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116th Congress    }                                            {   Report
                           HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES
 1st Session      }                                            {  116-100

======================================================================



 
     DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR, ENVIRONMENT, AND RELATED AGENCIES 
                       APPROPRIATIONS BILL, 2020

                                _______
                                

  June 3, 2019.--Committed to the Committee of the Whole House on the 
              State of the Union and ordered to be printed

                                _______
                                

          Ms. McCollum, from the Committee on Appropriations,
                        submitted the following

                              R E P O R T

                             together with

                             MINORITY VIEWS

                        [To accompany H.R. 3052]

    The Committee on Appropriations submits the following 
report in explanation of the accompanying bill making 
appropriations for the Department of the Interior, the 
Environmental Protection Agency, and Related Agencies for the 
fiscal year ending September 30, 2020. The bill provides 
regular annual appropriations for the Department of the 
Interior (except the Bureau of Reclamation and the Central Utah 
Project), the Environmental Protection Agency, and for other 
related agencies, including the Forest Service, the Indian 
Health Service, the Smithsonian Institution, and the National 
Foundation on the Arts and the Humanities.

                                CONTENTS

                                                            Page number

                                                            Bill Report
Title I--Department of the Interior:                            2
                                                                     10
        Bureau of Land Management..........................     2
                                                                     10
        United States Fish and Wildlife Service............     9
                                                                     17
        National Park Service..............................    16
                                                                     30
        United States Geological Survey....................    22
                                                                     43
        Bureau of Ocean Energy Management..................    24
                                                                     50
        Bureau of Safety and Environmental Enforcement.....    26
                                                                     51
        Office of Surface Mining Reclamation and 
            Enforcement....................................    28
                                                                     53
        Bureau of Indian Affairs...........................    31
                                                                     54
        Bureau of Indian Education.........................    36
                                                                     63
        Office of the Secretary............................    43
                                                                     67
        Insular Affairs....................................    45
                                                                     68
        Office of the Solicitor............................    48
                                                                     70
        Office of Inspector General........................    49
                                                                     71
        Office of the Special Trustee for American Indians.    49
                                                                     71
        Department-wide Programs:..........................    52
                                                                     72
        Wildland Fire Management, Interior Department......    52
                                                                     72
        Central Hazardous Materials Fund...................    55
                                                                     73
        Natural Resource Damage Assessment and Restoration.    56
                                                                     73
        Working Capital Fund...............................    56
                                                                     74
        Office of Natural Resources Revenue................    58
                                                                     74
        General Provisions, Department of the Interior.....    59
                                                                     75
Title II--Environmental Protection Agency:                     72
                                                                     76
        Science and Technology.............................    72
                                                                     78
        Environmental Programs and Management..............    73
                                                                     83
        Hazardous Waste Electronic Manifest System Fund....    75
                                                                     91
        Office of Inspector General........................    76
                                                                     91
        Buildings and Facilities...........................    76
                                                                     91
        Hazardous Substance Superfund......................    76
                                                                     92
        Leaking Underground Storage Tank Trust Fund Program    77
                                                                     94
        Inland Oil Spill Programs..........................    78
                                                                     95
        State and Tribal Assistance Grants.................    78
                                                                     96
        Water Infrastructure Finance and Innovation Program 
            Account........................................    88
                                                                     99
        Administrative Provisions..........................    89
                                                                    100
Title III--Related Agencies:                                   92
                                                                    100
        Office of the Under Secretary for Natural Resources 
            and Environment................................    92
                                                                    100
        Forest Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture.....    93
                                                                    102
        Wildland Fire Management, Forest Service...........    99
                                                                    113
        Indian Health Service, U.S. Department of Health 
            and Human Services.............................   107
                                                                    114
        National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences   117
                                                                    121
        Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry...   117
                                                                    122
        Other Related Agencies:............................   118
                                                                    122
        Council on Environmental Quality and Office of 
            Environmental Quality..........................   118
                                                                    122
        Chemical Safety and Hazard Investigation Board.....   119
                                                                    123
        Office of Navajo and Hopi Indian Relocation........   120
                                                                    123
        Institute of American Indian and Alaska Native 
            Culture and Arts Development...................   121
                                                                    124
        Smithsonian Institution............................   121
                                                                    124
        National Gallery of Art............................   122
                                                                    127
        John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts.....   124
                                                                    128
        Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars...   125
                                                                    129
        National Endowment for the Arts....................   125
                                                                    129
        National Endowment for the Humanities..............   125
                                                                    130
        Commission of Fine Arts............................   127
                                                                    131
        National Capital Arts and Cultural Affairs.........   128
                                                                    132
        Advisory Council on Historic Preservation..........   128
                                                                    132
        National Capital Planning Commission...............   128
                                                                    133
        United States Holocaust Memorial Museum............   128
                                                                    133
        Dwight D. Eisenhower Memorial Commission...........   129
                                                                    134
        Women's Suffrage Centennial Commission.............
                                                                    134
        World War I Centennial Commission..................   129
                                                                    135
Title IV--General Provisions                                  130
                                                                    135
House of Representatives Report Requirements:
                                                                    137
        Full Committee Votes...............................
                                                                    137
        Statement of General Performance Goals and 
            Objectives.....................................
                                                                    144
        Rescission of Funds................................
                                                                    144
        Transfer of Funds..................................
                                                                    144
        Disclosure of Earmarks and Congressionally Directed 
            Spending Items.................................
                                                                    145
        Ramseyer Rule......................................
                                                                    145
        Changes in Application of Existing Law.............
                                                                    152
        Appropriations Not Authorized by Law...............
                                                                    170
        Comparison with the Budget Resolution..............
                                                                    171
        Five-Year Outlay Projections.......................
                                                                    172
        Assistance to State and Local Governments..........
                                                                    172
        Program Duplication................................
                                                                    172
        Committee Hearings.................................
                                                                    173
        Comparative Statement of New Budget Authority......
                                                                    175
        Minority views.....................................
                                                                    236

                              INTRODUCTION

    The Department of the Interior, Environment, and Related 
Agencies Appropriations bill for fiscal year 2020 totals 
$37,277,000,000, $1,725,000,000 above the fiscal year 2019 
enacted level and $7,238,189,00 above the fiscal year 2020 
budget request.
    The amounts in the accompanying bill are reflected by title 
in the table below. References throughout this report to the 
enacted bill and the budget request refer to the fiscal year 
2019 enacted level and the fiscal year 2020 budget request 
unless otherwise stated.

                           DISCRETIONARY BUDGET AUTHORITY RECOMMENDED IN BILL BY TITLE
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                                 Committee bill
                        Activity                         Budget estimates,   Committee bill,     compared with
                                                          fiscal year 2020   fiscal year 2020   budget estimates
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Title I, Department of the Interior:
    New budget authority...............................    $11,683,237,000    $14,086,717,000    +$2,403,480,000
Title II, Environmental Protection Agency:
    New budget authority...............................     $6,222,490,000     $9,526,691,000    +$3,304,201,000
Title III, Related Agencies:
    New budget authority...............................    $14,503,084,000    $15,913,592,000    +$1,410,508,000
Title IV, General Provisions:
    New budget authority...............................                 $0                 $0                 +0
                                                        --------------------------------------------------------
          Grand total, New budget authority............    $32,408,811,000    $39,527,000,000    +$7,118,189,000
          Less Fire Cap Adjustment.....................    -$2,250,000,000    -$2,250,000,000
          Net, New budget authority....................    $30,158,811,000    $37,277,000,000    +$7,118,189,000
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

                          Committee Oversight

    Members of Congress have provided considerable input in 
fashioning this bill. In total, 381 Members submitted 6,434 
programmatic requests relating to multiple agencies and 
programs.
    The Interior, Environment, and Related Agencies 
Subcommittee conducted sixteen oversight hearings and briefings 
this year (including four hearings involving American Indians 
and Alaska Natives) to carefully review the programs and 
budgets under its jurisdiction. The Subcommittee held the 
following oversight hearings:
          Government Accountability Office, The Power of the 
        Purse: A Review of Agency Spending Restrictions During 
        a Shutdown--February 6, 2019
          Public Witness Day hearing--February 26, 2019 
        (morning)
          Public Witness Day hearing--February 26, 2019 
        (afternoon)
          American Indian/Alaska Native Public Witnesses--March 
        6, 2019 (morning)
          American Indian/Alaska Native Public Witnesses--March 
        6, 2019 (afternoon)
          American Indian/Alaska Native Public Witnesses--March 
        7, 2019 (morning)
          American Indian/Alaska Native Public Witnesses--March 
        7, 2019 (afternoon)
          Department of the Interior FY20 budget oversight 
        hearing--March 26, 2019
          Members of Congress Witness Day hearing--March 27, 
        2019
          Forest Service FY20 budget oversight hearing--March 
        28, 2019
          Environmental Protection Agency FY20 budget oversight 
        hearing--April 2, 2019
          National Park Service, Fish & Wildlife Service, and 
        U.S. Geological Survey FY20 budget oversight hearing--
        April 3, 2019
          Bureau of Land Management, Bureau of Ocean Energy 
        Management, and Bureau of Safety and Environmental 
        Enforcement FY20 budget oversight hearing--April 4, 
        2019
          Indian Health Service FY20 budget oversight hearing--
        April 9, 2019
          Bureau of Indian Affairs and Bureau of Indian 
        Education FY20 budget oversight hearing--April 3, 2019
          Department of the Interior FY20 budget oversight 
        hearing--May 7, 2019
    In total, 123 individuals representing the Executive 
Branch, Congress, State, Tribal, and local governments, and the 
general public testified before the Subcommittee. In addition 
to those who testified in person, another 146 Members of 
Congress, organizations, or coalitions provided written 
testimony for the hearing record which is publicly available 
online.

                21ST CENTURY CONSERVATION SERVICE CORPS

    The Committee encourages the Departments of Agriculture and 
the Interior to continue facilitating the approval of 21st 
Century Conservation Service Corps organizations and work in 
partnership to engage young adults and veterans in 
conservation, recreation, infrastructure, wildfire and disaster 
response, and community development service projects on public 
lands and in rural and urban communities, as authorized by the 
Public Lands Corps Act (16 U.S.C. 1721 et seq.).

                  BIRD COLLISIONS ON FEDERAL PROPERTY

    Collisions with glass kill up to one billion birds per year 
in the United States. All agencies under the jurisdiction of 
this Act are directed to monitor visitor and nature centers and 
office buildings for bird collisions with glass during spring 
migration (April 1-June 1) and fall migration (September 1-
November 1); determine the scale of collisions; and assess 
whether retrofits to windows will reduce collisions. At a 
minimum, all agencies are directed to take low cost or no cost 
action, such as turning off interior lights at night or 
applying films or other adhesives to glass windows to reduce 
bird collisions.

                   CONSERVATION COLLABORATION EFFORTS

    The Committee encourages the Department of the Interior and 
the Forest Service to support the conservation efforts of 
regional multi-organizational collaborations that help forests 
reduce emissions and improve climate change adaptation.

                           CORAL REEF HEALTH

    The Committee is concerned that emerging coral diseases 
have proven to be a major source of coral mortality, especially 
along the Florida Reef Tract, and pose a significant obstacle 
to coral reef restoration efforts. The Committee encourages the 
Department of the Interior to work with the National Oceanic 
and Atmospheric Administration, as well as state and 
territorial government partners, to support coral monitoring, 
research, and restoration efforts in highly impacted and high 
priority coral reef habitats in U.S. waters, including in 
Biscayne National Park and Dry Tortugas National Park.

                            CUSTOMER SERVICE

    The Committee directs each of the agencies funded by this 
Act to develop standards to improve customer service and 
incorporate the standards into the performance plans required 
under title 31 of the United States Code.

                   EDUCATIONAL AND OUTREACH PROGRAMS

    The Committee strongly supports academic internships, 
partnerships, and educational and outreach programs of the 
agencies funded through the Interior, Environment, and Related 
Agencies appropriations bill and encourages them to ensure that 
their efforts reach the widest possible audience including, but 
not limited to, Hispanic-Serving Institutions, Historically 
Black Colleges and Universities, and Tribal Colleges and 
Universities, as appropriate. The Committee directs the 
Departments funded by this Act to report on these efforts 
within 60 days of enactment of this Act.

                       FIREFIGHTING TECHNOLOGIES

    The Committee supports efforts to incorporate new 
approaches to fire science into its fire-fighting strategy. 
Such techniques include, but are not limited to, analyzing fire 
data to improve forecasts, using high-definition cameras as 
part of the AlertWildfire system, treatments to reduce 
accumulated fuels loads, and growing use of Unmanned Aircraft 
Systems. The Committee strongly encourages the Department of 
the Interior to work closely with the Forest Service, other 
Federal agencies, States, and other partners on these efforts. 
To improve the effectiveness and safety of nighttime aircraft 
operations, the Committee encourages the Department of the 
Interior and the Forest Service to explore advances in night 
vision goggles and infrared technology.

                       HARASSMENT-FREE WORKPLACE

    The Committee continues to be deeply concerned about 
reports of harassment and hostile work environments and notes 
with disappointment the finding from the Department of the 
Interior's 2017 Work Environment Study that 35 percent of its 
employees experienced some form of harassment and/or assault-
related behaviors in the 12 months preceding the survey. The 
Committee expects all Federal employees, including those in 
leadership positions at the agencies funded through this bill, 
to take the necessary steps to create and maintain harassment-
free workplaces. The Committee also directs the Office of 
Inspector General (OIG), not later than 180 days after the 
enactment of this Act, to report to the Committee on Forest 
Service progress to implement the recommendations included in 
the February 2019 OIG report entitled ``Forest Service 
Initiatives to Address Workplace Misconduct''.

                    LAND AND WATER CONSERVATION FUND

    The Committee recommends $523,950,000 for the various Land 
and Water Conservation Fund accounts and activities contained 
in the bill. This amount is $88,952,000 above the enacted level 
and $547,400,000 above the budget request, including 
rescissions. The Committee notes that, with respect to the 
budget request, the administration has proposed $32,882,000 in 
new funding but has also proposed rescissions totaling 
$56,332,000, thereby producing a net appropriation of 
-$23,450,000. Details of the recommendation are shown below and 
throughout the table at the back of this report.
    For the past two fiscal years, Congress has requested that 
the four land management bureaus forward to the House and 
Senate Appropriations Committees detailed and prioritized 
project lists containing federal acquisitions that could be 
funded in the coming fiscal year. This was a change from the 
previous long-standing practice of including these lists in the 
budget justifications submitted with the president's annual 
budget submission. While the Committee understands and 
appreciates that it remains the prerogative of the 
administration to request no funding for land acquisition 
activities, it is not acceptable for the administration to 
unduly delay a congressional request for project information as 
Congress decides on funding levels for the program as it has 
done on a bicameral and bipartisan basis since enactment of the 
Land and Water Conservation Act more than 50 years ago. 
Consequently, the Committee has reluctantly concluded that an 
explicit statutory directive is necessary to obtain the 
requested information in a timely manner. The Committee regrets 
taking this position but believes the dilatory actions of the 
leadership of the Interior and Agriculture departments have 
left it no other option.

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                          FY 2019 Enacted     Budget Request       This Bill
                                                        --------------------------------------------------------
                                                             (Excluding         (Excluding
                                                            Rescission)        Rescission)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
State, Local and Forest Legacy Programs................       $248,796,000         $5,000,000       $280,000,000
    National Park Service State Assistance.............        124,006,000                  0        140,000,000
    Coop. Endangered Species Conservation Fund.........         30,800,000                  0         40,000,000
    American Battlefield Protection Act................         10,000,000          5,000,000         15,000,000
    Highlands Conservation Act.........................         20,000,000                  0         10,000,000
    Forest Legacy Program..............................         63,990,000                  0         75,000,000
Federal Land Acquisition...............................        189,505,000         27,882,000        243,950,000
    Bureau of Land Management..........................         28,316,000                  0         33,800,000
    Fish and Wildlife Service..........................         45,189,000          9,864,000         57,750,000
    National Park Service..............................         34,436,000          9,828,000         53,400,000
    Forest Service.....................................         72,564,000                  0         90,000,000
    DoI, Office of Valuation Services..................          9,000,000          8,190,000          9,000,000
                                                        --------------------------------------------------------
        Land and Water Conservation Fund Total.........        438,301,000         32,882,000        523,950,000
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

              MITIGATION FROM BORDER BARRIER CONSTRUCTION

    Construction of a border barrier can adversely impact 
sensitive lands along the southwest border, including national 
wildlife refuges, national forests, national monuments, and 
wilderness areas. It can also jeopardize wildlife and the 
survival of imperiled species. The current Administration has 
instituted waivers of the National Environmental Policy Act and 
the Endangered Species Act, circumventing the normal process 
that would provide safeguards for species and habitats. The 
Committee directs the Department of the Interior and the U.S. 
Department of Agriculture to work with the Department of 
Homeland Security and the Department of Defense to provide a 
report to the Committee within 180 days of enactment of this 
Act that: (1) describes the impacts of border barrier 
construction on sensitive lands, habitat, and wildlife; (2) 
describes any measures that might contribute to mitigation of 
these impacts, including land acquisitions for national 
wildlife refuges and other federal public land units; and (3) 
estimates the costs of these mitigation measures.

                     MONARCH BUTTERFLY POPULATIONS

    The Committee is aware the U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service 
is gathering information to determine whether the monarch 
butterfly should be listed as a threatened or endangered 
species under the Endangered Species Act. Monarch butterflies 
are a fixture in crop fields across the Nation and listing them 
could have significant impacts on agriculture. The Committee 
directs the Secretary of the Interior to work with the 
Secretary of Agriculture in coordination with the states, and 
private and nonprofit organizations to develop and implement 
strategies, such as setting up milkweed reserves, to help 
protect monarch butterfly populations and preserve the natural 
habitats critical to their survival. The Secretaries are 
directed to report back within 120 days of enactment of this 
Act on the status of this plan and any other actions the 
Departments are taking to encourage support of monarch 
conservation.

                       PAYMENTS IN LIEU OF TAXES

    The Payments in Lieu of Taxes (PILT) program provides 
compensation to local governments for the loss of tax revenue 
resulting from the presence of Federal land in their county or 
State. In 2019, 49 states, the District of Columbia, Guam, the 
Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, and the U.S. Virgin Islands will 
receive PILT payments. The recommendation includes full funding 
for PILT for fiscal year 2020 in Section 114 of Title I General 
Provisions.

                          PERFORMANCE MEASURES

    The Committee directs all agencies funded by this Act to 
comply with title 31 of the United States Code, including the 
development of their organizational priority goals and outcomes 
such as performance outcome measures, output measures, 
efficiency measures, and customer service measures.

                         RAINY RIVER WATERSHED

    The Committee is deeply dissatisfied with the inexplicable 
actions taken by the Bureau of Land Management and the U.S. 
Forest Service over the past two years with respect to the 
advancement of a copper-sulfide ore mine on the Rainy River 
Watershed in Minnesota. Located within the Superior National 
Forest and adjacent to the Boundary Waters Canoe Area 
Wilderness and Voyageurs National Park, this administration has 
vigorously pushed to reinstate two 1966 mineral leases that 
have sat dormant for more than 50 years and which have been 
determined by the Forest Service to have the potential to do 
``serious and irreparable harm.'' The attack on this pristine 
area began in December of 2017 when the Department of the 
Interior's Solicitor issued an opinion overturning two prior 
opinions concerning the renewability of the leases. This led to 
the reissuance of these leases by the Bureau of Land Management 
in May 2018. Subsequently, in September of 2018, and contrary 
to assurances to this Committee, the Secretary of Agriculture 
abruptly canceled a scientific study associated with a mineral 
withdrawal action that would have proven beneficial to the 
decision-making process. In addition to the unsubstantiated 
nature of that action, the Committee is at a loss to explain 
the disparate treatment between the Rainy River withdrawal 
proposal and two other similar proposals in Washington and 
Montana which were allowed to be completed despite all three 
locations facing similar threats of acid drainage from sulfide-
ore mining. The Committee has asked both the Department of 
Agriculture and the Department of the Interior for background 
material on these decisions and others.
    The actions taken by the Interior and Agriculture 
departments over the past two years with regards to mining in 
the Superior National Forest overturn long-standing policies 
and practices, ignore science, limit public participation, and 
undermine the protection of iconic and irreplaceable wilderness 
and national park resources. Until the departments address the 
question of whether mining, especially copper-sulfide ore 
mining, is appropriate on National Forest System lands in the 
Rainy River Watershed, no action to advance mining in this area 
should occur. Accordingly, the Committee directs the Secretary 
of Agriculture, acting through the Forest Service, to reinstate 
and complete the Rainy River Watershed mineral withdrawal study 
in accordance with Section 204 of the Federal Land Policy and 
Management Act of 1976, and to provide that study and all 
associated analysis to the Committee. Further, the Committee 
directs that the Secretaries of the Interior and Agriculture 
shall take such actions as are necessary to segregate such 
lands during the period of study and forego taking any action 
that would advance mining within the watershed during the 
period of study and review.

                        RECREATION FEE AUTHORITY

    Enacted in 2004, the Federal Land Recreation Enhancement 
Act (FLREA) authorized five agencies to collect and expend 
recreation fees on land they manage: the Department of the 
Interior's Bureau of Land Management (BLM), Bureau of 
Reclamation (BOR), National Park Service (NPS), and U.S. Fish 
and Wildlife Service (FWS), and the U.S. Department of 
Agriculture's Forest Service (USFS). These fees, which leverage 
other funding sources and complement appropriated dollars, fund 
projects that directly benefit the visitor experience.
    The authority for FLREA is scheduled to sunset at the end 
of the current fiscal year. This expiration would impact the 
Department of the Interior's estimated annual collection of 
$406 million, of which the National Park Service collects 
nearly $310 million. An extension of recreation fee authority 
is necessary for land managers to plan for upcoming seasons 
including selling annual passes, hiring seasonal employees, 
planning projects, organizing volunteers, and accepting 
reservations.
    The Committee has included within Title IV General 
Provisions a one-year extension of the current recreation fee 
authority as requested. As part of this extension, the 
Committee reiterates longstanding Congressional intent that the 
collection and use of these fees is meant to complement, not 
supplant, annual appropriations. In particular, the Committee 
notes that fee revenues have never been intended to be used as 
a substitute for annual appropriations to fund agency 
operations in the event of a lapse in appropriations and 
expects the Department of the Interior and Forest Service to 
refrain from any future action to use fee revenues in this 
manner. The Committee was deeply troubled by the decision by 
senior officials at the Department of the Interior to change 
longstanding policy during the fiscal year 2019 partial 
government shutdown and use fee revenues to provide services 
for certain national parks and other public lands. This 
decision contributed to national parks being kept open to the 
public during the shutdown without sufficient staffing to 
adequately protect public safety or natural and cultural 
resources.

                        REPROGRAMMING GUIDELINES

    The Committee has historically included reprogramming 
guidelines in reports accompanying Interior and Environment 
appropriations bills that explicitly outline what actions by 
agencies under the Subcommittee's jurisdiction trigger the 
requirement to formally notify the Committees on Appropriations 
of the House of Representatives and the Senate. The Committee 
worked with the Department of the Interior on concerns and 
challenges with implementation and has incorporated their input 
into the Title IV General Provision that codifies these 
guidelines. This language protects the integrity of this 
Committee and establishes parity with other Appropriations 
Subcommittees whose bills contain similar language.

                          TRIBAL CONSULTATION

    The Committee notes with concern the frustrations heard 
from Tribes about agency failures to conduct ``true'' and 
``meaningful'' government-to-government consultation. Although 
the level of frustration varies by agency and event, the common 
theme is that while most consultations solicit input and 
feedback from Tribes, the communication is one way and fails to 
return feedback to Tribes. Tribes often report that they don't 
know whether and how their input is considered. On decisions 
made in consultation with Tribes, the Committee expects 
agencies funded in this bill to publish decision rationale in 
the context of and in reasonable detail to the Tribal input 
received during consultation.

             WILDLAND FIREFIGHTER OPERATIONAL REQUIREMENTS

    The Committee encourages the Interagency Fire Center to 
review operational requirements to ensure that wildland 
firefighters maintain proper hydration and have access to on-
the-move, hands-free hydration systems.

                             PUBLIC ACCESS

    The Department of the Interior and the Forest Service are 
directed to notify the House and Senate Committees on 
Appropriations in advance of any proposed project specifically 
intending to close an area to recreational shooting, hunting, 
or fishing on a non-emergency basis of more than 30 days.

                  TITLE I--DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR


                       Bureau of Land Management


                   MANAGEMENT OF LANDS AND RESOURCES

                    (INCLUDING RESCISSION OF FUNDS)

 
 
 
Appropriation enacted, 2019...........................    $1,178,696,000
Budget estimate, 2020.................................     1,054,430,000
Recommended, 2020.....................................     1,243,793,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2019...............................       +65,097,000
    Budget estimate, 2020.............................      +189,363,000
 

                    MANAGEMENT OF LAND AND RESOURCES

    The Committee recommends $1,243,793,000 for the Management 
of Lands and Resources appropriation. This amount is 
$65,097,000 above the enacted level and $189,363,000 above the 
budget request. The recommendation includes $10,387,000 for 
fixed costs, as requested, and a general rescission of 
$14,000,000 from unobligated funds originally made available in 
fiscal year 2016 and prior years. Details of the recommendation 
are explained in the narrative below and through the table at 
the back of this report.
    Land Resources.--The Committee recommends $229,682,000 for 
Land Resources, $17,940,000 above the enacted level and 
$36,080,000 above the budget request. The recommendation 
includes $1,940,000 for fixed costs; $20,080,000 in 
programmatic increases to restore reductions proposed in the 
budget request; and additional increases of $5,000,000 in 
rangeland management, $2,000,000 in forestry management, 
$3,000,000 in cultural resources management, and $6,000,000 in 
the wild horse and burro line. The Committee directs that half 
of the additional cultural resources funding be allocated 
toward updating the predictive modeling and data analysis 
capabilities of the National Cultural Resources Information 
Management System, which allows for better siting and planning 
decisions leading to more efficient project implementation.
    With respect to the Wild Horse and Burro program, the 
Committee recognizes and appreciates that several stakeholder 
groups who each have avid, although diverging, interests in the 
program, have come together on a non-lethal compromise proposal 
based on the following four aspects: strategic gatherings in 
the most densely populated herd management areas; relocating 
animals currently in holding facilities and those being removed 
from the range to larger, more cost-effective pasture 
facilities; increased and vigorous fertility control strategies 
to help reduce the population growth; and increased adoptions. 
The Committee believes these concepts, once more fully 
developed by program specialists at the Bureau, have merit. The 
Committee therefore recommends a program increase of $6,000,000 
for the Bureau to work with interested stakeholders to further 
develop a science-based removal, fertility control, and 
relocation pilot program targeted to the two or three most 
severely impacted herd management areas, and to begin to 
implement and scale up such plans once metrics for delineating 
a positive outcome have been designed and achieved. All 
removals must follow the guidelines outlined in the Bureau's 
Comprehensive Animal Welfare Policy. All private parties 
providing care for wild horses and burros shall provide proof 
of their ability to offer humane conditions and protection 
against abuse, neglect, or slaughter. Private parties shall 
ensure that wild horses and burros will not be returned to the 
range. The Bureau should plan on presenting the Committee with 
a detailed briefing prior to obligation and expenditure of the 
program increase, and quarterly once the program is 
implemented.
    Wildlife and Aquatic Habitat Management.--The Committee 
recommends $197,836,000 for Wildlife and Aquatic Habitat 
Management, $15,332,000 above the enacted level and $79,404,000 
above the budget request. The recommendation includes 
$1,332,000 for fixed costs; $65,404,000 in programmatic 
increases to restore reductions proposed in the budget request; 
and additional increases of $10,000,000 in wildlife habitat 
management and $4,000,000 in aquatic habitat management. Of the 
increase provided for wildlife habitat, $2,000,000 is for 
threatened and endangered species, $5,000,000 is for sage-
grouse conservation for a total of $65,000,000, and $3,000,000 
is for plant conservation including efforts to advance the 
national seed strategy. The Committee notes that at the 
recommended level, the bill supports the Plant Conservation and 
Restoration Program, including the Seeds of Success program, 
above the enacted level. Of the increase provided for aquatic 
habitat, the recommendation provides for the continuation of 
support at the $2,000,000 level for the Colorado Basin Salinity 
Control Program.
    Recreation Management.--The Committee recommends 
$81,455,000 for Recreation Management, $7,726,000 above the 
enacted level and $9,726,000 above the budget request. The 
recommendation includes $726,000 for fixed costs; $2,726,000 in 
programmatic increases to restore the net reductions proposed 
in the budget request; and additional increases of $2,000,000 
in wilderness management and $5,000,000 in recreation resources 
management, of which $1,000,000 is for the scenic trails 
program. The Committee agrees to the Bureau's proposed Lake 
Havasu watercraft decontamination project.
    Energy and Minerals.--The Committee recommends $193,700,000 
for Energy and Minerals, $724,000 below the enacted level and 
$4,665,000 below the budget request. The recommendation 
includes $2,065,000 in fixed costs, along with the proposed 
increase in the renewable energy subactivity but does not 
include the increase proposed in the coal management 
subactivity. The Committee notes that the requested reduction 
in the oil and gas permit processing subactivity is due to the 
expiration of the funding anomaly contained in section 3021 of 
the 2015 National Defense Authorization Act. Because the full 
amount of application fees collected is now available to the 
Bureau, additional appropriations provided through this bill 
are no longer necessary.
    The Bureau of Land Management is directed to use $500,000 
from within available funding, in conjunction with $500,000 
provided by the United States Geological Survey, to commission 
a report from the National Academy of Sciences on the impacts 
on ecosystem services of the Superior National Forest and the 
Boundary Waters Canoe Area Wilderness resulting from a Twin 
Metals sulfide-ore copper mine located in the watershed of the 
Boundary Waters Canoe Area Wilderness.
    Realty and Ownership Management.--The Committee recommends 
$73,480,000 for Realty and Ownership Management, $3,190,000 
above the enacted level and equal to the budget request. The 
recommendation includes $691,000 for fixed costs.
    Resource Protection and Maintenance.--The Committee 
recommends $140,062,000 for Resource Protection and 
Maintenance, $10,821,000 above the enacted level and 
$29,951,000 above the budget request. The recommendation 
includes $821,000 for fixed costs; $19,951,000 in programmatic 
increases to restore reductions proposed in the budget request; 
and additional increases of $5,000,000 in resource management 
planning, $1,000,000 in resource protection and law 
enforcement, and $4,000,000 in abandoned mine lands and 
hazardous materials management for additional clean-up work. 
The Committee directs the Bureau to provide a detailed list of 
all abandoned mine projects on Bureau-managed land within 30 
days of enactment of this Act. From within available funds in 
resource management planning, the Bureau is directed to 
contract with an independent, qualified scientific organization 
for a refined range mapping pilot project to develop or update 
range and habitat use maps for at least 30 threatened and 
endangered species that occur on Bureau-managed lands. Improved 
range mapping would support more effective and efficient 
conservation and recovery of threatened and endangered species 
on public lands.
    Transportation and Facilities Management.--The Committee 
recommends $125,653,000 for Transportation and Facilities 
Management, $10,653,000 above the enacted level and $32,327,000 
above the budget request. The recommendation includes $653,000 
in fixed costs; $22,327,000 in programmatic increases to 
restore reductions proposed in the budget request; and an 
additional increase of $3,000,000 in annual maintenance and 
$7,000,000 in deferred maintenance. With a deferred maintenance 
backlog exceeding $900,000,000 funding cuts in this area are 
unwarranted. The Committee also notes that these maintenance 
funds shall remain available until expended.
    Workforce and Organizational Support.--The Committee 
recommends $178,117,000 for Workforce and Organizational 
Support, $3,134,000 below the enacted level and $1,460,000 
below the budget request. The recommendation includes 
$1,866,000 for fixed costs; does not accept any programmatic 
changes proposed in the budget request; and includes a further 
baseline reduction of $5,000,000 in the administrative support 
subactivity to account for the discontinuance of the proposed 
reorganization, which the recommendation does not fund. The 
Bureau is directed to use the current enacted funding on the 
shared services component. The Committee is not convinced of 
the efficacy of moving additional personnel out of the 
headquarters area when approximately 93 percent of Bureau 
employees are already working in the field and directs that no 
additional relocations of headquarters staff take place.
    National Landscape Conservation System.--The Committee 
recommends $45,112,000 for National Landscape Conservation 
Lands, $5,293,000 above the enacted level and $8,000,000 above 
the budget request. The recommendation includes $293,000 in 
fixed costs; $3,000,000 in programmatic increases to restore 
reductions proposed in the budget request; and an additional 
increase of $5,000,000. The Committee believes a modest 
increase in this program will allow for greater inventory and 
monitoring of cultural resources and encourages the Bureau to 
increase its cultural resources staff.
    Communication Site Management.--The Committee recommends 
$2,000,000 for communications site management, equal to the 
budget request. This amount is reduced by $2,000,000 in 
offsetting collections.
    Mining Law Administration.--The Committee recommends 
$39,696,000 for mining law administration, equal to the budget 
request. This amount is offset by $61,000,000 in offsetting 
collections.
    Rescission.--The Committee recommends a rescission of 
$14,000,000 in funds made available under this heading in 
fiscal years 2016 and prior. These funds are now more than 3 
years old and, given the generally high obligation rates for 
nearly all activities and subactivities in this appropriation, 
are unlikely to be needed. The Committee believes that 
repurposing these funds, which this recommendation does, is a 
more efficient and transparent process.
    Period of Availability.--The Committee recommends a change 
to the period of availability of the Management of Lands and 
Resources appropriation from indefinite, ``no-year`` funding to 
2-year availability, with the exception of annual and deferred 
maintenance funding which will remain available until expended. 
This adjustment will align the Bureau's primary operations 
account to more closely mirror those of the other bureaus 
within the Department. The Committee is also keenly aware of 
its responsibilities to the American taxpayer in providing 
oversight of bureau activities and finds that large balances of 
unobligated funds substantially detracts from that 
responsibility.
    Southern Nevada Public Lands Management Act.--The Committee 
has not agreed to the proposed rescission of Southern Nevada 
Public Lands Management Act (SNPLMA) funds. The Committee notes 
that expected receipts in fiscal year 2019 and 2020 are 
estimated to be $91,000,000 and $131,000,000, respectively. The 
Bureau is directed to report to the Committee, within 30 days 
of enactment of this Act, on the status of balances in the 
SNPLMA account and the projects these balances are intended to 
fund.
    Sage Grouse.--The Committee is extremely concerned about 
the dismantling by the current administration of the 
unprecedented conservation partnership forged in 2015 by 11 
Western states, ranchers and other interested stakeholders to 
keep the sage-grouse off the endangered species list. This 
administration is moving forward with revisions that will 
weaken protections and conservation prescriptions for sage-
grouse that were included in the 2015 science-based greater 
sage grouse strategy. The Committee is also concerned that the 
Fish and Wildlife Service is no longer in initial discussions 
on amendments to land-use plans to provide the best available 
science or technical advice. The future of the sage-grouse, a 
species that is emblematic of the health of the sagebrush 
habitat that it shares with 350 other kinds of wildlife, 
depends on decisions being made with the best available science 
and technical advice. The Bureau and the Department are 
directed to include the Fish and Wildlife Service in any 
discussions pertaining to BLM leasing in the sagebrush habitat 
to prevent degradation to the habitat, minimize disturbance, 
and mitigate impacts.
    Aquifer Recharge and Water Quality.--The Committee 
encourages the Bureau to continue to work with the State of 
Idaho to provide appropriate access to Federal lands for the 
purposes of aquifer recharge projects and to work with Blaine 
County and interested community stakeholders to address the 
increased sediment buildup in the Hulen Meadows Pond by 
examining collaborative solutions to restoring the pond to 
adequate health through dredging and other cost-effective 
measures.
    Bighorn Sheep Research.--To prevent disease transmission 
between domestic sheep and bighorn sheep, the Committee directs 
the Forest Service and Bureau of Land Management to work with 
Indian Tribes, the Western Association of Fish and Wildlife 
Agencies and the Agricultural Research Service to complete a 
risk of contact analysis. Together, the agencies are encouraged 
to convene a meeting of interested stakeholders to share the 
findings of this analysis and collaborate on strategies to 
address the risk of disease transmission. The agencies are 
further directed to report to the Committee, within 180 days of 
enactment of this Act, on the progress made to complete the 
analysis and engage with stakeholders.
    Soda Ash.--The Committee is concerned about maintaining the 
United States' global competitiveness in the production of 
natural soda ash and directs the Bureau to analyze this matter 
and report to the Committee within 60 days of enactment of this 
Act on whether a revision of the rate is warranted.
    Drought in Western United States.--The Committee is 
concerned about the ongoing drought affecting the western 
United States and supports the Bureau's work with the State of 
Utah, through the Watershed Restoration Initiative, to develop 
water resources to benefit the public, wildlife, endangered 
species, permittees, and other users. The Bureau is encouraged 
to continue to work with the State and other interested 
entities to identify and pursue the highest priority projects.
    Off-Highway Vehicle Pilot Program.--The Bureau is directed 
to provide a report to the Committee, within 90 days of 
enactment of this Act, on the status of the Bureau's efforts 
regarding the directive contained in House Report 115-765.
    Greater Chaco Cultural Landscape.--The Committee recognizes 
that the Bureau of Land Management has delayed scheduled lease 
sales in areas within a 10-mile radius of Chaco Culture 
National Historical Park on three occasions since March 2018. 
The Committee is also aware of the recent decision from the 
United States Court of Appeals vacating the Bureau of Land 
Management environmental analysis for oil and gas leasing in 
the area. The Greater Chaco cultural landscape has inestimable 
value for Native people and for the American public. The 
Committee directs the Bureau to refrain from leasing or 
proposing new leases within a 10-mile radius of the Chaco 
Culture National Historical Park. The Committee further directs 
the Bureau to prioritize planning updates for the region, 
increase cultural resources inventories in cooperation with the 
State of New Mexico and tribes to ensure well-informed land 
management decisions, and engage in meaningful government-to-
government consultation with tribes, including conducting 
ethnographic studies outside of the 10-mile radius.
    National Fish and Wildlife Foundation.--The Committee 
appreciates the long-standing partnership between the Fish and 
Wildlife Foundation, a congressionally chartered institution, 
and several bureaus within the Interior Department, 
particularly the Bureau of Land Management. The Committee would 
therefore urge the Bureau to continue this partnership and 
agrees that, at the Bureau's discretion, up to $2,000,000 from 
within available funds may be used for critical conservation 
activities, pursuant to 16 U.S.C.3701 et seq., under the same 
term and conditions as outlined under this heading in Title I 
of Division G of P.L. 115-31, the fiscal year 2017 Interior, 
Environment and Related Agencies Act.
    Rewilding.--The Committee recognizes the value of horse 
rewilding as one of many herd management strategies and 
encourages the Bureau to explore collaborations with suitable 
organizations and willing landowners to adopt, transport and 
locate horses to appropriate habitats at no cost to taxpayers.

