOR FISCAL
                                                                        YEAR 2019
                                                                [In thousands of dollars]
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                                                         Senate Committee recommendation
                                                                                                                             compared with (+ or -)
                                Item                                       2018       Budget estimate     Committee    ---------------------------------
                                                                      appropriation                     recommendation        2018
                                                                                                                         appropriation   Budget estimate
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                  DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY
 
   TITLE I--DEPARTMENTAL MANAGEMENT, OPERATIONS, INTELLIGENCE, &
                             OVERSIGHT
 
          Office of the Secretary and Executive Management
 
Operations and Support:
    Office of the Secretary........................................          18,846           17,874           17,874             -972   ...............
    Office of Policy...............................................          40,524           34,683           35,097           -5,427             +414
    Office of Public Affairs.......................................           5,123            5,085            5,085              -38   ...............
    Office of Legislative Affairs..................................           5,000            4,992            4,992               -8   ...............
    Office of Partnership and Engagement...........................          13,373           12,656           13,475             +102             +819
    Office of General Counsel......................................          18,501           19,463           18,419              -82           -1,044
    Office for Civil Rights and Civil Liberties....................          23,571           20,825           23,717             +146           +2,892
    Office of the Citizenship and Immigration Services Ombudsman...           6,200            5,879            5,879             -321   ...............
    Privacy Office.................................................           8,464            7,403            8,366              -98             +963
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Operations and Support.............................         139,602          128,860          132,904           -6,698           +4,044
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Office of the Secretary and Executive Management......         139,602          128,860          132,904           -6,698           +4,044
                                                                    ====================================================================================
                       Management Directorate
 
Operations and Support:
    Immediate Office of the Under Secretary for Management.........           6,770            7,730            7,730             +960   ...............
    Office of the Chief Readiness Support Officer..................          71,105           90,413           90,618          +19,513             +205
    Office of the Chief Human Capital Officer......................          71,052          107,606           98,391          +27,339           -9,215
    Office of the Chief Security Officer...........................          74,963           78,868           78,868           +3,905   ...............
    Office of the Chief Procurement Officer........................         102,615          103,197          103,197             +582   ...............
    Office of the Chief Financial Officer..........................          63,734           64,873           64,873           +1,139   ...............
    Office of the Chief Information Officer........................         320,058          382,017          380,802          +60,744           -1,215
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Operations and Support.............................         710,297          834,704          824,479         +114,182          -10,225
 
Procurement, Construction, and Improvements:
    Construction and Facility Improvements.........................  ...............         171,149           81,151          +81,151          -89,998
        (From DRF unobligated balance).............................  ...............  ...............         (72,000)        (+72,000)        (+72,000)
    Mission Support Assets and Infrastructure......................          29,569           74,920           35,920           +6,351          -39,000
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Procurement, Construction, and Improvements........          29,569          246,069          117,071          +87,502         -128,998
 
Research and Development...........................................           2,545            2,545            2,545   ...............  ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Research and Development...........................           2,545            2,545            2,545   ...............  ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Management Directorate................................         742,411        1,083,318          944,095         +201,684         -139,223
                                                                    ====================================================================================
        Intelligence, Analysis, and Operations Coordination
 
Operations and Support.............................................         245,905          253,253          254,476           +8,571           +1,223
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Operations and Support.............................         245,905          253,253          254,476           +8,571           +1,223
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Intelligence, Analysis, and Operations Coordination...         245,905          253,253          254,476           +8,571           +1,223
                                                                    ====================================================================================
                    Office of Inspector General
 
Operations and Support.............................................         168,000          138,369          168,000   ...............         +29,631
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Operations and Support.............................         168,000          138,369          168,000   ...............         +29,631
          (Transfer from Disaster Relief Fund).....................  ...............         (24,000)  ...............  ...............        (-24,000)
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Office of Inspector General...........................         168,000          138,369          168,000   ...............         +29,631
          (By transfer)............................................  ...............         (24,000)  ...............  ...............        (-24,000)
                                                                    ====================================================================================
      Gross Budget Authority, Office of Inspector General..........        (168,000)        (162,369)        (168,000)  ...............         (+5,631)
                                                                    ====================================================================================
      Total, Title I, Departmental Management, Operations,                1,295,918        1,603,800        1,499,475         +203,557         -104,325
       Intelligence, and Oversight.................................
          (By transfer)............................................  ...............         (24,000)  ...............  ...............        (-24,000)
                                                                    ====================================================================================
        TITLE II--SECURITY, ENFORCEMENT, AND INVESTIGATIONS
 
                 U.S. Customs and Border Protection
 
Operations and Support:
    Border Security Operations:
        U.S. Border Patrol:
            Operations.............................................       3,706,547        3,987,892        3,820,785         +114,238         -167,107
            Assets and Support.....................................         625,151          708,952          646,082          +20,931          -62,870
        Office of Training and Development.........................          64,145           82,263           61,947           -2,198          -20,316
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Border and Security Operations.....................       4,395,843        4,779,107        4,528,814         +132,971         -250,293
 
Trade and Travel Operations:
    Office of Field Operations:
        Domestic Operations........................................       2,818,122        2,780,958        2,932,276         +114,154         +151,318
        International Operations...................................         130,270          156,669          150,213          +19,943           -6,456
        Targeting Operations.......................................         211,797          253,492          248,029          +36,232           -5,463
        Assets and Support.........................................         870,657          876,866          902,174          +31,517          +25,308
    Office of Trade................................................         234,201          272,118          267,687          +33,486           -4,431
    Office of Training and Development.............................          49,195           47,268           50,093             +898           +2,825
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Trade and Travel Operations........................       4,314,242        4,387,371        4,550,472         +236,230         +163,101
 
Integrated Operations:
    Air and Marine Operations:
        Operations.................................................         291,479          310,176          305,290          +13,811           -4,886
        Assets and Support.........................................         535,046          531,231          525,867           -9,179           -5,364
        Air and Marine Operations Center...........................          38,149           45,846           37,637             -512           -8,209
 Office of International Affairs...................................          35,176           44,244           41,677           +6,501           -2,567
Office of Intelligence.............................................          53,794           64,696           65,693          +11,899             +997
Office of Training and Development.................................           6,110            5,633            5,706             -404              +73
Operations Support.................................................         106,225          109,762          120,622          +14,397          +10,860
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
          Subtotal, Integrated Operations..........................       1,065,979        1,111,588        1,102,492          +36,513           -9,096
 
Mission Support
    Enterprise Services............................................       1,426,209        1,508,632        1,471,764          +45,555          -36,868
        (Harbor Maintenance Trust Fund)............................          (3,274)          (3,274)          (3,274)  ...............  ...............
    Office of Professional Responsibility..........................         182,131          224,871          202,692          +20,561          -22,179
    Executive Leadership and Oversight.............................         100,760          108,074          107,347           +6,587             -727
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Mission Support....................................       1,709,100        1,841,577        1,781,803          +72,703          -59,774
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Operations and Support.............................      11,485,164       12,119,643       11,963,581         +478,417         -156,062
 