                              CONSTRUCTION

                    (INCLUDING RESCISSION OF FUNDS)

 
 
 
Appropriation enacted, 2019...........................                $0
Budget estimate, 2020.................................                 0
Recommended, 2020.....................................        -5,000,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2019...............................        -5,000,000
    Budget estimate, 2020.............................        -5,000,000
 

    The Committee recommends a rescission of $5,000,000 for the 
Construction appropriation. These funds were originally made 
available in fiscal year 2014 and before and are no longer 
needed.

                            LAND ACQUISITION

 
 
 
Appropriation enacted, 2019...........................       $28,316,000
Budget estimate, 2020.................................                 0
Recommended, 2020.....................................        33,800,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2019...............................        +5,484,000
    Budget estimate, 2020.............................       +33,800,000
 

                            LAND ACQUISITION

    The Committee recommends $33,800,000 for the Land 
Acquisition appropriation. This amount is $7,284,000 above the 
enacted level and $43,800,000 above the budget request, 
including rescissions. Details of the recommendation are 
contained below and in the table at the back of this report.
    Because the Department has not made detailed, individual 
project information available in a timely manner, the Committee 
notes that the following list is preliminary in nature and may 
be revised later in the fiscal year 2020 budget process as 
additional information becomes available. The projects listed 
are in priority order, as determined by the Bureau.

------------------------------------------------------------------------
    State                     Project                      This Bill
------------------------------------------------------------------------
         AZ   Aravaipa Canyon Access.................         $2,600,000
           CA Bodie Hills............................            900,000
           CA Los Gatos Creek Ranch..................          1,200,000
           CO McInnis Canyons National Conservation              600,000
               Area..................................
         ID   Coeur d'Alene Lake Special Recreation            1,300,000
               Management Area.......................
         MT   Blackfoot River Watershed..............          3,500,000
         OR   Sandy River............................            500,000
         OR   Table Rocks Special Recreational                 2,700,000
               Management Area.......................
              Additional projects to be supplied by            5,000,000
               BLM...................................
             -----------------------------------------------------------
              Subtotal, Line Item Projects...........         18,300,000
------------------------------------------------------------------------


------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                      Budget Request       This Bill
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Acquisition Management............                  0          2,500,000
Recreational Access...............                  0         11,000,000
Emergencies, Hardships, and                         0          2,000,000
 Inholdings.......................
Rescission of Funds...............        -10,000,000                  0
                                   -------------------------------------
    Total, BLM Land Acquisition...        -10,000,000         33,800,000
------------------------------------------------------------------------

                   OREGON AND CALIFORNIA GRANT LANDS

 
 
 
Appropriation enacted, 2019...........................      $106,985,000
Budget estimate, 2020.................................       106,985,000
Recommended, 2020.....................................       117,195,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2019...............................       +10,210,000
    Budget estimate, 2020.............................       +10,210,000
 

                   OREGON AND CALIFORNIA GRANT LANDS

    The Committee recommends $117,195,000 for the Oregon and 
California Grant Lands appropriation. This amount is 
$10,210,000 above both the enacted level and the budget 
request. The recommendation includes $210,000 in fixed costs 
and $10,000,000 in programmatic increases, of which $9,000,000 
is in the resources management activity for additional work on 
forest management, and $1,000,000 is in the transportation and 
facilities maintenance activity. The recommendation does not 
adopt the proposed budget restructuring.
    Timber targets.--The Committee continues to be troubled by 
the disparity in timber targets compared with timber awarded 
and harvested on some districts. The Bureau is once again 
directed to prioritize response to administrative protests on 
timber sales in a timely manner and to report timber sale 
accomplishments in volume of timber sold and awarded, rather 
than merely the volume offered for sale, and shall report to 
the Committee on its progress.

                           RANGE IMPROVEMENTS

    The Committee recommends an indefinite appropriation of not 
less than $10,000,000 to be derived from public lands receipts 
and Bankhead-Jones Farm Tenant Act lands grazing receipts, as 
requested.

               SERVICE CHARGES, DEPOSITS, AND FORFEITURES

    The Committee recommends an indefinite appropriation 
estimated to be $26,000,000 for Service Charges, Deposits, and 
Forfeitures, as requested. The appropriation is fully offset 
through collections.

                       MISCELLANEOUS TRUST FUNDS

    The Committee recommends an indefinite appropriation 
estimated to be $26,000,000, as requested.

                       ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISIONS

    The Committee recommends inclusion of the Administrative 
Provisions proposed in the budget request and notes that they 
are long-standing items that facilitate more efficient 
operations.

                United States Fish and Wildlife Service

    Originating in 1871, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is 
the oldest federal conservation agency, and the only agency in 
the federal government, whose primary responsibility is 
management of fish and wildlife for the American public. 
Through protecting the environment, all Americans can be 
afforded the opportunity to enjoy the outdoors and to connect 
with and learn from nature. Maintaining and protecting the 
Nation's natural resources for present and future generations 
should be a top priority for the Service. This involves strict 
enforcement of important and foundational environmental laws 
such as the Endangered Species Act (ESA), Migratory Bird Treaty 
Act (MBTA), Marine Mammal Protection Act, Lacey Act, and 
international treaties like the Convention on International 
Trade in Endangered Species (CITES).
    The Service is responsible for the National Wildlife Refuge 
System that consists of more than 560 National Wildlife Refuges 
operating as a national network of lands and waters for the 
conservation, management, and restoration of fish, wildlife, 
and plant resources and habitats. The Service also operates one 
historic National Fish Hatchery and 70 National Fish Hatcheries 
that work with states and tribes to propagate fish to bolster 
or re-establish self-sustaining populations in the wild and 
mitigate impacts associated with Federal water projects.

                          RESOURCE MANAGEMENT

 
 
 
Appropriation enacted, 2019...........................    $1,292,078,000
Budget estimate, 2020.................................     1,257,161,000
Recommended, 2020.....................................     1,364,760,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2019...............................       +72,682,000
    Budget estimate, 2020.............................      +107,599,000
 

    The Committee recommends $1,364,760,000 for Resource 
Management, an increase of $72,682,000 above the enacted level 
and $107,599,000 above the budget request. The recommendation 
includes a $4,000,000 rescission from unobligated balances made 
available in fiscal year 2019 in General Operations for the 
Department-wide reorganization. The Committee approves the 
proposed budget restructuring for the new Joint Administrative 
Operations which consolidates administrative functions into a 
single organization but does not support any other 
reorganization, including the Department-wide reorganization, 
or consolidation in fiscal year 2020. Fixed cost increases as 
requested in the budget are provided, but none of the requested 
program changes are agreed to unless specifically addressed 
below. Recommended program changes, instructions, and details 
follow below and in the table at the end of this report. 
Additional instructions are included in the front of this 
report.
    Ecological Services.--The recommendation includes 
$288,983,000 in Ecological Services for Endangered Species Act 
(ESA) and related activities, $37,158,000 above the enacted 
level and $48,961,000 above the budget request. This program 
has been underfunded and the Committee is striving to rectify 
that deficiency by providing additional resources for 
endangered species conservation and recovery and habitat 
protection, and to enhance efforts in important ecosystems such 
as the Chesapeake Bay and the California Bay-Delta.
    Listing.--The recommendation includes $23,442,000 for ESA 
listings and related activities, an increase of $5,124,000 
above the enacted level, and $12,377,000 above the budget 
request. Through the listing process, the best scientific and 
commercial information on a species is analyzed so a 
determination can be made on whether the survival of a species 
requires the protections afforded by the ESA. The Committee is 
providing additional resources to help the Service work closely 
with States and Tribes as they evaluate the over 350 species 
that are potentially in need of protection under the ESA, 
develop a National Listing workplan, undertake 90-day and 12-
month petition findings and develop listing, 4(d), and critical 
habitat rules as required by law. Bill language is continued as 
requested to protect the rest of the Resource Management 
account from listing-related judicial mandates.
    Planning and Consultation.--The recommendation includes 
$113,018,000 for timely evaluations and permitting of 
development projects to ensure species are protected while 
allowing for development that contributes to economic growth 
and job creation. This recommendation is an increase of 
$6,939,000 above the enacted level and $5,502,000 above the 
budget request. This recommendation does not accept the 
reductions proposed in the budget request and provides 
$2,500,000 for National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) 
streamlining. The additional funding is for staffing to build 
field capacity for technical assistance to Federal agencies and 
project proponents and to work with States, counties and 
private landowners to create Habitat Conservation Plans; to 
enhance the Integrated Planning and Conservation (IPaC) system; 
and to plan the development of a system for compliance 
monitoring and enforcement to ensure adequate implementation of 
the ESA.
    The Service is encouraged to issue guidance to field 
offices for streamlining Endangered Species Act section 7(a)(2) 
consultations on federal actions that authorize, fund, or carry 
out a covered activity in an approved Habitat Conservation Plan 
(HCP) permitted under section 10(a)(1)(B) and that affect 
listed species that are covered species in the approved HCP.
    Conservation and Restoration.--The recommendation includes 
$34,650,000 for Conservation and Restoration, $2,254,000 above 
the enacted level, and $8,209,000 above the budget request. The 
recommendation does not include any of the proposed reductions 
and provides an additional $2,000,000 for Candidate 
Conservation. This increase will help the Service work with 
partners to conserve species by identifying and alleviating 
threats so they do not require listing. The Committee is 
disappointed to learn the Service is no longer actively engaged 
in many of the decisions made by the Bureau of Land Management 
on energy leasing and directs the Department of the Interior to 
involve the Service in any decision where leasing will impact 
species.
    Recovery.--The recommendation includes $117,873,000 for 
Endangered Species Act recovery activities, $22,841,000 above 
the enacted level, and $22,873,000 above the request. The 
recommendation does not accept the proposed budget reductions 
for de-listing and down-listing, State of the Birds, White Nose 
Syndrome, Prescott Grant Program and Wolf Livestock 
Demonstration Program, and includes a total of $8,000,000 for 
Recovery Challenge grants.
    The Committee has long championed the need for listing 
decisions to be based on science, not politics. In the current 
political climate, the Committee remains concerned that if 
iconic species are removed from the endangered species list, 
they will not receive adequate protections to ensure their 
survivability. The gray wolf is an example of a species of 
concern. The Committee directs that if the Service is going to 
delist a species based on the best available science, the 
Service must first carefully analyze state management plans to 
ensure adequate protections will be in place and then establish 
a stringent monitoring system that guarantees there is rigorous 
enforcement of those plans.
    Recovery Challenge matching grants are to be used to 
implement high priority recovery actions as prescribed in 
recovery plans, including genetically-sound breeding, rearing, 
and reintroduction programs. Longstanding partnerships, 
including for the northern aplomado falcon, California condor, 
and Steller's eider, should be funded at not less than 
$3,500,000 and partner contributions should be not less than 
their current amounts. The remaining funds should be dedicated 
to other multi-year partnerships and should require a 50:50 
match, which may include in-kind services. Unless an affected 
State is a partner on the project, none of the funds may be 
awarded to a project until the project partners have consulted 
with such State. The Service is expected to continue to work 
with the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation to administer a 
portion of the program in full consultation with the Service 
and subject to Service approval of all grants and cooperative 
agreements. This approach allows Service funds to be leveraged 
and expands recovery actions. The Service is also expected to 
administer a portion of the program itself in support of 
partnerships to implement recovery actions benefiting species 
for which the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation is not 
engaged in conservation efforts. None of the funds may be used 
for indirect costs. The Service is to provide a report on this 
collaboration to the Committee 60 days after enactment of this 
Act.
    The Committee has provided an increase of $4,480,000 above 
the increase in the budget request for recovery activities. The 
Service is encouraged to use this increase to develop and 
support dedicated extinction prevention programs for critically 
endangered species at the brink of extinction, including, but 
not limited to, species such as listed Hawaiian plants and 
forest birds, freshwater mussels, and butterflies, and to 
report back to the Committee within 90 days of enactment of 
this Act on the establishment of these programs.
    The Committee recommendation maintains funding at the 
enacted level for the Service's work on the Upper Colorado 
River Endangered Fish Recovery Program and the San Juan River 
Basin Recovery Implementation Program.
    Marbled Murrelet.--The Committee continues to support 
language included in House Report 116-9 concerning the 
development of the Long-Term Conservation Strategy.
    Habitat Conservation.--The recommendation includes 
$66,697,000 for voluntary, non-regulatory habitat conservation 
partnerships with public and private landowners, of which 
$52,954,000 is to implement the Partners for Fish and Wildlife 
Act and $13,743,000 is for the Coastal Program. This 
recommendation is an increase of $1,689,000 above the enacted 
level, and a reduction of $1,095,000 from the request. The 
recommendation does not include the reductions proposed in the 
budget request for Partners for Fish and Wildlife and the 
Coastal Program. For the Partners for Fish and Wildlife 
program, the recommendation does not provide the total program 
change increase requested in the budget but instead provides an 
increase of $1,000,000 over the enacted level for partner 
activities that can include additional work on invasive species 
and landscape habitat protection.
    National Wildlife Refuge System.--The recommendation 
includes $514,164,000 for the National Wildlife Refuge System, 
an increase of $25,913,000 above the enacted level, and 
$4,635,000 above the budget request.
    The recommendation continues support for the directive in 
the House Report 114-632 instituting signage on any individual 
refuge where trapping occurs and for adherence to the guidance 
that is now included in the refuge manual. The Service is 
directed to update the information posted on the website and 
physical premises of any refuge to note if body-gripping traps 
are on the premises. No later than 180 days after enactment of 
this Act, the Service shall report to the Committee on any 
refuge that uses body-gripping traps and why non-lethal control 
methods are not utilized instead for refuge management 
purposes, the types of body-gripping traps used; trap check 
time requirements; and the number and type of species captured, 
both target and non-target. This report is to be updated 
annually.
    Wildlife and Habitat Management.--The recommendation 
includes $239,437,000, an increase of $4,970,000 above the 
enacted level and equal to the budget request. The Committee 
supports the funding increase included in the budget request 
for Invasive Species Strike Teams and the reduction proposed 
for Inventory and Monitoring. The Committee understands the use 
of native plant materials increases resilience, reduces 
invasive species, and creates a more effective deterrent to 
fire. The Service is directed to brief the Committee on the use 
of native plants in refuge restoration within 180 days of 
enactment of this Act.
    Regional refuges such as the Silvio O. Conte National Fish 
and Wildlife Refuge effectively work with local communities and 
landowners to achieve collaborative conservation. The Committee 
encourages the continuation of this effort. The Service is also 
encouraged to sufficiently staff the Chesapeake Marshlands 
National Wildlife Refuge Complex.
    Refuge Visitor Services.--The recommendation includes 
$80,855,000, an increase of $7,536,000 above the enacted level, 
and equal to the budget request. The recommendation restores 
the reduction proposed in the budget request for Youth and 
Careers in Nature, which includes tribal youth, provides an 
additional $1,000,000 over the budget request for the Urban 
Wildlife Conservation Program, and provides $5,106,000 of the 
requested program increase for refuge visitor services. 
Engaging Americans of all ages with nature must be a priority.
    Refuge Law Enforcement.--Federal Wildlife Officers are the 
face of the Refuge System. Current refuge law enforcement 
staffing is at 22 percent of the staffing level recommended by 
the International Association of Chiefs of Police. The 
recommendation includes $45,307,000, an increase of $7,253,000 
above the enacted level and $2,112,000 above the budget 
request. This funding level provides an additional 40 FTE that 
are to be dispersed nationwide to ensure every refuge has law 
enforcement coverage by a Federal Wildlife Officer.
    Conservation Planning.--The recommendation provides 
$2,523,000, equal to the enacted level, and an increase of 
$2,523,000 above the budget request.
    Refuge Maintenance.--The recommendation includes 
$146,042,000, an increase of $6,154,000 above the enacted 
level, and equal to the budget request. The Service is 
encouraged to prioritize maintenance and restoration of units 
within the refuge system that were damaged by Hurricanes Sandy 
and Irene.
    Migratory Bird Management.--The recommendation includes 
$49,498,000 for Migratory Bird Management, an increase of 
$3,077,000 above the enacted level and $13,000 above the budget 
request. The recommendation provides $29,095,000 for 
Conservation and Monitoring which reflects the transfer of the 
$3,237,000 requested for Aviation Management to General 
Operations to correspond to Committee action in the fiscal year 
2019 enacted bill. The Committee provides an additional 
$250,000 to support the Service's efforts to work with 
landowners to reduce black vulture predation on livestock and 
to address the implementation of next steps identified in the 
December 17, 2018 summary report on the management of double 
crested cormorants. The recommendation provides $16,140,000 for 
North American Waterfowl Management Plan/Joint Ventures, an 
increase of $3,000,000 above the budget request. This program 
is essential for addressing the conservation needs of migratory 
birds by leveraging matching contributions from partners.
    The Committee remains concerned about the December 22, 2017 
legal opinion on the Migratory Bird Treaty Act (MBTA), M-37050, 
that is contrary to the long-standing interpretation of this 
Act by no longer prohibiting incidental take. Statistics on the 
Service website make it clear that migratory birds and their 
habitats remain at risk and that incidental take remains a 
threat. The Service is directed to report quarterly on the 
number of enforcement actions on the MBTA and its work with 
industry on voluntary actions to mitigate the impacts from 
development or activities that could result in incidental 
capture or mortality of migratory birds. This information 
should be compared to statistics from five years prior to M-
37050. This report should also include the costs associated 
with enforcement and a comparison of what was expended in the 
five years prior to M-37050.
    Law Enforcement.--The recommendation includes $81,217,000 
for law enforcement, $2,164,000 above the enacted level, and 
$4,000,000 above the budget request. The recommendation does 
not include the proposed reduction for the Indian Arts and 
Crafts Board but does accept the general program reduction. An 
additional $2,000,000 above the budget request is provided for 
wildlife trafficking. As in prior years, this increase may be 
used as necessary to supplement inspections.
    International Affairs.--The recommendation includes 
$18,023,000 for international affairs, $2,207,000 above the 
enacted level and $1,400,000 above the budget request. 
Increases above the budget request for Wildlife Trafficking 
include $1,200,000 in International Conservation and $200,000 
in International Wildlife Trade. The Committee supports the 
Service's efforts to modernize the international trade 
permitting system. The recommendation accepts the proposed 
reduction for the Arctic Council resulting from the ending of 
the U.S. chairmanship.
    The Committee recognizes the Service's work with Honduras, 
El Salvador, Guatemala, and Mexico to conserve priority species 
and ecosystems, and urges the continuation of these 
international partnerships in fiscal year 2020. The Committee 
directs the Service to submit a report within 60 days of the 
enactment of this Act on these efforts.
    The Committee also acknowledges and commends the enactment 
of the Defending Economic Livelihoods and Threatened Animals 
(DELTA) Act in 2018 and urges the Service, especially its 
International Affairs and Office of Law Enforcement programs, 
to work with Angola, Namibia, and Botswana in combating 
poaching and wildlife trafficking and strengthening protected 
area management, including through trans-boundary conservation 
programs in the region, with an initial focus on Angola.
    Fish and Aquatic Conservation.--The recommendation includes 
$178,424,000 for Fish and Aquatic Conservation, an increase of 
$11,197,000 above the enacted level and $22,797,000 above the 
budget request. The Service is expected to continue to work 
with partners and the public to manage fish and other aquatic 
resources for the benefit of the American people.
    National Fish Hatchery System Operations.--The 
recommendation provides $59,875,000, an increase of $53,000 
above the enacted level and $3,485,000 above the budget 
request. This funding level includes: $550,000 to implement the 
Great Lakes Consent Decree; $1,430,000 for the national wild 
fish health survey program, $1,475,000 to continue mass marking 
salmonids in the Pacific Northwest; and $1,200,000 for the 
Aquatic Animal Drug Approval Partnership. The recommendation 
provides $1,610,000 for Klamath Restoration. The budget request 
supports operation of national fish hatcheries at the enacted 
level.
    The Service may not terminate operations or close any 
facility of the National Fish Hatchery System. None of the 
production programs listed in the March 2013 National Fish 
Hatchery System Strategic Hatchery and Workforce Planning 
Report may be reduced or terminated without advance, informal 
consultation with affected States and Tribes.
    The Service is expected to continue funding mitigation 
hatchery programs via reimbursable agreements with Federal 
partners. Future agreements should include reimbursement for 
production, facilities, and administrative costs. The Service 
is expected to ensure that its costs are fully reimbursed 
before proposing to reduce or redirect base funding.
    The Committee encourages the Service to carry out sampling 
of re-introduced lake sturgeon and monitor the survival of 
juvenile lake sturgeon after they are stocked to determine 
whether the stocking rates should be increased to meet the 
target stock level.
    Maintenance and Equipment.--The recommendation provides 
$25,846,000, an increase of $2,926,000 above the enacted level 
and equal to the budget request, which includes $13,249,000 to 
reduce the deferred maintenance backlog. The Service should 
continue to allocate this funding to facilities with the most 
severe health and safety deficiencies across the System as a 
whole, rather than by region. All other funds should continue 
to be allocated as in prior years and should include mitigation 
hatcheries as needed to supplement reimbursable funds.
    Aquatic Habitat and Species Conservation.--The 
recommendation includes $92,703,000 for Aquatic Habitat and 
Species Conservation, an increase of $8,218,000 above the 
enacted level and $19,312,000 above the budget request. A 
discussion of the program components follows.
    Habitat Assessment and Restoration.--The recommendation 
includes $36,161,000, of which: $268,000 is for the Chehalis 
Fisheries Restoration Program; $10,000,000 is to implement the 
Delaware River Basin Conservation Act; $13,998,000 is for the 
National Fish Passage Program; and $6,664,000 is for the 
National Fish Habitat Action Plan. The Service is directed to 
be transparent with its partners regarding Federal costs for 
program coordination and administration of the National Fish 
Habitat Action Plan. The Service is encouraged to continue its 
collaborative work with partners on the Warren Glen Dam removal 
project and to report back to the Committee on the status of 
the project 180 days after enactment of this Act.
    Population Assessment and Cooperative Management.--The 
recommendation provides $30,241,000, of which $558,000 is to 
implement the Great Lakes Consent Decree, and $458,000 is to 
implement the Great Lakes Fish and Wildlife Restoration Act. 
The recommendation does not accept the proposed reduction for 
the Lake Champlain sea lamprey program and funds it at the 
enacted level. Within available funds, $250,000 is provided for 
Service biologists to research and develop a plan to eradicate 
northern snakehead in the Chesapeake Bay Watershed.
    Aquatic Invasive Species.--The recommendation includes 
$26,301,000, of which: $2,000,000 is to help States implement 
plans required by the National Invasive Species Act (NISA); 
$1,566,000 is for NISA coordination; $4,088,000 is to implement 
subsection 5(d)(2) of the Lake Tahoe Restoration Act; 
$11,600,000 is for controlling Asian carp as outlined in House 
Report 116-9; $1,011,000 is for Sea Lamprey administration 
costs; and $3,000,000 is to prevent the spread of quagga and 
zebra mussels in the West.
    Of the amount recommended for Asian carp control and 
prevention, $2,000,000 is to expand and perfect the combined 
use of contract fishing and deterrents to extirpate Asian carp, 
including grass carp, where already established, pursuant to 
individual State laws and regulations and as called for in 
management plans. Contract fishing has proven to be an 
extremely effective management tool and it is not meant to 
develop a sustainable commercial fishery. The Service shall 
continue to work with its State partners to gather data to 
analyze the impacts of contract fishing to control abundance 
and movement of Asian carp and to report its findings to the 
Committee within 180 days of enactment of this Act.
    The Service is encouraged to pursue technologies to aid in 
the elimination, mitigation, or control of aquatic nuisance 
species and invasive species that do not result in the addition 
of chemical agents to the ecosystem that can lead to harmful 
by-products such as algal blooms.
    Cooperative Landscape Conservation.--The 22 Landscape 
Conservation Cooperatives (LCCs) play an important role in 
bringing diverse partners together to focus on shared 
conservation goals and provide a forum and resources to address 
climate change. The Committee recommendation rejects the 
Administration's proposal to eliminate this program and 
includes $12,500,000 for these 22 LCCs, equal to the enacted 
level. If any LCC is not currently operating, the Service is 
directed to reestablish it.
    The recommendation restores funding for the program because 
there is inherent value in working with partners and 
stakeholders to address and understand the continual assaults 
on cultural and natural resources from climate change and 
address shared conservation goals.
    The reprogramming guidelines are explicit that any 
deviation from the budget justification must be transparent and 
officially presented to the Appropriations Committees of the 
House of Representatives and the Senate. If the Service would 
like to make any changes to this program, it must prepare a 
report to accompany an official reprogramming request to the 
Committees. The report must include the following information 
for each of the 22 LCCs from fiscal year 2016 to the present: 
funding allocations; the number of staff, their assigned 
roles--such as LCC coordinator, science coordinator, and 
whether their work or job description has changed; meetings and 
forums with stakeholders; climate change research with a 
corresponding timeline for initiation and completion of work; 
and an analysis on why the program change is beneficial. The 
report must also document the outreach the Service has made, or 
will make, to every State and partner associated with each of 
the 22 LCCs to solicit their input on the proposed change and a 
summary of the response. The Service is reliant on partners to 
accomplish its mission and must clearly demonstrate to Congress 
that the process used to devise any programmatic change has 
been transparent and inclusive.
    Science Support.--The recommendation does not approve the 
proposed elimination of the program and includes $17,267,000 
for the Science Support program, equal to the enacted level. 
This funding level includes $3,500,000 for research related to 
white-nose syndrome in bats. The Service should continue to co-
lead and implement the North American Bat Monitoring Program 
with other Federal, State, and non-governmental partners. The 
Service is also expected to partner with Cooperative Research 
Units whenever possible.
    General Operations.--The recommendation includes 
$137,987,000 for General Operations programs, a reduction of 
$10,723,000 below the enacted level and $2,879,000 below the 
budget request. This funding level provides $20,804,000 for 
Central Office Operations, a reduction of $1,000,000 below the 
budget request for the Office of the Director; $49,166,000 for 
Management and Administration, a reduction of $5,700,000 below 
the budget request as no funding is provided for the 
Department-wide reorganization; $35,332,000 for Servicewide 
Bill Paying, a reduction of $438,000 below the budget request 
for the Assistant Secretary Fish, Wildlife and Parks; 
$22,426,000 for the National Conservation Training Center, an 
increase of $1,000,000 above the budget request to provide 
funding for Youth and Careers in Nature, which includes tribal 
youth; and a rescission of $4,000,000 from fiscal year 2019 
funding provided for the Department-wide reorganization from 
Central Office Operations as noted in the joint explanatory 
statement accompanying the Consolidated Appropriations Act, 
2019 and outlined on pages GO-3 and GO-4 of the fiscal year 
2019 Budget Justification. The Committee directs the Service to 
use the balance of the fiscal year 2019 funding appropriated 
for the Department-wide reorganization to develop an electronic 
permitting system that will make the permitting process more 
efficient and can be used to combat the illegal trafficking of 
products and wildlife.
    The recommendation also includes $7,022,000 for the 
National Fish and Wildlife Foundation (NFWF), and $3,237,000 
for Aviation Management. Aviation management is funded under 
General Operations to accurately reflect the program's 
responsibilities across the Service.
    Everglades.--The Everglades Headwaters National Wildlife 
Refuge and Conservation Area was created to protect one of the 
last remaining grassland and longleaf pine savanna landscapes 
in eastern North America while securing water resources for 
seven million people in south Florida. The Committee continues 
its support for collaborative efforts to protect, restore, and 
conserve habitats for one of the greatest ecological treasures 
of the United States. The recommendation provides a minimum of 
$15,238,000 across multiple programs for Everglades 
restoration, including $2,718,000 to implement the 
Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan (CERP), and 
$3,700,000 for land acquisition.

                              CONSTRUCTION

 
 
 
Appropriation enacted, 2019...........................       $55,613,000
Budget estimate, 2020.................................        15,693,000
Recommended, 2020.....................................        15,693,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2019...............................       -39,920,000
    Budget estimate, 2020.............................                 0
 

    The Committee recommends $15,693,000 for Construction, the 
budget request. The detailed allocation of funding by activity 
is included in the table at the end of this report.
    When a construction project is completed or terminated and 
appropriated funds remain, the Service may use those balances 
to respond to unforeseen reconstruction, replacement, or repair 
of facilities or equipment damaged or destroyed by storms, 
floods, fires and similar unanticipated natural events.

------------------------------------------------------------------------
              Refuge, Hatchery, or                         Committee
    State          Other Unit         Budget Request     Recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
           CA Don Edwards San              $5,875,000         $5,875,000
               Francisco Bay
               National Wildlife
               Refuge.............
         MI   Jordan River                    500,000            500,000
               National Fish
               Hatchery...........
         VA   Harrison Lake                   558,000            558,000
               National Fish
               Hatchery...........
          *   Branch of Dam Safety            250,000            250,000
          *   Branch of Dam Safety            200,000            200,000
          *   Information                     250,000            250,000
               Resources &
               Technology
               Management.........
         GA   Chattahoochee Forest            816,000            816,000
               National Fish
               Hatchery...........
         WY   Saratoga National               644,000            644,000
               Fish Hatchery......
------------------------------------------------------------------------

                            LAND ACQUISITION

 
 
 
Appropriation enacted, 2019...........................       $65,189,000
Budget estimate, 2020.................................         9,864,000
Recommended, 2020.....................................        67,750,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2019...............................        +2,561,000
    Budget estimate, 2020.............................       +57,886,000
 

    The Committee recommends $67,750,000 for the Land 
Acquisition appropriation. This amount is $2,561,000 above the 
enacted level and $57,886,000 above the budget request, not 
including the proposed rescission. The recommendation does not 
accept the proposed rescission. Details of the recommendation 
are contained below and in the table at the back of this 
report.
    Because the Department has not made detailed, individual 
project information available in a timely manner, the Committee 
notes that the following list is preliminary in nature and may 
be revised later in the fiscal year 2020 budget process as 
additional information becomes available. The projects listed 
are in priority order, as determined by the Service.
    As the Service contemplates acquisitions, it should 
consider that sites, while not physically connected, often 
contain important ecological and cultural value when connected 
as part of a regional wildlife footprint. Future land 
acquisitions should also be prioritized to serve the various 
migratory flyways through an integrated migratory and 
ecological footprint across the Service.

------------------------------------------------------------------------
    State                     Project                      This Bill
------------------------------------------------------------------------
      IA/MN   Northern Tallgrass Prairie NWR.........         $1,000,000
         TX   Lower Rio Grande Valley NWR............          2,000,000
      SD/ND   Dakota Grassland Conservation Area.....          4,250,000
         FL   Everglades Headwaters NWR and                    3,700,000
               Conservation Area.....................
         WA   Steigerwald Lake NWR...................          1,900,000
         IA   Neal Smith NWR.........................            500,000
         LA   Bayou Sauvage NWR......................          2,000,000
         TX   Laguna Atascosa NWR....................          2,000,000
         FL   St. Marks NWR..........................          1,500,000
         WA   Willapa NWR............................          1,500,000
IA/IL/MN/WI   Upper Mississippi National Wildlife and          1,000,000
               Fish Refuge...........................
         MT   Montana National Wildlife Refuges and            2,000,000
               Conservation Areas....................
           CA North Central Valley Wildlife                      500,000
               Management Area.......................
         KS   Flint Hills Legacy Conservation Area...          3,000,000
          NC  Alligator River NWR....................          1,000,000
           CT/Great Thicket NWR......................            500,000
       NY/RI
           CA Humboldt Bay NWR.......................          1,100,000
         AR   Cache River NWR........................          1,800,000
             -----------------------------------------------------------
              Subtotal, Line Item Projects...........         31,250,000
------------------------------------------------------------------------


------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                     Budget  Request       This Bill
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Acquisition Management............         $9,526,000        $14,000,000
Recreational Access...............                  0          5,000,000
Emergencies, Hardships, and                       338          5,500,000
 Inholdings.......................
Exchanges.........................                  0          1,500,000
Land Protection Planning..........                  0            500,000
Highlands Conservation Act Grants.                  0         10,000,000
Rescission of Funds...............         -5,324,000                  0
                                   -------------------------------------
    Total, FWS Land Acquisition...          4,540,000         67,750,000
------------------------------------------------------------------------

            COOPERATIVE ENDANGERED SPECIES CONSERVATION FUND

    The Cooperative Endangered Species Conservation Fund 
(CESCF; Section 6 of the Endangered Species Act), administered 
by the Service's Ecological Services program, provides grant 
funding to States and Territories for species and habitat 
conservation actions on non-Federal lands, including habitat 
acquisition, conservation planning, habitat restoration, status 
surveys, captive propagation and reintroduction, research, and 
education.

 
 
 
Appropriation enacted, 2019...........................       $53,495,000
Budget estimate, 2020.................................                 0
Recommended, 2020.....................................        63,702,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2019...............................       +10,207,000
    Budget estimate, 2020.............................       +63,702,000
 

    The Committee recommends $63,702,000 for the Cooperative 
Endangered Species Conservation Fund, an increase of 
$10,207,000 above the enacted level, and $63,702,000 above the 
budget request. A detailed table of funding recommendations 
below the account level is provided at the end of this report. 
The additional funding will increase the grant funding 
available to States and Territories for species and habitat 
conservation actions on non-Federal lands. The recommendation 
only accepts $10,000,000 of the proposed rescission, to be 
derived from unobligated balances of appropriations made prior 
to fiscal year 2014.

                     NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE FUND

    The National Wildlife Refuge Fund shares refuge revenues 
and makes payments in lieu of taxes to counties in which 
Service lands are located.

 
 
 
Appropriation enacted, 2019...........................       $13,228,000
Budget estimate, 2020.................................                 0
Recommended, 2020.....................................        13,228,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2019...............................                 0
    Budget estimate, 2020.............................       +13,228,000
 

    The Committee recommends $13,228,000, equal to the enacted 
level and an increase of $13,228,000 above the budget request, 
for the National Wildlife Refuge Fund.

               NORTH AMERICAN WETLANDS CONSERVATION FUND

    The North American Wetlands Conservation Act of 1989 
provided for matching grants to carry out wetlands conservation 
projects in the United States, Canada, and Mexico for the 
benefit of wetlands-associated migratory birds and other 
wildlife. Additional program funding comes from fines, 
penalties, and forfeitures collected under the Migratory Bird 
Treaty Act of 1918; from Federal fuel excise taxes on small 
gasoline engines, as directed by amendments to the Federal Aid 
in Sport Fish Restoration Act of 1950, to benefit coastal 
ecosystem projects; and from interest accrued on the fund 
established under the Federal Aid in Wildlife Restoration Act 
of 1937. Authorization of appropriations in Public Law 109-322 
expired in fiscal year 2012.

 
 
 
Appropriation enacted, 2019...........................       $42,000,000
Budget estimate, 2020.................................        40,000,000
Recommended, 2020.....................................        50,000,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2019...............................        +8,000,000
    Budget estimate, 2020.............................       +10,000,000
 

    The Committee recommends $50,000,000 for the North American 
Wetlands Conservation Fund, an increase of $8,000,000 above the 
enacted level and an increase of $10,000,000 above the budget 
request.

                NEOTROPICAL MIGRATORY BIRD CONSERVATION

    The Neotropical Migratory Bird Conservation Act program 
provides matching grants to partners throughout the Western 
Hemisphere to promote the conservation of neotropical migratory 
birds in the United States, Canada, Latin America, and the 
Caribbean, with not less than 75 percent of the amounts 
available to be expended on projects outside the United States.

 
 
 
Appropriation enacted, 2019...........................        $3,910,000
Budget estimate, 2020.................................         3,900,000
Recommended, 2020.....................................         4,910,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2019...............................        +1,000,000
    Budget estimate, 2020.............................        +1,010,000
 

    The Committee recommends $4,910,000 for neotropical 
migratory bird conservation, an increase of $1,000,000 above 
the enacted level, and $1,010,000 above the budget request.

                MULTINATIONAL SPECIES CONSERVATION FUND

    The Multinational Species Conservation Fund provides 
technical and financial assistance to local communities, 
wildlife authorities, and non-governmental organizations in 
developing countries for on-the ground conservation work to 
protect African and Asian elephants, rhinoceroses, tigers, 
great apes, and marine turtles, and their habitats. Matching 
grants are provided to countries to strengthen anti-poaching 
activities; build community support for conservation near these 
species' habitats; survey and monitor; and provide 
infrastructure and field equipment necessary to conserve 
habitats. Authorizations of appropriations for the programs 
within this Fund have all expired.

 
 
 
Appropriation enacted, 2019...........................       $11,561,000
Budget estimate, 2020.................................         6,000,000
Recommended, 2020.....................................        15,000,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2019...............................        +3,439,000
    Budget estimate, 2020.............................        +9,000,000
 

    The Committee recommends $15,000,000 for the Multinational 
Species Conservation Fund to protect these priority species, an 
increase of $3,439,000 above the enacted level and $9,000,000 
above the budget request. A detailed table of funding 
recommendations below the account level is provided at the end 
of this report.

                    STATE AND TRIBAL WILDLIFE GRANTS

    The State and Tribal Wildlife Grants Program provides 
grants to States and Indian Tribes, the District of Columbia, 
Commonwealths, and Territories to conserve fish and wildlife 
and their habitats, including species that are not hunted or 
fished.

 
 
 
Appropriation enacted, 2019...........................       $64,571,000
Budget estimate, 2020.................................        31,286,000
Recommended, 2020.....................................        70,571,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2019...............................        +6,000,000
    Budget estimate, 2020.............................       +39,285,000
 

    The Committee recommends $70,571,000 for State and Tribal 
Wildlife Grants, an increase of $6,000,000 above the enacted 
level, and $39,285,000 above the budget request. The 
recommendation includes increased funding to acknowledge the 
important role States, Commonwealths, Territories, the District 
of Columbia, and Tribes play in managing and conserving species 
before they decline to levels that require listing.
    A detailed table of funding recommendations below the 
account level is provided at the end of this report. The 
Committee does not support the budget request of directing 
competitive grants solely toward funding big game research and 
conservation in the 11 western State-identified priority 
corridors. State Wildlife competitive grants must be available 
nationwide.

                       ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISIONS

    The recommendation continues various administrative 
provisions from fiscal year 2019.

                         National Park Service

    The mission of the National Park Service (Service) is to 
preserve unimpaired the natural and cultural resources and 
values of the national park system for the enjoyment, 
education, and inspiration of this and future generations. 
Established in 1916, the National Park Service has stewardship 
responsibilities for the protection and preservation of the 
heritage resources of the national park system. The system, 
consisting of 419 separate and distinct units, is recognized 
globally as a leader in park management and resource 
preservation. The national park system represents much of the 
finest the Nation has to offer in terms of natural beauty and 
wildlife, historical and archeological relics, and cultural 
heritage. Through its varied sites, the National Park Service 
attempts to explain America's history, interpret its culture, 
preserve examples of its natural ecosystems, and provide 
recreational and educational opportunities for U.S. citizens 
and visitors from all over the world. In addition, the National 
Park Service provides support to Tribal, local, and State 
governments to preserve culturally significant, ecologically 
important, and public recreational lands.

                 OPERATION OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM

 
 
 
Appropriation enacted, 2019...........................    $2,502,711,000
Budget estimate, 2020.................................     2,425,517,000
Recommended, 2020.....................................     2,646,979,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2019...............................      +144,268,000
    Budget estimate, 2020.............................      +221,462,000
 

    The Committee recommends $2,646,979,000 for Operation of 
the National Park System (ONPS), $144,268,000 above the enacted 
level and $221,462,000 above the budget request. The amounts 
recommended by the Committee compared with the budget estimates 
by activity are shown in the table at the end of this report.
    The Committee is acutely aware of the strain on the 
National Park System caused by its $11 billion maintenance 
backlog and insufficient staffing levels, which have declined 
by 2,500 positions since 2010. For the last several years, this 
Committee has focused on addressing the maintenance backlog 
issues across the National Park System. In this bill, the 
Committee not only continues those efforts, but also takes a 
major step to invest in the capacity of our national parks. The 
Committee recommends a $50,000,000 increase for the Service to 
begin rebuilding its workforce so that it can conserve and 
manage our natural and cultural resources to ensure an 
enriching national park experience for the public. These 
increases support the restoration of 500 positions in the parks 
and are distributed across Resource Stewardship, Visitor 
Services, Park Protection, and Park Support within the ONPS 
account.
    In its budget, the Service requests funding for facility 
operations and facilities maintenance as separate budget 
activities. The Committee then recommends funding levels in 
accordance with this structure and expects that the Service 
uses funding for the purposes Congress specifies. The Committee 
is, therefore, frustrated that the Service has continued its 
practice of allowing individual parks to use the operations and 
maintenance funds interchangeably.
    This means that increases Congress specified for certain 
activities are effectively absorbed into a general base. This 
practice makes it impossible for the Committee to fully 
exercise its oversight role and is, therefore, unacceptable. It 
is critical that the Service be able to account for the funds 
separately and the Service must educate park officials about 
the need to account for each activity separately and begin to 
integrate these principles into formal resource planning 
process at individual parks in the beginning of each fiscal 
year.
    The committee has reviewed the budget realignment proposed 
in the budget request for the ONPS account and believes this 
presentation is insufficient to meet the Committee's oversight 
needs. The Service is directed to provide alternatives to 
restructure the ONPS appropriation as expeditiously as possible 
and not later than 90 days following enactment of this Act. 
Additionally, until such time as a new structure is determined, 
the Service shall brief the Committee on the prior fiscal 
year's spending realignment within 60 days of the end of the 
fiscal year.
    Funding recommendations have been adjusted to align with 
the Service's fiscal year 2019 operating plan. The Committee 
expects the Service to execute its spending at the levels 
provided. The Service may not redistribute the recommendations 
in a fiscal year 2020 operating plan.
    Additional funding guidance is provided below.
    Resource Stewardship.--The Committee recommends 
$374,367,000 for resource stewardship, $39,930,000 above the 
enacted level and $52,805,000 above the budget request.
    Natural Resource Stewardship.--The Committee recommends 
$231,165,000 for Natural Resource Stewardship. The 
recommendation rejects the program changes proposed in the 
budget request, provides fixed costs, and includes a $1,093,000 
increase for the Partnership Wild & Scenic Rivers program. The 
recommendation provides $7,500,000 to begin rebuilding seasonal 
and permanent staffing capacity that parks have lost in recent 
years. This capacity is critical to fulfilling their core 
mission to preserve resources, provide for visitor enjoyment 
and protection, operate and maintain facilities, and manage and 
administer the national parks.
    Quagga and Zebra Mussel Programs are funded at $3,000,000, 
equal to the enacted level and a $1,000,000 increase above the 
budget request. The recommendation includes $800,000 for Cave 
and Karst Ecosystem Research, which is equal to the enacted 
level and a $1,000,000 increase above the budget request.
    Cultural Resource Stewardship.--The Committee recommends 
$132,920,000 for Cultural Resource Stewardship, an increase of 
$10,824,000 above the enacted level and $17,759,000 above the 
budget request. The recommendation rejects the program changes 
proposed in the budget request, provides fixed costs, and 
includes a program increase of $582,000 for the National Trails 
System. Additionally, the recommendation provides $1,000,000 
for the national networks, which include the National 
Underground Railroad Network to Freedom, the African American 
Civil Rights Network, the Reconstruction Era National Historic 
Network, and the World War II Heritage Cities Network. The 
recommendation also provides a $200,000 program increase above 
enacted for New Responsibilities at New and Existing Parks, for 
a total funding level of $425,000. The recommendation provides 
$7,500,000 to begin rebuilding seasonal and permanent staffing 
capacity that parks have lost in recent years. This capacity is 
critical to fulfilling their core mission to preserve 
resources, provide for visitor enjoyment and protection, 
operate and maintain facilities, and manage and administer the 
national parks.
    Everglades Restoration.--The Committee recommends 
$10,282,000 for the Everglades Restoration Program, an increase 
of $250,000 above the enacted level and $582,000 above the 
budget request. The Committee notes the substantial progress 
made toward restoration of the Everglades ecosystem and 
continues to support this multi-year effort to preserve one of 
the great ecological treasures of the United States.
    Visitor Services.--The Committee recommends $261,583,000 
for Visitor Services, $5,900,000 above the enacted level and 
$24,496,000 above the budget request. The Committee once again 
notes that the recommendation has been adjusted to align with 
the Service's fiscal year 2019 operating plan, and the 
recommendation rejects the program changes proposed in the 
budget request. The recommendation provides a $375,000 program 
increase for New Responsibilities at New and Existing Parks, 
for a total funding level of $737,000, equal to the request. 
Fixed costs are also provided. The recommendation provides 
$7,500,000 to begin rebuilding seasonal and permanent staffing 
capacity that parks have lost in recent years. This capacity is 
critical to fulfilling their core mission to preserve 
resources, provide for visitor enjoyment and protection, 
operate and maintain facilities, and manage and administer the 
national parks.
    Park Protection.--The Committee recommends $381,487,000 for 
Park Protection, an increase of $24,261,000 above the enacted 
level and $19,517,000 above the budget request. The 
recommendation rejects proposed reductions, provides fixed 
costs and includes the requested transfer. The recommendation 
provides $10,000,000 to begin rebuilding seasonal and permanent 
staffing capacity that parks have lost in recent years. This 
capacity is critical to fulfilling their core mission to 
preserve resources, provide for visitor enjoyment and 
protection, operate and maintain facilities, and manage and 
administer the national parks.
    Facility Operations and Maintenance.--The Committee 
recommends $892,448,000 for Facilities Operations and 
Maintenance, $70,910,000 above the enacted level and 
$95,658,000 above the budget request. The recommendation 
provides fixed costs and includes the requested program 
increases for New Responsibilities at New and Existing Park 
Area and DC Water and Sewer. The recommendation rejects all 
other proposed program changes. Additionally, the 
recommendation shifts $40,000,000 from unspecified funding in 
the construction account into this account, providing an 
additional $15,000,000 for Repair and Rehabilitation Projects, 
$15,000,000 for Cyclic Maintenance Projects, and $10,000,000 
for Maintenance Project Planning. This funding will allow the 
Service to address deferred maintenance on deteriorating 
facilities and to conduct large recurring or renewal projects. 
The recommendation provides $10,000,000 to begin rebuilding 
seasonal and permanent staffing capacity that parks have lost 
in recent years. This capacity is critical to fulfilling their 
core mission to preserve resources, provide for visitor 
enjoyment and protection, operate and maintain facilities, and 
manage and administer the national parks.
    Park Support.--The Committee recommends $543,507,000 for 
Park Support, $5,395,000 below the enacted level and 
$28,986,000 above the budget request. The recommendation 
provides fixed costs but does not include the $5,700,000 
requested for the Department Wide Reorganization or other 
proposed program changes, unless otherwise specified below. The 
recommendation provides $7,500,000 to begin rebuilding seasonal 
and permanent staffing capacity that parks have lost in recent 
years. This capacity is critical to fulfilling their core 
mission to preserve resources, provide for visitor enjoyment 
and protection, operate and maintain facilities, and manage and 
administer the national parks.
    Commissions.--The recommendation includes $500,000 for the 
400 Years of African-American History Commission to be spent in 
accordance with the 400 Years of African-American History 
Commission Act and $500,000 for the Semiquincentennial 
Commission to be spent in accordance with the 
Semiquincentennial Commission Act of 2016.
    Global Positioning System Modernization.--The 
recommendation provides $4,000,000 for the replacement of 
Global Positioning System (GPS) data collection devices used by 
the Service for facilities planning, lands administration, 
visitor safety, and infrastructure protection. The Committee is 
aware that approximately 25 percent of the Service's field data 
collection devices use an operating system that are no longer 
supported by the manufacturer and, therefore, the devices are 
not able to comply with the Department's Information Technology 
security requirements. The funds provided will allow the 
Service to bring field data collection devices into compliance.
    National Park Foundation.--The recommendation accepts the 
proposal to move funding for the National Park Foundation from 
the Centennial Challenge account into the Operation of the 
National Park System account, a total of $5,000,000. 
Accompanying bill language is included, as requested.
    New Responsibilities at New and Existing Park Areas.--The 
recommendation provides $369,000 for New Responsibilities at 
New and Existing Park Areas, as requested.
    Additional Guidance.--The following additional direction 
and guidance is provided with respect to funding provided 
within this account:
    America's First Frontier.--The Committee urges the Service 
to advance interpretive efforts at existing Service sites and 
in collaboration with other Federal, State, and local agencies, 
including other bureaus within the Department of the Interior, 
to detail the start of westward expansion through the Northwest 
Territory as Americas First Frontier.
    Autonomous Parks.--The Committee encourages the Service to 
develop guidance and procedures that can be used at individual 
parks to determine appropriate uses of autonomous vehicles for 
visitor transportation within parks. The guidance should 
include vehicle features that provide for the best usage within 
the parks, including but not limited to, rigorous safety 
certification, soundless operation, and fully electric or 
emissions free operation.
    Chesapeake and Ohio Canal National Historical Park.--The 
Committee looks favorably on the Cooperative Management 
Agreement approach currently being used for designing, 
constructing, and establishing the Service's occupancy at the 
new headquarters for the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal National 
Historical Park. The Service is encouraged to explore the use 
of this model, where viable and appropriate, as an alternative 
to the GSA leasing process for relocating or developing new 
permanent headquarters, such as the headquarters for the 
Mississippi National River and Recreation Area.
    Commercial Use Authorization Requirements/Fee changes.--The 
Committee notes concerns raised by commercial tour operators 
regarding the Service's April 2018 plan standardizing its 
Commercial Use Authorization (CUA) requirements and changes to 
CUA fees for road-based commercial tour operators. The 
Committee acknowledges the Service's efforts to address these 
concerns, however, additional engagement with commercial tour 
operators is necessary. This engagement should include 
discussions about whether or not further changes to the plan 
are warranted. The Service should also conduct outreach to 
field staff, commercial tour operators and the public. The 
Committee directs the Service to establish a communication plan 
to ensure commercial tour operators have consistent and 
transparent information available to them. The Service should 
provide the plan to the Committee within 60 days of enactment 
of this Act.
    Human Trafficking in National Parks.--The Committee notes 
concern raised about reports of human trafficking in our 
nation's national parks. The Committee urges the Service to 
provide training to staff to identify signs of trafficking and 
how to combat it.
    Outreach.--The Committee recognizes that the Service has 
taken steps to increase outreach, make parks more accessible, 
and increase recruitment within minority schools and 
communities. The Committee directs the Service to continue 
these efforts and work to develop partnerships and programs 
with Hispanic Serving Institutions, Historically Black Colleges 
and Universities, and other Minority Serving Institutions that 
contribute to the mission of the National Park Service. The 
Committee directs the Service to submit a report to Congress on 
its efforts no later than 120 days after enactment of this Act.
    Vietnam Veterans Memorial.--The Committee acknowledges that 
visiting the Vietnam Veterans Memorial can be a powerful 
healing experience for surviving servicemembers and families of 
the fallen. The Committee is aware the number of Vietnam 
veterans and surviving relatives diminishes every month due to 
their advanced age. The Committee directs the Service to 
provide technical assistance to the Department of Defense's 
Office of Commemorations to provide nationwide access to the 
Vietnam Veterans Memorial through a traveling exhibit and 
education center. The Committee urges the Service to work with 
an established non-profit Vietnam veterans organization already 
implementing this mobile, community-based commemorative and 
educational programming to further expand public access, 
promote healing, and teach the lessons of the Vietnam War to 
future generations of Americans.
    Visually Impaired.--The Committee recommends the National 
Park Service investigate the feasibility of deploying access 
technologies for the visually impaired that enable access to 
visual information, enhance independent navigation and provide 
descriptions of visual elements in real time at National Park 
Service administered parks and monuments.
    Water Filling Stations.--The Committee supports the use of 
free water filling stations to improve the visitor experience, 
reduce waste management costs, and demonstrate ``leave no 
trace'' leadership. In some Park Units where water refilling 
stations already exist, water refilling stations have become 
natural displays for educational, interpretative, safety, or 
other useful visitor information. Future stations should 
implement this best practice to further improve the visitor 
experience.
    WWII Memorial.--The Committee recognizes that the World War 
II Memorial is one of the most visited Memorials in our 
nation's Capital, with an estimated five million visitors each 
year. The Committee is concerned that the proposed operations 
plan does not address a hairline fracture in the Atlantic side 
of the memorial. This fracture requires immediate attention 
before further damage leads to increased repair costs. Within 
90 days of enactment of this Act, the Service shall report to 
the Committee on its plans to address this hairline fracture. 
The 75th anniversary of the American victory in World War II 
will be celebrated this year and the memorial symbolizes this 
defining event.

                  NATIONAL RECREATION AND PRESERVATION

    The National Recreation and Preservation account provides 
for outdoor recreation planning, preservation of cultural and 
national heritage resources, technical assistance to Federal, 
State and local agencies, and administration of Historic 
Preservation Fund grants.

 
 
 
Appropriation enacted, 2019...........................       $64,138,000
Budget estimate, 2020.................................        32,337,000
Recommended, 2020.....................................        73,508,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2019...............................        +9,370,000
    Budget estimate, 2020.............................       +41,171,000
 

    The Committee recommends $73,508,000 for national 
recreation and preservation, $9,370,000 above the enacted level 
and $41,171,000 above the budget request. The amounts 
recommended by the Committee compared with the budget estimates 
by activity are shown in the table at the end of this report.
    Natural Programs.--The Committee recommends $17,976,000 for 
the Natural Programs activity, an increase of $3,806,000 above 
the enacted level and $6,781,000 above the budget request. The 
recommendation rejects the reductions proposed in the budget 
request. The proposed transfer is accepted and the requested 
increases for fixed costs are provided.
    Rivers, Trails, and Conservation Assistance.--The Committee 
recommends $13,478,000 for the Rivers, Trails, and Conservation 
program, $3,445,000 above the enacted level and $4,420,000 
above the budget request. The recommendation includes a program 
increase of $3,500,000 to provide technical assistance and work 
with partners, including local leaders and nonprofit 
organizations, to enhance on-water education and recreation 
programming for youth.
    Chesapeake Bay Gateways and Trails.--The Committee 
recommends $2,270,000 for Chesapeake Bay Gateways and Trails, 
an increase of $250,000 above the enacted level and $2,270,000 
above the budget request.
    Cultural Programs.--The Committee recommends $31,196,000 
for the Cultural Programs activity, an increase of $5,634,000 
above the enacted level and $11,792,000 above the budget 
request. The recommendation rejects the reductions proposed in 
the budget request, provides the requested increases for fixed 
costs, and a program increase of $300,000.
    Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation 
Grants.--The Committee recommends $1,907,000 for Native 
American Graves Protection and Repatriation Grants, an increase 
of $250,000 above the enacted level and $1,907,000 above the 
budget request.
    Japanese Confinement Site Grants.--The Committee recommends 
$3,155,000 for Japanese Confinement Site Grants, an increase of 
$250,000 above the enacted level and $3,155,000 above the 
budget request.
    American Indian and Native Hawaiian Art and Culture 
Grants.--The Committee recommends $1,250,000 for American 
Indian and Native Hawaiian Art and Culture Grants, an increase 
of $250,000 above the enacted level and $1,250,000 above the 
budget request.
    9/11 Memorial Act Grants.--The Committee recommends 
$2,000,000 for the competitive grant program, as authorized by 
the 9/11 Memorial Act (Public Law 115-413).
    Grants Administration.--The Committee accepts the proposed 
transfer of the funding in the grants administration budget 
activity into Cultural Programs and provides $2,815,000, an 
increase of $2,815,000 above the enacted level and $832,000 
above the budget request. This amount represents a $2,004,000 
transfer, a program increase of $800,000, and fixed costs, as 
requested.
    International Park Affairs.--The Committee recommends 
$1,903,000 for International Park Affairs, an increase of 
$255,000 above the enacted level and $928,000 above the budget 
request. The recommendation rejects the proposed transfer and 
provides requested fixed costs, and a program increase of 
$250,000.
    Heritage Partnership Programs.--The Committee recommends 
$21,998,000 for Heritage Partnership Programs, an increase of 
$1,677,000 above the enacted level and $21,624,000 above the 
budget request.
    Commissions and Grants.--The Committee notes that the 
recent enactment of the John D. Dingell, Jr. Conservation, 
Management, and Recreation Act (Public Law 116-9) created six 
new National Heritage Areas (NHAs). The recommendation, 
therefore, provides $20,812,000 for Commissions and Grants, 
which is sufficient to provide stable funding sources for both 
the new and existing NHAs. This is an increase of $1,473,000 
above the enacted level and $20,812,000 above the budget 
request. The Committee continues the directive contained in the 
explanatory statement that accompanied Public Law 116-6 with 
regards to funding distribution.
    The bill includes within Title I General Provisions bill 
language extending the authorization for the National Aviation 
Heritage Area and the Oil Region National Heritage Area. The 
bill also includes language addressing the Last Green Valley 
National Heritage Corridor, the South Carolina National 
Heritage Corridor, and the Erie Canalway National Heritage 
Corridor.
    Administrative Support.--The recommendation provides 
$1,186,000 for administrative support, an increase of $204,000 
above the enacted level and $812,000 above the budget request. 
Within this amount, fixed costs are provided, and a program 
increase of $200,000 is included to build additional 
administrative capacity to support the new NHAs.
    Additional Guidance.--The following additional direction 
and guidance is provided with respect to funding provided 
within this account:
    Chief Standing Bear Trail.--The Committee recognizes the 
importance of Chief Standing Bear as one of America's earliest 
civil rights leaders. The Committee supports work being done at 
the state and local level to establish a multi-state trail 
commemorating his accomplishments and urges the Secretary of 
the Interior to assist in these efforts.
    Crossroads of the West Historic District.--Congress 
designated the Crossroads of the West Historic District in 
Public Law 106-577, section 302, to preserve and enhance the 
historic character of the properties around Union Station in 
Ogden, Utah. Congress authorized $5 million for this purpose. 
To date, $1.5 million has been appropriated. The funding 
recommended in this bill will allow National Heritage Areas, 
such as Crossroads of the West Historic District to continue to 
develop as Congress intended. The Park Service is a member of 
the Management Committee for the Historic District.
    National Natural Landmarks.--The Wetumpka Impact Crater, 
located in Elmore County, Alabama, is a uniquely preserved 
marine impact crater created approximately 80 million years ago 
when an asteroid measuring an estimated 350 meters in diameter 
struck a coastal basin under 300-400 feet of water. The crater 
is widely considered to be the best-preserved marine impact 
crater ever discovered and one of only about six in the entire 
World. Given that the crater is an extremely rare and well-
preserved geologic feature of national and international 
significance, the Committee urges the Service to assess the 
suitability of designating the Wetumpka Marine Impact Crater as 
a National Natural Landmark.

                       HISTORIC PRESERVATION FUND

    The Historic Preservation Fund supports the State historic 
preservation offices to perform a variety of functions. These 
include State management and administration of existing grant 
obligations; review and advice on Federal projects and actions; 
determinations and nominations to the National Register; Tax 
Act certifications; and technical preservation services. The 
States also review properties to develop data for planning use. 
Funding in this account also supports direct grants to 
qualifying organizations for individual preservation projects 
and for activities in support of heritage tourism and local 
historic preservation.

 
 
 
Appropriation enacted, 2019...........................      $102,660,000
Budget estimate, 2020.................................        32,672,000
Recommended, 2020.....................................       121,660,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2019...............................       +19,000,000
    Budget estimate, 2020.............................       +88,988,000
 

    The Committee recommends $121,660,000 for historic 
preservation, $19,000,000 above the enacted level and 
$88,988,000 above the budget request.
    State Historic Preservation Offices.--The bill provides 
$53,675,000 for State Historic Preservation Offices, an 
increase of $4,000,000 above the enacted level and $26,741,000 
above the budget request.
    Tribal Historic Preservation Offices.--The bill provides 
$13,735,000 for Tribal Historic Preservation Offices, 
$2,000,000 above the enacted level and $7,997,000 above the 
budget request.
    Competitive Grants.--The Committee rejects the proposed 
elimination of the competitive grants program and recommends 
$23,250,000, an increase of $8,000,000 above the enacted level. 
Competitive grants to document, interpret, and preserve 
historical sites associated with the African American Civil 
Rights Movement are funded at $17,500,000, an increase of 
$3,000,000 above the enacted level. Building on the success of 
this program, the Committee provides $5,000,000 to establish a 
new civil rights grant program that would preserve and 
highlight the sites and stories associated with securing civil 
rights for All Americans, including women, American Latino, 
Native American, Alaska Native, Native Hawaiian, and LGBTQ 
Americans. The recommendation also includes $750,000 for grants 
to under-represented communities.
    Save America's Treasures Grants.--The Committee rejects the 
proposed elimination of the Save America's Treasures Grant 
program and recommends $16,000,000, an increase of $3,000,000 
above the enacted level. The Save America's Treasures 
competitive grant program preserves our nation's most 
significant historic and cultural resources. The demand for 
this program eclipses the funds available. In fiscal year 2017, 
the Service received applications requesting more than six 
times the available funding.
    Grants to Historically Black Colleges and Universities.--
The Committee rejects the proposed elimination of the 
Historically Black Colleges and Universities grant program and 
provides $10,000,000, an increase of $2,000,000 above the 
enacted level. The Committee notes that the John D. Dingell, 
Jr. Conservation, Management, and Recreation Act (Public Law 
116-9) reauthorized the Historically Black Colleges and 
Universities Historic Preservation Fund Program through fiscal 
year 2025. The recommendation funds the program at the fully 
authorized amount.
    Additional Guidance.--The following guidance is provided 
with respect to funding provided within this account:
    Chisholm and Great Western Trail.--The Committee is 
concerned with the Service's lack of progress in completing a 
final study on the feasibility of designating the Chisholm and 
Great Western Trail cattle trails as national historic routes, 
as directed by Section 5303 of the Omnibus Public Land 
Management Act of 2009. The Committee encourages the Service to 
work expeditiously to complete the study in a timely fashion 
and report back to the Committee on any impediments to 
completion.
    Hispanic Heritage Sites.--The Committee is concerned that 
across the United States, many sites that are historically 
connected to Hispanic contributions to American society and 
culture have not been given proper recognition, which affects 
how Americans see Hispanics in U.S. history. While the Service 
has taken steps to improve Hispanic representation in heritage 
sites, the Committee believes there is more work to be done and 
directs the Service to study Hispanic heritage representation 
in the National Park System and submit a report to the 
Committee no later than 180 days after enactment of this Act.
    Proposed Rulemaking.--The Committee is concerned with the 
Service's proposal to modify long-standing procedures to 
nominate properties to the National Register. It remains 
unclear to the Committee what problems the Service is trying to 
solve by its proposal. The Committee does not believe that the 
proposed changes are required by the minor amendments that 
Congress made to the National Historic Preservation Act in 
2016. Further, the Committee is troubled that the Service 
failed to consult with other federal land management agencies, 
state and tribal historic preservation officers, and other key 
stakeholders during the proposal's development or conduct 
required consultation. The Committee urges the Service to 
withdraw the proposed rule and consult with key stakeholders on 
the underlying issues the Service is trying to resolve. Such 
stakeholders should include other federal land management 
agencies, including the Department of Defense, state and tribal 
historic preservation officers, and the National Trust for 
Historic Preservation. The Committee also expects the United 
States to enter into meaningful government-to-government 
consultation with affected tribes prior to finalizing any 
changes to the regulation.
    Shenandoah Valley Battlefields National Historic 
District.--The Shenandoah Valley Battlefields National Historic 
District has proven to be a unique public-private partnership 
that models protection and preservation of this nationally 
significant site. The Service is encouraged to consider 
reclassifying it as a National Battlefield Site.

                              CONSTRUCTION

 
 
 
Appropriation enacted, 2019...........................      $364,704,000
Budget estimate, 2020.................................       246,333,000
Recommended, 2020.....................................       319,704,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2019...............................       -45,000,000
    Budget estimate, 2020.............................       +73,371,000
 

    The Committee recommends $319,704,000 for Construction, 
$45,000,000 below the enacted level and $73,371,000 above the 
budget request. The recommendation provides fixed costs as 
requested. The fiscal year 2019 bill provided a general program 
increase for Construction. The Committee recommendation does 
not continue this unspecified funding, but rather directs it to 
priority areas. To that end, the recommendation provides 
increases in other parts of the Service's accounts that 
include: $15,000,000 for repair and rehabilitation projects, 
$15,000,000 for cyclic maintenance projects, $10,000,000 for 
maintenance project planning, $65,320,000 for line item 
construction projects. Other increases within the Construction 
account are shown in the table at the end of this report.
    Line-Item Construction.--The bill provides $212,331,000 for 
line-item construction, an increase of $65,320,000 above the 
enacted level and $51,639,000 above the budget request.
    No funds are provided for the project entitle 
``Rehabilitate Barracks'' at the Fort Vancouver National 
Historic Site. The Committee is aware that the proposed project 
was intended as part of a future plan to relocate the Service's 
Pacific West Regional Office from its current location in 
California. With the extension of the lease through August 
2023, the Service should not proceed on construction in fiscal 
year 2020 and instead utilize this time to work with 
stakeholders and Congress on the plan for the future of the 
regional office.
    The Committee notes that the majority of projects listed in 
the current, fiscal year 2020 budget justification were funded 
in the fiscal year 2019 enacted bill, thus making the proposed 
list largely redundant. Therefore, the Committee requested that 
the Service provide an updated list of proposed projects along 
with the corresponding project data sheets. Because the 
Department has not made project data sheets available in a 
timely manner, the Committee notes that the following list is 
preliminary in nature and may be revised later in the fiscal 
year 2020 budget process as additional information becomes 
available. The projects listed are in priority order, as 
determined by the Service.
    Given the size of the Service's maintenance and 
construction portfolio, the Committee is confident there is no 
shortage of project proposals that could be put forward and 
finds the reluctance to do so unacceptable. Therefore, the 
Committee directs that, within 30 days of the submission of the 
fiscal year 2021 budget or by March 1, 2020, whichever comes 
first, the Service shall submit to the Committee a prioritized 
list of projects and the corresponding project data sheets 
totaling 125% of the amount appropriated in the prior enacted 
fiscal year, with no less than one-third of the projects 
allocated to deferred maintenance.
    The following table details the line item construction 
activity for specific projects requested or provided by the 
administration.

                   NATIONAL PARK SERVICE CONSTRUCTION

------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                           Committee
    State            Project          Budget Request     recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
         NY   Statue of Liberty            $7,852,000         $7,852,000
               National Monument &
               Ellis Island,
               rehabilitate stone
               walls..............
         NJ   Statue of Liberty             5,501,000          5,501,000
               National Monument &
               Ellis Island,
               rehabilitate main
               immigration
               building...........
         PA   Independence                  3,587,000          3,587,000
               National Historical
               Park, replace
               critical chiller
               components.........
         PA   Independence                  3,669,000          3,669,000
               National Historical
               Park, replace
               Second Bank roof...
         PA   Independence                  3,127,000          3,127,000
               National Historical
               Park, preserve
               Second Bank walls..
         AL   Tuskegee Institute            3,533,000          3,533,000
               National Historic
               Site, preserve
               Carver Museum......
         MA   Boston National               9,117,000          9,117,000
               Historical Park,
               perform critical
               repairs............
         TN   Chickamauga &                 3,810,000          3,810,000
               Chattanooga
               National Military
               Park, Stabilize
               Moccasin Bend
               riverbank..........
         OR   Crater Lake National         10,613,000         10,613,000
               Park, correct
               structural
               deficiencies and
               stabilize..........
          SC  Fort Sumter National          4,566,000          4,566,000
               Monument,
               rehabilitate Fort
               Sumter breakwater..
         AZ   Grand Canyon                 16,700,000         16,700,000
               National Park,
               improve potable
               water supply.......
         MA   Boston National               5,445,000          5,445,000
               Historical Park,
               rehabilitate and
               replace heat and
               distribution system
           CO Curecanti National            7,080,000          7,080,000
               Recreation Area,
               rehabilitate Elk
               Creek visitor
               center.............
           CA Golden Gate National          6,311,000          6,311,000
               Recreation Area,
               repair park
               headquarters.......
         MO   Ozark National               21,697,000         21,697,000
               Scenic River,
               rehabilitate
               historic district
               cabins and lodge...
         MA   Cape Cod National             3,245,000          3,245,000
               Seashore, rebuild
               Nauset Light beach
               bathhouse..........
         WA   Fort Vancouver               15,368,000                  0
               National Historic
               Site, rehabilitate
               barracks...........
         AK   Western Arctic                3,068,000          3,068,000
               National Parklands,
               replace obsolete
               housing............
         AZ   Pipe Spring National          3,860,000          3,860,000
               Monument, replace
               obsolete housing...
         AK   Klondike Gold Rush            4,295,000          4,295,000
               National Historical
               Park, replace
               obsolete housing...
         WY   Yellowstone National          3,630,000          3,630,000
               Park, replace
               obsolete trailers..
         WY   Devil's Tower                 4,118,000          4,118,000
               National Monument,
               replace obsolete
               housing............
         WA   Olympic National              2,500,000          2,500,000
               Park, settlement
               for restoration....
                                   -------------------------------------
      ......  Subtotal, Projects          152,692,000        137,324,000
               included in budget
               request............
 
Additional
 Projects:
         OH   Perry's Victory &                     0         29,671,000
               International Peace
               Memorial, restore
               North and South
               seawalls...........
          NC  Cape Hatteras                         0         18,727,000
               National Seashore,
               repair Cape
               Hatteras lighthouse
         MD   Catoctin Mountain                     0         21,811,000
               Park, replace
               parkwide utility
               infrastructure.....
          SC  Congaree National                     0          4,798,000
               Park, replace
               wilderness
               boardwalk sections.
                                   -------------------------------------
      ......  Total...............        152,692,000        212,331,000
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Pavement Standards.--The Service is encouraged to review 
and update if necessary the pavement design and composition 
standards for highways under its jurisdiction.
    Rehabilitation of Carter Barron Amphitheatre.--The Service 
is commended for its efforts to ensure that the national parks 
and related facilities are safe, well-maintained, and available 
for public enjoyment. The Committee was pleased to see the 
Service requested funds in fiscal year 2019 for the 
rehabilitation of Carter Barron Amphitheatre in Rock Creek 
Park, a facility which has been closed since 2017. Given Carter 
Barron Amphitheatre's national historical significance and the 
vital role it plays as a venue for world-class entertainment 
and affordable programming in the nation's capital, the 
Committee encourages the Service to ensure that the 
rehabilitation of this facility is completed as expeditiously 
as possible.
    World Heritage Sites.--The Committee urges the Service to 
prioritize funding for the backlog of maintenance and 
preservation projects including National Park System units 
designated as World Heritage Sites and to submit a report to 
the Committees on Appropriations within 60 days of enactment of 
this Act on its efforts.

                    LAND AND WATER CONSERVATION FUND

                               RESCISSION

 
 
 
Appropriation enacted, 2019...........................                 0
Budget estimate, 2020.................................                 0
Recommended, 2020.....................................      -$28,140,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2019...............................       -28,140,000
    Budget estimate, 2020.............................       -28,140,000
 

    The bill includes the rescission of the annual contract 
authority provided by 16 U.S.C. 460l-10a in fiscal year 2020.

                 LAND ACQUISITION AND STATE ASSISTANCE

 
 
 
Appropriation enacted, 2019...........................      $168,444,000
Budget estimate, 2020.................................        14,828,000
Recommended, 2020.....................................       208,400,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2019...............................       +39,956,000
    Budget estimate, 2020.............................      +193,572,000
 

                            LAND ACQUISITION

    The Committee recommends $208,400,000 for the Land 
Acquisition appropriation. This amount is $39,956,000 above the 
enacted level and $193,572,000 above the budget request, not 
including the proposed rescission. Details of the 
recommendation are contained below and in the table at the back 
of this report.
    Because the Department has not made detailed, individual 
project information available in a timely manner, the Committee 
notes that the following list is preliminary in nature and may 
be revised later in the fiscal year 2020 budget process as 
additional information becomes available. The projects listed 
are in priority order, as determined by the Service.

------------------------------------------------------------------------
    State                     Project                      This Bill
------------------------------------------------------------------------
      WA/OR   Lewis and Clark National Historical             $2,555,000
               Park..................................
         GA   Cumberland Island National Seashore....          1,100,000
         TX   Palo Alto Battlefield National                   3,500,000
               Historical Park.......................
         NM   El Malpais National Monument...........          5,182,189
         VA   Petersburg National Battlefield........          2,417,811
      KY/TN   Big South Fork National River &                    850,000
               Recreation Area.......................
          NC  Guilford Courthouse National Military              400,000
               Park..................................
   Multiple   Battlefield Parks......................          2,000,000
         HI   Ala Kahakai National Historic Trail....          6,000,000
      NE/SD   Missouri National Recreation River.....          2,100,000
         ND   Theodore Roosevelt National Park.......            900,000
      MD/VA   George Washington Memorial Parkway.....          1,395,000
             -----------------------------------------------------------
              Subtotal, Line Item Projects...........         28,400,000
------------------------------------------------------------------------


------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                      Budget Request       This Bill
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Acquisition Management............         $8,828,000        $11,000,000
Recreational Access...............          1,000,000          5,000,000
Emergencies, Hardships,                             0          4,000,000
 Relocations, and Deficiencies....
Inholdings, Donations, and                          0          5,000,000
 Exchanges........................
American Battlefield Protection             5,000,000         15,000,000
 Program..........................
Rescission of Funds...............        -10,000,000                  0
                                   -------------------------------------
    Total, NPS Land Acquisition...          4,828,000         68,400,000
Assistance to States:
    State conservation grants                       0        110,000,000
     (formula)....................
    State conservation grants                       0         25,000,000
     (competitive)................
    Administrative expenses.......                  0          5,000,000
                                   -------------------------------------
        Total, Assistance to                        0        140,000,000
         States...................
                                   -------------------------------------
        Total, NPS Land                     4,828,000        208,400,000
         Acquisition and State
         Assistance...............
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    American Battlefield Protection Program Assistance 
Grants.--The Committee supports the American Battlefield 
Protection Program and provides $15,000,000, an increase of 
$5,000,000 above the enacted level and $10,000,000 above the 
budget request. The Committee recognizes the importance of 
public-private partnerships to maintain the preservation of 
America's battlefields and urges the Service to give priority 
to projects with broad partner support, including non-profits, 
academic institutions, and regional, State, Tribal and local 
government agencies, and in which the partner commits to match 
the grants on a 1:1 basis. The Committee encourages the 
Department to work with the authorizing committees of 
jurisdiction to review the authorities provided in the enabling 
legislation for battlefields that are designated as National 
Historic Districts and determine whether they should be 
reclassified as a National Battlefield.
    Arlington National Cemetery.--The Service is encouraged to 
continue to work expeditiously and collaboratively with the 
U.S. Army and Arlington National Cemetery regarding a potential 
land exchange along Memorial Avenue.

                          CENTENNIAL CHALLENGE

 
 
 
Appropriation enacted, 2019...........................       $20,000,000
Budget estimate, 2020.................................                 0
Recommended, 2020.....................................        20,000,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2019...............................                 0
    Budget estimate, 2020.............................       +20,000,000
 

    The Committee recommends $20,000,000 for the Centennial 
Challenge matching grant program, equal to the enacted level 
and $20,000,000 above the budget request. The recommendation 
accepts the budget proposal to move funding for the National 
Park Foundation out of the Centennial Challenge account to the 
ONPS account.