Procurement, Construction, and Improvements:
    Border Security Assets and Infrastructure......................       1,741,701        1,647,304        1,652,304          -89,397           +5,000
    Trade and Travel Assets and Infrastructure.....................         263,640           44,237          182,690          -80,950         +138,453
    Integrated Operations Assets and Infrastructure:
        Airframes and Sensors......................................         190,035           83,241          112,612          -77,423          +29,371
        Watercraft.................................................           8,573   ...............          14,500           +5,927          +14,500
        Other Systems and Assets...................................           1,200   ...............  ...............          -1,200   ...............
    Construction and Facility Improvements.........................          59,775           48,222           48,222          -11,553   ...............
    Mission Support Assets and Infrastructure......................          16,433           18,544           18,544           +2,111   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Procurement, Construction, and Improvements........       2,281,357        1,841,548        2,028,872         -252,485         +187,324
 
    CBP Services at User Fee Facilities (Small Airport) (Permanent            9,001            8,941            8,941              -60   ...............
     Indefinite Discretionary).....................................
Fee Funded Programs:
    Immigration Inspection User Fee................................        (732,834)        (769,636)        (769,636)        (+36,802)  ...............
    Immigration Enforcement Fines..................................          (1,000)            (676)            (676)           (-324)  ...............
    Electronic System for Travel Authorization (ESTA) Fee..........         (62,480)        (218,900)         (61,417)         (-1,063)       (-157,483)
    Land Border Inspection Fee.....................................         (48,476)         (53,512)         (53,512)         (+5,036)  ...............
    COBRA Passenger Inspection Fee.................................        (562,151)        (594,978)        (594,978)        (+32,827)  ...............
    APHIS Inspection Fee...........................................        (534,515)        (539,325)        (539,325)         (+4,810)  ...............
    Global Entry Fee...............................................        (159,000)        (165,961)        (165,961)         (+6,961)  ...............
    Puerto Rico Trust Fund.........................................         (92,500)         (31,941)         (31,941)        (-60,559)  ...............
    Virgin Island Fee..............................................         (11,170)          (7,795)          (7,795)         (-3,375)  ...............
    Customs Unclaimed Goods........................................          (5,992)          (1,461)          (1,461)         (-4,531)  ...............
    9-11 Response and Biometric Exit Account.......................         (90,550)         (71,000)         (71,000)        (-19,550)  ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Fee Funded Programs................................       2,300,668        2,455,185        2,297,702           -2,966         -157,483
 
Administrative Provisions:
    Colombia Free Trade Act Collections............................         242,000          255,000          255,000          +13,000   ...............
    Reimbursable Preclearance......................................          39,000           39,000           39,000   ...............  ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Adminstrative Provisions (Gross)...................         281,000          294,000          294,000          +13,000   ...............
 
    Reimbursable Preclearance (Offsetting Collections).............         -39,000          -39,000          -39,000   ...............  ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Adminstrative Provisions (Net).....................         242,000          255,000          255,000          +13,000   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, U.S. Customs and Border Protection....................      14,017,522       14,225,132       14,256,394         +238,872          +31,262
          (Non-Defense)............................................     (14,017,522)     (14,225,132)     (14,256,394)       (+238,872)        (+31,262)
          (Discretionary Appropriation)............................     (14,056,522)     (14,264,132)     (14,295,394)       (+238,872)        (+31,262)
          (Offsetting Collection)..................................        (-39,000)        (-39,000)        (-39,000)  ...............  ...............
        Fee Funded Programs........................................       2,300,668        2,455,185        2,297,702           -2,966         -157,483
      Gross Budget Authority, U.S. Customs and Border Protection...      16,357,190       16,719,317       16,593,096         +235,906         -126,221
                                                                    ====================================================================================
              U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement
 
Operations and Support:
    Homeland Security Investigations:
        Domestic Investigations....................................       1,898,542        1,385,777        1,621,187         -277,355         +235,410
        International Investigations...............................         169,178          150,691          167,330           -1,848          +16,639
        Intelligence...............................................          85,042           73,799           74,144          -10,898             +345
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Homeland Security Investigations...................       2,152,762        1,610,267        1,862,661         -290,101         +252,394
 
    Enforcement and Removal Operations:............................
        Custody Operations.........................................       3,075,686        3,519,932        2,897,534         -178,152         -622,398
        Fugitive Operations........................................         158,805          255,864          138,520          -20,285         -117,344
        Criminal Alien Program.....................................         319,440          619,109          258,492          -60,948         -360,617
        Alternatives to Detention..................................         187,205          184,446          176,009          -11,196           -8,437
        Transportation and Removal Program.........................         369,201          511,058          366,686           -2,515         -144,372
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Enforcement and Removal Operations.................       4,110,337        5,090,409        3,837,241         -273,096       -1,253,168
 
        Mission Support............................................         458,558        1,214,436        1,187,760         +729,202          -26,676
        Office of the Principal Legal Advisor......................         272,318          305,513          252,180          -20,138          -53,333
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Operations and Support.............................       6,993,975        8,220,625        7,139,842         +145,867       -1,080,783
 
Procurement, Construction, and Improvements:
    Operational Communications/Information Technology..............          21,839           30,859           30,859           +9,020   ...............
    Construction and Facility Improvements.........................          29,000           34,872           34,872           +5,872   ...............
    Mission Support Assets and Infrastructure......................          31,060            4,700            4,700          -26,360   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Procurement, Construction, and Improvements........          81,899           70,431           70,431          -11,468   ...............
 
Fee Funded Programs:
    Immigration Inspection User Fee................................        (135,000)        (135,000)        (135,000)  ...............  ...............
    Breached Bond/Detention Fund...................................         (55,000)         (55,000)         (55,000)  ...............  ...............
    Student Exchange and Visitor Fee...............................        (186,610)        (128,000)        (128,000)        (-58,610)  ...............
    Immigration Examination Fee Account............................  ...............        (207,600)  ...............  ...............       (-207,600)
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Fee Funded Programs................................         376,610          525,600          318,000          -58,610         -207,600
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement..............       7,075,874        8,291,056        7,210,273         +134,399       -1,080,783
          (Non-Defense)............................................      (7,075,874)      (8,291,056)      (7,210,273)       (+134,399)     (-1,080,783)
            (Discretonary Appropriation)...........................      (7,075,874)      (8,291,056)      (7,210,273)       (+134,399)     (-1,080,783)
        Fee Funded Programs........................................         376,610          525,600          318,000          -58,610         -207,600
        Gross Budget Authority, U.S. Immigration and Customs              7,452,484        8,816,656        7,528,273          +75,789       -1,288,383
         Enforcement...............................................
                                                                    ====================================================================================
               Transportation Security Administration
 
Operations and Support:
    Aviation Screening Operations:
        Screening Workforce:
            Screening Partnership Program..........................         184,936          181,382          188,382           +3,446           +7,000
            Screener Personnel, Compensation, and Benefits.........       3,229,026        3,191,783        3,294,783          +65,757         +103,000
            Screener Training and Other............................         232,985          218,738          220,738          -12,247           +2,000
    Airport Management.............................................         646,053          647,541          649,951           +3,898           +2,410
    Canines........................................................         151,764          152,226          162,404          +10,640          +10,178
    Screening Technology Maintenance...............................         397,882          382,927          382,927          -14,955   ...............
    Secure Flight..................................................         106,856          113,882          113,882           +7,026   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Aviation Screening Operations......................       4,949,502        4,888,479        5,013,067          +63,565         +124,588
 