                    United States Geological Survey

    Originating in 1879, the United States Geological Survey 
(USGS or Survey) is the sole science agency for the Department 
of the Interior. It serves the Nation by providing reliable 
scientific information to describe and understand the Earth; 
monitor and protect public safety, health and American economic 
prosperity and improve resilience to natural hazards; inform 
stewardship of energy and mineral resources; help sustain 
healthy fish and wildlife populations; improve water resource 
decision making; investigate wildlife diseases; and provide 
accurate, high-resolution geospatial data. The Survey 
coordinates and collaborates within Interior and across the 
government as well as with States, Tribal nations, and 
academia. The diversity of Survey scientific expertise enables 
the bureau to provide scientific information to resource 
managers and planners, emergency response officials, and the 
public.

                 SURVEYS, INVESTIGATIONS, AND RESEARCH

 
 
 
Appropriation enacted, 2019...........................    $1,160,596,000
Budget estimate, 2020.................................       983,467,000
Recommended, 2020.....................................     1,236,398,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2019...............................       +75,802,000
    Budget estimate, 2020.............................      +252,931,000
 

    The Committee recommends $1,236,398,000 for Surveys, 
Investigations, and Research, $75,802,000 above the enacted 
level and $252,931,000 above the budget request. The Committee 
does not approve the budget restructure proposed in the budget 
request because it reduces program and funding transparency. 
All fixed costs outlined in the budget request are provided, 
but none of the requested program changes are agreed to unless 
specifically addressed below. Recommended program changes, 
instructions, and details follow below and in the table at the 
end of this report.
    The Survey provides critical scientific research and data 
to land and water managers in priority landscapes including the 
California Bay Delta, the Everglades, the Chesapeake Bay and 
the Great Lakes. This work is funded through multiple mission 
areas and accounts, and the Committee expects this work to 
continue at no less than fiscal year 2019 funding levels, 
unless otherwise directed.
    Ecosystems.--The Committee recommends $168,023,000 for 
Ecosystems programs as depicted in the fiscal year 2019 budget 
structure, an increase of $11,141,000 above the enacted level. 
The recommendation provides $16,456,000 for Status and Trends 
which includes a general reduction of $1,917,000; $45,469,000 
for Wildlife; and $38,570,000 for Environments which includes 
an increase of $2,000,000 for Chesapeake Bay research.
    The recommendation includes $22,136,000 for Fisheries, an 
increase of $3,000,000 above the enacted level. The Committee 
continues to be concerned about the significant data gaps that 
still exist in understanding and enhancing the Great Lakes 
ecosystem and is anticipating the briefing directed in House 
Report 116-9 to determine the funding level needed for 
scientific information used by resource managers such as 
provided by the Great Lakes Science Center. The $3,000,000 
increase provided in the recommendation is to be used for new 
biological assessment tools and technology to support fishery 
management and ecosystem-based decisions for the Great Lakes 
ecosystem.
    The Committee continues to be concerned about the economic, 
ecologic, and health threats posed by invasive species and has 
provided $21,392,000 for the Invasive Species program, an 
increase of $2,062,000 above the enacted level. The 
recommendation includes $8,620,000 for Asian carp control, of 
which $3,000,000 is for research on grass carp to contain or 
eradicate them. The recommendation also includes an increase of 
$1,000,000 for research on chronic wasting disease (CWD) in 
wild and captive populations of cervids. The Survey should 
provide no less than $1,720,000 for CWD research and should 
continue to collaborate with partners to develop early 
detection tools and compounds to disrupt transmission of the 
disease.
    The Committee recognizes the value of the Cooperative 
Research Units (CRUs) program and rejects the proposed 
elimination of the program. The recommendation includes a total 
of $24,000,000, an increase of $5,629,000 above the enacted 
level, to support these research institutions and maintain the 
educational pipeline, including improving and increasing youth 
involvement in science and resource management. The increase 
should be used to fill critical vacancies as quickly as 
practicable, with priority given to vacancies to build 
quantitative fisheries capacity in inland waters of the Upper 
Mississippi Basin. The CRUs are expected to coordinate new 
research projects with the Fish and Wildlife Service to the 
greatest extent practicable.
    Land Resources.--The Committee recommends $171,570,000 for 
Land Resources as depicted in the fiscal year 2019 budget 
structure, an increase of $13,271,000 above the enacted level. 
The recommendation includes $5,800,000 for the continued 
development of a ground system for satellite operations and 
provides the $10,905,000 needed for the maintenance, hardware, 
and software refresh of satellite operations. The total funding 
provided for satellite operations is $84,337,000, equal to the 
enacted level. Within funds provided for the National Land 
Imaging program, $4,847,000 is included for the National Civil 
Applications Center and $1,215,000 for Remote Sensing State 
grants. The recommendation includes $34,202,000 for Land Change 
Science, the enacted level plus fixed costs.
    National and Regional Climate Adaptation Science Centers.--
The Committee does not accept the funding reduction or 
realignment proposed in the budget request and provides 
$38,377,000, an increase of $13,042,000 above the enacted 
level. Climate Adaptation Science Centers (CASCs) provide 
actionable science and research that directly address many of 
the climate-related challenges unique to different regions of 
the country. The Committee believes the Administration's 
attempt to reduce and curtail the activities of these centers 
is shortsighted and counterproductive at a time when our 
natural and cultural resources, our communities, and our health 
are being assaulted by climate change. This increase ensures 
that all eight regional centers remain open, operational, and 
fully functional and is a step toward funding them at the 
authorized level. The Northeast Climate Adaptation Science 
Center currently encompasses 21 states with divergent climates 
and adaptation needs. The recommendation includes $4,000,000 to 
establish a Midwest Climate Adaptation Science Center to focus 
on and address the threats to natural and human communities in 
Midwest states and develop a more tailored strategic science 
agenda.
    Energy, Minerals, and Environmental Health.--The Committee 
recommends $111,113,000 for Energy, Minerals and Environmental 
Health, a reduction of $623,000 below the enacted level and an 
increase of $25,041,000 above the budget request.
    The recommendation includes $58,839,000 for the Mineral 
Resources Program, including $10,598,000, the budget request, 
for the Earth Mapping Resources Initiative, Earth MRI, to 
develop a plan to improve the topographic, geological, and 
geophysical mapping of the United States and make the data 
available electronically to support management of private-
sector mineral exploration of critical minerals and for land-
use planning. This effort will be done in collaboration with 
other Federal agencies, States, universities, outside partners, 
and stakeholders. The requested increase of $1,726,000 for 
completion of the magnetotelluric survey is not funded in 
Minerals Resources but included in the funding recommended for 
the Geomagnetism Program in the Natural Hazards Mission Area, 
the appropriate account in which to fund this program. The 
recommendation includes the reductions proposed in the budget 
request for the domestic mineral base assessment and minerals 
information, but not the reduction for research.
    The recommendation includes $26,379,000 for the Energy 
Resources Program. The Committee adopts the budget request but 
restores $500,000 of the proposed reduction for coal and 
uranium research to continue uranium research.
    The Committee does not accept the proposed elimination of 
the Environmental Health program. The recommendation funds 
Containment Biology at $10,897,000, an increase of $700,000 
above the enacted level which is to be used for research on the 
impacts of unconventional oil and gas. The recommendation also 
includes $14,998,000 for Toxic substances hydrology an increase 
of $2,400,000 above the enacted level which is to be used for 
research on unconventional oil and gas (UOG) to enhance the 
scope of ongoing efforts to distinguish actual from perceived 
contaminant hazards associated with production, management, and 
reuse of wastewaters and other waters produced during UOG 
activities. The Survey is directed to use $500,000 from within 
available funding, in conjunction with $500,000 provided by the 
Bureau of Land Management, to commission a report from the 
National Academy of Sciences on the impacts on ecosystem 
services of the Superior National Forest and the Boundary 
Waters Canoe Area Wilderness resulting from a Twin Metals 
sulfide-ore copper mine located in the watershed of the 
Boundary Waters Canoe Area Wilderness. The Committee supports 
the continuation of Survey research on understanding the 
prevalence of toxins in the nation's natural bodies of water by 
expanding its understanding of cyanobacteria and toxins in 
stream and wetland ecosystems and associated health impacts, 
and directs no less than $1,750,000 to these efforts. The 
Survey is encouraged to participate in interagency efforts to 
expedite the development and deployment of remote sensing tools 
to assist with early event warning delivered through mobile 
devices and web portals.
    Natural Hazards.--The Committee recommends $171,823,000 for 
natural hazards programs, an increase of $5,565,000 above the 
enacted level, and an increase of $26,798,000 above the budget 
request.
    The recommendation provides $85,375,000 for Earthquake 
hazards. The Committee strongly supports the Earthquake Hazards 
program and recommends $19,000,000 for continued development 
and expansion of the ShakeAlert West Coast earthquake early 
warning (EEW) system and $6,700,000 in infrastructure funding 
for capital costs associated with the buildout of the 
ShakeAlert EEW. The Committee is encouraged by the partnerships 
already in place with the Survey and California, Oregon and 
Washington to put ShakeAlert EEW into place. Additionally, the 
recommendation includes $5,000,000 in infrastructure funding 
for Advanced National Seismic System (ANSS) deferred 
maintenance and modernization and includes the continuation of 
$800,000 for the Central and Eastern U.S. Seismic Network 
(CEUSN) and $1,400,000 for Earthscope USArray. The 
recommendation does not accept the proposed increase in the 
budget request for National Seismic Hazard Model Improvement 
and accepts the proposed reduction for ANSS staffing.
    The Committee is concerned about the lack of knowledge and 
offshore real-time instrumentation available for the Cascadia 
subduction zone. Scientific understanding of earthquakes and 
the ocean environment will benefit from the wealth of offshore 
data collected. The Survey is to continue its development of an 
early earthquake warning system and its expansion into 
locations that will benefit from early detection and 
characterization of earthquakes and tsunamis.
    The Committee recommends $30,363,000 for the Volcano 
Hazards program. The recommendation maintains the enacted level 
for operations at high-threat volcanoes, next generation lahar 
detection operations, and next generation lahar detection 
system infrastructure on very high-threat volcanoes. This 
funding level will help the Survey ensure there is a system and 
equipment in place to monitor, detect, and warn the public of 
volcano and seismic hazards, including lahars, and earthquakes 
on high-threat volcanoes.
    The Committee recommends $4,154,000 for the Landslides 
Hazards program to prevent human and economic loss through the 
development of methods and models for landslide hazard 
assessment, monitoring, and tools for landslide early warning 
and situational awareness.
    The Committee recommends $7,161,000, for the Global 
Seismographic Network (GSN) which will continue the multiyear 
effort to address the deferred maintenance needs of the GSN, 
replace failing and obsolete equipment, and provide for the 
installation in 2020 of 15 to 20 Very Broad Band seismic 
sensors.
    The USGS Geomagnetism program is part of the U.S. National 
Space Weather Program (NSWP), an interagency collaboration that 
includes programs in the National Aeronautics and Space 
Administration (NASA), the Department of Defense, the National 
Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, and the National 
Science Foundation. The program provides data to the NSWP 
agencies, oil drilling services companies, geophysical 
surveying companies, and electrical transmission utilities. The 
Committee funds this program at $4,114,000 to ensure that all 
observatories remain open and operating and to avoid any 
disruption to this work. Included in this funding level is 
$1,726,000 for the completion of the Magnetotelluric Survey of 
the U.S. that was requested in the Mineral Resources Mission 
Area but is more appropriately funded in the Natural Hazards 
Mission Area.
    The Coastal and Marine Hazards and Resources program 
supports the hazards programs across the Survey and the 
Administration's priorities to ensure secure and reliable 
supplies of critical mineral and energy resources. The 
recommendation includes $40,656,000 and rejects the proposed 
reduction in research.
    Water Resources.--The Committee does not accept the 
proposed budget restructure and provides $239,917,000 for Water 
Resources. The recommendation includes $42,861,000 for Water 
Availability and Use Science and rejects the proposed 
reductions in the budget request except for the Mississippi 
Alluvial Plain Aquifer Assessment. The Water Resources Mission 
Area allows the Survey to provide information and tools to 
first responders, the public, water managers and planners, 
policy makers and other decision makers. The Committee urges 
the Survey to continue to engage with universities and other 
partners to utilize the best available technology to develop 
advanced modeling tools, state-of-the-art forecasts, and 
decision support systems for water emergencies and daily water 
operations.
    The Cooperative Matching Funds program is designed to bring 
State, Tribal, and local partners together to respond to 
emerging water issues through shared efforts and funding. The 
recommendation provides $63,529,000, an increase of $1,783,000 
above the enacted level. The recommendation rejects the 
proposal to eliminate Tribal Water and funds it at the enacted 
level.
    Streamgages are crucial to early warning and flood damage 
reduction efforts across the United States. The Committee 
recommends $93,284,000 for the National Groundwater and 
Streamflow Information Program, an increase of $10,611,000 
above the enacted level. The recommendation provides an 
increase of $4,770,000 for infrastructure investments in the 
streamgage network which will provide an additional 95 flood-
hardened gages to the Federal Priority Streamgage (FPS) network 
and will allow the Survey and partners to support approximately 
3,555 streamgages, which accelerates attainment of the long-
term goal of 4,760 sites. In addition, an increase of 
$7,000,000 is provided so the Survey can proceed with the next 
phase of the Next Generation Water Observing System. The 
Committee does not accept any of the proposed program 
reductions and provides a general reduction of $1,500,000. The 
Survey is not to reduce any program outlined in the 
recommendation and must inform the Committee about what 
activities would be reduced.
    The Committee recommends $93,772,000 for the National Water 
Quality program, an increase of $2,124,000 above the enacted 
level. This recommendation rejects the proposed reductions and 
includes an additional $283,000 for the Urban Waters Federal 
Partnership for a total funding level of $1,000,000. To 
understand the health effects of harmful algal blooms, monitor, 
characterize, prevent, and control them, the recommendation 
includes an increase of $1,500,000 over the enacted level for a 
total of $4,971,000. As part of this research, the Committee 
supports the Survey's examination of the pathways through which 
sediment and nutrients move through watersheds and into bodies 
of water and how that relates to the formation of harmful algal 
blooms. The Survey is also urged to coordinate with EPA to 
monitor the nations water systems and publish available data on 
the amount of Per- and Polyfluoroalkyl Substances (PFAS) 
chemicals detected in our water systems.
    The Water Resources Research Act was designed to provide 
more effective coordination of the nation's water research by 
establishing Water Resources Research Institutes at 
universities in each State, territory, and the District of 
Columbia. These institutes provide vital support to 
stakeholders, States, and Federal agencies for long-term water 
planning, policy development, and resource management. The 
recommendation includes $10,000,000 for this program, an 
increase of $3,500,000 above the enacted level. This increase 
includes $1,000,000 for research on aquatic invasive species in 
the Upper Mississippi River region to address a critical need 
for multi-state research.
    Core Science Systems.--The Committee does not accept the 
budget restructure and recommends $143,224,000 for Core Science 
Systems, an increase of $25,322,000 above the budget request. 
The recommendation includes $24,125,000, for Science, 
Synthesis, Analysis and Research, the enacted level plus fixed 
costs.
    The recommendation includes $34,468,000 for the National 
Cooperative Geologic Mapping Program, an increase of 
$10,071,000 above the enacted level. This increase provides an 
additional $10,000,000 to support launch of Phase Three of the 
National Geologic Map Database that will bring together 
detailed national and continental-resolution 2D and 3D 
information produced throughout the Survey and by federal and 
state partners. This information is an essential underpinning 
of the USGS Earth Map and Earth MRI initiatives and will 
enhance drinking water protection, hazards resilience, 
infrastructure design, natural resource management, and support 
a wide range of fundamental research applications.
    The recommendation includes $84,631,000 for the National 
Geospatial Program, an increase of $15,177,000 above the 
enacted level, which includes the following increases: 
$5,000,000 for 3DEP National Enhancement to accelerate 
achievement of 100% coverage of the Great Lakes region; 
$5,000,000 to work with State Geologic Surveys to develop a 3D 
Geologic Map GIS Database and migrate current and prior 
geologic mapping into a unified common GIS data standard; 
$2,000,000 for the US Topo program to procure product-on-demand 
updates; and $3,000,000 to produce digital surface models using 
unclassified satellite optical data for the U.S. and 
territories not mapped with LiDAR by 2021 in collaboration with 
appropriate U.S. agencies including the National Geospatial-
Intelligence Agency, NASA, and the National Science Foundation. 
The Committee supports the continued collaboration with 
partners to leverage the resources provided for 3DEP to achieve 
the goal of national coverage by 2026.
    The Committee notes the importance of this mission area to 
conduct detailed surveys and distribute the resulting high-
quality and highly-accurate topographic, geologic, 
hydrographic, and biogeographic maps and remotely-sensed data 
to the public. The Committee urges the Survey to continue to 
engage with universities and other partners to utilize the best 
available technology to develop scalable, automated systems 
that can rapidly identify emerging hazard threats and provide 
real-time risk, damage and vulnerability assessments, and 
planning capabilities onto a website to provide enough 
precision to aid emergency responders and decision makers. The 
Committee also acknowledges the National Geospatial Program's 
interest in any technology, systems, or partners that can 
accelerate or meet 3DEP requirements, regardless of the source 
(i.e. industry, academia, etc.)
    Science Support.--The Committee recommends $97,243,000 for 
science support, a reduction of $5,585,000 below the enacted 
level and $5,667,000 below the budget request. The 
recommendation does not provide the $6,200,000 requested for 
the Department-wide reorganization. The Committee believes the 
Survey has not presented strong foundational analysis or a 
compelling argument to support establishing a headquarters 
presence in the West. A relocation of the magnitude proposed in 
the budget request would dramatically change the organization, 
have significant financial costs, and impact the Survey's 
effectiveness and strategic national-level partnerships with 
Federal agencies, States, scientific organizations, and 
stakeholders. The Survey should not commit federal funds or 
personnel time to this relocation but instead focus its efforts 
on ensuring Survey operations are open and transparent, the 
quality and objectivity of Survey science is maintained, and 
investments are leveraged. The Committee expects administration 
and management services and information services to continue 
without reductions that would delay hiring, contracting, 
accounting functions, and other activities that support the 
missions of the Survey.
    Facilities.--The recommendation includes $133,485,000, an 
increase of $13,102,000 above the enacted level, and 
$12,189,000 above the budget request. The recommendation 
accepts the proposed $500,000 reduction from base funding for 
the Department-wide reorganization, restores the proposed 
reduction for deferred maintenance, and provides an increase of 
$5,000,000 for the National Wildlife Health Center to renovate 
the Biosafety level 3 Diagnostic Laboratories and convert to a 
new solid waste disposal system, a better use of the fiscal 
year 2020 funding requested by the Administration for the 
Department-wide reorganization. This investment ensures the 
investigation of outbreaks of wildlife disease can be done 
safely. The recommendation continues funding for the relocation 
of Menlo Park to Moffett Field.

                   Bureau of Ocean Energy Management


                        OCEAN ENERGY MANAGEMENT

 
 
 
Appropriation enacted, 2019...........................      $179,266,000
Budget estimate, 2020.................................       193,426,000
Recommended, 2020.....................................       182,781,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2019...............................        +3,515,000
    Budget estimate, 2020.............................       -10,645,000
 

                        OCEAN ENERGY MANAGEMENT

    The Committee recommends $182,781,000 for the Ocean Energy 
Management appropriation, $3,515,000 above the enacted level, 
including $1,015,000 for requested fixed costs, and $10,645,000 
below the budget request. The overall appropriation is 
partially offset through the collection of rental receipts and 
cost recovery fees totaling $60,000,000, resulting in a net 
appropriation of $122,781,000. Details of the recommendation 
are explained in the narrative below and through the table at 
the back of this report.
    Renewable Energy.--The Committee recommends $23,325,000 for 
Renewable Energy, $2,605,000 above the enacted level and 
$2,000,000 above the budget request. The recommendation 
includes $105,000 for fixed costs, and programmatic increases 
of $500,000, as requested, for additional leasing capacity, and 
a general increase of $2,000,000 for additional permitting and 
environmental staff.
    Conventional Energy.--The Committee recommends $59,565,000 
for Conventional Energy, $2,234,000 below the enacted level and 
$4,558,000 below the budget request. The recommendation 
includes $494,000 for fixed costs and the transfer of 
$2,728,000, as requested, to the new Marine Minerals activity 
noted below. The recommendation does not include the proposed 
increase for the national plan. Given the legal uncertainty 
surrounding the Bureau's efforts, the Committee believes 
providing this funding is not a responsible use of resources.
    Environmental Programs.--The Committee recommends 
$77,965,000 for Environmental Programs, $1,809,000 below the 
enacted level and $7,145,000 below the budget request. The 
recommendation includes $250,000 for fixed costs and the 
transfer of $2,059,000, as requested, to the new Marine 
Minerals activity. The recommendation does not include the 
proposed increase for the national plan given the concerns 
noted above, nor does it include the proposed reduction to 
other environmental studies as an offset for costs associated 
with the national plan. The Committee would urge the Bureau to 
offer greater detail when proposing substantial reductions to 
an ongoing program.
    Marine Minerals.--The Committee recommends $4,787,000 for 
Marine Minerals, $4,787,000 above the enacted level and 
$942,000 below the budget request. The Committee concurs with 
the Bureau's proposal to create this new activity within the 
Ocean Energy Management appropriation and has agreed to the 
transfer of funds from both the Conventional Energy and 
Environmental Programs activities as noted above. The 
recommendation does not include the proposed new programmatic 
funding, and the Committee directs that the Bureau continue to 
focus its marine minerals efforts on current projects.
    Executive Direction.--The Committee recommends $17,139,000 
for Executive Direction, $166,000 above the enacted level and 
equal to the request. The increase is fully attributable to 
fixed costs.
    General Provision.--Within the General Provisions section 
of this title, the Committee has included a provision which 
limits funding for the Bureau's pre-leasing and leasing 
activities concerning Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) lease sales 
to only those sales contained in the current and officially 
approved 2017-2022 OCS plan, which is the only operative 
offshore energy development plan that has complied with all 
procedural requirements set out in the Outer Continental Shelf 
Lands Act. Despite numerous assertions that no final decision 
on where OCS leasing would take place under the proposed new 
2019-2024 plan, the Bureau states in its budget justification 
that it is preparing ``four new environmental impact statements 
for the lease sales that are planned in 2020 or early 2021''. 
The Committee notes the significance of the Bureau's position 
that the lease sales are ``planned'' as opposed to merely 
``proposed'' and understands why many coastal communities 
believe their voices are not being heard. The Committee also 
believes that long-standing procedural requirements, many set 
in statutes such as the OCS Lands Act, serve an effective and 
useful purpose and moving forward with programmatic activities 
prior to the completion of the process is ill-advised, at best.
    Wind Energy.--The Committee is aware that the United States 
wind energy sector is rapidly expanding both on and offshore. 
As new projects arise and existing projects progress through 
the approval process the Committee urges the thorough 
consideration and accommodation of all affected interests 
including national defense, security, environmental, maritime 
safety, fisheries, and particularly locally affected community 
concerns.

             Bureau of Safety and Environmental Enforcement

    The Bureau of Safety and Environmental Enforcement is 
responsible for oversight of exploration, development, and 
production operations for oil, gas, and other marine minerals 
on the Outer Continental Shelf (OCS). The Bureau's safety and 
environmental compliance activities include facility 
inspections; safety and oil spill research; field operations; 
environmental compliance and enforcement; review of operator 
oil spill response plans; and operation of a national training 
center for inspectors and engineers.

             OFFSHORE SAFETY AND ENVIRONMENTAL ENFORCEMENT

 
 
 
Appropriation enacted, 2019...........................      $187,240,000
Budget estimate, 2020.................................       192,812,000
Recommended, 2020.....................................       192,812,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2019...............................        +5,572,000
    Budget estimate, 2020.............................                 0
 

             OFFSHORE SAFETY AND ENVIRONMENTAL ENFORCEMENT

    The Committee recommends $192,812,000 for the Offshore 
Safety and Environmental Enforcement appropriation, an increase 
of $5,572,000 above the enacted level and equal to the budget 
request. The recommendation includes $943,000 for fixed costs 
and the requested increase of $4,629,000 for the expansion of 
the Risk-Based Inspection Program initially established in 
2015. The overall appropriation is partially offset through the 
collection of rental receipts and inspection fees, totaling in 
aggregate $73,308,000 and producing a net appropriation of 
$119,504,000. As explained below, inspection fee receipts are 
$3,800,000 above the request and allow for an equivalent 
reduction in appropriated funds in the Operations, Safety and 
Regulation activity, yet result in a final funding level in 
that activity equal to the request. Further details of the 
recommendation by activity and the corresponding offsetting 
collections are displayed in the table at the back of the 
report that accompanies this Act.
    General Provisions.--Within the General Provisions section 
of this title, the Committee has recommended two provisions 
affecting the Bureau.
    Inspection fees.--Since fiscal year 2012, the Secretary of 
the Interior has been authorized to collect a nonrefundable 
inspection fee to offset the cost of inspecting oil and gas 
rigs operating within the Outer Continental Shelf. 
Unfortunately, despite increased costs to the Bureau these fees 
have not changed over the intervening seven fiscal years, 
resulting in a program which only recovers approximately two-
thirds of its actual cost. The Committee has therefore included 
a modest increase in fees of $3,800,000, which is the amount 
those fees would have increased had they been tied to 
inflation. In addition, the Committee has finally adopted the 
Bureau's request for a new, non-rig inspection fee totaling 
$2,800,000. As the Bureau notes, non-rig inspections have risen 
from 184 in fiscal year 2014 to 470 in fiscal year 2018, and 
``pose an increased risk in comparison to the activities 
conducted by a `drilling rig'.'' Given the fact that the Bureau 
is required to inspect these facilities, many in water depths 
exceeding 500 feet, the Committee concurs with the Bureau's 
request that rig operators defray the cost of inspecting this 
equipment, which this fee does. Lastly, the Committee has 
adopted the Bureau's request to allow for quarterly billing off 
all inspection fees.
    Disclosure of Waivers.--In support of the Bureau's 
strategic goal of promoting transparency, the Committee has 
included language authorizing the Bureau of Safety and 
Environmental Enforcement and the Bureau of Ocean Energy 
Management to post on a publicly available website a copy of 
any waiver from any regulation or rule enforced by the bureaus, 
subject to redaction of confidential business information The 
Committee believes that keeping the public fully informed with 
respect to the operation and enforcement of safety regulations 
is a good management practice that will engender confidence in 
Bureau operations.

                           OIL SPILL RESEARCH

 
 
 
Appropriation enacted, 2019...........................       $14,899,000
Budget estimate, 2020.................................        12,700,000
Recommended, 2020.....................................        14,899,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2019...............................                 0
    Budget estimate, 2020.............................        +2,199,000
 

                           OIL SPILL RESEARCH

    The Committee recommends $14,899,000 for the Oil Spill 
Research appropriation, equal to the enacted level and an 
increase of $2,199,000 above the request. The Committee does 
not agree to the proposed reduction given the lack of 
supporting documentation. The Committee also notes that such a 
reduction seems at odds with the Bureau's acknowledgement that 
an additional $7,000,000 is required for maintenance of the 
Ohmsett Oil Spill Research Facility; $4,000,000 for tank 
maintenance in the summer of 2020 and $3,000,000 for 
replacement of the main bridge. The Committee urges the Bureau 
to request these funds in subsequent budget submissions.

          Office of Surface Mining Reclamation and Enforcement

    The Office of Surface Mining Reclamation and Enforcement 
(OSM), through its regulation and technology account, regulates 
surface coal mining operations to ensure that the environment 
is reclaimed once mining is completed. The OSM accomplishes 
this mission by providing grants and technical assistance to 
those States that maintain their own regulatory and reclamation 
programs and by conducting oversight of State programs. 
Further, the OSM administers the regulatory programs in the 
States that do not have their own programs and on Federal and 
Tribal lands. Through its Abandoned Mine Land (AML) reclamation 
program, the OSM provides funding for environmental restoration 
at abandoned coal mines based on fees collected from current 
coal production operations. In their un-reclaimed condition 
these abandoned sites endanger public health and safety and 
prevent the beneficial use of land and water resources. 
Mandatory appropriations provide funding for the abandoned coal 
mine sites as required under the 2006 amendments to the Surface 
Mining Control and Reclamation Act.

                       REGULATION AND TECHNOLOGY

 
 
 
Appropriation enacted, 2019...........................      $115,804,000
Budget estimate, 2020.................................        96,960,000
Recommended, 2020.....................................       121,647,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2019...............................        +5,843,000
    Budget estimate, 2020.............................       +24,687,000
 

                       REGULATION AND TECHNOLOGY

    The Committee recommends $121,647,000 for the Regulation 
and Technology appropriation, $5,843,000 above the enacted 
level and $24,687,000 above the budget request. The Committee 
does not agree to the proposed reduction of $24,687,000 in 
State and tribal grants and maintains the regulatory grant line 
at the enacted level of $68,590,000. Additional details 
regarding the recommendation are contained in the table at the 
back of this report.

                    ABANDONED MINE RECLAMATION FUND

 
 
 
Appropriation enacted, 2019...........................      $139,672,000
Budget estimate, 2020.................................        24,713,000
Recommended, 2020.....................................       139,713,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2019...............................           +41,000
    Budget estimate, 2020.............................      +115,000,000
 

                    ABANDONED MINE RECLAMATION FUND

    The Committee recommends $139,713,000 for the Abandoned 
Mine Reclamation Fund appropriation, $41,000 above the enacted 
level and $115,000,000 above the budget request. Of the funds 
provided, $24,713,000 are derived from the Abandoned Mine 
Reclamation Fund and $115,000,000 are derived from the general 
treasury. The recommendation includes all changes proposed in 
the budget request except for the $115,000,000 reduction in the 
economic development grants line in the environmental 
restoration activity, which the Committee continues under the 
same terms and conditions as contained in the fiscal year 2019 
enacted bill. Additional details regarding the recommendation 
are contained in the table at the back of this report.

                        Bureau of Indian Affairs

    Bureau of Indian Affairs and Office of the Assistant 
Secretary--Indian Affairs (together, ``Indian Affairs'') 
programs serve 573 federally recognized Indian Tribes, a 
service population of approximately two million American 
Indians and Alaska Natives in tribal and native communities. 
The Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) provides direct services and 
funding for compacts and contracts for Tribes to provide 
Federal programs for a wide range of activities necessary for 
community development. Programs address tribal government, 
natural resource management, trust services, law enforcement, 
economic development, and social service needs.
    In preparation for the fiscal year 2020 appropriation bill, 
the Subcommittee held two days of hearings and received 
testimony from over 60 witnesses on a variety of topics 
pertaining to American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) 
programs. The Federal government has a legal and moral 
obligation to provide quality services to AI/AN. On a 
nonpartisan basis, the Committee continues to protect and, 
where possible, strengthen the budgets for Indian Country 
programs in this bill in order to address longstanding and 
underfunded needs.

                      OPERATION OF INDIAN PROGRAMS

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

 
 
 
Appropriation enacted, 2019...........................    $2,414,577,000
Budget estimate, 2020.................................     1,462,310,000
Recommended, 2020.....................................     1,650,504,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2019...............................      -764,073,000
    Budget estimate, 2020.............................      +188,194,000
 

                             REORGANIZATION

    The Committee accepts the budget proposal to establish the 
Bureau of Indian Education (BIE) as an independent bureau with 
a separate budget structure, including a separate construction 
budget, from the BIA. The separation is reflected below.
    The Committee recommends $1,650,504,000 for Operation of 
Indian Programs, $764,073,000 below the enacted level and 
$188,194,000 above the budget request. All subactivities and 
program elements presented in the budget estimate submitted to 
the Congress are continued at the enacted levels and adjusted 
for requested fixed costs and internal transfers unless 
specifically addressed below. None of the requested program 
changes are agreed to unless specifically addressed below. 
Recommended program changes, instructions, and details follow 
below and in the table at the end of this report. Additional 
instructions are included in the front of this report.
    The Committee notes that due to internal transfers 
requested by Indian tribes, some increases and decreases in the 
budget lines are anomalies. The Committee encourages Indian 
Affairs to consult with Indian tribes about the need to include 
tribally requested internal transfers on the budget line if 
there is no impact on the ability of compacting and contracting 
Indian tribes to transfer funds among accounts. This will 
provide Congress and Indian Country with more transparency in 
future years about the amount of funds being appropriated for 
various activities.
    Tribal Priority Allocations.--The recommendation includes 
$767,417,000 for Bureau of Indian Affairs Tribal Priority 
Allocation (TPA) programs, $33,252,000 above the enacted level 
and $108,603,000 above the budget request. TPA programs fund 
basic Tribal services, such as social services, job placement 
and training, child welfare, natural resources management, and 
Tribal courts. TPA programs give Tribes the opportunity to 
further Indian self-determination by establishing their own 
priorities and reallocating Federal funds among programs in 
this budget category.
    Tiwahe.--The Committee directs Indian Affairs to continue 
funding for the Tiwahe (family) initiative across all Indian 
Affairs accounts at the same amounts at the enacted level. 
Additionally, the Committee directs Indian Affairs to conduct a 
new round of five-year Tiwahe grants to continue to assist 
tribal nations with critical needs. The new round of grants 
should apply the lessons learned and recommendations from 
tribal leaders who participated in the initial Tiwahe 
initiative, which concluded in fiscal year 2019, and 
incorporate the recommendations from the Office of the 
Inspector General to improve the accuracy and efficacy of the 
funding distributions.
    Tribal Government.--The recommendation includes 
$337,632,000 for Tribal government programs, $16,659,000 above 
the enacted level and $11,619,000 above the budget request. The 
recommendation includes $1,281,000 for new Tribes, as 
requested, and accepts all proposed internal transfers and 
estimated fixed costs, as requested. The Committee rejects the 
proposed elimination of funding for small and needy Tribes and 
the proposed reduction to Tribal government program oversight.
    Road Maintenance.--The recommendation includes $40,063,000 
for road maintenance, $4,240,000 above the enacted level and 
$5,170,000 above the budget request. The Committee continues 
the $2,000,000 provided in fiscal year 2019 to improve the 
condition of unpaved roads and bridges used by school buses 
transporting students and directs Indian Affairs to use 
$2,000,000 of the increase for this purpose, for a total of 
$4,000,000 for these efforts.
    Human Services.--As part of the Tribal/Interior Budget 
Council, Indian Country identified Social Services, Indian 
Child Welfare Act, and the Housing Program as part of its top 
eleven priorities. The recommendation includes $169,251,000 for 
human services programs, $7,835,000 above the enacted level and 
$26,301,000 above the request. The Committee includes all 
proposed internal transfers and estimated fixed costs, as 
requested. The Committee rejects the proposed elimination of 
the Housing Program and instead provides $15,948,000 for the 
Housing Program. Additionally, the Committee recommends 
$55,800,000 for Social Services and $77,734,000 for Welfare 
Assistance.
    Within the $16,431,000 provided for the Indian Child 
Welfare Act, the Committee expects Indian Affairs to use 
$1,000,000 for off-reservation programs authorized by section 
202 of the Indian Child Welfare Act (25 U.S.C. Sec. 1932).
    Trust--Natural Resources.--The recommendation includes 
$235,486,000 for natural resources programs, $28,616,000 above 
the enacted level, and $51,397,000 above the budget request. 
The Committee includes estimated fixed costs, as requested, and 
accepts the proposed internal transfers. The Committee rejects 
the proposed elimination of the Tribal Climate Resilience/
Cooperative Landscape program and instead includes $14,956,000 
for the program. The recommendation rejects all proposed 
program cuts.
    Elwha River Ecosystem.--The Committee expects Indian 
Affairs to use $2,000,000 of the $9,241,000 provided for 
Natural Resources (TPA) for the Lower Elwha Klallam Tribe to 
fulfill the remaining authorization in section 7 of the Elwha 
River Ecosystem and Fisheries Restoration Act (P.L. 102-495). 
Additionally, the Committee directs the Secretary of the 
Interior to work with the Lower Elwha Klallam Tribe to identify 
appropriate land for acquisition to satisfy the requirements of 
the Elwha River Ecosystem and Fisheries Restoration Act.
    Within the $15,691,000 provided for Tribal Management/
Development Program, the Committee directs Indian Affairs to 
provide $830,000 for the Salmon and Steelhead Habitat Inventory 
and Assessment Program and $2,500,000 for the Inter Tribal 
Buffalo Council. The Committee encourages Indian Affairs to 
examine the historical funding provided for buffalo 
preservation and management in comparison to other native food 
activities, such as the preservation and management of fish. 
The Committee directs Indian Affairs to provide the comparison 
of historical funding provided to native food preservation and 
management activities and a plan to ensure parity among native 
food activities to the Committee within 90 days of enactment of 
this Act.
    The Committee supports Indian Affairs' efforts to address 
the resiliency needs of tribal communities by working to 
address threats to public safety, natural resources, and sacred 
sites. The Committee is particularly concerned about coastal 
tribal communities, Alaska Native Villages, and Alaska Native 
Corporations that face severe challenges to their long-term 
resilience due to the impacts of climate change. Consistent 
with the Federal Government's treaty and trust obligations, the 
Committee directs Indian Affairs to work with at-risk tribes 
and Alaska Native Villages to identify and expedite the 
necessary resources to support mitigation and relocation 
efforts. The Committee also directs Indian Affairs to develop a 
report outlining the unmet infrastructure needs of tribal 
communities and Alaska Native Villages in the process of 
relocating to higher ground as a direct result of the impacts 
of climate change on their existing lands and to transmit this 
report to the Committee within 180 days of enactment of this 
Act.
    The Committee has heard concerns expressed by Indian 
Country that Indian Affairs directs program increases towards 
project accounts rather than the tribal priority allocation 
accounts. Therefore, within the $35,314,000 provided for the 
Agriculture and Range Program, the Committee recommends 
$26,541,000 for the Agriculture Program (TPA), $2,063,000 above 
the enacted level and $6,903,000 above the budget request; and 
$8,773,000 for the Invasive Species program, $2,000,000 above 
the enacted level and $3,310,000 above the budget request.
    The Committee is also aware of the recent momentum in 
achieving Everglades restoration with the funding provided for 
Endangered Species and Invasive Species through the BIA. The 
Committee expects Indian Affairs to continue the Everglades 
restoration funding at no less than the fiscal year 2019 
enacted level and strongly encourages Indian Affairs to 
continue prioritizing funding for Everglades restoration 
activities.
    Within the $55,473,000 provided for Forestry, the Committee 
recommends $28,524,000 for Forestry Program (TPA), $142,000 
below the enacted level and $684,000 above the budget request, 
and $26,949,000 for Forestry Projects, $24,000 above the 
enacted level and $30,000 above the budget request.
    Within the $15,625,000 provided for Water Resources, 
$7,100,000 is for Water Resources Program (TPA), $3,005,000 
above the enacted level and $3,019 above the budget request; 
and $8,525,000 is for Water Management, Planning and Pre-
Development, $2,006,000 above the enacted level and $2,014,000 
above the budget request.
    Within the $20,012,000 provided for Fish, Wildlife, and 
Parks, the recommendation includes $8,071,000 for Wildlife and 
Parks (TPA), $2,722,000 above the enacted level and $3,544,000 
above the budget request; and $11,941,000 for Fish, Wildlife, 
and Parks Projects, $2,003,000 above the enacted level and 
$2,005,000 above the budget request.
    Trust--Real Estate Services.--The recommendation includes 
$172,347,000 for Trust--Real Estate Services, $41,667,000 above 
the enacted level and $50,382,000 above the budget request. The 
recommendation includes the estimated fixed costs, as 
requested, and accepts the proposed internal transfers. The 
Committee rejects the proposed elimination of Litigation 
Support/Attorney Fees and Other Indian Rights Protection within 
the Rights Protection program and rejects all proposed budget 
cuts.
    Within the amounts provided, the Committee recommends 
$13,446,000 for Trust Services (TPA), $4,920,000 above the 
enacted level and $5,040,000 above the budget request; 
$1,201,000 for Navajo-Hopi Settlement Program, $7,000 above the 
enacted level and $9,000 above the budget request; $12,802,000 
for Probate (TPA), $78,000 above the enacted level and $126,000 
above the budget request; $14,935,000 for Land Titles and 
Records offices, $29,000 above the enacted level and $132,000 
above the budget request; $38,096,000 for Real Estate Services, 
$37,000 above the enacted level and $343,000 above the budget 
request; $6,952,000 for Land Records Improvement, $3,000 above 
the enacted level and $4,000 above the budget request; 
$22,595,000 for Environmental Quality, $3,528,000 above the 
enacted level and $9,155,000 above the budget request; 
$1,471,000 for Alaska Native Programs, $1,000 above the enacted 
level and $770,000 above the budget request; $46,478,000 for 
Rights Protection, $33,017,000 above the enacted level and 
$34,699,000 above the budget request; and $14,371,000 for 
Trust--Real Estate Services Oversight, $47,000 above the 
enacted level and $104,000 above the budget request.
    Within the amounts provided for Environmental Quality, the 
Committee recommends $4,852,000 for Environmental Quality 
Program (TPA), $2,010,000 above the enacted level and 
$2,020,000 above the budget request; and $17,743,000 for 
Environmental Quality Projects, $1,518,000 above the enacted 
level and $7,135,000 above the budget request.
    Within the amounts provided for Rights Protection, the 
Committee recommends $22,078,000 for Rights Protection (TPA), 
$20,010,000 above the enacted level and $20,018,000 above the 
budget request; $14,727,000 for Water Rights Negotiations/
Litigation, $5,007,000 above the enacted level and $5,008,000 
above the budget request; $9,000,000 for Litigation Support/
Attorney Fees, $7,500,000 above the enacted level and 
$9,000,000 above the budget request; and $673,000 for Other 
Indian Rights Protection, $500,000 above the enacted level and 
$673,000 above the budget request.
    United States v. Michigan Consent Decree.-- The Committee 
supports the protection of treaty-based fishing rights by the 
United States established through the litigation United States 
v. Michigan, No. 2:73 CV 26 (W.D. Mich.). In a 1979 decision, 
the Court reaffirmed the Tribes' reserved right to fish the 
waters of Lake Michigan, Lake Superior, and Lake Huron, as 
codified in the Treaty of 1836. On August 8, 2000, the parties 
in that litigation (the United States, the five Michigan 
Tribes, and the State of Michigan) entered a consent decree, 
which governs the allocation, regulation, protection, and 
management of fisheries in the 1836 Treaty waters. That 2000 
Consent Decree will expire by its own terms on August 8, 2020. 
The parties to the case must agree on a new consent decree to 
succeed the expiring one. In prior negotiations over these 
federally enforced fishing rights, the United States provided 
substantial litigation support funding to the Tribes. The 
Committee urges the Department of Interior to continue to 
fulfil its obligations as trustee and respect the Tribes' 
autonomy and right to self-governance by providing the 
litigation support funds requested by the Tribes. The Committee 
further encourages the Department to continue protecting the 
treaty fishing right by defending the Great Lakes habitat and 
supporting Great Lakes restoration efforts and to coordinate 
such protection efforts with the Department of Justice.
    Tule River Tribe.--In 2007, the Tule River Tribe, located 
east of Porterville, California, entered into an agreement with 
local area water users to address tribal water rights claims. 
Based on this agreement, the Tribe has sought to negotiate a 
water rights settlement with the Federal government rather than 
initiating litigation. Although the Committee is concerned that 
after more than 10 years the Secretary and the Attorney General 
have not resolved the Tribe's water rights claims, the 
Committee recognizes recent efforts made by this Administration 
to work with the Tribe. The Committee directs the Secretary, in 
consultation with the Attorney General, to expeditiously find a 
resolution to the Tribe's claims. Furthermore, the Committee 
directs the Secretary to report on the status of settlement 
negotiations, and provide a timeline to the Committee on when 
Congress can expect to receive a proposed settlement for review 
and consideration by no later than July 1, 2019 and every three 
months thereafter until a settlement proposal is transmitted to 
Congress.
    Gila River Indian Community.--The Committee alerts Indian 
Affairs to passage of the Gila River Indian Community Federal 
Rights-of-Way, Easements and Boundary Clarification Act (P.L. 
115-350) and expects Indian Affairs to use $3,000,000 of the 
Trust Services (TPA) increase to fulfill its responsibilities 
under the Act.
    Public Safety and Justice.--The recommendation includes 
$452,410,000 for Public Safety and Justice, $40,893,000 above 
the enacted level and $43,251,000 above the budget request. The 
Committee includes estimated fixed costs, as requested, and 
accepts the proposed internal transfers. The Committee rejects 
the proposed reduction to Indian Police Academy.
    Within the amounts provided, the Committee provides 
$400,312,000 for Law Enforcement, $22,629,000 above the enacted 
level and $23,618,000 above the budget request; $50,507,000 for 
Tribal Courts (TPA), $18,263,000 above the enacted level and 
$19,626,000 above the budget request; and $1,591,000 for Fire 
Protection (TPA), $1,000 above the enacted level and $7,000 
above the budget request.
    Within the $14,388,000 provided for Law Enforcement Special 
Initiatives, the Committee includes $2,546,000, as requested, 
to support the budget proposal to hire ten additional patrol 
officers in areas hit hardest by the opioid epidemic.
    Additionally, the Committee is concerned about the high 
rate of recidivism in Indian Country. The Committee directs 
Indian Affairs to provide mental health and substance abuse 
services when needed by juvenile and adult detainees and 
convicted prisoners. Within the amounts provided for Law 
Enforcement Special Initiatives, the Committee provides 
$1,400,000 for behavioral health services in tribal detention/
correction facilities to address the high rate of recidivism. 
The Committee directs Indian Affairs to report to the 
Committees on Appropriations of the House and Senate within 90 
days of enactment of this Act on how the funds will be 
distributed across Indian Country.
    Several tribes have expressed concern about Indian Affairs 
not adequately funding detention facilities in Indian Country 
in favor of regional detention facilities located outside 
Indian Country. Within the $111,338,000 provided for Detention/
Corrections, the Committee includes an additional $8,356,000 
and expects Indian Affairs to allocate this increase to 
tribally-operated detention facilities and Indian Affairs-
operated facilities located within Indian Country without 
decreasing fiscal year 2019 funding levels.
    The Committee includes $15,724,000 for Facilities 
Operations and Maintenance, $2,023,000 above the enacted level 
and $2,044,000 above the budget request. The Committee expects 
Indian Affairs to distribute the increase to facilities in 
Indian Country without decreasing fiscal year 2019 funding 
levels.
    The Committee is concerned about the high rate of violence 
perpetrated against Native women. Within the amounts provided 
for Tribal Justice Support, the Committee includes $7,000,000 
to implement the Violence Against Women Act in Indian Country, 
$5,000,000 above the enacted level.
    Additionally, the Tribal/Interior Budget Council identified 
funding for Criminal Investigations and Police Services as one 
of the to priorities for fiscal year 2020. The Committee 
recommends $216,543,000 for this activity.
    Community and Economic Development.--The recommendation 
includes $51,529,000 for Community and Economic Development, 
$3,950,000 above the enacted level and $7,132,000 above the 
budget request. This includes the estimated fixed costs, as 
requested, and the proposed internal transfers. The Committee 
rejects all proposed program reductions. Within the amounts 
provided, the Committee includes $14,525,000 for Job Placement 
and Training (TPA), $1,948,000 above the enacted level and 
$2,028,000 above the budget request; and $3,791,000 for 
Economic Development (TPA), $1,953,000 above the enacted level 
and $2,012,000 above the budget request.
    The Office of Indian Energy and Economic Development 
(Office) should provide assistance to Tribes to enhance 
economic development and improve access to private financing of 
development projects. The Office should assist with feasibility 
studies and provide technical assistance to Tribes to establish 
commercial codes, courts and other business structures. Further 
the Office should undertake efforts to build Tribal capacity to 
lease Tribal lands and manage economic and energy resource 
development. Finally, the Office should explore opportunities 
to foster incubators of Tribally-owned and other Native 
American-owned businesses. The Office is expected to track 
accomplishments for each of these purposes and to report them 
annually in its budget justification.
    The recommendation continues the $1,000,000 in Minerals and 
Mining Projects provided in fiscal year 2019 for modernizing 
oil and gas records management in BIA Agency Offices.
    The recommendation continues the $3,400,000 for 
implementation of the Native American Tourism Improvement and 
Visitor Experience Act of 2016 (NATIVE Act), including via 
cooperative agreements with Tribes or Tribal organizations.
    Executive Direction and Administrative Services.--The 
recommendation includes $231,849,000 for Executive Direction 
and Administrative Services, $1,882,000 below the budget 
request and $864,000 above the enacted level. This includes the 
estimated fixed costs and proposed program increases, as 
requested, and accepts the proposed internal transfers.
    The following programs are funded as follows: $10,200,000 
for Assistant Secretary Support; $20,425,000 for Executive 
Direction; $48,030,000 for Administrative Services; $3,024,000 
for Safety & Risk Management; $42,438,000 for Information 
Resources Technology (includes proposed reduction, as 
requested); $24,363,000 for Human Capital Management; 
$18,233,000 for Facilities Management; $22,982,000 for Intra-
Governmental Payments; and $42,154,000 for Rentals.

                         CONTRACT SUPPORT COSTS

 
 
 
Appropriation enacted, 2019...........................      $247,000,000
Budget estimate, 2020.................................       271,000,000
Recommended, 2020.....................................       271,000,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2019...............................       +24,000,000
    Budget estimate, 2020.............................                 0
 

    The Committee recommends an indefinite appropriation 
estimated to be $271,000,000 for contract support costs 
incurred by the agency as required by law. The bill includes 
language making available for two years such sums as are 
necessary to meet the Federal Government's full legal 
obligation and prohibiting the transfer of funds to any other 
account for any other purpose.

                 BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS CONSTRUCTION

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

 
 
 
Appropriation enacted, 2019...........................      $358,719,000
Budget estimate, 2020.................................        58,482,000
Recommended, 2020.....................................       146,014,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2019...............................      -212,705,000
    Budget estimate, 2020.............................       +87,532,000
 

    The Committee accepts the budget proposal to establish the 
BIE as an independent bureau with a separate budget structure, 
including a separate construction budget, from the BIA. The 
separation is reflected below.
    The Committee recommends $146,014,000 for BIA Construction, 
$212,705,000 below the enacted level and $87,532,000 above the 
budget request. All subactivities and program elements 
presented in the budget estimate submitted to the Congress are 
continued at enacted levels and adjusted for requested fixed 
costs. None of the requested program changes are agreed to 
unless specifically addressed below. Recommended program 
changes, instructions, and details follow below and in the 
table at the end of this report. Additional instructions are 
included in the front of this report.
    Public Safety and Justice Construction.--The recommendation 
provides $48,811,000 for Public Safety and Justice 
Construction, $13,501,000 above the enacted level and 
$38,389,000 above the budget request, and includes the 
following: $28,000,000 for facilities replacement and new 
construction, $10,000,000 above the enacted level and 
$28,000,000 above the budget request; $5,994,000 for employee 
housing, $1,500,000 above the enacted level and $2,902,000 
above the budget request; $11,372,000 for facilities 
improvement and repair, $2,000,000 above the enacted level and 
$7,314,000 above the budget request; $171,000 for fire safety 
coordination, $1,000 above the enacted level and $4,000 above 
the budget request; and $3,274,000 for fire protection, equal 
to the enacted level and $169,000 above the budget request. The 
recommendation includes all estimated fixed costs, as 
requested, and rejects all proposed program decreases.
    Green Infrastructure.--Within the amounts for Public Safety 
and Justice Construction, the Committee includes $3,000,000 to 
incorporate planning, design, and operations of buildings to 
reduce costs, minimize environmental impacts, use renewable 
energy and incorporate green infrastructure and the most 
current energy efficiency codes and standards to the maximum 
extent practicable. The Committee directs Indian Affairs to 
submit a report to the Committee within 90 days of enactment of 
this Act explaining how it proposes to use the funds provided 
for green infrastructure and renewable energy.
    Eligible Facilities.--The Committee has heard from tribes 
that Indian Affairs considers funding made available for 
facility replacement/new construction for public safety and 
justice facilities as only available for detention facilities. 
The Committee directs Indian Affairs to consider all public 
safety and justice facilities as eligible for funding under 
this program and to include such facilities in the master plan 
that the Committee has directed Indian Affairs to maintain. The 
Committee directs Indian Affairs to provide the master plan to 
the Committee within 90 days of enactment of this Act.
    Resources Management Construction.--The recommendation 
provides $83,258,000 for Resources Management Construction, 
$12,027,000 above the enacted level and $47,205,000 above the 
budget request. Within the amounts provided, the Committee 
includes the following: $30,698,000 for Irrigation Project 
Construction, of which $10,000,000 is continued from fiscal 
year 2019 for projects authorized by the Water Infrastructure 
Improvements for the Nation Act; $2,613,000 for Engineering and 
Supervision; $1,016,000 for Survey and Design; $651,000 for 
Federal Power Compliance; and $48,280,000 for Dam Projects, 
$10,015,000 above the enacted level and $28,536,000 above the 
budget request. The Committee rejects all proposed program 
decreases and includes all estimated fixed costs.
    Within the funds recommended for Dam Projects, the 
Committee recommends $44,548,000 for Safety of Dam projects and 
$3,732,000 for dam maintenance.
    Other Program Construction.--The recommendation includes 
$13,945,000 for Other Program Construction, $17,000 above the 
enacted level and $1,938,000 above the budget request. Within 
the funds provided, the Committee includes $1,419,000 for 
Telecommunications Improvement and Repair, equal to the enacted 
level and $302,000 above the budget request; $3,919,000 for 
Facilities/Quarters Improvement and Repair, equal to the 
enacted level and $1,002,000 above the budget request; and 
$8,607,000 for Construction Program Management, $17,000 above 
the enacted level and $634,000 above the budget request. The 
Committee provides $3,210,000 for the Fort Peck Water System. 
The Committee rejects all proposed program decreases and 
includes all estimated fixed costs.

 INDIAN LAND AND WATER CLAIM SETTLEMENTS AND MISCELLANEOUS PAYMENTS TO 
                                INDIANS

 
 
 
Appropriation enacted, 2019...........................       $50,057,000
Budget estimate, 2020.................................        45,644,000
Recommended, 2020.....................................        45,644,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2019...............................        -4,413,000
    Budget estimate, 2020.............................                 0
 

    The Committee recommends $45,644,000 for Indian Land and 
Water Claim Settlements and Miscellaneous Payments to Indians. 
The recommended level enables Indian Affairs to make a final 
payment to the Pechanga Band of Luiseno Mission Indians if 
needed to complete the Federal obligation and includes amounts 
to make a payment, in an amount to be determined by the 
Secretary, to the Blackfeet Settlement Trust Fund. A detailed 
table of funding recommendations below the account level is 
provided at the end of this report.

                 INDIAN GUARANTEED LOAN PROGRAM ACCOUNT

 
 
 
Appropriation enacted, 2019...........................       $10,779,000
Budget estimate, 2020.................................           909,000
Recommended, 2020.....................................        12,784,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2019...............................        +2,005,000
    Budget estimate, 2020.............................       +11,875,000
 

    The Committee recommends $12,784,000 for the Indian 
Guaranteed Loan Program Account, $2,005,000 above the enacted 
level and $11,875,000 above the budget request. The amount 
provided includes estimated fixed costs, as requested.

                       BUREAU OF INDIAN EDUCATION

    The BIE manages a school system with 169 elementary and 
secondary schools and 14 dormitories providing educational 
services to 47,000 individual students, with an Average Daily 
Membership of 41,000 students in 23 States. The BIE also 
operates two post-secondary schools and provides operating 
grants for 29 tribally controlled colleges and universities and 
two tribal technical colleges.

 
 
 
Appropriation enacted, 2019...........................                $0
Budget estimate, 2020.................................       867,416,000
Recommended, 2020.....................................     1,000,233,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2019...............................    +1,000,233,000
    Budget estimate, 2020.............................      +132,817,000
 

                             REORGANIZATION

    The Committee accepts the budget proposal to establish the 
BIE as an independent bureau with a separate budget structure, 
including a separate construction budget, from the BIA. The 
separation is reflected below.
    Bureau of Indian Education.--The recommendation includes 
$1,000,233,000 for BIE, $1,000,233,000 above the enacted level 
and $132,817,000 above the budget request. The Committee 
approves all fixed costs, as requested, approves the proposed 
internal transfers, and rejects all proposed reductions or 
eliminations. Additional details and instructions are included 
below and in the table at the end of this report. All 
subactivities and program elements presented in the budget 
request submitted to Congress are continued at enacted levels 
and adjusted for requested fixed costs. None of the requested 
program changes are agreed to unless specifically addressed 
below. Recommended program changes, instructions, and details 
follow below and in the table at the end of this report. 
Additional instructions are included in the front of this 
report.
    Tribal Priority Allocations.--The recommendation includes 
$83,854,000 for BIE Tribal Priority Allocation (TPA) programs, 
$83,854,000 above the enacted level and $67,799,000 above the 
budget request. TPA programs give Tribes the opportunity to 
further Indian self-determination by establishing their own 
priorities and reallocating Federal funds among the budget 
accounts.
    Elementary and Secondary Programs (forward funded).--The 
Committee recommends $599,994,000 for Elementary and Secondary 
Programs (forward funded), $599,994,000 above the enacted level 
and $14,939,000 above the budget request. The recommendation 
includes estimated fixed costs, as requested.
    Early childhood pilot.--While the Committee supports BIE's 
attempt to try to provide more services to pre-school children, 
the Committee is concerned that BIE has not provided any 
details about the proposal. Before proceeding with the pilot 
program, the Committee directs the BIE to consult with Indian 
tribes on how to best reach more children, how funds will be 
distributed, and performance measures to be used to measure 
success and report to the House and Senate Committees on 
Appropriations within 90 days after tribal consultation ends on 
the results of the consultation.
    Native languages.--The Committee recommends $14,303,000 for 
Education Program Enhancements, which includes $2,000,000, as 
requested, for Native language immersion grants at BIE and 
tribally operated schools. The Committee continues the 
$2,000,000 provided in fiscal year 2019 for Native language 
immersion for a total of $4,000,000 for this purpose.
    Elementary and Secondary Programs.--The Committee 
recommends $184,043,000 for Elementary and Secondary Programs, 
$184,043,000 above the enacted level and $42,314,000 above the 
budget request. The Committee approves the requested internal 
transfers and estimated fixed costs, as requested.
    Alternative Financing.--The Committee includes $6,000,000 
within the $78,234,000 recommended for Facilities Operations 
for the alternative financing pilot developed by the Department 
to fund replacement school construction. The Secretary is 
encouraged to develop an estimate of possible future costs 
associated with this pilot program and provide this estimate to 
the Committee within 90 days of enactment of this Act.
    Johnson O'Malley.--The Committee recommends $44,403,000 for 
Johnson O'Malley, $44,403,000 above the enacted level. The 
Committee supports the recent enactment of the Johnson O'Malley 
Supplemental Education Modernization Act (P.L. 115-404). Within 
the funds provided for Johnson O'Malley, the Committee expects 
BIE to allocate $2,500,000 in one-time funding for capacity 
building activities, such as performing planning activities and 
providing technical assistance and training based on the new 
law. With the remaining increased funds, the Committee directs 
BIE to provide funding to more tribes in order to assist more 
students.
    Post-Secondary Programs (forward funded).--The Committee 
recommends $121,696,000 for Post-Secondary Programs (forward 
funded), $121,696,000 above the enacted level and $24,886,000 
above the budget request. The recommendation accepts the 
proposed internal transfers and includes estimated fixed costs, 
as requested.
    Tribal Colleges and Universities.--Within the $86,696,000 
provided for Tribal Colleges and Universities, the Committee 
recommends $63,886,000 for Title I activities, $17,000,000 for 
Title II activities, $109,000 for Title III activities, 
$701,000 for technical assistance, and $5,000,000 for tribal 
college and universities infrastructure improvements as 
authorized by 25 U.S.C. 1813.
    Post-Secondary Programs.--The Committee recommends 
$51,893,000 for Post-Secondary Programs, $51,893,000 above the 
enacted level and $50,673,000 above the budget request. The 
Committee rejects the proposed elimination of the scholarship 
programs and approves the proposed internal transfer, as 
requested.
    The Committee directs BIE to complete annual health and 
safety inspections of all BIE system facilities and to publish 
quarterly updates on the status of such inspections.
    Education Management.--The recommendation includes 
$42,607,000 for Education Management, $42,607,000 above the 
enacted level and $5,000 above the budget request. The 
Committee includes the estimated fixed costs, as requested. 
Within the amounts provided, the Committee includes: 
$32,300,000 for education program management activities, 
$32,300,000 above the enacted level and equal to the budget 
request, and $10,307,000 for education information technology, 
$10,307,000 above the enacted level and $5,000 above the budget 
request.

                Bureau of Indian Education Construction


 
 
 
Appropriation enacted, 2019...........................                $0
Budget estimate, 2020.................................        68,858,000
Recommended, 2020.....................................       387,252,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2019...............................      +387,252,000
    Budget estimate, 2020.............................      +318,394,000
 

    The Committee accepts the budget proposal to establish BIE 
as an independent bureau with a separate budget structure, 
including a separate construction budget, from the BIA. The 
separation is reflected below.
    The Committee recommends $387,252,000 for BIE Construction, 
$387,252,000 above the enacted level and $318,394,000 above the 
budget request. The Committee rejects the proposed program 
eliminations and includes requested fixed costs. All 
subactivities and program elements presented in the budget 
estimate submitted to the Congress are continued at enacted 
levels and adjusted for requested fixed costs and transfers. 
None of the requested program changes are agreed to unless 
specifically addressed below. Recommended program changes, 
instructions, and details follow below and in the table at the 
end of this report. Additional instructions are included in the 
front of this report.
    Within the recommendation, the Committee includes 
$205,504,000 for campus-wide replacement, $205,504,000 above 
the enacted level and the budget request; $53,935,000 for 
component facilities replacement, $53,935,000 above the enacted 
level and the budget request; $1,000,000 for replacement/new 
employee housing, $1,000,000 above the enacted level and equal 
to the budget request; $15,576,000 for employee housing repair, 
$15,576,000 above the enacted level and $10,514,000 above the 
budget request; and $111,237,000 for facilities improvement and 
repair, $111,237,000 above the enacted level and $48,441,000 
above the budget request.
    Employee Housing.--The Committee accepts the proposed 
separate budget line item for replacement/new employee housing 
and includes $1,000,000 to be used for this purpose. The 
Committee directs BIE to provide an assessment of need for 
replacement/new employee housing and to provide a spend plan to 
the Committee within 90 days of enactment of this Act.
    Green Infrastructure.--The Committee includes $10,000,000 
in the replacement school construction program and $5,000,000 
in the replacement facility program to incorporate planning, 
design, and operations of buildings to reduce costs, minimize 
environmental impacts, use renewable energy and incorporate 
green infrastructure and the most current energy efficiency 
codes and standards to the maximum extent practicable. The 
Committee directs BIE to submit a report to the Committee 
within 90 days of enactment of this Act explaining how it 
proposes to use the funds provided for green infrastructure and 
renewable energy.
    The Committee recognizes the School Facilities & 
Construction Negotiated Rulemaking Committee established under 
Public Law 107-110 for the equitable distribution of funds. 
Appropriations in this bill for campus-wide replacement are 
limited to the 10 schools selected via the rulemaking committee 
process and published by Indian Affairs on April 5, 2016.\1\ 
Indian Affairs should submit a similar list for facilities with 
the fiscal year 2021 budget request.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    \1\https://www.bia.gov/as-is/ofpsm.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    The Committee directs BIE to prepare a five-year spend plan 
for replacement schools and replacement facilities based on the 
last fiscal year enacted levels or the current year budget 
request, whichever is highest, and submit the spend plans to 
the Committee at the same time the budget is submitted to 
Congress. The Committee directs BIE to begin preparing the next 
projects for when the current list is completed.

                       ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISIONS

    The bill continues language limiting the expansion of 
grades and schools in the BIE system which allows for the 
expansion of additional grades to schools that meet certain 
criteria. The intent of the language is to prevent already 
limited funds from being spread further to additional schools 
and grades. The intent is not to limit Tribal flexibility at 
existing schools. Nothing in the bill is intended to prohibit a 
Tribe from converting a Tribally-controlled school already in 
the BIE system to a charter school in accordance with State and 
Federal law.
    The bill continues language providing the Secretary with 
the authority to approve satellite locations of existing BIE 
schools if a Tribe can demonstrate that the establishment of 
such locations would provide comparable levels of education as 
are being offered at such existing BIE schools, and would not 
significantly increase costs to the Federal Government. The 
intent is for this authority to be exercised only in 
extraordinary circumstances to provide Tribes with additional 
flexibility regarding where students are educated without 
compromising how they are educated, and to significantly reduce 
the hardship and expense of transporting students over long 
distances, all without unduly increasing costs that would 
otherwise unfairly come at the expense of other schools in the 
BIE system.

                          Departmental Offices


                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

                        Office of the Secretary

    The Office of the Secretary supports a wide-range of 
Departmental business, policy, and oversight functions.

 
 
 
Departmental Operations Appropriation enacted, 2019...      $124,673,000
Budget estimate, 2020.................................       129,422,000
Recommended, 2020.....................................       131,232,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2019...............................        +6,559,000
    Budget estimate, 2020.............................        +1,810,000
 

    The Committee recommends $131,232,000 for the Office of the 
Secretary, Departmental Operations appropriation, $6,559,000 
above the enacted level and $1,810,000 above the budget 
request. The recommendation includes $834,000 in fixed costs 
and programmatic increases of $1,810,000. Within Management 
Services, $810,000 of the recommended increase restores the 
proposed reduction in the Appraisal and Valuation Services 
Office, for a total recommendation of $20,061,000; $9,000,000 
for Federal lands and $11,061,000 for Indian country. Within 
Leadership and Administration, $1,000,000 of the recommended 
increase is to be used to hire no less than 10 additional staff 
to assist with the Department's compliance responsibilities 
under the Freedom of Information Act (5 U.S.C. 552). The 
Committee is aware that the Department has seen a substantial 
increase in the number of informational requests over the past 
two years. It is also aware that the Department's litigation 
costs have risen because it is not responding to those requests 
in a timely manner. The Committee believes that an investment 
in additional staff, thus allowing the Department to respond 
more rapidly, will be paid for through reduced litigation.
    Department-wide Reorganization.--The recommendation does 
not provide funds requested within the Department's bureaus for 
the Department Wide Reorganization. The explanatory statement 
that accompanied the fiscal year 2019 enacted bill stated that 
the Department must develop a concrete plan for how it will 
reshape its essential functions, taking into account its 
relationships with the Tribes, State and local governments, 
private and nonprofit partners, the public, and the 
Department's workforce. Further, the Department was directed to 
provide a report to the Committee 30 days prior to obligating 
the funds provided for the reorganization.
    To date, the Department has not provided any of this 
information. On numerous occasions the Committee has sought 
background information to substantiate the costs of the 
reorganization but has not received even the most rudimentary 
data explaining how such costs eventually pay for themselves or 
translate into better service for the American public. There 
are only four months remaining in fiscal year 2019 and, as the 
Committee understands, all of the enacted funds remain 
unobligated. For these reasons, it is inappropriate to provide 
any additional funding.
    Grant Review.--The Committee is concerned that a 
Departmental review of all funding agreements above $50,000 is 
causing excessive delays in awarding funds and undue burden on 
recipients. The Department should have streamlined processes in 
place for making awards for Congressionally directed funding, 
such as the Heritage Partnership Program, and for programs for 
which there are longstanding cooperative agreements. To better 
understand the impact of the Departmental review, the Committee 
directs the Department to provide a report on all financial 
assistance documents reviewed during the last year to the 
Committee within thirty days of enactment of this Act and then 
update the report on a quarterly basis. The report should 
include for each of the Assistant Secretaries, the name of each 
financial assistance document reviewed, the dollar amount, the 
date it was received by the Assistant Secretary, the date it 
was approved or denied, the total number of days it sat for 
review, and the bureau from which it was submitted. The same 
information should be provided for the review conducted by the 
Senior Advisor to the Assistant Secretary for Policy, 
Management, and Budget.

                            Insular Affairs


                       ASSISTANCE TO TERRITORIES

    The Office of Insular Affairs (OIA) was established on 
August 4, 1995, through Secretarial Order No. 3191, which also 
abolished the former Office of Territorial and International 
Affairs. OIA has administrative responsibility for coordinating 
Federal policy in the territories of American Samoa, Guam, the 
U.S. Virgin Islands, and the Commonwealth of the Northern 
Mariana Islands (CNMI), and oversight of Federal programs and 
funds in the freely associated states of the Federated States 
of Micronesia (FSM), the Republic of the Marshall Islands 
(RMI), and the Republic of Palau. The permanent and trust fund 
payments to the territories and the compact nations provide 
substantial financial resources to these governments. During 
fiscal year 2004, financial arrangements for the Compacts of 
Free Association with the FSM and the RMI were implemented. 
These also included mandatory payments for certain activities 
previously provided in discretionary appropriations as well as 
Compact impact payments of $30,000,000 per year split among 
Guam, CNMI, AS, and Hawaii.

 
 
 
Appropriation enacted, 2019...........................      $100,688,000
Budget estimate, 2020.................................        80,967,000
Recommended, 2020.....................................       108,631,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2019...............................        +7,943,000
    Budget estimate, 2020.............................       +27,664,000
 

    The Committee recommends $108,631,000 for Assistance to 
Territories, $7,943,000 above the enacted level and $27,664,000 
above the budget request. Fixed costs are provided at the 
requested level, but the Committee rejects the requested 
program changes unless specifically addressed below. 
Recommended program changes, instructions, and details follow 
below and in the table at the end of this report.
    Office of Insular Affairs.--The recommendation includes 
$9,491,000 for the Office of Insular Affairs, $43,000 above the 
enacted level and $61,000 above the budget request. The 
recommendation includes $43,000 for fixed costs as requested.
    Maintenance Assistance Fund.--The recommendation includes 
$4,500,000 for Maintenance Assistance, $500,000 above the 
enacted level and $3,477,000 above the budget request. The 
recommendation includes a $500,000 increase for grants that 
focus on institutionalizing better maintenance practices.
    Energizing Insular Communities.--The recommendation 
includes $12,000,000 for Energizing Insular Communities (EIC), 
$7,000,000 above the enacted level and $9,189,000 above the 
budget request.
    The Committee expects funds to be used in accordance with 
48 U.S.C. 1492a to update and implement the energy action plans 
of American Samoa, Guam, the Commonwealth of the Northern 
Mariana Islands, and the U.S. Virgin Islands with the goals of 
reducing reliance and expenditures on imported fuels, 
developing and utilizing domestic energy sources, and improving 
the performance of energy infrastructure and overall energy 
efficiency in each of these insular areas. The Committee 
directs the Department to establish reporting requirements in 
EIC grants necessary to meet the reporting requirements of 48 
U.S.C. 1492a.
    The Department is directed to submit a report on the status 
of updating and implementing existing energy action plans 
within 90 days of the enactment of this act. The report should 
(1) include detailed information on the progress made to-date 
addressing the recommendations identified in existing energy 
action plans, including a brief summary of each grant awarded 
since the energy action plans were published; and (2) provide a 
timeline for updating and implementing the previously published 
plans, and identify any barriers to implementation.
    American Samoa Operations Grants.--The Committee recommends 
$24,120,000 for American Samoa Operations, $400,000 above the 
enacted level and $2,591,00 above the budget request. The 
Committee continues to be concerned about the impact of Cyclone 
Gita on American Samoa, and rejects the reduction proposed in 
the budget request. The recommendation includes a $400,000 
increase for general operations.
    Biosecurity Report.--The Department is directed to include 
in its annual budget submission a report describing the 
activities of the Department during the preceding fiscal year 
to implement the Regional Biosecurity Plan for Micronesia and 
Hawaii, as developed jointly by the Department and other 
Federal and non-Federal entities to prevent and control the 
introduction of invasive species in the United States Pacific 
Region. The report shall also include next steps and planned 
activities of the Department for further implementation of the 
plan, including estimates of additional funding to be used or 
needed for such next steps and planned activities.
    The Committee recognizes that the Office of Insular Affairs 
funds important efforts to improve education, health, 
infrastructure, judicial training, and economic sustainability 
in the Insular areas and expects funds to continue to be 
awarded accordingly. Additionally, the Department is directed 
to continue to award noncompetitive technical assistance funds 
to support investments in civic education programs for Insular 
Area students.

                      COMPACT OF FREE ASSOCIATION

 
 
 
Appropriation enacted, 2019...........................        $3,413,000
Budget estimate, 2020.................................         3,109,000
Recommended, 2020.....................................         3,236,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2019...............................          -177,000
    Budget estimate, 2020.............................          +127,000
 

    The Committee recommends $3,236,000 for Compact of Free 
Association, $177,000 below the enacted level and $127,000 
above the budget request. The Committee rejects the requested 
program changes unless specifically addressed below. 
Recommended program changes, instructions, and details follow 
below and in the table at the end of this report.
    In addition to the funding provided under this heading, the 
Committee recommendation includes $5,000,000 in the Title I 
General Provisions as the initial payment towards the 
$20,000,000 requested by the Republic of the Marshall Islands 
in September 2009, as authorized in section 111(d) of the 
Compact of Free Association Act of 1986 (P.L. 99-239; 99 Stat. 
1799; 48 U.S.C. 1911) and section 108(b) of the Compact of Free 
Association Amendments Act of 2003 (P.L. 108-188; 117 Stat. 
2755; 48 U.S.C. 1921g).
    Compact of Free Association--Federal Services.--The 
Committee recommends $2,636,000 for Federal Services, $177,000 
below the enacted level and equal to the budget request. The 
Committee accepts the reduction proposed in the budget request 
with the understanding that the level of service will not be 
reduced.

                        Office of the Solicitor


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

 
 
 
Appropriation enacted, 2019...........................       $65,674,000
Budget estimate, 2020.................................        66,816,000
Recommended, 2020.....................................        66,816,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2019...............................        +1,142,000
    Budget estimate, 2020.............................                 0
 

    The Committee recommends $66,816,000 for the Salaries and 
Expenses appropriation, $1,142,000 above the enacted level and 
equal to the budget request. The recommendation includes 
$628,000 for fixed costs.

                      Office of Inspector General


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

 
 
 
Appropriation enacted, 2019...........................       $52,486,000
Budget estimate, 2020.................................        52,486,000
Recommended, 2020.....................................        55,986,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2019...............................        +3,500,000
    Budget estimate, 2020.............................        +3,500,000
 

    The Committee recommends $55,986,000 for salaries and 
expenses of the Office of Inspector General, an increase of 
$3,500,000 over the enacted level and the budget request.
    The Committee includes additional funds for fixed costs and 
to hire auditors, investigators, and mission support staff to 
meet increased workload requirements. The Committee also 
concurs with the budget proposal for two-year funding 
availability to ensure there is no disruption in oversight 
activities.

           Office of the Special Trustee for American Indians


                         FEDERAL TRUST PROGRAMS

              (INCLUDING TRANSFER AND RESCISSION OF FUNDS)

    Congress has designated the Secretary of the Interior as 
the trustee delegate with responsibility for approximately 55 
million surface acres of land, 57 million acres of subsurface 
mineral interests, and nearly $4.4 billion that is held in 
trust by the Federal government on behalf of American Indians, 
Alaska Natives, and federally recognized Indian Tribes. The 
Office of the Special Trustee's (OST) trust management of these 
assets includes conserving, maintaining, accounting, investing, 
disbursing, and reporting to individual Indians and federally 
recognized Tribes and Tribal organizations on asset 
transactions generated from sales, leasing and other commercial 
activities on these lands.