Other Operations and Enforcement:
    Inflight Security:
        Federal Air Marshals.......................................         779,000          779,210          779,210             +210   ...............
        Federal Flight Deck Officer and Crew Training..............          19,514           19,539           19,539              +25   ...............
    Aviation Regulation............................................         218,535          171,905          218,185             -350          +46,280
    Air Cargo......................................................         102,721          103,572          103,572             +851   ...............
    Intelligence and TSOC..........................................          79,790           79,524           79,524             -266   ...............
    Surface programs...............................................         129,316           73,818          129,455             +139          +55,637
    Vetting Programs...............................................          60,215           52,770           52,770           -7,445   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Other Operations and Enforcement...................       1,389,091        1,280,338        1,382,255           -6,836         +101,917
 
    Mission Support................................................         869,258          907,133          907,133          +37,875   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Operations and Support (Gross).....................       7,207,851        7,075,950        7,302,455          +94,604         +226,505
 
    Aviation Passenger Security Fees (offsetting collections)......      -2,470,000       -2,670,000       -2,670,000         -200,000   ...............
    Passenger Security Fee Increase (offsetting                      ...............        -520,000   ...............  ...............        +520,000
     collections)(legislative proposal)............................
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Operations and Support (Net).......................       4,737,851        3,885,950        4,632,455         -105,396         +746,505
 
Procurement, Construction, and Improvements:
    Aviation Screening Infrastructure:
        Checkpoint Support.........................................          68,019           74,422           74,422           +6,403   ...............
    Checked Baggage................................................          83,004           35,367           85,367           +2,363          +50,000
    Infrastructure for Other Operations Vetting Programs...........          16,291           29,840           29,840          +13,549   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Procurement, Construction, and Improvements........         167,314          139,629          189,629          +22,315          +50,000
 
Research and Development...........................................          20,190           20,594           20,594             +404   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Research and Development...........................          20,190           20,594           20,594             +404   ...............
 
Fee Funded Programs:
    TWIC Fee.......................................................         (64,449)         (65,535)         (65,535)         (+1,086)  ...............
    Hazardous Materials Endorsement Fee............................         (20,200)         (18,500)         (18,500)         (-1,700)  ...............
    General Aviation at DCA Fee....................................            (560)            (700)            (700)           (+140)  ...............
    Commercial Aviation and Airports Fee...........................          (8,000)          (8,000)          (8,000)  ...............  ...............
    Other Security Threat Assessments Fee..........................             (50)             (50)             (50)  ...............  ...............
    Air Cargo/Certified Cargo Screening Program Fee................          (5,200)          (5,000)          (5,000)           (-200)  ...............
    TSA PreCheck Fee...............................................        (136,900)        (136,900)        (136,900)  ...............  ...............
    Alien Flight School Fee........................................          (5,200)          (5,200)          (5,200)  ...............  ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Fee Funded Programs................................        (240,559)        (239,885)        (239,885)           (-674)  ...............
 
Aviation Security Capital Fund (Mandatory).........................        (250,000)        (250,000)        (250,000)  ...............  ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Transportation Security Administration................       4,925,355        4,046,173        4,842,678          -82,677         +796,505
          (Offsetting Collections).................................     (-2,470,000)     (-2,670,000)     (-2,670,000)       (-200,000)  ...............
          (Offsetting Collections) (Legislative Proposals).........  ...............       (-520,000)  ...............  ...............       (+520,000)
          Fee Funded Programs......................................         240,559          239,885          239,885             -674   ...............
      Gross Budget Authority, Transportation Security                     7,885,914        7,726,058        8,002,563         +116,649         +276,505
       Administration..............................................
                                                                    ====================================================================================
                            Coast Guard
 
Operations and Support:
    Military Pay and Allowances....................................       3,716,444        3,851,095        3,866,095         +149,651          +15,000
    Civilian Pay and Benefits......................................         847,678          929,385          929,385          +81,707   ...............
    Training and Recruiting........................................         191,015          187,991          188,338           -2,677             +347
    Operating Funds and Unit Level Maintenance.....................         897,171          907,894          925,447          +28,276          +17,553
    Centrally Managed Accounts.....................................         142,788          143,641          165,441          +22,653          +21,800
    Intermediate and Depot Level Maintenance.......................       1,415,217        1,442,048        1,435,048          +19,831           -7,000
    Reserve Training...............................................  ...............         117,655          117,655         +117,655   ...............
    Environmental Compliance and Restoration.......................  ...............          13,429   ...............  ...............         -13,429
    Overseas Contingency Operations/Global War on Terrorism                 163,000   ...............         165,000           +2,000         +165,000
     (Defense).....................................................
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Operations and Support.............................       7,373,313        7,593,138        7,792,409         +419,096         +199,271
          (Defense)................................................        (503,000)        (340,000)        (505,000)         (+2,000)       (+165,000)
              (Overseas Contingency Operations/Global War on               (163,000)  ...............        (165,000)         (+2,000)       (+165,000)
               Terrorism)..........................................
              (Other Defense)......................................        (340,000)        (340,000)        (340,000)  ...............  ...............
Environmental Compliance and Restoration...........................          13,397   ...............          13,429              +32          +13,429
Reserve Training...................................................         114,875   ...............  ...............        -114,875   ...............
 
Procurement, Construction, and Improvements:
     Vessels:
        Survey and Design-Vessels and Boats........................           4,500              500            5,500           +1,000           +5,000
        In-Service Vessel Sustainment..............................          60,500           63,250           63,250           +2,750   ...............
        National Security Cutter...................................       1,241,000           65,000           72,600       -1,168,400           +7,600
        Offshore Patrol Cutter.....................................         500,000          400,000          400,000         -100,000   ...............
        Fast Response Cutter.......................................         340,000          240,000          240,000         -100,000   ...............
        Cutter Boats...............................................           1,000            5,000            5,000           +4,000   ...............
        Polar Ice Breaking Vessel..................................          19,000          750,000          750,000         +731,000   ...............
        Inland Waterways and Western River Cutters.................          26,100            5,000            5,000          -21,100   ...............
        Polar Sustainment..........................................  ...............          15,000           15,000          +15,000   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Vessels............................................       2,192,100        1,543,750        1,556,350         -635,750          +12,600
 
    Aircraft:
        HC-144 Conversion/Sustainment..............................  ...............          17,000           17,000          +17,000   ...............
        HC-27J Conversion/Sustainment..............................          70,000           80,000           80,000          +10,000   ...............
        HC-130J Acquisition/Conversion/Sustainment.................         100,600   ...............  ...............        -100,600   ...............
        HH-65 Conversion/Sustainment Projects......................          22,000           20,000           20,000           -2,000   ...............
        MH-60T Sustainment.........................................           2,500           25,000          175,000         +172,500         +150,000
        Small Unmanned Aircraft Systems............................             500            6,000            6,000           +5,500   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Aircraft...........................................         195,600          148,000          298,000         +102,400         +150,000
 
    Other Acquisition Programs:
        Other Equipment and Systems................................           4,000            3,500            3,500             -500   ...............
    Program Oversight and Management...............................          15,000           20,000           20,000           +5,000   ...............
    C4ISR..........................................................          22,000           23,300           23,300           +1,300   ...............
    CG-Logistics Information Management System (CG-LIMS)...........           9,800           13,200           13,200           +3,400   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Other Acquisition Programs.........................          50,800           60,000           60,000           +9,200   ...............
 