 
 
 
Appropriation enacted, 2019...........................      $111,540,000
Budget estimate, 2020.................................       105,143,000
Recommended, 2020.....................................        97,613,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2019...............................       -13,927,000
    Budget estimate, 2020.............................        -7,530,000
 

    The Committee recommends $97,613,000 for Federal trust 
programs in OST, $13,927,0000 below the enacted level and 
$7,530,000 below the budget request. Within the amounts 
provided, the Committee includes: $1,400,000 for Executive 
Direction, $297,000 below the enacted level and $1,047,000 
below the budget request; and $96,213,000 for Program 
Operations and Support, $13,630,000 below the enacted level and 
$6,483,000 below the budget request. The Committee 
recommendation includes fixed costs, as requested. A detailed 
table of funding recommendations below the account level is 
provided at the end of this report.
    The bill provides that of the amounts provided to OST, 
$10,000,000 shall not be available for obligation until the 
report required by section 304(a)(3) of the Indian Trust Asset 
Reform Act (P.L. 114-178), which requires a transition plan and 
timetable for the termination of the Office of the Special 
Trustee, not just the termination of the position of Special 
Trustee, is provided to the House and Senate Committees on 
Appropriation.
    The bill includes language rescinding $3,000,000 from OST. 
The Committee is aware that OST has significant unobligated 
balances and directs OST to use these funds first. Further, the 
Committee is not rescinding any funds appropriated for 
historical accounting activities.

                        Department-Wide Programs


                             Wildland Fire


                     (INCLUDING TRANSFERS OF FUNDS)

    The Department's Wildland Fire Management account supports 
fire activities for the Bureau of Land Management, the National 
Park Service, the Fish and Wildlife Service, and the Bureau of 
Indian Affairs.

                        WILDLAND FIRE MANAGEMENT

 
 
 
Appropriation enacted, 2019...........................      $941,211,000
Budget estimate, 2020.................................       919,908,000
Recommended, 2020.....................................       952,338,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2019...............................       +11,127,000
    Budget estimate, 2020.............................       +32,430,000
 

    The Committee recommends $952,338,000 for Wildland Fire 
Management at the Department of the Interior. In addition, the 
bill provides $300,000,000 in fire cap adjustment funds for 
suppression operations for a total programmatic increase of 
$311,127,000 over the enacted level and $32,430,000 over the 
budget request. The detailed allocation of funding by activity 
is included in the table at the end of this report.
    Wildland Fire Management.--The Consolidated Appropriations 
Act, 2018 (P.L. 115-141) included a budget cap adjustment for 
wildfire suppression costs and this additional funding is 
included for the first time in fiscal year 2020. Of the 
additional $2,250,000,000 available for fire suppression 
operations, $300,000,000 is provided to the Department of the 
Interior and the remaining $1,950,000,000 is available through 
a transfer from the Department of Agriculture (Forest Service). 
The bill also permits a transfer of $50,000,000 in base 
discretionary fire suppression funds between the Departments. 
The Committee provides these additional funds and authorities 
to ensure that sufficient funds are available to protect 
American homes, lands, and wildlife from catastrophic fires 
without requiring a transfer of funds from the very activities 
that advance forest health and prevent wildland fires. The 
Committee expects the Department to use suppression funds 
judiciously and continue to work closely with the Office of 
Management and Budget and the Forest Service to accurately 
account for expenditures and recover costs.
    Wildland Fire Preparedness.--The Committee recommends 
$332,784,000 for Wildland Fire Preparedness, $10,605,000 above 
the enacted level and equal to the budget request. The 
Department should immediately notify the Committees on 
Appropriations if it appears that funding shortfalls may limit 
needed firefighting capacity.
    Wildland Fire Suppression.--The Committee recommends 
$383,657,000, for Wildland Fire Suppression, $4,478,000 below 
the enacted level and equal to the budget request. The 
recommended amount is the fiscal year 2015 10-year average cost 
for wildland fire suppression which is required for the 
Committee to provide an additional $300,000,000 in fire cap 
funding.
    Fuels Management.--The Committee recommends $194,000,000 
for the Fuels Management program, $5,000,000 above the enacted 
level and equal to the budget request.
    Burned Area Rehabilitation.--The Committee recommends 
$20,470,000 for the Burned Area Rehabilitation program, equal 
to the enacted level and $11,003,000 above the budget request.
    The Committee notes that funding for Burned Area 
Rehabilitation is meant to supplement emergency stabilization 
funding provided under suppression, not replace it.
    Fire Facilities.--The Committee recommends $18,427,000 for 
Fire Facilities, equal to the enacted level and $18,427,000 
above the request. The Committee rejects the proposal to fund 
fire facilities through the Bureau of Indian Affairs, Bureau of 
Land Management, Fish and Wildlife Service, and National Park 
Service facility accounts.

                    CENTRAL HAZARDOUS MATERIALS FUND

 
 
 
Appropriation enacted, 2019...........................       $10,010,000
Budget estimate, 2020.................................         2,000,000
Recommended, 2020.....................................        13,010,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2019...............................        +3,000,000
    Budget estimate, 2020.............................       +11,010,000
 

                    CENTRAL HAZARDOUS MATERIALS FUND

    The Committee recommends $13,010,000 for the Central 
Hazardous Materials Fund appropriation, $3,000,000 above the 
enacted level and $11,010,000 above the budget request. While 
the Committee appreciates and fully supports the Department's 
effort to recover more clean-up funding from potentially 
responsible parties, the Committee believes that the number of 
funding requests coming into the Fund demonstrates that such 
cuts are unwarranted and therefore does not concur with the 
proposed reduction of $8,000,000 in the base account.
    The Committee has also included an additional increase of 
$3,000,000 for the remediation of radium contamination at any 
land-grant university facility previously used by the 
Department or its respective current or former bureaus 
resulting from federal activities. The funds shall be used to 
analyze and initiate such facility's decontamination and 
disposal of contaminated materials.

           Natural Resource Damage Assessment and Restoration


                NATURAL RESOURCE DAMAGE ASSESSMENT FUND

 
 
 
Appropriation enacted, 2019...........................        $7,767,000
Budget estimate, 2020.................................         4,600,000
Recommended, 2020.....................................         7,767,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2019...............................                 0
    Budget estimate, 2020.............................        +3,167,000
 

    The Committee recommends $7,767,000 for the Natural 
Resource Damage Assessment Fund appropriation, equal to the 
enacted level and $3,167,000 above the budget request. Details 
of the recommendation by activity are contained in the table at 
the back of this report.

                          Working Capital Fund


 
 
 
Appropriation enacted, 2019...........................       $55,735,000
Budget estimate, 2020.................................        69,284,000
Recommended, 2020.....................................        69,284,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2019...............................       +13,549,000
    Budget estimate, 2020.............................                 0
 

                          WORKING CAPITAL FUND

    The Committee recommends $69,284,000 for the Working 
Capital Fund appropriation, $13,549,000 above the enacted level 
and equal to the budget request. Changes to the request include 
an increase of $1,996,000 to restore the Service First and 
scientific collection activities and a corresponding reduction 
of $1,996,000 in the NewPay activity. The Committee looks 
forward to working with the Department to learn more about the 
NewPay initiative, including the specifics of the various 
budget components, and anticipates a favorable outcome with 
respect to this proposal. Within available funds the Committee 
directs that $1,2000,000 be available for the Invasive Species 
Council.

                  Office of Natural Resources Revenue


                       NATURAL RESOURCES REVENUE

 
 
 
Appropriation enacted, 2019...........................      $137,505,000
Budget estimate, 2020.................................       147,330,000
Recommended, 2020.....................................       147,330,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2019...............................        +9,825,000
    Budget estimate, 2020.............................                 0
 

                  OFFICE OF NATURAL RESOURCES REVENUE

    The Committee recommends $147,330,000 for the Office of 
Natural Resources Revenue appropriation, $9,825,000 above the 
enacted level and equal to the budget request. Increases 
include $961,000 for audit and compliance activities and 
$8,864,000 to initiate the program to replace the Office's 
current Minerals Revenue Management Support System, which has 
become outdated and inefficient. While the Committee supports 
this effort, the Office is directed to brief the Committee on 
no less than a quarterly basis as to the status of the upgrade.
    Distribution of GOMESA revenues.--The Committee directs the 
Office to distribute revenues from Gulf of Mexico operations in 
a manner consistent with current law, including the Gulf of 
Mexico Energy Security Act of 2006 (P.L. 109-432), as amended.

             General Provisions, Department of the Interior


                     (INCLUDING TRANSFERS OF FUNDS)

    Section 101 continues a provision providing for emergency 
transfer authority (intra-bureau) with the approval of the 
Secretary.
    Section 102 continues a provision providing for emergency 
transfer authority (Department-wide) with the approval of the 
Secretary.
    Section 103 continues a provision providing for the use of 
appropriations for certain services.
    Section 104 continues a provision permitting the transfer 
of funds between the Bureau of Indian Affairs and Bureau of 
Indian Education, and the Office of the Special Trustee for 
American Indians and includes a notification requirement.
    Section 105 continues a provision permitting the 
redistribution of Tribal priority allocation and Tribal base 
funds to alleviate funding inequities.
    Section 106 continues a provision authorizing the 
acquisition of lands for the purpose of operating and 
maintaining facilities that support visitors to Ellis, 
Governors, and Liberty Islands, NJ and NY.
    Section 107 modifies a provision allowing Outer Continental 
Shelf inspection fees to be collected by the Secretary of the 
Interior.
    Section 108 directs the public disclosure of waivers from 
safety regulations for operators within the Outer Continental 
Shelf.
    Section 109 continues a provision allowing the Bureau of 
Land Management (BLM) to enter into long-term cooperative 
agreements for long-term care and maintenance of excess wild 
horses and burros on private land.
    Section 110 continues a provision dealing with the U.S. 
Fish and Wildlife Service's responsibilities for mass marking 
of salmonid stocks.
    Section 111 continues a provision allowing the Bureau of 
Indian Affairs and Bureau of Indian Education to more 
efficiently and effectively perform reimbursable work.
    Section 112 permits the humane transfer of excess wild 
horses and burros for work purposes.
    Section 113 continues bill language establishing a 
Department of the Interior Experienced Services Program.
    Section 114 provides funding for the Payments in Lieu of 
Taxes (PILT) program.
    Section 115 provides payment to the Republic of the 
Marshall Islands as authorized by the Compact of Free 
Association Act of 1985.
    Section 116 requires funds to be available for obligation 
and expenditure not later than 60 days after the date of 
enactment.
    Section 117 limits the use of funds for certain Outer 
Continental Shelf activities to lease sales that are contained 
in the currently approved 2017-2022 plan.
    Section 118 restricts the use of funds for certain Bureau 
of Land Management oil and gas lease sales to ensure minimum 
bonus bid amounts.
    Section 119 addresses National Heritage Areas.
    Section 120 authorizes the Secretary to transfer funds in 
conformity with the reprogramming requirements between the 
Bureau of Indian Affairs and the Bureau of Indian Education in 
order to separate the accounts.

               TITLE II--ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY

    The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) was created by 
Reorganization Plan No. 3 of 1970, which consolidated nine 
programs from five different agencies and departments. Major 
EPA programs include air and water quality, drinking water, 
hazardous waste, research, pesticides, radiation, toxic 
substances, enforcement and compliance assurance, pollution 
prevention, Inland oil spill, Superfund, Brownfields, and the 
Leaking Underground Storage Tank program. In addition, EPA 
provides Federal assistance for wastewater treatment, sewer 
overflow control, drinking water facilities, other water 
infrastructure projects, and diesel emission reduction 
projects. The Agency is responsible for conducting research and 
development, establishing environmental standards through the 
use of health science, risk assessment, and cost-benefit, 
monitoring pollution conditions, seeking compliance through 
enforcement actions, managing audits and investigations, and 
providing technical assistance and grant support to States and 
Tribes, which in many cases are delegated authority for much of 
program implementation. Under existing statutory authority, the 
Agency contributes to specific homeland security efforts and 
participates in international environmental activities.
    Among the statutes for which the Environmental Protection 
Agency has sole or significant oversight responsibilities are:
    National Environmental Policy Act of 1969, as amended.
    Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act, as 
amended.
    Toxic Substances Control Act, as amended.
    Clean Water Act [Federal Water Pollution Control Act], as 
amended.
    Federal Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act, as amended.
    Ocean Dumping Act [Marine Protection, Research, and 
Sanctuaries Act of 1972], as amended.
    Oil Pollution Act of 1990.
    Safe Drinking Water Act [Public Health Service Act (Title 
XIV)], as amended.
    Solid Waste Disposal Act, as amended by the Resource 
Conservation and Recovery Act.
    Clean Air Act, as amended.
    Great Lakes Legacy Act of 2002.
    Bioterrorism Preparedness and Response Act of 2002.
    Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and 
Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA), as amended.
    Small Business Liability Relief and Brownfields 
Revitalization Act of 2002 (amending CERCLA).
    Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act of 1986.
    Pollution Prevention Act of 1990.
    Pollution Prosecution Act of 1990.
    Pesticide Registration Improvement Act of 2003.
    Energy Policy Act of 2005.
    Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007.
    For fiscal year 2020, the Committee recommends 
$9,526,691,000 for the Environmental Protection Agency, 
$677,203,000 above the combined appropriations (provided in 
Title II and Title IV) in the enacted bill, and $3,304,201,000 
above the budget request. Comparisons to the budget request and 
enacted levels in Title II are shown by account in the table at 
the end of this report.
    The Committee notes that the fiscal year 2019 appropriation 
provided funding for the Environmental Protection Agency in two 
separate Titles. Title II provided appropriations totaling 
$8,058,488,000, and Title IV provided $791,000,000 in 
additional appropriations for the Hazardous Substance 
Superfund, State and Tribal Assistance Grants, and Water 
Infrastructure Finance and Innovation Program, for a combined 
agency appropriations of $8,849,488,000.
    Reprogramming.--The Agency is held to the reprogramming 
limitation of $1,000,000. This limitation will be applied to 
each program area in every account at the levels provided in 
the table at the end of this report. This will allow the Agency 
the flexibility to reprogram funds within a set program area. 
However, where the Committee has cited funding levels for 
certain program projects or activities within a program area, 
the reprogramming limitation continues to apply to those 
funding levels. Further, the Agency may not use any amount of 
de-obligated funds to initiate a new program, office, or 
initiative without the prior approval of the Committee.
    Congressional Budget Justification.--The Committee directs 
the Agency to include in future justifications the following 
items: (1) a comprehensive index of programs and activities 
within the program projects; (2) the requested bill language, 
with changes from the enacted language highlighted, at the 
beginning of each account section; (3) a justification for 
every program/project, including those proposed for 
elimination; (4) a comprehensive, detailed explanation of all 
changes within a program project; (5) a table showing 
consolidations, realignments or other transfers of resources 
and personnel from one program project to another such that the 
outgoing and receiving program projects offset and clearly 
illustrate a transfer of resources; and, (6) a table listing 
the budgets and FTE by major office within each National 
Program Management area, itemized by headquarter and each 
regional office, with pay/non-pay breakouts. Further, if EPA is 
proposing to change State allocation formulas for the 
distribution of appropriated funds, then EPA should include 
such proposals in the congressional justification.
    Workforce and Staffing Plans.--The Committee expects the 
Agency to submit as part of its operating plan, staffing 
targets by National Program Management area, with separate 
staffing targets for headquarters and each regional office 
within each Program, in line with the Agency's enacted 
appropriation. The Committee expects the Agency to develop 
workforce and staffing plans to achieve the staffing targets 
included with the operating plan, and directs the Agency to 
submit these workforce and staffing plans to the Committee not 
more than 30 days after the submission of the Agency's 
operating plan. Further, the Committee expects quarterly 
reports on the Agency's progress in achieving these staffing 
targets.
    Study on Grants to Communities in Need.--The Committee 
supports targeted investments in impoverished areas, 
particularly in persistent poverty counties and in high-poverty 
census tracts. To better understand how Agency grant programs 
are serving these particular areas, the Committee directs the 
Agency to submit a report to the Committee on the percentage of 
funds allocated by all competitive grant programs for fiscal 
years 2017, 2018, and 2019 to recipients in: (1) persistent 
poverty counties, defined as a county that has had 20 percent 
or more of its population living in poverty over the past 30 
years, as measured by the 1990 and 2000 decennial censuses and 
the most recent Small Area Income and Poverty estimates; and 
(2) high-poverty areas, defined as any census tract with a 
poverty rate of at least 20 percent as measured by the 2013-
2017 5-year data series available from the American Community 
Survey of the Census Bureau. The Agency is directed to report 
this information to the Committee within 90 days of such data 
being available, and provide a briefing to the Committee not 
later than 180 days after enactment on the Agency's progress in 
carrying out this directive.

                         Science and Technology

    The Science and Technology (S&T) account funds all 
Environmental Protection Agency research (including Superfund 
research activities paid with funds transferred into this 
account from the Hazardous Substance Superfund account). This 
account includes programs carried out through grants, 
contracts, and cooperative agreements, cooperative research and 
development agreements, and interagency agreements, with other 
Federal agencies, States, universities, nonprofit 
organizations, and private business, as well as in-house 
research. It also funds personnel compensation and benefits, 
travel, supplies and operating expenses, including rent, 
utilities and security, for all Agency research. Research 
addresses a wide range of environmental and health concerns 
across all environmental media and encompasses both long-term 
basic and near-term applied research to provide the scientific 
knowledge and technologies necessary for preventing, 
regulating, and abating pollution, and to anticipate emerging 
environmental issues.

 
 
 
Appropriation enacted, 2019...........................      $717,723,000
Budget estimate, 2020.................................       463,060,000
Recommended, 2020.....................................       727,633,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2019...............................        +9,910,000
    Budget estimate, 2020.............................      +264,573,000
 

    The fiscal year 2019 appropriation provided $717,723,000 
for programs across S&T, to be partially offset by a rescission 
of $11,250,000, for a net appropriation of $706,473,000. The 
appropriation included directives on the manner in which the 
rescissions were to be applied. The Agency was directed to 
submit, as part of its fiscal year 2019 operating plan, details 
on the application of the rescissions at the program project 
level.
    For fiscal year 2020, the Committee recommends $727,633,000 
for Science and Technology, $21,160,000 above the net fiscal 
year 2019 enacted level and $264,573,000 above the budget 
request. The Committee recommends that $30,496,000 be paid to 
this account from the Hazardous Substance Superfund account for 
ongoing research activities. A detailed table of funding 
recommendations below the account level is provided at the end 
of this report, and the Committee provides the following 
additional detail by program area:
    Clean Air.--The Committee recommends $117,241,000, a 
$700,000 increase above the enacted level and $29,900,000 above 
the request. The Committee directs the $700,000 increase to be 
used for increased fixed costs in the Federal Vehicles and Fuel 
Standards Certification program project. The Agency is directed 
to maintain other program project funding at the levels 
specified in the 2019 operating plan prior to the application 
of the rescission.
    Enforcement.--The Committee recommends $14,669,000, a 
$1,000,000 increase above the enacted level and $3,786,000 
above the request. The Committee directs that of the increase, 
$400,000 be used for fixed costs increases for base workforce, 
and the remainder be used for essential operations and 
maintenance costs at the National Enforcement Investigations 
Center's laboratory.
    Homeland Security.--The Committee recommends $34,418,000, a 
$1,296,000 increase above the enacted level and $1,614,000 
above the request. The Committee notes that $1,744,000 was 
rescinded in 2019. The Committee is aware that the recently 
enacted America's Water Infrastructure Act of 2018 (P.L. 115-
270) (AWIA) included requirements that public water systems 
update prior vulnerability assessments and expand the scope to 
include risks to natural disaster hazards and opportunities to 
incorporate resilience. The Committee takes its responsibility 
to ensure the safety and security of the American people 
seriously, and the Committee strongly supports efforts to 
harden critical water infrastructure against threats by both 
malevolent actors and natural hazards. The Committee directs 
that $9,071,000 be used for Critical Infrastructure Protection. 
This level of funding is sufficient to meet the Agency's 
projected needs with respect to implementing the requirements 
under section 2013 of AWIA. Further, the resources provided 
should be sufficient for the Agency to maintain its emergency 
response efforts without the streamlining proposed in the 
request. The Committee supports the requested funding levels 
for the other program projects in this area.
    Indoor Air and Radiation.--The Committee recommends 
$5,997,000, equal to the enacted level and $1,214,000 above the 
request. The Committee notes that $848,000 was rescinded in 
fiscal year 2019. The Committee directs the Agency to maintain 
program project funding at the levels specified in the 2019 
operating plan prior to the application of the rescission.
    Operations and Administration.--The Committee recommends 
$67,274,000, a decrease of $1,065,000 below the enacted level 
and $5,994,000 below the request. The bill provides funding for 
Facilities Infrastructure and Operations as requested. No funds 
are provided for Workforce Reshaping activities requested in 
the budget.
    Research: Air and Energy.--The Committee recommends 
$95,406,000, a $500,000 increase above the enacted level and 
$63,699,000 above the request. The Committee notes that 
$1,910,000 was rescinded in 2019. The Committee directs the 
Agency to apply the $2,410,000 increase above the 2019 post-
rescission level to support the Agency's ongoing research 
efforts as part of the Global Change Research Program, which 
delivers actionable science that informs local, state, and 
national decisions in responding to the expected impacts from 
climate change.
    The Agency is directed to continue supporting year 3 of the 
Partnership Research as outlined in the explanatory statement 
accompanying Public Law 115-141. This jointly funded, multi-
year government-industry research initiative should be used to 
produce credible science of national scope on such development, 
including periodic review and tracking of existing exposure and 
health studies already underway, and continuation of research 
initiated under this section. The Agency is encouraged to 
submit a report updating the Committees on the implementation 
of this partnership within 90 days of enactment of this Act.
    The Committee is concerned by the Agency's decision in 
October 2018 to eliminate the Particulate Matter Review Panel 
(PMRP). In past reviews of particulate matter (PM), the Clean 
Air Scientific Advisory Committee (CASAC) has relied on the 
PRMP's reviews of the CASAC's integrated science assessments to 
provide additional expertise and experience beyond that of the 
members of CASAC. To ensure that the CASAC has access to the 
highest quality information, the Committee directs the Agency 
to enter into a contract with the National Academies of 
Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine (NAS) within 30 days of 
enactment to conduct an independent scientific review of EPA's 
Integrated Science Assessment (ISA) for Particulate Matter, 
External Review Draft. The Agency should ensure that the NAS 
review examines the ISA's review, synthesis, and evaluation of 
the science relevant to evaluating the health effects of 
exposure to PM and as a scientific foundation for evaluating 
the adequacy of the National Ambient Air Quality Standards for 
PM for protecting public health. The review should also 
consider the ISA's evaluation of evidence for drawing 
scientific conclusions and making causal judgments. The NAS 
should provide the report to the Agency and to the Committee 
within one year from the time the contract is initiated. The 
Committee is aware the CASAC has recommended in its April 11, 
2019 letter to the Administrator that EPA produce a new draft 
of the ISA and that this new draft be resubmitted for CASAC 
review. The Committee expects the NAS review to include a 
review of the ISA draft of October 2018 and any subsequent ISA 
review produced by EPA in response to the CASAC review.
    Research: Chemical Safety and Sustainability.--The 
Committee recommends $126,930,000, equal to the enacted level 
and $40,364,000 above the request. The Committee directs the 
Agency to fund the computational toxicology and endocrine 
disruptor programs at the levels specified in the 2019 
operating plan prior to the application of the rescission.
    Maintaining IRIS Program Integrity.--The Committee is 
deeply concerned that the Agency has been inappropriately 
assigning resources provided for the Integrated Risk 
Information System (IRIS) in fiscal years 2018 and 2019 to 
support work in the Office of Pollution Prevention and Toxics. 
As in the previous two fiscal years, the Agency is directed to 
continue funding for the IRIS program at the fiscal year 2017 
level, and to continue the program within the Office of 
Research and Development. Workforce costs for IRIS staff who 
have been detailed to other programs or to other agencies 
should not be included in this total. Within 10 days of 
enactment, the Agency is directed to provide to the Committee 
data on the amount of IRIS staff time utilized to support the 
TSCA program during fiscal years 2018 and 2019, including the 
number of individuals assigned to TSCA efforts and hours 
worked, by month. The Agency is further directed to provide 
ongoing quarterly reports in fiscal year 2020 of the same 
information.
    Research: National Priorities.--The bill provides 
$6,000,000, a $1,000,000 increase above the enacted level and 
$6,000,000 above the request. The Committee directs that these 
funds be used for extramural research grants, independent of 
the Science to Achieve Results (STAR) grant program, to fund 
high-priority water quality and availability research by not-
for-profit organizations who often partner with the Agency. 
Because these grants are independent of the STAR grant program, 
the Agency should strive to award grants in as large an amount 
as is possible to achieve the most scientifically significant 
research. Funds shall be awarded competitively with priority 
given to partners proposing research of national scope and who 
provide a 25 percent match. The Agency is directed to allocate 
funds to grantees within 180 days of enactment of this Act.
    Research: Safe and Sustainable Water Resources.--The 
Committee recommends $113,257,000, a $7,000,000 increase above 
enacted and $43,294,000 above the request. The Committee notes 
that $1,367,000 was rescinded in 2019. Of the increase above 
pre-rescission levels, the Committee directs that $3,000,000 be 
used to support ongoing work to establish Maximum Contaminant 
Levels for PFAS chemicals, and that $4,000,000 be used to award 
grants under Section 2007 of AWIA (P.L. 115-270). The Committee 
rejects the budget request's proposals to streamline and 
refocus research, and directs the Agency to continue those 
activities with the resources provided.
    Additional Guidance.--The Committee includes the following 
additional guidance with respect to funding provided under this 
account:
    Improving Risk Assessments for Susceptible 
Subpopulations.--The Committee is aware that the Agency has 
developed its Strategic Plan for the reduction of testing in 
vertebrates for chemicals which references the use of new 
methodologies for assessing risk to potentially exposed or 
susceptible subpopulations. The Committee understands that in-
vitro and in-silico methods have the potential to identify 
risks to potentially exposed or susceptible subpopulations more 
efficiently and accurately than traditional animal models, and 
urges the Agency to include in its Strategic Plan a section 
concerning the development and implementation of alternative 
test methods that are directly applicable to identifying the 
risks faced by susceptible subpopulations, while reducing 
reliance on testing in vertebrates.
    STAR Grants.--The Committee provides funds to continue the 
Science to Achieve Results (STAR) program at the enacted levels 
and urges the Agency to continue its support for the Children's 
Environmental Health and Disease Prevention Research Centers.
    Harmful Algal Blooms.--The Committee recognizes the 
increasing challenges many communities face from harmful algal 
blooms (HABs) in freshwater and coastal ecosystems. The 
Committee encourages the Agency conduct and support research 
that help promote scientific progress towards preventing and 
controlling HABs, including research to: (1) determine the 
effectiveness of existing nutrient treatment technologies; (2) 
evaluate the scale-up of emerging nutrient treatment 
technologies and develop new technologies; and (3) develop best 
management practices to help both rural and urban communities 
control nutrients in their watersheds. Additionally, $6,000,000 
is made available to investigate health effects from exposure 
to HABs and cyanobacteria toxins and to develop methods to 
monitor, characterize, and predict blooms for early action.
    Water Distribution Systems.--The Agency is encouraged to 
continue utilizing infrastructure solutions such as 
distribution network leak detection, pressure monitoring, and 
sanitary and combined sewer monitoring technologies during 
upgrades to water and wastewater systems to optimize water 
delivery performance, reduce energy usage, limit water waste in 
distribution systems, and enhance modeling of sewer collection 
networks. The Committee anticipates that these solutions will 
help improve operations, maintenance, and capital expenditure 
in planning and budgeting, and increase spatial and temporal 
monitoring data available on U.S. water quality and quantity.
    Water Security Test Bed.--For both fiscal year 2020 and 
future budget requests, the Committee encourages EPA to include 
adequate funding for advancing full scale applied research and 
testing capabilities to address threats to drinking water and 
drinking water infrastructure.
    Environmental Impact of Sunscreens.--The Committee 
recognizes the important health benefits that come from 
reducing exposure to ultraviolet radiation, including by the 
use of sunscreens. To better assess any potential environmental 
impacts of sunscreens on the environment, the Agency is 
directed to contract with the NAS to conduct a review of the 
current scientific literature of potential risks to the marine 
environment, including risks to freshwater ecosystems, coral 
reefs, aquatic and marine life, and wetland ecosystems, from 
oxybenzone and octinoxate. The contract should also include NAS 
recommendations for additional research needed to conduct 
freshwater and marine environmental risk assessments.
    Strengthening Use of Science.--The Committee is aware that 
the Agency has proposed a rule ``Strengthening Transparency in 
Regulatory Science'' (Docket ID No. EPA-HQ-OA-2018-0259), and 
understands that the Administrator has recently stated that the 
Agency intends to finalize the rule in the near future. The 
Committee is also aware that shortly after the rule was 
proposed, the SAB wrote to the Administrator in June 2018 
requesting the opportunity to comment on the rule. The 
Administrator responded in April 2019 and noted that the Agency 
would benefit from consultation with SAB on the proposal.
    The Agency is directed to engage in formal consultation on 
the proposed rule with the SAB. Further, given the centrality 
of scientific studies in Agency decision-making and the unique 
experience and expertise of the SAB on such matters, the 
Committee urges the Agency to seek feedback on the full list of 
issues on which SAB indicated the Agency would benefit. The 
Committee expects the Agency to take no final action on the 
rule until the Agency has concluded such consultations.
    Additionally, within 30 days after enactment or 30 days 
after this rule is finalized, whichever is later, the Committee 
directs the Agency to enter into a contract with the NAS to 
review this rule. The review should assess the manner in which 
the rule alters the ability of the Agency to use publicly 
available peer-reviewed scientific and medical studies in its 
regulatory decision-making, including what the NAS considers to 
be the best available scientific information, and be completed 
within 270 days.
    Extending Student Services Contracting Authority.--The 
Committee notes that the Office of Research and Development 
contracts for the temporary hiring of pre-baccalaureate and 
post-baccalaureate students in science and engineering fields. 
The Committee understands that other Program Offices, including 
the Office of Water and Office of Chemical Safety and Pollution 
Prevention, may benefit from the use of similar contracting 
authority. The Committee invites the Agency to submit a 
proposal outlining such a request.
    Estimating Air Emissions from Animal Operations.--The 
Committee is aware that the Agency is working on the 
development of emission estimating methodologies for Animal 
Feeding Operations (AFOs), and has announced that it intends to 
release draft models for different types of livestock operators 
over the course of the next year. The Committee supports the 
Agency's efforts to develop accurate, robust, and accessible 
models for estimating these emissions, and urges the Agency to 
prioritize these efforts so that these methodologies can be 
finalized as quickly as possible.
    Enhanced Aquifer Recharge and Storage.--The Committee 
supports the Agency's ongoing work on Aquifer Recharge (AR) and 
Aquifer Storage and Recovery (ASR) as tools that can support 
sustainability and resiliency of drinking water resources 
across the nation. The Committee understands that in 
coordination with federal, state, and other partners, the 
Agency is leading the development of a Water Reuse Action Plan, 
which will be drafted later this year. The Committee supports 
continued efforts by the Agency to assist states and other 
stakeholders to creatively enhance water supplies through AR 
and ASR, including in sole source aquifers, and supports the 
continued regulation of AR and ASR under the Underground 
Injection Control program. The Committee encourages the Agency 
to consider partnerships with universities, tribes, and water 
related institutions for planning, research, monitoring, 
outreach, and implementation as it develops its Water Reuse 
Action Plan. Further, the Committee directs the Agency to brief 
the Committee on its Water Reuse Action Plan within 60 days 
after it is publicly available.

                 Environmental Programs and Management

    The Environmental Programs and Management (EPM) account 
encompasses a broad range of abatement, prevention, 
enforcement, and compliance activities, and personnel 
compensation, benefits, travel, and expenses for all programs 
of the Agency except Science and Technology, Hazardous 
Substance Superfund, Leaking Underground Storage Tank Trust 
Fund, Inland Oil Spill Programs, and the Office of Inspector 
General.
    Abatement, prevention, and compliance activities include 
setting environmental standards, issuing permits, monitoring 
emissions and ambient conditions and providing technical and 
legal assistance toward enforcement, compliance, and oversight. 
For many environmental programs, States and Tribes are directly 
responsible for actual operation of the various environmental 
programs, and the Agency's activities include, providing 
support and assistance and conducting oversight.
    In addition to program costs, this account funds 
administrative costs associated with the operating programs of 
the Agency, including support for executive direction, policy 
oversight, grants and resources management, general office and 
building services for program operations, and direct 
implementation of Agency environmental programs for 
headquarters, the ten EPA regional offices, and all non-
research field operations.

 
 
 
Appropriation enacted, 2019...........................    $2,658,200,000
Budget estimate, 2020.................................     2,149,268,000
Recommended, 2020.....................................     2,707,704,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2019...............................       +49,504,000
    Budget estimate, 2020.............................      +558,436,000
 