Shore Facilities and Aids to Navigation:
        Major Construction; Housing; ATON; and Survey and Design...          42,400           30,000           74,510          +32,110          +44,510
        Major Acquisition Systems Infrastructure...................          87,100          100,000          175,400          +88,300          +75,400
        Minor Shore................................................           5,000            5,000            5,000   ...............  ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Shore Facilities and Aids to Navigation............         134,500          135,000          254,910         +120,410         +119,910
 
Personnel and Related Support Costs................................         121,745   ...............  ...............        -121,745   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Procurement, Construction, and Improvements........       2,694,745        1,886,750        2,169,260         -525,485         +282,510
 
Research and Development...........................................          29,141           19,109           20,109           -9,032           +1,000
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Research and Development...........................          29,141           19,109           20,109           -9,032           +1,000
 
Health Care Fund Contribution (Permanent Indefinite Discretionary).         204,136          199,360          199,360           -4,776   ...............
Mandatory:
    Retired Pay (Mandatory)........................................       1,676,117        1,739,844        1,739,844          +63,727   ...............
Administrative Provisions:
        Coast Guard Continuation of Pay............................           2,000   ...............  ...............          -2,000   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Administrative Provisions..........................           2,000   ...............  ...............          -2,000   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Mandatory..........................................       1,676,117        1,739,844        1,739,844          +63,727   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Coast Guard...........................................      12,107,724       11,438,201       11,934,411         -173,313         +496,210
          (Non-Defense)............................................      (9,928,607)      (9,358,357)      (9,689,567)       (-239,040)       (+331,210)
          (Defense)................................................        (503,000)        (340,000)        (505,000)         (+2,000)       (+165,000)
              (Overseas Contingency Operations/Global War on               (163,000)  ...............        (165,000)         (+2,000)       (+165,000)
               Terrorism ).........................................
              (Other Defense)......................................        (340,000)        (340,000)        (340,000)  ...............  ...............
                                                                    ====================================================================================
                    United States Secret Service
 
Operations and Support:
    Protective Operations:.........................................
        Protection of Persons and Faciities........................         711,227          747,201          734,961          +23,734          -12,240
        Protective Countermeasures.................................          46,862           55,309           55,903           +9,041             +594
        Protective Intelligence....................................          47,814           48,239           48,239             +425   ...............
        Presidential Campaigns and National Special Security Events           4,500           28,500           28,500          +24,000   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Protective Operations..............................         810,403          879,249          867,603          +57,200          -11,646
 
    Field Operations:
        Domestic and International Field Operations................         596,478          627,687          627,687          +31,209   ...............
    Support for Missing and Exploited Children Investigations......           6,000            6,000            6,000   ...............  ...............
    Support for Computer Forensics Training........................          18,778            4,000           25,022           +6,244          +21,022
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Field Operations...................................         621,256          637,687          658,709          +37,453          +21,022
 
    Basic and In-Service Training and Professional Development.....          64,212          101,854          101,854          +37,642   ...............
    Mission Support................................................         419,923          465,518          465,518          +45,595   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Operations and Support.............................       1,915,794        2,084,308        2,093,684         +177,890           +9,376
 
Procurement, Construction, and Improvements:
    Protection Assets and Infrastructure...........................          65,462           52,971           71,686           +6,224          +18,715
    Operational Communications/Information Technology..............          25,018            8,845            8,845          -16,173   ...............
    Construction and Facility Improvements.........................  ...............           3,000            3,000           +3,000   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Procurement, Construction, and Improvements........          90,480           64,816           83,531           -6,949          +18,715
 
Research and Development...........................................             250            2,500            2,500           +2,250   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Research and Development...........................             250            2,500            2,500           +2,250   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, United States Secret Service..........................       2,006,524        2,151,624        2,179,715         +173,191          +28,091
                                                                    ====================================================================================
      Total, Title II, Security, Enforcement, and Investigations...      40,132,999       40,152,186       40,423,471         +290,472         +271,285
          (Non-Defense)............................................     (37,953,882)     (38,072,342)     (38,178,627)       (+224,745)       (+106,285)
          (Offsetting Collections).................................     (-2,509,000)     (-2,709,000)     (-2,709,000)       (-200,000)  ...............
          (Offsetting Collections)(Legislative Proposals)..........  ...............       (-520,000)  ...............  ...............       (+520,000)
          (Defense)................................................        (503,000)        (340,000)        (505,000)         (+2,000)       (+165,000)
          (Overseas Contingency Operations/Global War on Terrorism)        (163,000)  ...............        (165,000)         (+2,000)       (+165,000)
          (Other Defense)..........................................        (340,000)        (340,000)        (340,000)  ...............  ...............
          Aviation Security Capital Fund (Mandatory)...............         250,000          250,000          250,000   ...............  ...............
          Fee Funded Programs......................................       2,917,837        3,220,670        2,855,587          -62,250         -365,083
                                                                    ====================================================================================
    Title III--PROTECTION, PREPAREDNESS, RESPONSE, AND RECOVERY
 
            National Protection and Programs Directorate
 
Operations and Support:
    Cybersecurity:
        Cyber Readiness and Response:
            NCCIC Operations.......................................         136,439          140,049          157,890          +21,451          +17,841
                (CERT).............................................        (104,689)        (117,556)        (117,556)        (+12,867)  ...............
            NCCIC Planning and Exercises...........................         107,553           84,347          122,091          +14,538          +37,744
                (CERT).............................................         (69,220)         (64,297)         (69,220)  ...............         (+4,923)
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Cyber Readiness and Response.......................         243,992          224,396          279,981          +35,989          +55,585
 
        Cyber Infrastructure Resilience:...........................
            Cybersecurity Advisors.................................          14,693            6,860           14,693   ...............          +7,833
            Enhanced Cybersecurity Services........................          17,157           13,097           13,357           -3,800             +260
            Cybersecurity Education and Awareness..................          14,393           10,102           14,393   ...............          +4,291
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
          Subtotal, Cyber Infrastructure Resilience................          46,243           30,059           42,443           -3,800          +12,384
 
        Federal Cybersecurity:
            Federal Network Resilience.............................          42,766           49,834           54,663          +11,897           +4,829
            Continuous Diagnostics and Mitigation..................         102,681          112,089          115,689          +13,008           +3,600
            National Cybersecurity Protection System...............         287,226          296,677          296,677           +9,451   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Federal Cybersecurity..............................         432,673          458,600          467,029          +34,356           +8,429
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Cybersecurity......................................         722,908          713,055          789,453          +66,545          +76,398
 
    Infrastructure Protection:
        Infrastructure Capacity Building:
            Sector Risk Management.................................          47,612           55,859           56,980           +9,368           +1,121
            Protective Security Advisors...........................          35,677           39,114           39,114           +3,437   ...............
            Bombing Prevention.....................................          16,199           14,752           16,842             +643           +2,090
            Infrastructure Information and Sensitive Data                    22,288           19,457           22,288   ...............          +2,831
             Protection............................................
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Infrastructure Capacity Building...................         121,776          129,182          135,224          +13,448           +6,042
 
        Infrastructure Security Compliance.........................          72,440           76,853           76,853           +4,413   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Infrastructure Protection..........................         194,216          206,035          212,077          +17,861           +6,042
 
    Emergency Communications:
        Emergency Communications Preparedness......................          54,501           51,785           53,785             -716           +2,000
        Priority Telecommunications Service GETS/WPS/SRAS/TSP......          56,319           56,293           56,293              -26   ...............
            Next Generation Networks Priority Services.............           7,636            7,618            7,618              -18   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Priority Telecommunications Service................          63,955           63,911           63,911              -44   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Emergency Communications...........................         118,456          115,696          117,696             -760           +2,000
 
    Integrated Operations:
        Cyber and Infrastructure Analysis:
            National Infrastructure Simulation Analysis Center               18,650            8,912           18,650   ...............          +9,738
             (NISAC)...............................................
            Infrastructure Analysis................................          37,760           35,771           36,271           -1,489             +500
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Cyber and Infrastructure Analysis..................          56,410           44,683           54,921           -1,489          +10,238
 
        Critical Infrastructure Situational Awareness..............          21,222           23,429           23,429           +2,207   ...............
            (Defense)..............................................         (19,312)         (21,320)         (21,320)         (+2,008)  ...............
        Stakeholder Engagement and Requirements....................          50,583           45,127           48,827           -1,756           +3,700
            (Defense)..............................................         (45,525)         (40,614)         (43,944)         (-1,581)         (+3,330)
        Strategy, Policy and Plans.................................          14,448           13,931           13,931             -517   ...............
            (Defense)..............................................          (9,536)          (9,194)          (9,194)           (-342)  ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
          Subtotal, Integrated Operations..........................         142,663          127,170          141,108           -1,555          +13,938
 
    Office of Biometric Identity Management:
        Identity and Screening Program Operations..................          68,826           69,590           69,590             +764   ...............
        IDENT/Homeland Advanced Recognition Technology.............         150,603          160,691          160,691          +10,088   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Office of Biometric Identity Management............         219,429          230,281          230,281          +10,852   ...............
    Mission Support................................................          84,493           78,103           78,103           -6,390   ...............
        (Defense)..................................................         (26,193)         (24,212)         (24,212)         (-1,981)  ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Operations and Support.............................       1,482,165        1,470,340        1,568,718          +86,553          +98,378
 
Federal Protective Service:
    FPS Operations:
        Operating Expenses.........................................         360,079          359,196          359,196             -883   ...............
    Countermeasures:
        Protective Security Officers...............................       1,071,286        1,121,883        1,121,883          +50,597   ...............
        Technical Countermeasures..................................          44,690           46,031           46,031           +1,341   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Countermeasures....................................       1,115,976        1,167,914        1,167,914          +51,938   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Federal Protective Service (Gross).................       1,476,055        1,527,110        1,527,110          +51,055   ...............
 
        Offsetting Collections.....................................      -1,476,055       -1,527,110       -1,527,110          -51,055   ...............
Procurement, Construction, and Improvements:
    Cybersecurity:
        Continuous Diagnostics and Mitigation......................         246,981          125,548          172,262          -74,719          +46,714
        National Cybersecurity Protection System...................         115,186          110,078          110,078           -5,108   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Cybersecurity......................................         362,167          235,626          282,340          -79,827          +46,714
 
    Emergency Communications:
        Next Generation Networks Priority Services.................          48,905           42,551           42,551           -6,354   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Emergency Communications...........................          48,905           42,551           42,551           -6,354   ...............
 
    Biometric Identity Management:
        IDENT/Homeland Advanced Recognition Technology.............  ...............          20,000           40,100          +40,100          +20,100
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Biometric Identity Management......................  ...............          20,000           40,100          +40,100          +20,100
 
    Integrated Operations Assets and Infrastructure:
        Modeling Capability Transition Environment.................             500   ...............  ...............            -500   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Integrated Operations Assets and Infrastructure....             500   ...............  ...............            -500   ...............
 
    Infrastructure Protection:
        Infrastructure Protection (IP) Gateway.....................           2,539            4,787            4,787           +2,248   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Integrated Operations Assets and Infrastructure....           2,539            4,787            4,787           +2,248   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Procurement, Construction, and Improvements........         414,111          302,964          369,778          -44,333          +66,814
 
Research and Development Cybersecurity.............................           4,695           41,416            4,695   ...............         -36,721
    Infrastructure Protection......................................           6,431            2,431            2,431           -4,000   ...............
    Integrated Operations..........................................           4,000            4,000            4,000   ...............  ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Research and Development...........................          15,126           47,847           11,126           -4,000          -36,721
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, National Protection and Programs Directorate..........       1,911,402        1,821,151        1,949,622          +38,220         +128,471
          (Non-Defense)............................................        (289,609)        (315,531)        (336,001)        (+46,392)        (+20,470)
              (Offsetting Collections).............................     (-1,476,055)     (-1,527,110)     (-1,527,110)        (-51,055)  ...............
          (Defense)................................................      (1,621,793)      (1,505,620)      (1,613,621)         (-8,172)       (+108,001)
      Gross Budget Authority, National Protection and Programs            3,387,457        3,348,261        3,476,732          +89,275         +128,471
       Directorate.................................................
                                                                    ====================================================================================
                      Office of Health Affairs
 
Operations and Support:
    Chemical and Biological Readiness..............................          79,130   ...............          79,130   ...............         +79,130
    Health and Medical Readiness...................................           4,620   ...............           4,620   ...............          +4,620
    Integrated Operations..........................................           9,400   ...............           9,400   ...............          +9,400
    Mission Support................................................          28,419   ...............          28,419   ...............         +28,419
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Operations and Support.............................         121,569   ...............         121,569   ...............        +121,569
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Office of Health Affairs..............................         121,569   ...............         121,569   ...............        +121,569
                                                                    ====================================================================================
                Federal Emergency Management Agency
 
Operations and Support Regional Operations.........................         156,417          158,439          158,439           +2,022   ...............
    Mitigation.....................................................          36,141           36,011           36,011             -130   ...............
    Preparedness and Protection....................................         131,981          132,823          132,823             +842   ...............
    Response and Recovery:
        Response...................................................         182,893          174,337          182,893   ...............          +8,556
            (Urban Search and Rescue)..............................         (35,180)         (27,513)         (35,180)  ...............         (+7,667)
        Recovery...................................................          46,694           49,010           49,010           +2,316   ...............
    Mission Support................................................         476,009          485,662          495,662          +19,653          +10,000
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Operations and Support.............................       1,030,135        1,036,282        1,054,838          +24,703          +18,556
          (Defense)................................................         (42,945)         (42,213)         (42,213)           (-732)  ...............
Procurement, Construction, and Improvements Operational                      12,018           11,670           11,670             -348   ...............
 Communications/Information Technology.............................
    Construction and Facility Improvements.........................          44,519           46,996           71,996          +27,477          +25,000
    Mission Support, Assets, and Infrastructure....................          28,739           44,683           44,683          +15,944   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Procurement, Construction, and Improvements........          85,276          103,349          128,349          +43,073          +25,000
          (Defense)................................................         (53,262)         (57,166)         (62,166)         (+8,904)         (+5,000)
 