    The fiscal year 2019 appropriation provided $2,658,200,000 
for programs across EPM, to be partially offset by a rescission 
of $60,201,000, for a net appropriation of $2,597,999,000. The 
appropriation included guidance on the manner in which the 
rescissions were to be applied to program. The Agency was 
directed to submit, as part of its fiscal year 2019 operating 
plan, details on the application of the rescissions at the 
program project level.
    For fiscal year 2020, the Committee recommends 
$2,707,704,000 for EPM, $109,705,000 above the net enacted 
level and $558,436,000 above the budget request. A detailed 
table of funding recommendations below the account level is 
provided at the end of this report, and the Committee provides 
the following additional detail by program area:
    Clean Air.--The Committee recommends $274,276,000, a 
$1,168,000 increase above the enacted level and $118,462,000 
above the request. The recommendation includes $97,249,000 for 
Atmospheric Protection program project, and the Committee 
directs the Agency to apply the increase above the enacted 
level evenly to the greenhouse gas reporting program and the 
preparation of the Inventory of U.S. Greenhouse Gas Emissions 
and Sinks, in fulfillment of U.S. treaty obligations under the 
1992 Framework Convention on Climate Change. The Committee 
continues to support the EnergySTAR program and rejects the 
proposed shift to a fee-based funding mechanism, and provides 
$42,000,000 for its continued operation. Further, the Committee 
rejects the proposed termination of voluntary programs such as 
Natural GasSTAR, AgSTAR, and other partnership programs where 
the Agency works collaboratively with non-governmental entities 
to identify beneficial methods to reduce emissions, pollution, 
and increase efficiency. The Committee increases funding for 
Federal Support for Air Quality Management by $2,704,000 above 
the enacted level prior to the application of the rescission, 
and directs that the increase be applied to providing technical 
assistance and support to state, tribal, and local air 
programs. The proposed increases for Administration priorities 
listed in the request are rejected. The Committee provides 
funding for Federal Stationary Source Regulation at the 
requested level. Finally, the Committee directs that funding 
for the remaining program projects be maintained at the levels 
specified in the fiscal year 2019 operating plan prior to the 
application of the rescission, including $8,736,000 to assist 
with the international phase-out of ozone depleting substances 
under the Montreal Protocol.
    Compliance.--The Committee recommends $103,665,000 for 
compliance activities, an increase of $2,000,000 above the 2019 
enacted level and $14,021,000 above the request. The Committee 
notes that funds in this program were rescinded at a 
significantly higher percentage compared to other programs 
within EPM. The Committee is extremely concerned by the 
precipitous decrease in compliance and enforcement activities 
by the Agency over the past three fiscal years. The Committee 
considers a robust inspection and monitoring program to be an 
essential element of any effective Compliance Assurance regime, 
and urges the Agency to use the additional resources to meet 
and exceed the inspection and monitoring targets proposed in 
the budget. The Agency is directed to provide to the Committee, 
within 30 days of enactment, separate target and actuals data 
for onsite inspections and offsite compliance monitoring 
activities since fiscal year 2013, and in future budget 
requests to present separate targets for onsite inspections and 
offsite monitoring.
    The Committee urges the Agency, in coordination with state 
and local public health departments and other federal partners, 
to continue ambient air monitoring for ethylene oxide, 
particularly in communities identified by the 2014 National Air 
Toxics Assessment with high health hazard quotients for 
ethylene oxide exposure.
    Enforcement.--The Committee recommends $255,504,000 for 
enforcement activities, an increase of $14,867,000 above the 
2019 enacted level and $43,938,000 above the request. The 
Committee notes that $11,634,000 was rescinded in 2019, which 
is twice the average percentage of rescissions in other 
programs. Within the amounts provided, the Committee directs 
that in fiscal year 2020, not more than the post-rescission 
amount specified in the fiscal year 2019 operating plan be for 
NEPA implementation.
    Further, the Committee directs that $9,554,000 be used for 
Environmental Justice program projects. The Committee directs 
that, of the increase, $750,000 be used to award additional 
environmental justice grants, and the remaining funds be used 
to increase the capacity within the Agency and among State and 
local partners to incorporate environmental justice 
considerations in policy making, with a particular emphasis on 
assessing and minimizing cumulative impacts of pollution.
    Environmental Protection: National Priorities.--The bill 
provides $17,700,000, a $2,700,000 increase above the enacted 
level and $17,700,000 above the request. The Committee directs 
that funds be used for a competitive grant program for 
qualified non-profit organizations, to provide technical 
assistance for improved water quality or safe drinking water, 
adequate waste water to small systems or individual private 
well owners. The Agency shall provide $15,000,000 for 
Grassroots Rural and Small Community Water Systems Assistance 
Act, for activities specified under Section 1442(e) of the Safe 
Drinking Water Act (42 U.S.C.300j-1(e)(8)). The Agency is also 
directed to provide $1,700,000 for grants to qualified not-for-
profit organizations for technical assistance for individual 
private well owners, with priority given to organizations that 
currently provide technical and educational assistance to 
individual private well owners. The Agency is directed to 
provide on a national and multi-State regional basis, 
$1,000,000 for grants to qualified organizations, for the sole 
purpose of providing on-site training and technical assistance 
for wastewater systems. The Agency shall require each grantee 
to provide a minimum 10 percent match, including in kind 
contributions. The Agency is directed to allocate funds to 
grantees within 180 days of enactment of this Act.
    Geographic Programs.--The bill provides $475,958,000, a 
$19,000,000 increase above the enacted level and $438,658,000 
above the request. The Committee believes that protecting these 
important water bodies is a national priority, and provides 
funding for programs that support their restoration and 
protection. From within the amount provided, the Committee 
directs the following:
    Great Lakes Restoration Initiative.--The Committee 
recommends $320,000,000 for the Great Lakes Restoration 
Initiative (GLRI), an increase of $20,000,000 above the enacted 
level and $20,000,000 above the budget request. The Committee 
directs the Agency and the other Federal partners to continue 
to prioritize action oriented projects in lieu of additional 
studies, monitoring and evaluations. In addition, as the Agency 
distributes funds across the five focus areas, tribal related 
activities should be maintained at not less than $15,000,000. 
Further, the Committee supports ongoing work to reduce the 
growth of harmful algal blooms and encourages continued 
targeting of watersheds that could pose a threat to human 
health in drinking water.
    The Committee notes that the recently enacted Vessel 
Incidental Discharge Act (P.L. 115-282) places the Great Lakes 
and Lake Champlain Invasive species program in the Great Lakes 
National Program Office. The Committee urges the Agency to 
prioritize efforts to reduce the risk of introduction of 
invasive species in the Great Lakes and Lake Champlain, using 
funds from the appropriate Geographic Program.
    Chesapeake Bay.--The Committee recommends $85,000,000 for 
the Chesapeake Bay program, an increase of $12,000,000 above 
the enacted level and $77,700,000 above the budget request. 
From within the amount provided, $9,000,000 is for nutrient and 
sediment removal grants and $9,000,000 is for small watershed 
grants to control polluted runoff from urban, suburban and 
agricultural lands, and $6,000,000 is for state-based 
implementation in the most effective basins.
    Puget Sound.--The Committee recommends $33,000,000 for 
Puget Sound, $5,000,000 above the enacted level and $33,000,000 
above the budget request. Funds shall be allocated in the same 
manner as directed in House Report 112-331. The Committee 
directs the Agency to expeditiously obligate funds, in a manner 
consistent with the authority and responsibilities under 
Section 320 and the National Estuary Program.
    Long Island Sound.--The Committee recommends $21,000,000 
for Long Island Sound, an increase of $7,000,000 above the 
enacted level and $21,000,000 above the budget request. The 
Agency shall operate the program as specified in section 119 of 
the Clean Water Act.
    San Francisco Bay.--The Committee recommends $5,019,000, a 
$200,000 increase above the enacted level and $5,019,000 above 
the request. The Committee directs the Agency to apply the 
increase towards high priority activities within the Bay Delta 
Action Plan.
    South Florida.--The Committee recommends $3,504,000, a 
$300,000 increase above the enacted level and $3,504,000 above 
the request. The Agency is directed to apply the increase 
evenly to continue ongoing work monitoring coral health, 
enhancing water quality in the Caloosahatchee Estuary and 
Indian River Lagoon, and enhancing water quality in Florida Bay 
and Biscayne Bay.
    Southern New England Estuaries.--The Committee recommends 
$5,400,000, a $400,000 increase above the enacted level and 
$5,400,000 above the request. The Committee directs the Agency 
to use the increase to continue to spur investments in 
regionally significant and landscape-scale restoration projects 
through technical assistance, grants, and contracts.
    Columbia River Basin.--The Committee recommends $1,100,000, 
a $100,000 increase above the enacted level and $1,100,000 
above the request. The Committee directs the Agency to continue 
to operate the program as specified under section 123 of the 
Federal Water Pollution Control Act.
    Indoor Air and Radiation.--The Committee recommends 
$27,637,000, equal to the enacted level and $23,111,000 above 
the request. The Committee notes that $2,686,000 was rescinded 
in fiscal year 2019. The Agency is directed to continue to 
operate the Radon program as in fiscal year 2019. Additionally, 
the Committee notes the need to continue to maintain the U.S. 
source standard for radon gas for use by states and industry as 
the national benchmark for radon measurement devices, and 
encourages the Agency to collect available radon test data to 
update the national U.S. EPA Radon Map and develop locality-
specific classifications of radon risks. The Committee directs 
that funding for the other program projects be allocated in the 
manner specified in the 2019 operating plan prior to the 
application of the rescission.
    Information Exchange/Outreach.--The Committee recommends 
$121,491,000, a $5,047,000 decrease below the enacted level and 
$31,594,000 above the request. The Committee provides 
$41,771,000 for Executive Management, as requested. The Agency 
is directed to allocate the funds in the remaining program 
project lines in the manner specified in the fiscal year 2019 
operating plan prior to the application of the rescission.
    International Programs.--The Committee recommends 
$15,400,000, equal to the enacted level and $10,061,000 above 
the request. The Committee notes that $789,000 was rescinded in 
2019. The Committee expects the Agency to allocate funds as 
specified in the 2019 operating plan prior to the application 
of the rescission.
    Legal/Science/Regulatory/Economic Review.--The Committee 
recommends $109,023,000, a $2,391,000 decrease below the 
enacted level and $1,181,000 above the request. The Committee 
provides $14,271,000, an increase of $900,000 above the pre-
rescission enacted level, for Integrated Environmental 
Strategies, and directs that the increase be used to support 
Community-Driven Environmental Protection and the Office of 
Community Revitalization. The Committee increases support for 
the SAB by $1,000,000 above the level specified in the fiscal 
year 2019 operating plan prior to the application of the 
rescission. Funding for the Legal Advice: Support Program, and 
Regulatory Analysis program is provided at the fiscal year 2019 
post-rescission level, and the Legal Advice: Environmental 
Program project is funded at $45,000,000, a decrease of 
$2,100,000 below the post-rescission level. The remaining 
program projects are funded at the levels specified in the 
fiscal year 2019 operating plan prior to the application of the 
rescission.
    Operations and Administration.--The Committee recommends 
$473,109,000, a $7,642,000 decrease below the enacted level and 
$21,198,000 below the request. No funds are provided for the 
Agency's proposed workforce reshaping. Additionally, the 
Committee directs that funding be allocated to Human Resources 
Management and Financial Assistance Grants as specified in the 
fiscal year 2019 operating plan prior to the application of the 
rescission. The Committee accepts the other project allocations 
in the budget request.
    Pesticides Licensing.--The Committee recommends $96,135,000 
for licensing and registration activities, a decrease of 
$13,228,000 below the enacted level, and $10,456,000 above the 
request. In March 2019, Congress enacted the Pesticide 
Registration Improvement Act of 2018 (P.L. 116-8) which made 
previously collected fees available for use without further 
appropriation. The Committee expects that increased fee 
utilization will result in the need for decreased 
appropriations in fiscal year 2020 and in the future.
    Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA).--The 
Committee recommends $118,377,000, $6,000,000 above the enacted 
level and $38,362,000 above the budget request. Of the funds 
provided under this section, $6,000,000 is provided for 
implementation of a federal permit program for coal combustion 
residuals. The Committee does not support the proposed 
modification of cleanups under the RCRA Waste Management 
program nor the proposed elimination of the RCRA Waste 
Minimization and Recycling program, and directs the Agency to 
operate these projects at the levels specified in the fiscal 
year 2019 operating plan prior to the application of the 
rescission.
    Toxics Risk Review and Prevention.--The Committee 
recommends $89,217,000, a decrease of $3,304,000 below the 
enacted level, and $22,799,000 above the request. The Committee 
notes that $1,806,000 was rescinded in fiscal year 2019. As 
projected in the budget request, the Committee assumes an 
additional $11,500,000 in resources will be available in fiscal 
year 2020 from fees collected to conduct chemical reviews. For 
Chemical Risk Review, the committee provides $58,624,000. The 
Committee approves the requested increases for fixed costs and 
staff to support implementation of TSCA. Of the requested 
increase in non-pay resources, the Committee provides 
$4,500,000.
    The Committee directs that the Endocrine Disruptors and 
Lead Risk Reduction projects be allocated funds as specified in 
the fiscal year 2019 operating plan prior to the application of 
the rescission.
    Water: Ecosystems.--The Committee recommends $52,788,000, a 
$5,000,000 increase above the enacted level, and a $31,210,000 
increase above the request. From within the amount provided, 
the Committee directs that $21,000,000 be used to provide 
$750,000 to each National Estuary Program (NEP) funded under 
Section 320 of the Clean Water Act. Further, in the 
Administrative Provisions section, the Committee directs that 
$4,000,000 in competitive grants be made available for 
additional projects, and encourages the Agency to work in 
consultation with the NEP directors to identify worthy projects 
and activities.
    Water: Human Health Protection.--The Committee recommends 
$108,234,000, a $9,727,000 increase above the enacted level, 
and a $18,426,000 increase above the request. The Committee 
directs the Agency to maintain the Beach program at the level 
specified in the fiscal year 2019 operating plan prior to the 
application of the rescission. For the Drinking Water Program, 
the Committee provides the requested increases for fixed costs, 
priority work associated with PFAS in drinking water, and 
provides $4,142,000 for implementation and administration of 
new drinking water requirements in AWIA (P.L. 115-270). The 
Committee directs the Agency to maintain its other drinking 
water protection activities with the resources provided.
    The Agency is encouraged to continue coordinating with the 
Food and Drug Administration in light of the directive included 
in Section 773 of Division B of the Consolidated Appropriations 
Act, 2019 (P.L. 116-6).
    Water Quality Protection.--The Committee recommends 
$211,217,000, a $300,000 increase above the enacted level and 
$22,984,000 above the request. The Committee notes that 
$4,728,000 was rescinded in fiscal year 2019. The Committee 
supports the WaterSENSE and Urban Waters programs, and directs 
the Agency to continue funding for these activities at the 2019 
enacted levels prior to the application of the rescission. The 
Committee also supports ongoing activities related to 
integrated planning, which will be increasingly necessary as 
States and communities evaluate wastewater systems for lead 
contamination issues and pipe replacement. The Committee has 
provided an increase above the enacted level to assist with the 
implementation and administration of new programmatic 
requirements in AWIA.
    The recently enacted Water Infrastructure Improvement Act 
(P.L. 115-436) (WIIA) established a Municipal Ombudsman within 
the Office of the Administrator to facilitate coordination and 
communication between municipalities, regional offices, and the 
Administrator, and to provide municipalities with technical 
assistance as they develop permits that incorporate integrated 
plans. The Agency is directed to brief the Committee on the 
implementation of WIIA.
    The Committee is aware that more than one quarter of the 
U.S. population relies on onsite-decentralized systems to treat 
wastewater. The Committee urges the Agency to designate 
additional technical assistance, resources and expertise toward 
onsite wastewater recycling issues within the Decentralized 
Wastewater Program.
    Additional Guidance.--The Committee includes the following 
additional guidance with respect to funding provided under this 
account:
    Administrator Priorities.--The Agency is directed to submit 
a report within 90 days of enactment of this Act that 
identifies how any fiscal year 2019 funding was used, by 
account, program area, and program project. Each activity 
funded should include a justification for the effort and any 
anticipated results.
    Adequate and Accessible Training for Lead Paint 
Abatement.--The Committee fully supports activities by EPA, 
States, contractors and homeowners that result in the safe and 
proper abatement of lead paint in homes. The Committee believes 
it is incumbent upon contractors to be fully trained, certified 
and knowledgeable about the risks related to lead exposure 
especially for children and at-risk populations. It is 
imperative that EPA and the States continue to make those 
training opportunities readily available and easily accessible 
along with improved outreach to build awareness for homeowners 
during renovations. As such, the Committee recommends that the 
EPA continue to make the necessary training available for all 
contractors to quickly and efficiently identify whether lead 
paint was present during a renovation and to remove the lead as 
quickly as possible readily available with more flexible dates 
and locations.
    National Recycling Strategy.--The Committee is concerned 
that the current system of recycling waste materials in the 
U.S. is unsustainable. The Agency can help ensure the long-term 
economic and environmental viability of local recycling 
programs by exercising national leadership and facilitating the 
harmonization of standards. The Committee believes that this 
will strengthen markets, reduce contamination, and prevent 
recyclable materials from needlessly polluting the environment, 
being incinerated, or sent to landfills. The Committee directs 
the Agency to develop, in collaboration with for-profit, non-
profit, state and local governments, and other stakeholders, a 
national recycling strategy to strengthen and sustain the 
current system with recommendations for voluntary action to be 
reported to the Committees on Appropriations within 270 days of 
enactment. The strategy should analyze the expected benefits of 
each element of the strategy, including the value of 
implementing a national system of standardized recycling 
labeling, the importance of public education to increase 
residential and institutional compliance, and other 
opportunities to significantly reduce cross-contamination and 
comingling of materials entering the recycling stream, as part 
of efforts to increase the economic viability of processing 
recyclable materials, including paper, cardboard, plastics, 
metals, electronic waste, and compostable materials.
    Restrictions on Certain Communications.--The Committee 
reminds EPA that funding may not be used in a manner contrary 
to Section 401 of this bill.
    Designating Chitosan as Minimum Risk.--The Committee is 
aware that the Agency has received a petition to add chitosan 
to the Minimum Risk Pesticide List. The Committee encourages 
the Agency to review this petition in a timely matter, and to 
notify the Committee when the review has been completed.
    Lead-free Plumbing Fixtures.--The Committee urges the 
Agency to finalize regulations implementing P.L. 111-380 to 
require that plumbing components meet the definition of lead 
free in Section 1417(d) of the Safe Drinking Water Act (42 
U.S.C. 300g-6(d)) by the end of 2019.
    Protecting School Children from Lead.--The Committee 
considers protecting children from lead exposure to be a top 
priority. The Committee urges the Agency to expand efforts by 
the Agency to reduce childhood exposure to lead in drinking 
water at schools and childcare facilities. The Committee 
directs the Agency to study the merits of issuing separate 
requirements for public water systems to conduct lead 
monitoring in schools and child care facilities that they 
serve. The study should consider the frequency at which water 
systems conduct monitoring at schools and how water systems 
should share results with schools and communities. The 
Committee directs the Administrator to publish a report 
following completion of the study with findings and conclusions 
related towards the feasibility of the monitoring requirement.

            HAZARDOUS WASTE ELECTRONIC MANIFEST SYSTEM FUND

    This account supports all activities necessary for the 
development and operation of the system established by the 
Hazardous Waste Electronic Manifest Establishment Act (P.L. 
112-195).

 
 
 
Appropriation enacted, 2019...........................                $0
Budget estimate, 2020.................................                 0
Recommended, 2020.....................................                 0
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2019...............................                 0
    Budget estimate, 2020.............................                 0
 

    The Committee provides $8,000,000 for the Hazardous Waste 
Electronic Manifest System Fund, which is to be offset by 
$8,000,000 in collections from e-Manifest user fees, resulting 
in $0 new net budget authority.

                      Office of Inspector General

    The Office of Inspector General (OIG) provides audit, 
evaluation, and investigation products and advisory services to 
improve the performance and integrity of EPA programs and 
operations. The Inspector General (IG) will continue to perform 
the function of IG for the Chemical Safety and Hazard 
Investigation Board. This account funds personnel compensation 
and benefits, travel, and expenses (excluding rent, utilities, 
and security costs) for the Office of Inspector General. In 
addition to the funds provided under this heading, this account 
receives funds from the Hazardous Substance Superfund account.

 
 
 
Appropriation enacted, 2019...........................       $41,489,000
Budget estimate, 2020.................................        38,893,000
Recommended, 2020.....................................        48,514,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2019...............................        +7,025,000
    Budget estimate, 2020.............................        +9,621,000
 

    The Committee recommends $48,514,000, which is $7,025,000 
above the enacted level and $9,621,000 above the budget 
request. In addition, the Committee recommends $9,586,000 as a 
payment to this account from the Hazardous Substance Superfund 
account. The Committee notes the OIG letter dated February 8 
2019, to Office of Management and Budget Director Mick 
Mulvaney, which was submitted to Congress by the Agency as part 
of its fiscal year 2020 request. The combined funding to the 
OIG recommended in the bill is sufficient to meet the IG's 
initial request of $58,100,000. The Committee understands that 
this level of funding should be sufficient to meet OIG's 
increased workload.
    The IG is directed to prioritize funds to projects that 
prevent and detect fraud, waste and abuse at the Environmental 
Protection Agency.

                        BUILDINGS AND FACILITIES

    The Buildings and Facilities account provides for the 
design and construction of EPA-owned facilities as well as for 
the repair, extension, alteration, and improvement of 
facilities used by the Agency. The funds are used to correct 
unsafe conditions, protect health and safety of employees and 
Agency visitors, and prevent deterioration of structures and 
equipment.

 
 
 
Appropriation enacted, 2019...........................       $34,467,000
Budget estimate, 2020.................................        39,553,000
Recommended, 2020.....................................        39,553,000
Comparison:
  Appropriation, 2019.................................        +5,086,000
  Budget estimate, 2020...............................                 0
 

    The bill provides $39,553,000, which is $5,086,000 above 
the enacted level, and equal to the request. EPA should 
prioritize projects based on anticipated cost savings, 
including energy and other utility cost savings, and allocate 
funds accordingly. The Agency is reminded of the Committee's 
long-standing reprogramming requirements with respect to 
closures, consolidations, and relocations of offices, 
facilities, and laboratories.

                     Hazardous Substance Superfund

    The Hazardous Substance Superfund (Superfund) program was 
established in 1980 by the Comprehensive Environmental 
Response, Compensation, and Liability Act to clean up emergency 
hazardous materials, spills, and dangerous, uncontrolled, and/
or abandoned hazardous waste sites. The Superfund Amendments 
and Reauthorization Act (SARA) expanded the program 
substantially in 1986, authorizing approximately $8,500,000,000 
in revenues over five years. In 1990, the Omnibus Budget 
Reconciliation Act extended the program's authorization through 
1994 for $5,100,000,000 with taxing authority through calendar 
year 1995.
    The Superfund program is operated by EPA subject to annual 
appropriations from a dedicated trust fund and from general 
revenues. Enforcement activities are used to identify and 
induce parties responsible for hazardous waste problems to 
undertake cleanup actions and pay for EPA oversight of those 
actions. These enforcement actions are an essential element to 
the success of the program. In addition, responsible parties 
have been required to cover the cost of fund-financed removal 
and remedial actions undertaken at spills and waste sites by 
Federal and State agencies. At sites where no viable 
responsible party can be identified, EPA may use monies from 
the Trust Fund to remediate contaminated site. Funds are paid 
from this account to the Office of Inspector General and 
Science and Technology accounts for Superfund related 
activities.

 
 
 
Appropriation enacted, 2019...........................    $1,091,947,000
Budget estimate, 2020.................................     1,045,351,000
Recommended, 2020.....................................     1,214,648,000
Comparison:
  Appropriation, 2019.................................      +122,701,000
  Budget estimate, 2020...............................      +169,297,000
 

    The fiscal year 2019 appropriation to the Hazardous 
Substance Superfund account included an appropriation of 
$1,091,947,000 in Title II and an appropriation of $68,000,000 
in Title IV. For fiscal year 2020, the bill provides 
$1,214,648,000 for the Hazardous Substance Superfund program, 
which is $54,701,000 above the combined fiscal year 2019 level 
and $169,297,000 above the budget request. The Committee 
recommends that $9,586,000 be transferred to the Office of 
Inspector General, and $30,496,000 be transferred to the 
Science and Technology account.
    Enforcement.--The Committee recommends $171,968,000, a 
$5,593,000 increase above the enacted level and $611,000 above 
the request. The Committee rejects the proposed reductions in 
Forensics Support and Environmental Justice, and directs the 
agency to maintain these projects at the fiscal year 2019 
level.
    Operations and Administration.--The Committee recommends 
$124,241,000, a $3,864,000 decrease below the enacted level and 
$279,000 below the request. and directs the agency to maintain 
funding for Human Resources Management at not less than the 
fiscal year 2019 level.
    Research: Chemical Safety and Sustainability.--The 
Committee recommends $12,824,000, a $10,000,000 increase above 
the enacted level and $7,486,000 above the request. The 
Committee notes that as part of its PFAS action plan, which was 
released in February 2019, the Agency identified significant 
research needs with respect to the human health and ecological 
impacts of PFAS exposure, and methods for treatment and 
remediation. The Committee recommends a $10,000,000 increase to 
address research needs in support of designating PFAS chemicals 
as hazardous substances under Section 102 of CERCLA. The Agency 
is directed to include these funds as part of the transfer to 
the Science and Technology account.
    Research: Sustainable and Healthy Communities.--The 
Committee recommends $16,463,000, a $5,000,000 increase above 
the enacted level and $5,486,000 above the request. The 
Committee recommends a $5,000,000 increase to address research 
needs in support of designating PFAS chemicals as hazardous 
substances under Section 102 of CERCLA. The Agency is directed 
to include these funds as part of the transfer to the Science 
and Technology account.
    Superfund Cleanup.--The Committee recommends $822,073,000, 
an increase of $32,333,000 above the combined funding levels 
provided in Title II and Title IV in fiscal year 2019, and 
$153,790,000 above the request. The Committee urges the Agency 
to prioritize work at sites where activities will result in 
reduced human exposure to toxic substances. The Committee 
expects the additional funding will also support pipeline 
activities such as remedial investigations, feasibility 
studies, and remedial designs which are critical steps prior to 
construction.
    The Committee also encourages the Agency, within 180 days 
of enactment of this Act, to submit a report on the status of 
each time-critical removal action for which Federal funds 
greater than $1,000,000 have been expended since January 1, 
2017, along with the Federal cost of clean-up efforts, whether 
responsible parties have faced criminal charges, and the amount 
of recovered Federal dollars.
    Additional Guidance.--The Committee includes the following 
additional guidance with respect to funding provided under this 
account:
    Operation of Aircraft.--The Committee is aware of the value 
of using aircraft in emergency situations, and has provided 
authority within this account for the Agency to use aircraft to 
effectively and efficiently assist in carrying out its response 
mission and better detect and monitor the release and spread of 
hazardous substances.
    New and Emerging Technologies.--To increase the rate of 
cleanups of Superfund sites around the country, the Agency is 
encouraged to collaborate with the private sector to utilize 
the best available technologies and in situ remediation 
products to restore these sites as expeditiously as possible to 
return them to productive use.

          Leaking Underground Storage Tank Trust Fund Program

    Subtitle I of the Solid Waste Disposal Act, as amended by 
the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act, authorized 
the establishment of a response program for cleanup of releases 
from leaking underground storage tanks. Owners and operators of 
facilities with underground tanks must demonstrate financial 
responsibility and bear initial responsibility for cleanup. The 
Federal trust fund is funded through the imposition of a motor 
fuel tax of one-tenth of a cent per gallon.
    In addition to State resources, the Leaking Underground 
Storage Tank (LUST) Trust Fund provides funding to clean up 
sites, enforces necessary corrective actions, and recovers 
costs expended from the Fund for cleanup activities. The 
underground storage tank response program is designed to 
operate primarily through cooperative agreements with States. 
Funds are also used for grants to non-State entities, including 
Indian Tribes, under Section 8001 of the Resource Conservation 
and Recovery Act. The Energy Policy Act of 2005 expanded the 
authorized activities of the Fund to include the underground 
storage tank program. In 2006, Congress amended section 9508 of 
the Internal Revenue Code to authorize expenditures from the 
trust fund for prevention and inspection activities.

 
 
 
Appropriation enacted, 2019...........................       $91,941,000
Budget estimate, 2020.................................        47,801,000
Recommended, 2020.....................................        94,410,000
Comparison:
  Appropriation, 2019.................................        +2,469,000
  Budget estimate, 2020...............................       +46,609,000
 

    The Committee recommends $94,410,000 for the Leaking 
Underground Storage Tank (LUST) Trust Fund Program, an increase 
of $2,469,000 above the enacted level and $46,609,000 above the 
budget request. The Committee has provided additional resources 
for enforcement activities to oversee cleanups by responsible 
parties, and for fixed costs associated with research 
activities. The Committee rejects the proposed decrease in 
research to characterize and remediate contaminated sites.
    Regular inspections of Underground Storage Tanks (USTs) are 
a key part of an overall strategy to prevent and minimize 
impacts of releases of fuels or other hazardous substances from 
USTs. The Committee provides $25,369,000 to support state 
inspection programs. The Committee directs the increase in 
cooperative agreement funding be fully allocated to states, and 
that not less than $500,000 of the increase to the LUST/UST 
program project be used for cleanups in Indian Country.
    The Committee supports the Agency's ongoing efforts to 
study and mitigate corrosion issues at USTs as the nation 
employs increasing quantities of emerging fuels.

                       Inland Oil Spill Programs

    This appropriation, authorized by the Federal Water 
Pollution Control Act, as amended by the Oil Pollution Act of 
1990, provides funds to prepare for and prevent releases of oil 
and other petroleum products in navigable waterways. In 
addition, EPA is reimbursed for incident specific response 
costs through the Oil Spill Liability Trust Fund managed by the 
United States Coast Guard.
    EPA is responsible for directing all cleanup and removal 
activities posing a threat to public health and the 
environment; conducting site inspections; providing a means to 
achieve cleanup activities by private parties; reviewing 
containment plans at facilities; reviewing area contingency 
plans; pursuing cost recovery of fund-financed cleanups; and 
conducting research of oil cleanup techniques. Funds for this 
appropriation are provided through the Oil Spill Liability 
Trust Fund which is composed of fees and collections made 
through provisions of the Oil Pollution Act of 1990, the 
Comprehensive Oil Pollution Liability and Compensation Act, the 
Deepwater Port Act of 1974, the Outer Continental Shelf Lands 
Act Amendments of 1978, and the Federal Water Pollution Control 
Act, as amended. Pursuant to law, the Trust Fund is managed by 
the United States Coast Guard.

 
 
 
Appropriation enacted, 2019...........................       $18,209,000
Budget estimate, 2020.................................        15,962,000
Recommended, 2020.....................................        23,237,000
Comparison:
  Appropriation, 2019.................................        +5,028,000
  Budget estimate, 2020...............................        +7,275,000
 

    The Committee recommends $23,237,000 for the Inland Oil 
Spill program, an increase of $5,028,000 above the enacted 
level and $7,275,000 above the budget request.
    The Committee notes that there is an acute need to prevent, 
and when necessary, to respond to oil spills. This includes 
ensuring that the agency and state and local first responders 
have adequate personnel, training, and equipment, to respond to 
emergencies. The Committee recommends a $4,700,000 increase to 
the Oil program, and directs that of the increase, not less 
than $1,250,000 be used to support emergency responder 
trainings, including for responding to shale oil emergencies, 
and that not less than $2,750,000 be used for oil accident 
prevention and preparedness activities, including support for 
inspections at high risk facilities.
    Preventing Oil Spills.--The Committee is aware of the high 
non-compliance rate among facilities that are required to 
submit Spill Prevention Control and Countermeasures Plans or 
Facility Response Plans. The Committee directs the agency to 
utilize the additional resources provided for compliance and 
enforcement to develop and implement strategies to reduce the 
rate of non-compliance. The agency is directed to brief the 
Committee on its strategy within 90 days of enactment.
    Research on Dispersants.--The Committee expects the agency 
to continue its work studying the performance and behavior of 
oil dispersants in deep water and arctic spills, as well as 
developing protocols for testing oil spill control agents.
    Operation of Aircraft.--The Committee is aware of the value 
of using aircraft in emergency situations, and has provided 
authority within this account for the Agency to use aircraft to 
effectively and efficiently assist in carrying out its response 
mission and better detect and monitor the release and spread of 
petroleum and other related substances.

                   State and Tribal Assistance Grants

    The State and Tribal Assistance Grants (STAG) account 
provides grant funds for programs operated primarily by State, 
Tribal, local, and other governmental partners. The account 
includes two broad types of funds: (1) Infrastructure 
Assistance, which is used primarily by state, local, and tribal 
partners for projects that directly improve air quality, water 
quality, or clean up contaminated sites; supporting 
environmental protection; and (2) Categorical Grants, which 
assist State and Tribal governments and other environmental 
partners with the operation of environmental programs.
    In the STAG account, the agency provides funding for 
infrastructure projects through two State Revolving Funds 
(Clean Water and Drinking Water), geographic specific projects 
in Alaskan Native Villages and on the United States-Mexico 
Border, Brownfields revitalization projects, diesel emission 
reduction grants, and other targeted infrastructure projects. 
Additionally, the Water Infrastructure Improvements for the 
Nation Act (P.L. 114-322) (WIIN Act) and Americas Water 
Infrastructure Act of 2018 (P.L. 115-270) (AWIA) authorized a 
number of clean water and drinking water grant programs 
designed to address specific water-related health and 
environmental concerns in communities.
    The State Revolving Funds (SRFs) provide Federal financial 
assistance to protect the Nation's water resources. The Clean 
Water SRF helps eliminate municipal discharge of untreated or 
inadequately treated pollutants and thereby helps maintain or 
restore the country's water to a swimmable and/or fishable 
quality. The Clean Water SRF provides resources for municipal, 
inter-municipal, State, and interstate agencies and Tribal 
governments to plan, design, and construct wastewater 
facilities and other projects, including non-point source, 
estuary, stormwater, and sewer overflow projects. The Safe 
Drinking Water SRF finances improvements to community water 
systems so that they can achieve compliance with the mandates 
of the Safe Drinking Water Act and continue to protect public 
health.
    Many Federal environmental statutes include provisions 
allowing delegation of day-to-day management of environmental 
programs to approved State and Tribal environmental programs. 
The Federal statutes were designed to recognize the States and 
Tribes as partners and co-regulators, allowing States and 
Tribes to assist with the execution and implementation of 
environmental safeguards. For delegated environmental programs, 
State and Tribal governments issue and enforce permits, carry 
out inspections and monitoring, and collect data. To assist 
States and Tribes in this task, the statutes also authorized 
the agency to provide funding to States and Tribes. These 
grants, which cover every major aspect of environmental 
protection, include those programs authorized by sections 319 
and 106 of the Clean Water Act (Federal Water Pollution Control 
Act, as amended) (for non-point source pollution and the water 
quality permits programs), sections 103 and 105 of the Clean 
Air Act (for State and Local air quality management programs), 
section 128 of CERCLA (for State and Tribal response programs), 
section 1443(a) of the Safe Drinking Water Act (for public 
water system supervision), and section 3011 of RCRA (for the 
implementation of State hazardous waste programs).

 
 
 
Appropriation enacted, 2019...........................    $3,605,041,000
Budget estimate, 2020.................................     2,774,602,000
Recommended, 2020.....................................     4,620,992,000
Comparison:
  Appropriation, 2019.................................    +1,015,951,000
  Budget estimate, 2020...............................    +1,846,390,000
 

    The fiscal year 2019 appropriation to the STAG account 
included an appropriation of $3,605,041,000 in Title II, an 
appropriation of $665,000,000 in Title IV, and a rescission of 
$139,078,000 in the Administrative Provision which was applied 
on an equal percentage basis across all STAG program projects, 
for a net appropriation in fiscal year 2019 of $4,130,963,000.
    For fiscal year 2020, the Committee recommends 
$4,620,992,000 for the State and Tribal Assistance Grants 
account, net increase of $490,029,000 above the total net 
fiscal year 2019 enacted level and $1,846,390,000 above the 
budget request. The Committee provides the following additional 
detail by program area:
    Infrastructure Assistance.--The Committee recommends 
$3,506,000,000 in funds for infrastructure assistance.
    Clean Water State Revolving Fund.--The Committee recommends 
$1,784,000,000 for the Clean Water SRF, requires at least 10 
percent of funds to be used for green infrastructure or energy 
efficiency projects, reserves $2,000,000 for technical 
assistance and training grants, and requires that 10 percent of 
grant funds be used for additional subsidization.
    The Committee notes that wastewater treatment facilities 
are some of the largest industrial users of electricity in the 
nation, and has provided Green Project Reserve (GPR) funds as 
part of the Clean Water State Revolving Fund to encourage 
states to improve energy and water efficiency at treatment 
facilities. In order to better track the ways in which states 
are utilizing GPR funds, the Committee directs the Agency to 
develop a uniform reporting framework which states may use to 
report their GPR spending, and urges the Agency to include 
tools and metrics that allow states toquantify estimated energy 
and water savings benefits of these investments. The Agency is 
directed to brief the Committee on its progress in developing 
this guidance within 180 days of enactment.
    Drinking Water State Revolving Fund.--The Committee 
recommends $1,300,000,000, allows funds to be used to finance 
green infrastructure or energy efficiency projects, and 
requires that 14 percent be used for additional subsidization.
    AWIA reauthorized the Drinking Water SRF program, amended 
the list of eligible uses for Drinking Water SRF funding, and 
gave states new authorities and requirements for administering 
the program. For FY 2020, AWIA authorized $1,300,000,000 in 
funding for capitalization grants to states, tribes, and 
territories, which is the amount provided in the bill. AWIA 
also changed requirements that a portion of capitalization 
grants to be used for additional subsidization in the range 
between 6 percent and 35 percent, and a requirement that 
projects accessing Drinking Water SRF funds through fiscal year 
2023 use American iron and steel. The Committee's direction to 
provide additional subsidization equal to 14 percent is in 
addition to that required by AWIA, and is equal to the minimum 
amount that has been required in previous years.
    US-Mexico Border Water Infrastructure Grant Program.--The 
Committee recommends $30,000,000 for drinking water and 
wastewater infrastructure projects along the US-Mexico border 
that benefit U.S. citizens by reducing the flow of 
transnational pollution into the U.S.
    Alaska Native Villages.--The Committee recommends 
$20,000,000 in drinking water and waste water infrastructure 
projects for Alaska Native Villages and other rural communities 
that face significant health challenges due to lack of adequate 
sanitation.
    Brownfields Program.--The Committee recommends $105,000,000 
for brownfields grants and directs that at least 10 percent of 
such grants be provided to areas in which at least 20 percent 
of the population has lived under the poverty level over the 
past 30 years as determined by censuses and the most recent 
Small Area Income and Poverty Estimates. The Committee notes 
that the agency is soliciting grant applications for FY 2020 
for Environmental Workforce Development and Job Training 
Grants, and supports expanded investments in this program.
    Diesel Emissions Reductions Grants (DERA).--The Committee 
recommends $55,000,000 for DERA grants. More than 10 million 
older, heavily polluting diesel engines remain in use that have 
yet to be retrofitted, repowered, or replaced, and over one 
million are expected to remain in use in 2030. For fiscal year 
2020, the Committee directs EPA to continue to make at least 70 
percent of DERA grants available to improve air quality in non-
attainment areas.
    Targeted Airshed Grants.--The Committee recommends 
$30,000,000 for targeted airshed grants to reduce particulate 
matter 2.5 and ozone air pollution in non-attainment areas.
    Water Quality Monitoring Grants.--The Committee recommends 
$4,000,000 for water monitoring authorized under section 5004 
of the WIIN Act (P.L. 114-322).
    Small and Disadvantaged Communities Grants.--The Committee 
recommends $25,000,000 in funding for grants to assist small 
and disadvantaged communities meet Safe Drinking Water Act 
requirements, as authorized in section 2104 of the WIIN Act and 
section 2005 of AWIA.
    Lead Testing in Schools Grants.--The Committee recommends 
$25,000,000 for voluntary testing of drinking water for lead 
contamination at schools and child care facilities, as 
authorized in section 2107 of the WIIN Act and section 2006 of 
AWIA.
    Reducing Lead in Drinking Water Grants.--The Committee 
recommends $20,000,000 for grants to reduce the concentration 
of lead in drinking water, as authorized in section 2105 of the 
WIIN Act.
    Drinking Water Infrastructure Resilience and Sustainability 
Program Grants.--The Committee recommends $4,000,000 for grants 
to increase resilience of drinking water infrastructure to 
natural hazards, as authorized in section 2005 of AWIA.
    Technical Assistance for Treatment Works Grants.--The 
Committee recommends $13,000,000 for grants to provide 
technical assistance to small, rural, and disadvantaged 
communities for the planning, design, financing, operation, and 
maintenance of water treatment infrastructure, as authorized by 
section 4103 as AWIA.
    Sewer Overflow Control Grants.--The Committee recommends 
$90,000,000 for grants to control and treat sewer overflows, as 
authorized in section 4106 of AWIA. The Committee directs the 
Agency to award no less than 30 percent of grants to green 
infrastructure projects.
    Water Infrastructure Workforce Development.--The Committee 
recommends $1,000,000 for grants to support workforce 
development for drinking water and waste water system workers, 
as authorized by section 4304 of AWIA.
    Categorical Grants.--For categorical grants to States and 
other environmental partners for the implementation of 
delegated programs, the bill provides $1,114,992,000, an 
increase of $37,951,000 above the enacted level and 
$534,645,000 above the request. After accounting for the 
effects of the across-the-board 3.3 percent rescission in the 
Administrative Provisions in fiscal year 2019, the recommended 
level for fiscal year 2020 is an increase of $73,031,000 above 
the fiscal year 2019 enacted level. Funding levels for each 
grant program within the Categorical Grants program are 
specified in the table at the end of this report.
    Radon.--The Committee continues to support state radon 
program efforts that raise awareness about the associated risks 
of radon exposure. The Committee recommends $8,051,000, equal 
to the enacted level, and the Agency shall prioritize radon 
grants to states that have adopted or are seeking to adopt 
statewide radon building codes, conduct awareness and education 
programs for homebuyers and renters, and that have in place 
adequate certification or credentialing requirements for radon 
measurement and mitigation workers.

          WATER INFRASTRUCTURE FINANCE AND INNOVATION PROGRAM

 
 
 
Appropriation enacted, 2019...........................       $10,000,000
Budget estimate, 2020.................................        25,000,000
Recommended, 2020.....................................        50,000,000
Comparison:
  Appropriation, 2019.................................       +40,000,000
  Budget estimate, 2020...............................       +25,000,000
 

    The Committee recommends a total of $50,000,000 for the 
Water Infrastructure Finance and Innovation Act (WIFIA) 
Program, a decrease of $18,000,000 below the combined funding 
levels provided in Titles II and IV of the fiscal year 2019 
enacted appropriations, and an increase of $25,000,000 above 
the budget request. From the funds provided, the Agency may use 
up to $5,000,000 to assist with the administrative expenses of 
the program. The remaining $45,000,000 in WIFIA funds are 
provided for direct loan subsidization, which may be used to 
support a maximum loan capacity of up to $5,410,000,000 to 
eligible entities for water infrastructure projects.
    The WIFIA program is one of many tools that the Committee 
is employing to assist states and local communities in ensuring 
a clean and safe water supply. The Committee notes that greater 
investments through a variety of funding mechanisms are needed 
to repair, replace, and upgrade critical water infrastructure. 
These investments will improve and protect clean water sources, 
enhance the resiliency of communities in the aftermath of 
natural disasters, and improve the health of important 
ecosystems across the country. Credit subsidy programs can play 
a part in such investments, but may not be the optimal form of 
assistance for smaller, rural, or disadvantaged communities.