Federal Assistance:
    Grants:........................................................
        State Homeland Security Grant Program......................         507,000          349,362          512,000           +5,000         +162,638
            (Operation Stonegarden)................................         (85,000)  ...............         (90,000)         (+5,000)        (+90,000)
            (Nonprofit Security)...................................         (10,000)  ...............         (10,000)  ...............        (+10,000)
        Urban Area Security Initiative.............................         630,000          448,844          605,000          -25,000         +156,156
            (Nonprofit Security)...................................         (50,000)  ...............         (25,000)        (-25,000)        (+25,000)
        Public Transportation Security Assistance..................         100,000           36,358          100,000   ...............         +63,642
            (Amtrak Security)......................................         (10,000)  ...............         (10,000)  ...............        (+10,000)
            (Over-the-Road Bus Security)...........................          (2,000)  ...............          (2,000)  ...............         (+2,000)
        Port Security Grants.......................................         100,000           36,358          100,000   ...............         +63,642
        Assistance to Firefighter Grants...........................         350,000          344,344          350,000   ...............          +5,656
        Staffing for Adequate Fire and Emergency Response (SAFER)           350,000          344,344          350,000   ...............          +5,656
         Grants....................................................
        Emergency Management Performance Grants....................         350,000          279,335          350,000   ...............         +70,665
        Competitive Preparedness Grants Program....................  ...............         522,000   ...............  ...............        -522,000
        National Predisaster Mitigation Fund.......................         249,200           39,016          250,000             +800         +210,984
            (From DRF unobligated balance).........................  ...............  ...............        (150,000)       (+150,000)       (+150,000)
        Flood Hazard Mapping and Risk Analysis Program.............         262,531          100,000          250,000          -12,531         +150,000
            (From DRF unobligated balance).........................  ...............  ...............         (78,000)        (+78,000)        (+78,000)
        Regional Catastrophic Preparedness.........................  ...............  ...............          15,000          +15,000          +15,000
        High Risk Dam Safety.......................................  ...............  ...............          15,000          +15,000          +15,000
        Emergency Food and Shelter.................................         120,000   ...............         100,000          -20,000         +100,000
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Grants.............................................       3,018,731        2,499,961        2,997,000          -21,731         +497,039
 
    Education, Training, and Exercises Center for Domestic                   63,939           63,756           65,939           +2,000           +2,183
     Preparedness..................................................
        Center for Homeland Defense and Security...................          18,000   ...............          18,000   ...............         +18,000
        Emergency Management Institute.............................          20,569           18,876           21,000             +431           +2,124
        U.S. Fire Administration...................................          42,900           43,493           44,000           +1,100             +507
        National Domestic Preparedness Consortium..................         101,000   ...............         101,000   ...............        +101,000
        Continuing Training Grants.................................           8,000   ...............           8,000   ...............          +8,000
        National Exercise Program..................................          20,793           18,647           18,000           -2,793             -647
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Education, Training, and Exercises.................         275,201          144,772          275,939             +738         +131,167
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Federal Assistance.................................       3,293,932        2,644,733        3,272,939          -20,993         +628,206
 
    Disaster Relief Fund:
        Base Disaster Relief.......................................         534,720          582,000          582,000          +47,280   ...............
        Disaster Relief Category...................................       7,366,000        6,652,000        6,652,000         -714,000   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Disaster Relief Fund (Gross).......................       7,900,720        7,234,000        7,234,000         -666,720   ...............
          (Transfer to Office of Inspector General)................  ...............        (-24,000)  ...............  ...............        (+24,000)
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Disaster Relief Fund (Net).........................       7,900,720        7,210,000        7,234,000         -666,720          +24,000
 
National Flood Insurance Fund:
    Floodplain Management and Mapping..............................         189,927          187,907          187,907           -2,020   ...............
    Mission Support................................................          13,573           13,784           13,784             +211   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, National Flood Insurance Fund......................         203,500          201,691          201,691           -1,809   ...............
 
    Offsetting Fee Collections.....................................        -203,500         -201,691         -201,691           +1,809   ...............
Disaster Assistance Direct Loan Program............................  ...............           3,000            3,000           +3,000   ...............
Administrative Provisions:
    Radiological Emergency Preparedness Program....................          -1,024             -665             -665             +359   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Administrative Provisions..........................          -1,024             -665             -665             +359   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Federal Emergency Management Agency...................      12,309,039       11,020,699       11,692,461         -616,578         +671,762
          (Non-Defense)............................................        (-96,207)        (-99,379)       (-104,379)         (-8,172)         (-5,000)
          (Discretionary Appropriations)...........................      (5,050,332)      (4,471,011)      (5,137,773)        (+87,441)       (+666,762)
          (Offsetting Collections).................................       (-203,500)       (-201,691)       (-201,691)         (+1,809)  ...............
          (Disaster Relief Category)...............................      (7,366,000)      (6,652,000)      (6,652,000)       (-714,000)  ...............
          (Defense)................................................         (96,207)         (99,379)        (104,379)         (+8,172)         (+5,000)
      Gross Budget Authority, Federal Emergency Management Agency..      12,512,539       11,198,390       11,894,152         -618,387         +695,762
                                                                    ====================================================================================
      Total, Title III, Protection, Preparedness, Response, and          14,342,010       12,841,850       13,763,652         -578,358         +921,802
       Recovery....................................................
          (Non-Defense)............................................     (12,624,010)     (11,236,851)     (12,045,652)       (-578,358)       (+808,801)
              (Offsetting Collections).............................     (-1,679,555)     (-1,728,801)     (-1,728,801)        (-49,246)  ...............
              (Disaster Relief Category)...........................      (7,366,000)      (6,652,000)      (6,652,000)       (-714,000)  ...............
          (Defense)................................................      (1,718,000)      (1,604,999)      (1,718,000)  ...............       (+113,001)
                                                                    ====================================================================================
     TITLE IV--RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT, TRAINING, AND SERVICES
 
         United States Citizenship and Immigration Services
 
Operations and Support:
    Employment Status Verification.................................         108,856          109,081          109,081             +225   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Operations and Support.............................         108,856          109,081          109,081             +225   ...............
 
Procurement, Construction, and Improvements........................          22,657           22,838           22,838             +181   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Procurement, Construction, and Improvements........          22,657           22,838           22,838             +181   ...............
 
Fee Funded Programs:
    Immigration Examinations Fee Account:
        Adjudication Services:
            District Operations....................................      (1,805,941)      (1,938,508)      (1,938,508)       (+132,567)  ...............
                (Immigrant Integration Grants).....................         (10,000)         (10,000)         (10,000)  ...............  ...............
            Service Center Operations..............................        (687,491)        (767,263)        (767,263)        (+79,772)  ...............
            Asylum, Refugee, and International Operations..........        (345,100)        (356,206)        (356,206)        (+11,106)  ...............
            Records Operations.....................................        (137,526)        (150,941)        (150,941)        (+13,415)  ...............
            Premium Processing (Including Transformation)..........        (642,746)        (643,423)        (643,423)           (+677)  ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Adjudication Services..............................      (3,618,804)      (3,856,341)      (3,856,341)       (+237,537)  ...............
 
        Information and Customer Services:
            Operating Expenses.....................................        (108,146)        (112,493)        (112,493)         (+4,347)  ...............
        Administration:
            Operating Expenses.....................................        (504,615)        (519,002)        (519,002)        (+14,387)  ...............
        Systematic Alien Verification for Entitlements [SAVE]......         (36,774)         (37,514)         (37,514)           (+740)  ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Immigration Examinations Fee Account...............      (4,268,339)      (4,525,350)      (4,525,350)       (+257,011)  ...............
 
    H1-B Non-Immigrant Petititioner Account:
        Adjudication Services:
            Service Center Operations..............................         (15,000)         (15,000)         (15,000)  ...............  ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, H-1B Non-Immigrant Petitioner Account..............         (15,000)         (15,000)         (15,000)  ...............  ...............
 
Fraud Prevention and Detection Account:
    Adjudication Services:
        District Operations........................................         (45,101)         (27,178)         (27,178)        (-17,923)  ...............
        Service Center Operations..................................         (21,778)         (19,815)         (19,815)         (-1,963)  ...............
        Asylum and Refugee Operating Expenses......................            (308)            (308)            (308)  ...............  ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Fraud Prevention and Detection Account.............         (67,187)         (47,301)         (47,301)        (-19,886)  ...............
      Subtotal, Fee Funded Programs................................      (4,350,526)      (4,587,651)      (4,587,651)       (+237,125)  ...............
 
Administrative Provisions:
    Immigration Authorization Extensions...........................           1,000   ...............  ...............          -1,000   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Administrative Provisions..........................           1,000   ...............  ...............          -1,000   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, United States Citizenship and Immigration Services....         132,513          131,919          131,919             -594   ...............
          Fee Funded Programs......................................       4,350,526        4,587,651        4,587,651         +237,125   ...............
      Gross Budget Authority, United States Citizenship and               4,483,039        4,719,570        4,719,570         +236,531   ...............
       Immigration Services........................................
                                                                    ====================================================================================
              Federal Law Enforcement Training Centers
 
Operations and Support:............................................
    Law Enforcement Training.......................................         225,966          267,749          246,858          +20,892          -20,891
    Mission Support................................................          28,034           28,808           28,808             +774   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Operations and Support.............................         254,000          296,557          275,666          +21,666          -20,891
 
Procurement, Construction, and Improvements:
    Construction and Facility Improvements.........................  ...............          85,577           85,577          +85,577   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Procurement, Construction, and Improvements........  ...............          85,577           85,577          +85,577   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Federal Law Enforcement Training Centers..............         254,000          382,134          361,243         +107,243          -20,891
                                                                    ====================================================================================
                 Science and Technology Directorate
 
Operations and Support:
    Laboratory Facilities..........................................         150,116          110,519          121,952          -28,164          +11,433
    Acquisition and Operations Analysis............................          46,245           42,552           48,510           +2,265           +5,958
    Mission Support................................................         134,752          118,732          138,058           +3,306          +19,326
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subotal, Operations and Support..............................         331,113          271,803          308,520          -22,593          +36,717
Research and Development:
    Research, Development, and Innovation..........................         469,330          289,734          464,096           -5,234         +174,362
    University Programs............................................          40,500           21,746           40,500   ...............         +18,754
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subotal, Research and Development............................         509,830          311,480          504,596           -5,234         +193,116
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Science and Technology................................         840,943          583,283          813,116          -27,827         +229,833
                                                                    ====================================================================================
                 Domestic Nuclear Detection Office
 
Operations and Support:
    Mission Support................................................          54,664   ...............          54,664   ...............         +54,664
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Operations and Support.............................          54,664   ...............          54,664   ...............         +54,664
 
Procurement, Construction, and Improvements:
    Large Scale Detection Systems..................................          64,524   ...............          64,524   ...............         +64,524
    Human Portable Rad/Nuclear Detection Systems...................          24,572   ...............          24,572   ...............         +24,572
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subotal, Procurement, Construction, and Improvements.........          89,096   ...............          89,096   ...............         +89,096
Research and Development:
    Architecture Planning and Analysis.............................          15,937   ...............          15,937   ...............         +15,937
    Transformational Research and Development......................          62,081   ...............          62,081   ...............         +62,081
    Detection Capability Development...............................          15,155   ...............          15,155   ...............         +15,155
    Detection Capability Assessments...............................          34,127   ...............          34,127   ...............         +34,127
    Nuclear Forensics..............................................          18,361   ...............          18,361   ...............         +18,361
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Research and Development...........................         145,661   ...............         145,661   ...............        +145,661
 
Federal Assistance:
    Federal, State, Local, Territorial, and Tribal Support.........          24,884   ...............          24,884   ...............         +24,884
    Securing the Cities............................................          21,135   ...............          21,135   ...............         +21,135
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Federal Assistance.................................          46,019   ...............          46,019   ...............         +46,019
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Domestic Nuclear Detection Office.....................         335,440   ...............         335,440   ...............        +335,440
                                                                    ====================================================================================
               Countering Weapons of Mass Destruction
 
Operations and Support:
    Capability and Operations Support..............................  ...............         125,943   ...............  ...............        -125,943
    Mission Support................................................  ...............          83,321   ...............  ...............         -83,321
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Operations and Support.............................  ...............         209,264   ...............  ...............        -209,264
 
Procurement, Construction, and Improvements:
    Assets and Infrastructure Acquisition..........................  ...............          74,896   ...............  ...............         -74,896
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subotal, Procurement, Construction, and Improvements.........  ...............          74,896   ...............  ...............         -74,896
Research and Development:
    CWMD Research and Development..................................  ...............          80,443   ...............  ...............         -80,443
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Research and Development...........................  ...............          80,443   ...............  ...............         -80,443
 
Federal Assistance:
    Capability Building............................................  ...............          64,663   ...............  ...............         -64,663
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Federal Assistance.................................  ...............          64,663   ...............  ...............         -64,663
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Countering Weapons of Mass Destruction................  ...............         429,266   ...............  ...............        -429,266
                                                                    ====================================================================================
      Total, Title IV, Research and Development, Training, and            1,562,896        1,526,602        1,641,718          +78,822         +115,116
       Services....................................................
          (Non-Defense)............................................      (1,562,896)      (1,526,602)      (1,641,718)        (+78,822)       (+115,116)
          Fee Funded Programs......................................       4,350,526        4,587,651        4,587,651         +237,125   ...............
                                                                    ====================================================================================
                    TITLE V--GENERAL PROVISIONS
 
Financial Systems Modernization....................................          41,800   ...............          39,000           -2,800          +39,000
Presidential Residence Protection Assistance.......................          41,000   ...............  ...............         -41,000   ...............
Analysis and Operations (Public Law 115-31) (Rescission)...........          -4,307   ...............  ...............          +4,307   ...............
TSA Operations and Support (Public Law 115-31) (FY17) (Rescission).         -44,557   ...............  ...............         +44,557   ...............
Coast Guard AC&I; (Public Law 114-113) (FY16) (Rescission)..........         -25,000   ...............  ...............         +25,000   ...............
Coast Guard AC&I; (Public Law 115-31) (FY17) (Rescission)...........  ...............  ...............         -17,472          -17,472          -17,472
Coast Guard Alteration of Bridges (Public Law 108-334) (FY05)                -1,786   ...............  ...............          +1,786   ...............
 (Rescission)......................................................
Coast Guard Alteration of Bridges (Public Law 109-90) (FY06)                 -1,920   ...............  ...............          +1,920   ...............
 (Rescission)......................................................
Coast Guard Alteration of Bridges (Public Law 109-295) (FY07)                -1,791   ...............  ...............          +1,791   ...............
 (Rescission)......................................................
Coast Guard Alteration of Bridges (Public Law 110-61) (FY08)                 -3,222   ...............  ...............          +3,222   ...............
 (Rescission)......................................................
Coast Guard Alteration of Bridges (Public Law 111-83) (FY10)                 -3,681   ...............  ...............          +3,681   ...............
 (Rescission)......................................................
S&T; RDA&O; (Public Law114-113) (FY16) (Rescission)..................          -2,000   ...............  ...............          +2,000   ...............
S&T; O&S; (Public Law115-31) (FY17) (Rescission).....................          -2,000   ...............  ...............          +2,000   ...............
S&T; R&D; (Public Law115-31) (FY17) (Rescission).....................          -6,000   ...............  ...............          +6,000   ...............
DHS administrative savings.........................................  ...............  ...............         -39,000          -39,000          -39,000
Legacy Funds (Rescission)..........................................            -100   ...............  ...............            +100   ...............
DHS Lapsed Balances (Rescission)...................................         -27,980   ...............  ...............         +27,980   ...............
Treasury Asset Forfeiture Fund (Rescission)........................        -364,162   ...............        -120,000         +244,162         -120,000
FEMA Disaster Relief Fund (DRF) (Rescission).......................  ...............        -300,000   ...............  ...............        +300,000
                                                                    ====================================================================================
      Total, Title V, General Provisions...........................        -405,706         -300,000         -137,472         +268,234         +162,528
          (Rescissions/Cancellations)..............................       (-488,506)       (-300,000)       (-176,472)       (+312,034)       (+123,528)
                                                                    ====================================================================================
                        OTHER APPROPRIATIONS
 
     ADDITIONAL SUPPLEMENTAL APPROPRIATIONS FOR DISASTER RELIEF
               REQUIREMENTS, 2017 (PUBLIC LAW 115-72)
 
Federal Emergency Management Agency Disaster Relief Fund                 18,670,000   ...............  ...............     -18,670,000   ...............
 (emergency).......................................................
National Flood Insurance Fund (debt cancellation) (Sec. 308)             16,000,000   ...............  ...............     -16,000,000   ...............
 (emergency).......................................................
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Additional Supplemental Appropriations for Disaster         34,670,000   ...............  ...............     -34,670,000   ...............
       Relief Requirements (Public Law 115-72).....................
          (emergency)..............................................      34,670,000   ...............  ...............     -34,670,000   ...............
                                                                    ====================================================================================
                   BIPARTISAN BUDGET ACT OF 2018
 
Office of Inspector General:
    Operations and Support (emergency).............................          25,000   ...............  ...............         -25,000   ...............
U.S. Customs and Border Support
    Operations and Support (emergency).............................         104,494   ...............  ...............        -104,494   ...............
    Procurement, Constructions, and Improvements (emergency).......          45,000   ...............  ...............         -45,000   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, U.S. Customs and Border Support....................         149,494   ...............  ...............        -149,494   ...............
 
U.S. Immigrations and Customs Enforcement:
    Operations and Support (emergency).............................          30,905   ...............  ...............         -30,905   ...............
    Procurement, Constructions, and Improvements (emergency).......          33,052   ...............  ...............         -33,052   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, U.S. Immigrations and Customs Enforcement..........          63,957   ...............  ...............         -63,957   ...............
 
Transportation Security Administration:............................
    Operations and Support (emergency).............................          10,322   ...............  ...............         -10,322   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Transportation Security Administration.............          10,322   ...............  ...............         -10,322   ...............
 
Coast Guard:
    Operating Expenses (emergency).................................         112,136   ...............  ...............        -112,136   ...............
    Environmental Compliance and Restoration (emergency)...........           4,038   ...............  ...............          -4,038   ...............
    Acquisistion, Construction, and Improvements (emergency).......         718,919   ...............  ...............        -718,919   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Coast Guard........................................         835,093   ...............  ...............        -835,093   ...............
 
Federal Emergency Management Agency:
    Operations and Support (emergency).............................          58,800   ...............  ...............         -58,800   ...............
    Procurement, Constructions, and Improvements (emergency).......           1,200   ...............  ...............          -1,200   ...............
    Disaster Relief Fund (emergency)...............................      23,500,000   ...............  ...............     -23,500,000   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Federal Emergency Management Agency................      23,560,000   ...............  ...............     -23,560,000   ...............
 
Federal Law Enforcement Training Centers:
    Operations and Support (emergency).............................           5,374   ...............  ...............          -5,374   ...............
    Procurement, Constructions, and Improvements (emergency).......           5,000   ...............  ...............          -5,000   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Federal Law Enforcement Training Centers...........          10,374   ...............  ...............         -10,374   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Bipartisan Budget Act of 2018.........................      24,654,240   ...............  ...............     -24,654,240   ...............
          (Defense)................................................           1,200   ...............  ...............          -1,200   ...............
          (Emergency)..............................................      24,654,240   ...............  ...............     -24,654,240   ...............
                                                                    ====================================================================================
      Total, Other Appropriations..................................      59,324,240   ...............  ...............     -59,324,240   ...............
          (Emergency appropriations)...............................      59,324,240   ...............  ...............     -59,324,240   ...............
          (Defense)................................................           1,200   ...............  ...............          -1,200   ...............
          (Nondefense).............................................      59,323,040   ...............  ...............     -59,323,040   ...............
                                                                    ====================================================================================
      Grand Total..................................................     116,252,357       55,824,438       57,190,844      -59,061,513       +1,366,406
          (Non-Defense)............................................    (112,355,240)     (52,139,595)     (53,228,000)    (-59,127,240)     (+1,088,405)
          (Emergency Appropriations)...............................     (59,324,240)  ...............  ...............    (-59,324,240)  ...............
          (Offsetting Collections).................................     (-4,188,555)     (-4,437,801)     (-4,437,801)       (-249,246)  ...............
          (Offsetting Collections)(Legislative Proposals)..........  ...............       (-520,000)  ...............  ...............       (+520,000)
          (Disaster Relief Category)...............................      (7,366,000)      (6,652,000)      (6,652,000)       (-714,000)  ...............
          (Rescissions)............................................       (-488,506)       (-300,000)       (-176,472)       (+312,034)       (+123,528)
          (Defense)................................................      (2,221,000)      (1,944,999)      (2,223,000)         (+2,000)       (+278,001)
          (Overseas Contingency on Operations/Global War on                (163,000)  ...............        (165,000)         (+2,000)       (+165,000)
           Terrorism)..............................................
          (Other Defense)..........................................      (2,058,000)      (1,944,999)      (2,058,000)  ...............       (+113,001)
          Aviation Security Capital Fund...........................         250,000          250,000          250,000   ...............  ...............
          Fee Funded Programs......................................       7,268,363        7,808,321        7,443,238         +174,875         -365,083
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