                       ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISIONS

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFERS OF FUNDS)

    The Committee continues the language, carried in prior 
years, concerning Tribal Cooperative Authority, the collection 
and obligation of pesticides fees, and transfer authorities for 
the purposes of implementing the Great Lakes Restoration 
Initiative.
    The bill authorizes the collection and obligation of TSCA 
user fees.
    The bill authorizes the collection and obligation of 
Electronic Manifest fees.
    The bill continues language authorizing up to $150,000 to 
be spent for facility repairs at any one time.
    The bill authorizes certain uses for Section 319 non-point 
source grants.
    The bill directs the availability of not less than 
$4,000,000 of funds for the National Estuary program as 
competitive grants.
    The bill extends the authority for the Agency to hire 
scientists under 42 U.S.C. Section 209 until 2025.

                      TITLE III--RELATED AGENCIES


                       Department of Agriculture


  OFFICE OF THE UNDER SECRETARY FOR NATURAL RESOURCES AND ENVIRONMENT

 
 
 
Appropriation enacted, 2019...........................          $875,000
Budget estimate, 2020.................................           875,000
Recommended, 2020.....................................           875,000
Comparison:
  Appropriation, 2019.................................                 0
  Budget estimate, 2020...............................                 0
 

    The Committee recommends $875,000 for the Office of the 
Under Secretary for Natural Resources and Environment, equal to 
the enacted level and the budget request.
    Forest Service Accounting, Budgeting, and Management.--The 
Committee supports Forest Service efforts to improve 
accounting, budgeting, and management practices and appreciates 
the efforts of the Forest Service, Office of Budget and Program 
Analysis, Under Secretary for Natural Resources and 
Environment, and Secretary of Agriculture to make improvements. 
Public Law 107-63 directed the Forest Service to fund indirect 
expenses from any funds available to the Forest Service. As 
directed, the Forest Service established cost pools for 
activities not directly related to specific programs and 
charged these costs to budget lines. Annual budget 
justifications have included estimates of these indirect 
expenditures. As part of continuing efforts to improve 
transparency and collaboration in budgeting, Public Law 115-141 
directed the Forest Service to provide to Congress a plan to 
end cost pools. The fiscal year 2020 budget request includes 
such a plan and proposes to consolidate certain budget line 
items. This bill establishes the ``Forest Service Operations'' 
account to fund activities previously supported through cost 
pools but does not accept the proposal to consolidate budget 
lines. Bill language is included that prohibits the Forest 
Service from charging the other discretionary accounts for cost 
pool activities. This report includes comparisons of fiscal 
year 2019 enacted levels for budget lines with cost pool 
estimates removed so that programmatic changes are clear. The 
Committee directs that future budget submissions reflect this 
new budget structure.
    Wildland Fire Management.--The Consolidated Appropriations 
Act, 2018 (P.L 115-141) provided a budget cap adjustment for 
wildfire suppression costs and this additional funding is 
included for the first time in fiscal year 2020. After 
adjusting for the movement of cost pools to the Forest Service 
Operations account and including additional budget cap adjusted 
fire suppression funding, the Forest Service will have an 
additional $1,295,634,000 for Wildland Fire Management in 
fiscal year 2020. In addition, $300,000,000 of cap adjusted 
fire suppression funds and $50,000,000 in base discretionary 
fire suppression funds are available through a transfer from 
the Department of the Interior. The Committee provides these 
additional funds and authorities to ensure that sufficient 
funds are available to protect American homes, lands, and 
wildlife from catastrophic fires without requiring a transfer 
of funds from the very activities that advance forest health 
and prevent wildland fires. The Committee expects the Forest 
Service to use suppression funds judiciously and continue to 
work closely with the Office of Management and Budget and the 
Department of the Interior to accurately account for 
expenditures and recover costs.
    External Assistance and Partners.--The Committee urges the 
Forest Service to expand the authorized use of donations, 
cooperative and cost-sharing agreements, and assistance from 
external groups and partners to provide a quality experience 
for all National Forest visitors.
    Forest Service Research.--The Committee has not received 
the report on Forest Service research directed by Public Law 
116-9 and due at the end of the second quarter of fiscal year 
2019. The Committee looks forward to reviewing this report and 
Forest Service plans to establish a rigorous review cycle; 
ensure that research reflects the needs of the National Forest 
System; improve coordination with the other Federal research 
agencies; and respond to industry, stakeholder, and partner 
input.
    Capital Improvement Plan.--The Committee has not received a 
comprehensive capital improvement plan as directed by Public 
Law 115-141 and due by December 30, 2018. The Committee 
recommendation has provided limited capital improvement 
increases in this bill pending review of this plan. The 
Committee reminds the Forest Service of Congress's expectations 
of this plan as delineated in Public Law 115-141.
    Insect and Disease Threats.--The Committee recognizes that 
National Forest System lands, as well as other forested lands 
in the United States, are at increasing risk for insect and 
disease outbreaks and invasive plant infestations, which often 
result in catastrophic wildland fire. The Emerald Ash Borer and 
bark beetle are examples of these threats. As such, the 
Committee recommends a programmatic increase of $10,000,000 for 
research and development programs, $19,000,000 for Federal and 
Cooperative Land forest health management, $26,802,000 for 
Hazardous Fuels, and $12,395,000 for Urban and Community 
Forestry to prevent and address such outbreaks, improve forest 
sustainability, combat climate change, and assist with 
reforestation efforts. The Committee expects the Forest Service 
to consider the important role of urban forests and work in 
concert with Federal agencies, States, and other entities to 
prioritize the allocation of these funds.
    Indian Trust Lands.--The Forest Service is encouraged to 
promote and expand the use of agreements with Indian Tribes to 
protect Indian trust resources from catastrophic wildfire, 
insect and disease infestation or other threats from adjacent 
Federal lands, as authorized by law.
    Puerto Rico Post-Hurricane Reforestation Initiative.--The 
Committee believes the reforestation of native and endemic 
species is a critical component of Puerto Rico's recovery in 
the wake of Hurricanes Irma and Maria. The Committee supports 
Forest Service efforts to build and strengthen collaborative 
partnerships with non-profit organizations committed to the 
reforestation of Puerto Rico, including its urban and rural 
forests.

                             FOREST SERVICE

    The U.S. Forest Service manages 193 million acres of 
National Forests, Grasslands, and a Tallgrass Prairie, 
including lands in 44 States and the Commonwealth of Puerto 
Rico, and cooperates with States, other Federal agencies, 
Tribes and private landowners to sustain the Nation's forests 
and grasslands. The National Forest System (NFS) includes 154 
national forests, 22 national grasslands, 20 national 
recreation areas, a national Tallgrass prairie, 13 national 
monuments, and seven land utilization projects. The Forest 
Service administers a wide variety of programs and activities 
that sustain the health, diversity, and productivity of forests 
and grasslands to include forest and rangeland research, State 
and private forestry assistance, cooperative forest health 
management, international operations, NFS management, and 
wildland fire management.

                       FOREST SERVICE OPERATIONS

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFERS OF FUNDS)

 
 
 
Appropriation enacted, 2019...........................                $0
Budget estimate, 2020.................................                 0
Recommended, 2020.....................................       921,849,000
Comparison:
  Appropriation, 2019.................................      +921,849,000
  Budget estimate, 2020...............................      +921,849,000
 

    The Committee recommends $921,849,000 for Forest Service 
Operations. The Committee is recommending the creation of this 
account as its preferred method to accomplish elimination of 
the cost pools, which is consistent with the budget reforms 
proposed by the Forest Service. The Committee includes this new 
account to replace the practice of using cost pools. The Forest 
Service estimates $921,849,000 for fiscal year 2019 and 
$835,161,000 for fiscal year 2020 for cost pools that fund the 
employee salaries and related costs for line officers, union 
officials, civil rights positions, safety officers, and public 
affairs and legislative liaison positions; employee salaries 
and related costs for cross-cutting projects such as Tribal 
Relations and Freedom of Information Act activities; and 
employee salaries and related costs for business operations to 
include budget, finance, acquisition, human resource 
management, procurement, grant management, and information 
systems management; and leases, utilities, office equipment, 
supplies, and radios. The fiscal year 2020 cost pool estimates 
reflect a budget request that substantially reduced Forest 
Service activities. The Committee believes the fiscal year 2019 
estimated level for operations is required for fiscal year 2020 
to support the increase in activities that is provided 
throughout the rest of the Forest Service accounts. The table 
below reflects the amounts provided from accounts for cost pool 
activities in fiscal year 2019 which are instead appropriated 
to the Forest Service Operations account for fiscal year 2020.

------------------------------------------------------------------------
                Account (in thousands)                   FY19 Cost Pool
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Forest and Rangeland Research........................            $38,845
State and Private Forestry...........................             20,843
National Forest System...............................            440,350
Capital Improvement and Maintenance..................             78,841
Land Acquisition Management..........................              1,895
Wildland Fire Management.............................            341,075
                                                      ------------------
    Total............................................            921,849
------------------------------------------------------------------------

                     FOREST AND RANGELAND RESEARCH

 
 
 
Appropriation enacted, 2019...........................      $300,000,000
Budget estimate, 2020.................................       254,500,000
Recommended, 2020.....................................       277,155,000
Comparison:
  Appropriation, 2019.................................       -22,845,000
  Budget estimate, 2020...............................       +22,655,000
 

    The Committee recommends $277,155,000 for Forest and 
Rangeland Research. The table below summarizes the cost pool 
adjustments. After the elimination of cost pools, the 
recommendation is a programmatic increase of $16,000,000 over 
the enacted level and $59,930,000 over the budget request. The 
Committee notes that the budget request proposed to shift all 
research cost pool expenses to the research and development 
business line. The elimination of cost pools makes this 
proposed shift unnecessary.

                                                 [In thousands]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                   Cost       FY19                  Cost       FY20
                                        FY19       Pool     adjusted   FY20 PB      Pool     adjusted     Rec
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Forest Inventory and Analysis......    $77,000   $(9,826)    $67,174    $77,000         $0    $77,000    $73,174
Research and Development...........    223,000   (29,019)    193,981    177,500   (37,275)    140,225    203,981
                                    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Total..........................    300,000   (38,845)    261,155    254,500   (37,275)    217,225    277,155
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Forest Inventory and Analysis.--The recommendation includes 
$73,174,000 for forest inventory and analysis which is a 
programmatic increase of $6,000,000 above the enacted level. 
The Committee commends the Forest Service for including urban 
forests in Forest Inventory Analysis data collection and 
includes this increase to expand data collection in both urban 
and non-urban settings.
    Research and Development.--The recommendation includes 
$203,981,000, a programmatic increase of $10,000,000 for 
research and development activities. The Forest Service is 
directed to provide $3,000,000 to the Joint Fire Science 
program for fiscal year 2020.
    The Committee notes the interest of Members of Congress, 
States, and stakeholders in funding specific research 
laboratories, programs, and projects, including those noted 
below. This report emphasizes some of the research activities 
of importance to the Committee and expects the Forest Service 
to develop a research program that reflects these priorities 
and the other activities and programs most critical to forest 
health, particularly with respect to climate change adaption, 
preventing the spread of disease and invasive species, and 
watershed improvement.
    Fire Plan Research and Development.--The Committee supports 
continued research that significantly contributes to the 
understanding of wildfire regimes, and the development of new 
firefighting technologies and decision support tools.
    Wood Products Research.--The Committee supports continued 
research to improve the environmental performance, resiliency, 
and affordability of mass timber and other wood products. The 
Committee also supports research on advanced wood products that 
incorporate carbon fiber, on wood use in building materials, 
and that would extend the usability period of fallen wood, such 
as timber that has been flattened by hurricanes.
    Nanomaterials research.--The Committee commends the Forest 
Service for their work on Forest Based materials and cellulose 
nanomaterials in particular.
    Bighorn Sheep Research.--To prevent disease transmission 
between domestic sheep and bighorn sheep, the Committee directs 
the Forest Service and Bureau of Land Management to work with 
Indian Tribes, the Western Association of Fish and Wildlife 
Agencies and the Agricultural Research Service to complete a 
risk of contact analysis. Together, the agencies are encouraged 
to convene a meeting of interested stakeholders to share the 
findings of this analysis and collaborate on strategies to 
address the risk of disease transmission. The agencies are 
further directed to report to the Committee, within 180 days of 
enactment of this Act, on the progress made to complete the 
analysis and engage with stakeholders.
    Forest Carbon Research.--The Committee encourages the 
Forest Service to continue work with other U.S. Department of 
Agriculture agencies and offices to enhance and refine methods 
and tools needed to quantify forest emission reductions for 
forest carbon offset markets.

                       STATE AND PRIVATE FORESTRY

 
 
 
Appropriation enacted, 2019...........................      $336,990,000
Budget estimate, 2020.................................       182,296,000
Recommended, 2020.....................................       382,894,000
Comparison:
  Appropriation, 2019.................................       +45,904,000
  Budget estimate, 2020...............................      +200,598,000
 

    The Committee recommends $382,894,000 for State and Private 
Forestry. The table below summarizes the cost pool adjustments. 
After the elimination of cost pools, the recommendation is a 
programmatic increase of $66,747,000 over the enacted level and 
$216,088,000 over the budget request.

                                                 [In thousands]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                   Cost       FY19                  Cost       FY20
                                        FY19       Pool     adjusted   FY20 PB      Pool     adjusted     Rec
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Landscape Scale....................    $14,000         $0    $14,000         $0         $0         $0    $20,000
Forest Health Federal lands........     56,000   (10,422)     45,578     51,495    (9,527)     41,968     54,578
Cooperative lands forest health....     42,000    (2,842)     39,158     34,376    (2,527)     31,849     49,158
State Fire Assistance..............     81,000    (1,895)     79,105     65,930    (1,818)     64,112     83,105
Volunteer Fire.....................     17,000  .........     17,000     11,020  .........     11,020     19,000
Forest Stewardship.................     20,500    (1,895)     18,605     19,475    (1,618)     17,857     25,000
Forest Legacy......................     63,990      (947)     63,043          0  .........          0     75,000
Community Forest and Open Space....      4,000  .........      4,000          0  .........          0      5,000
Urban and Community Forest.........     29,500    (1,895)     27,605          0  .........          0     40,000
International......................      9,000      (947)      8,053          0  .........          0     12,053
                                    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Total..........................    336,990   (20,843)    316,147    182,296   (15,490)    166,806    382,894
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Landscape Scale Restoration.--The Committee rejects the 
budget request proposal to eliminate this program and instead 
provides $20,000,000 for Landscape Scale Restoration, 
$6,000,000 above the enacted level.
    Forest Health Management.--The Committee recommends 
$103,736,000 for Forest Health Management, which is a 
programmatic increase of $19,000,000 above the enacted level 
and $29,919,000 above the budget request. The Committee 
encourages the Forest Service to address high priority invasive 
species, pests, and diseases, including the Emerald Ash Borer 
and bark beetle infestations.
    Cooperative Fire Assistance.--The Committee recognizes 
Forest Service efforts to create fire-resilient communities 
through active fuel reduction treatments and collaboration with 
State and local fire agencies. The Committee recommends 
$83,105,000 for State Fire Assistance, a programmatic increase 
of $4,000,000 above the enacted level and $19,000,000 for 
Volunteer Fire Assistance, an increase of $2,000,000 above the 
enacted level.
    FireWise Program.--The Committee commends the Forest 
Service for the work done through the FireWise program to 
educate communities and homeowners on the importance of taking 
practical steps to lessen wildfire hazards and prevent 
catastrophic fire.
    Lake Tahoe Basin.--The Committee is encouraged by the work 
conducted in the Lake Tahoe Basin Management Unit and urges the 
Forest Service to support the implementation of P.L. 106-506.
    Forest Stewardship Program.--The Committee recommends 
$25,000,000 for the Forest Stewardship Program, which is a 
programmatic increase of $6,395,000 above the enacted level and 
$7,143,000 above the budget request.
    Great Lakes Forests.--The Forest Service is encouraged to 
work with partners to educate natural resource professionals 
and private woodland owners on effective land stewardship 
practices of the native forests of the lower Great Lakes such 
as woodlot management and agroforestry.
    Forest Legacy.--The Committee rejects the budget request 
proposal to eliminate this program and instead includes 
$75,000,000 for Forest Legacy, a programmatic increase of 
$11,957,000 above the enacted level.
    Community Forest and Open Space Conservation.--The 
Committee rejects the budget request proposal to eliminate this 
program and instead provides $5,000,000 for Community Forest 
and Open Space Conservation, an increase of $1,000,000 above 
the enacted level.
    Urban and Community Forestry.--The Committee rejects the 
budget request proposal to eliminate this program and instead 
recommends $40,000,000 for Urban and Community Forestry, which 
is a programmatic increase of $12,395,000 above the enacted 
level.
    Urban Reforestation.--The Committee acknowledges the 
important role of urban forests to improve health outcomes and 
decrease contaminants in the air, soil, and water and urges the 
Forest Service to expand efforts to promote urban 
reforestation, particularly in urban areas with critically 
insufficient tree canopy.
    Urban Connections Program.--The Committee strongly supports 
the US Forest Service Urban Connections program in Region 9 as 
a model program in building strong relationships with youth, 
interested citizens, urban leaders, interagency partners, non-
profit organizations, and non-government organizations. The 
Committee encourages the Forest Service to build on and expand 
this program to other regions, with a focus on youth engagement 
and outdoor learning in and on urban waterways via partnerships 
with non-profits to provide recreational and outdoor education 
programs, like Wilderness Inquiry's Canoemobile.
    International Forestry.--The Committee rejects the budget 
request proposal to eliminate this program and instead 
recommends $12,053,000 for International Forestry, which is a 
programmatic increase of $4,000,000 above the enacted level. 
This increase will be used to expand wood origin and illegal 
wood detection, promote grassroots monitoring, and establish a 
network of wood identification and screening centers to combat 
illegal logging; expand private sector collaborations, sentinel 
planting programs, and pest management research to protect 
against invasive species; and conserve the habitats of U.S. 
migratory species to include the Rufous hummingbird and the 
monarch butterfly.
    International Reforestation.--The Committee recognizes the 
important work of U.S. based, non-profit organizations engaged 
in reforestation efforts around the world.
    DELTA Act.--The Committee recognizes and commends the 
enactment of the Defending Economic Livelihoods and Threatened 
Animals (DELTA) Act in 2018 and urges the U.S. Forest Service's 
Office of International Programs to work with Angola, Namibia, 
and Botswana in promoting sustainable economic growth, natural 
resource and water management, protected area and habitat 
conservation, and law enforcement through trans-boundary 
programs in the region, with an initial focus on Angola.
    Northeastern States Research Cooperative.--The Committee 
applauds the Forest Service partnership with the Northeastern 
States Research Cooperative and encourages continuation of this 
work to sustain the health of the northern forest ecosystem.

                         NATIONAL FOREST SYSTEM

 
 
 
Appropriation enacted, 2019...........................    $1,938,000,000
Budget estimate, 2020.................................     1,912,750,000
Recommended, 2020.....................................     1,599,308,000
Comparison:
  Appropriation, 2019.................................      -338,692,000
  Budget estimate, 2020...............................      -313,442,000
 

    The Committee recommends $1,599,308,000 for the National 
Forest System. The table below summarizes the cost pool 
adjustments. After the elimination of cost pools, the 
recommendation is a programmatic increase of $101,658,000 over 
the enacted level and $91,467,000 over the budget request.

                                                 [In thousands]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                   Cost       FY19                  Cost       FY20
                                        FY19       Pool     adjusted   FY20 PB      Pool     adjusted     Rec
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Land Management....................   $180,000  $(37,897)   $142,103   $179,263  $(31,507)   $147,756   $147,103
Recreation, Heritage, and              260,000   (80,532)    179,468    257,848   (77,278)    180,570    194,468
 Wilderness........................
Grazing Management.................     57,000   (16,106)     40,894     56,856   (14,456)     42,400     40,750
Hazardous Fuels....................    435,000   (71,633)    363,367    450,000   (68,739)    381,261    390,169
Forest Products....................    368,000   (98,397)    269,603    375,000   (94,421)    280,579    276,603
Vegetation and Watershed...........    180,000   (39,407)    140,593    180,000   (37,815)    142,185    165,593
Wildlife and Fisheries Habitat.....    137,000   (33,847)    103,153    136,430   (32,780)    103,650    121,153
Collaborative forest landscape.....     40,000    (9,474)     30,526          0  .........          0     35,526
Mineral and Geology................     75,000   (17,054)     57,946     74,200   (15,365)     58,835     57,946
Landownership......................     75,000   (18,949)     56,051     74,000   (16,183)     57,817     56,051
Law Enforcement....................    131,000   (17,054)    113,946    129,153   (16,365)    112,788    113,946
                                    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Total..........................  1,938,000  (440,350)  1,497,650  1,912,750  (404,909)  1,507,841  1,599,308
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Land Management.--The Committee recommends $147,103,000 for 
Land Management, Planning, Assessment, and Monitoring, which is 
a programmatic increase of $5,000,000 above the enacted level 
and $653,000 below the budget request. Funds are increased to 
address the backlog of management plans. The Committee directs 
the Forest Service to provide a report to the Committees on 
Appropriations, not later than March 1, 2020 on actions taken 
to improve the timely completion of forest management plans.
    Recreation, Heritage and Wilderness.--The Committee 
recommends $194,468,000 for Recreation, Heritage and 
Wilderness, which is a programmatic increase of $15,000,000 
above the enacted level and $13,898,000 above the budget 
request. Funding is increased to improve the recreational 
experience on National Forest System lands. Within the funds 
provided for Recreation, $750,000 is provided for maintenance 
of rural airstrips.
    Feral Hogs.--The Committee recognizes the damage and danger 
caused by feral hogs in the Mark Twain National Forest and 
encourages the Forest Service to continue to work with 
stakeholders to utilize all practical methods for eradication.
    Off-Highway Vehicle Report.--The Committee looks forward to 
receiving the report on off-highway vehicle (OHV) mixed-use 
analysis that was directed in House Report 115-238. The 
Committee reminds the Forest Service of the importance of 
making the national forests as accessible as possible to the 
American people and requests that the Forest Service work with 
States, local officials, communities, and partners as it 
implements the travel analysis process.
    Costs of OHV access.--The Forest Service is directed to 
brief the Committee on the OHV mixed-use analysis report within 
60 days of report completion. The Forest Service is further 
directed to include in this briefing a discussion of the costs 
associated with OHV access and expansion.
    Wilderness Area Management.--The Forest Service Handbooks 
and Manual are the principle sources of specialized guidance 
and instruction for ensuring the protection of Wilderness 
Areas. The Committee expects Forest Service personnel to adhere 
to such direction in making determinations with respect to 
inconsistent uses.
    Grazing Management.--The Committee recommends $40,750,000 
for Grazing Management, which is a programmatic decrease of 
$144,000 below the enacted level and $1,650,000 below the 
budget request.
    The Committee encourages the Service to improve its 
monitoring of grazing permits in allotments where riparian 
streamside health is a concern for listed or threatened 
species. The Committee also encourages the Forest Service to 
improve the transparency and reporting of how monitoring 
resources are used on the ground.
    Hazardous Fuels.--The Committee recommends $390,169,000 for 
hazardous fuels, which is a programmatic increase of 
$26,802,000 above the enacted level and $8,908,000 above the 
budget request.
    The Committee directs the Forest Service to engage with 
stakeholders and use the best science available on historical 
fire data, landscape characteristics, and forest composition; 
the effects of past and current human influences, such as 
development and land-use patterns; and climatic conditions to 
identify ecologically-based forest health projects that reduce 
risks of catastrophic wildland fires. The Committee expects the 
Forest Service to engage with the highest priority areas for 
hazardous fuel reduction and forest health and management 
treatments.
    Wood Innovation Grant Program.--The Committee directs the 
Forest Service to support the Wood Innovation Grant Program at 
not less than the fiscal year 2019 enacted level. The program 
works to expand wood products and wood energy markets that 
support forest management and deliver economic and 
environmental benefits to communities.
    Lake Tahoe Basin.--The Committee is encouraged by the 
hazardous fuels work conducted by the Lake Tahoe Basin 
Management Unit and directs the Forest Service to support the 
implementation of P.L. 106-506 at not less than fiscal year 
2019 enacted levels.
    Southwest Ecological Restoration Institutes.--The Committee 
directs the Forest Service to continue support to the Southwest 
Ecological Restoration Institutes at not less than the fiscal 
year 2019 enacted level.
    Forest Products.--The Committee recommends $276,603,000 for 
Forest Products, which is a programmatic increase of $7,000,000 
above the enacted level and $3,976,000 below the budget 
request. The increase is provided to mitigate the risk of 
wildland fire through the expeditious extraction of damaged but 
marketable wood.
    Vegetation and Watershed Management.--The Committee 
recommends $165,593,000 for Vegetation and Watershed 
Management, which is a programmatic increase of $25,000,000 
above the enacted level and $23,408,000 above the budget 
request. Additional funding is provided to implement treatments 
to increase the percentage of watersheds in properly 
functioning condition and capable of providing clean water.
    Lake Tahoe Basin.--The EPA has identified Lake Tahoe as a 
priority watershed. The Committee urges the Forest Service to 
support the implementation of P.L. 106-506.
    Wildlife and Fisheries Habitat Management.--The Committee 
recommends $121,153,000 for Wildlife and Fisheries Habitat 
Management, which is a programmatic increase of $18,000,000 
above the enacted level and $17,503,000 above the budget 
request.
    Collaborative Forest Landscape Restoration Fund.--The 
Committee rejects the budget request proposal to eliminate this 
program and instead provides $35,526,000 for the Collaborative 
Forest Landscape Restoration Fund, which is a programmatic 
increase of $5,000,000 above the enacted level. The Committee 
recognizes the success of forest collaboratives. Funding is 
increased to expand this program to additional projects.
    The Committee recognizes the need to ensure forest 
resiliency and support multiple uses on national forest lands. 
The Committee urges the Forest Service to incorporate a variety 
of landscapes, including wet forests, as it develops future 
projects for the Collaborative Forest Landscape Restoration 
Program.
    Minerals and Geology Management.--The Committee recommends 
$57,946,000 for Minerals and Geology Management, which is 
programmatically equal to the enacted level and $889,000 below 
the budget request.
    Landownership Management.--The Committee recommends 
$56,051,000 for Landownership Management, which is 
programmatically equal to the enacted level and $1,766,000 
below the budget request.
    Law Enforcement Operations.--The Committee recommends 
$113,946,000 for Law Enforcement Operations, which is 
programmatically equal to the enacted level and $1,158,000 
above the budget request.
    Bill Language.--The Committee includes the following bill 
language in Title IV General Provisions: Section 407, allowing 
forest management plans to expire if the Forest Service has 
made a good faith effort to update plans commensurate with 
appropriated funds; Section 416, allowing the Forest Service to 
renew grazing permits; Section 418, extending the Forest 
Service Facility Realignment Enhancement Act for one year; 
Section 422, extending the Federal Lands Recreation Enhancement 
Act for one year; and Section 423 providing procedures for 
reprogrammings and the disclosure of administrative expenses 
and operating plans.

                  CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT AND MAINTENANCE

 
 
 
Appropriation enacted, 2019...........................      $446,000,000
Budget estimate, 2020.................................       434,000,000
Recommended, 2020.....................................       419,103,000
Comparison:
  Appropriation, 2019.................................       -26,897,000
  Budget estimate, 2020...............................       -14,897,000
 

    The Committee recommends $419,103,000 for Capital 
Improvement and Maintenance. The table below summarizes the 
cost pool adjustments. After the elimination of cost pools, the 
recommendation is a programmatic increase of $51,944,000 over 
the enacted level and $4,896,000 above the budget request.

                                                 [In thousands]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                   Cost       FY19                  Cost       FY20
                                        FY19       Pool     adjusted   FY20 PB      Pool     adjusted     Rec
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Facilities.........................   $148,000  $(15,159)   $132,841   $151,000   $(2,333)   $148,667   $148,841
Roads*.............................    218,000   (40,944)    177,056    218,000   (14,939)    203,061    205,000
Trails.............................     80,000   (22,738)     57,262     65,000    (2,521)     62,479     65,262
                                    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Total..........................    446,000   (78,841)    367,159    434,000   (19,793)    414,207    419,103
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
*Cost pool for roads includes FY19 cost pool for legacy roads and trails.

    Facilities Maintenance and Construction.--The Committee 
recommends $148,841,000 for Facilities Maintenance and 
Construction, which is a programmatic increase of $16,000,000 
above the enacted level. Within this amount, the Forest Service 
is directed to spend $6,000,000 more than the fiscal year 2019 
enacted level for Air Tanker Base repairs.
    Smokejumper Base.--The Committee is aware the North 
Cascades Smokejumper Base in Winthrop, Washington, is in need 
of facility upgrades, improvements, and renovations to meet 
Federal Aviation Administration compliance standards and 
requirements, and understands the Forest Service has completed 
a Preliminary Project Analysis that recommends maintaining the 
base. The Committee urges the Forest Service to devote the 
necessary resources to ensure the base can maintain operational 
excellence.
    Southern California Fire Cache.--The Forest Service is 
strongly encouraged to expeditiously determine a new location 
for the Southern California Fire Cache and to consider a 
transfer of any excess land near the March Air Reserve Base in 
Riverside County, California.
    Road Maintenance and Construction.--The Committee 
recommends $205,000,000 for Road Maintenance and Construction, 
which is a programmatic increase of $27,944,000 above the 
enacted level and $1,939,000 above the budget request. The 
Committee directs the Forest Service to use the increase to 
improve public safety, watersheds, aquatic habitats, and 
recreational access.
    Uwharrie National Forest.--The Committee directs the Forest 
Service to consider upgrading residential access roads within 
the Uwharrie National Forest, working with the State and 
surrounding communities to identify priority projects, and to 
report back to the Committee within 120 days of the enactment 
of this Act.
    Trail Maintenance and Construction.--The Committee 
recommends $65,262,000 for Trail Maintenance and Construction, 
which is a programmatic increase of $8,000,000 above the 
enacted level and $2,783,000 above the budget request.
    National Scenic and Historic Trails.--The Committee directs 
the Forest Service to continue to provide specific trail 
operation, maintenance, and construction funding and 
accomplishment data for the national scenic and historic trails 
in future budget justifications. The Committee notes that the 
fiscal year 2020 justification does not propose acquisition 
funding and directs the Forest Service to provide the 
Committees an updated estimate of trails and land acquisition 
not later than 60 days after the enactment of this Act.
    Legacy Roads and Trail Remediation.--The Committee 
continues to recognize the need to remediate legacy roads and 
trails and directs the Forest Service to address these projects 
as they rank in priority along with all other infrastructure 
needs from the appropriations provided for roads and trails 
through the Capital Improvement and Maintenance account.

                            LAND ACQUISITION

 
 
 
Appropriation enacted, 2019...........................       $72,564,000
Budget estimate, 2020.................................                 0
Recommended, 2020.....................................        90,000,000
Comparison:
  Appropriation, 2019.................................       +17,436,000
  Budget estimate, 2020...............................       +90,000,000
 

    The Committee recommends $90,000,000 for the Land 
Acquisition appropriation. This amount is a programmatic 
increase of $19,331,000 above the enacted level and $90,000,000 
above the budget request. Details of the recommendation are 
contained below and in the table at the back of this report.
    Because the Service has not made detailed, individual 
project information available in a timely manner, the Committee 
notes that the following list is preliminary in nature and may 
be revised later in the fiscal year 2020 budget process as 
additional information becomes available. The projects listed 
are in priority order, as determined by the Service.

------------------------------------------------------------------------
    State             Project              Forest Unit        This Bill
------------------------------------------------------------------------
         MT   Clearwater Blackfoot..  Lolo.................   $8,000,000
         ID   Teton Timbers.........  Caribou-Targhee......    2,750,000
         MT   Lolo Trails Landmark..  Lolo.................    4,400,000
         OR   Wasson Creek..........  Siuslaw..............    4,268,000
         MN   School Trust..........  Superior.............    4,500,000
           CA Sanhedrin.............  Mendocino............    6,400,000
          SC  Promise of the          Francis Marion &         1,600,000
               Piedmont.               Sumter.
           CA Wild & Scenic Kern      Sequoia..............    1,505,000
               River Acess.
         MI   West Branch of the      Ottawa...............    2,000,000
               Ontonagon.
         TN   Tennessee Mountain      Cherokee.............    4,000,000
               Trails & Waters.
          NC  North Carolina's        Nantahala/Pisgah/        4,500,000
               Threatened Treasures.   Uwharrie.
         ID   SF Wilderness Ranch...  Payette..............    1,500,000
         NM   Mimbres River Parcels.  Gila.................    2,906,000
         WV   Hooke Brothers........  Monongahela..........      750,000
         KY   Daniel Boone NF.......  Daniel Boone.........      350,000
         VT   Green Mountain NF       Green Mountain.......      600,000
               (inholdings).
      VA/WV   George Washington and   George Washington and      920,000
               Jefferson NF.           Jefferson.
         AL   Alabama's Wild Wonders  Bankhead/Talladega/        500,000
                                       Conecuh.
         OR   Three Rivers..........  Siuslaw..............      720,000
         AK   Kadashan..............  Tongass..............      500,000
         GA   Chattahoochee-Oconee    Chattahoochee-Oconee.      620,000
               NF.
         WA   Washington Cascades...  Okanogan-Wenatchee...    1,800,000
         VT   Lincoln Park..........  Green Mountain.......      350,000
           CA Trinity Alps            Shasta-Trinity.......    1,200,000
               Wilderness
               (inholdings).
         MT   Falls Creek Access....  Lewis & Clark........    1,000,000
              Additional projects to  .....................   14,111,000
               be supplied.
                                                            ------------
              Subtotal, FS Land       .....................   71,750,000
               Acquisitions.
------------------------------------------------------------------------


------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                   Budget
                                                  Request     This Bill
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Acquisition Management........................            0    8,500,000
Recreational Access...........................            0    7,500,000
Critical Inholdings/Wilderness................            0    2,000,000
Cash Equalization.............................            0          250
                                               -------------------------
    Total, FS Land Acquisition................            0   90,000,000
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    The Committee supports the continuation of efforts to 
resolve the long-standing management challenges regarding the 
school trust lands within the Boundary Waters Canoe Area in the 
Superior National Forest in Minnesota and encourages the 
Service to collaborate with nonprofit partners on the private 
forestland exchange alternative, which will provide the added 
benefit of preserving valuable forestlands outside of Superior 
National Forest.

         ACQUISITION OF LANDS FOR NATIONAL FORESTS SPECIAL ACTS

 
 
 
Appropriation enacted, 2019...........................          $700,000
Budget estimate, 2020.................................                 0
Recommended, 2020.....................................           700,000
Comparison:
  Appropriation, 2019.................................                 0
  Budget estimate, 2020...............................          +700,000
 

    The Committee recommends $700,000 for Acquisition of Lands 
for National Forests Special Acts, equal to the enacted level 
and $700,000 more than the budget request.

            ACQUISITION OF LANDS TO COMPLETE LAND EXCHANGES

 
 
 
Appropriation enacted, 2019...........................          $150,000
Budget estimate, 2020.................................                 0
Recommended, 2020.....................................           150,000
Comparison:
  Appropriation, 2019.................................                 0
  Budget estimate, 2020...............................          +150,000
 

    The Committee recommends $150,000 for Acquisition of Lands 
to Complete Land Exchanges under the Act of December 4, 1967 
(16 U.S.C. 484a), equal to the enacted level and $150,000 more 
than the budget request.

                         RANGE BETTERMENT FUND

 
 
 
Appropriation enacted, 2019...........................        $1,700,000
Budget estimate, 2020.................................                 0
Recommended, 2020.....................................         2,000,000
Comparison:
  Appropriation, 2019.................................          +300,000
  Budget estimate, 2020...............................        +2,000,000
 

    The Committee recommends $2,000,000 for the Range 
Betterment Fund, $300,000 more than the enacted level and 
$2,000,000 above the budget request, to be derived from grazing 
receipts from national forests (Public Law 94-579) and to be 
used for range rehabilitation, protection, and improvements 
including seeding, reseeding, fence construction, weed control, 
water development, and fish and wildlife habitat enhancement in 
16 western States.

    GIFTS, DONATIONS AND BEQUESTS FOR FOREST AND RANGELAND RESEARCH

 
 
 
Appropriation enacted, 2019...........................           $45,000
Budget estimate, 2020.................................                 0
Recommended, 2020.....................................            45,000
Comparison:
  Appropriation, 2019.................................                 0
  Budget estimate, 2020...............................           +45,000
 

    The Committee recommends $45,000 for Gifts, Donations and 
Bequests for Forest and Rangeland Research, equal to the 
enacted level and $45,000 above the budget request.

        MANAGEMENT OF NATIONAL FOREST LANDS FOR SUBSISTENCE USES

 
 
 
Appropriation enacted, 2019...........................        $2,500,000
Budget estimate, 2020.................................         1,832,000
Recommended, 2020.....................................         2,500,000
Comparison:
  Appropriation, 2019.................................                 0
  Budget estimate, 2020...............................          +668,000
 

    The Committee recommends $2,500,000 for the Management of 
National Forest Lands for Subsistence Uses in Alaska, equal to 
the enacted level and $668,000 above the request.

                             Wildland Fire


                        WILDLAND FIRE MANAGEMENT

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFERS OF FUNDS)

 
 
 
Appropriation enacted, 2019...........................    $3,004,986,000
Budget estimate, 2020.................................     2,350,620,000
Recommended, 2020.....................................     2,009,545,000
Comparison:
  Appropriation, 2019.................................      -995,441,000
  Budget estimate, 2020...............................      -341,075,000
 

    The Committee recommends $2,009,545,000 for Wildland Fire 
Management. The table below summarizes the cost pool 
adjustments and includes funds provided as fire cap adjustment 
funds. After the elimination of cost pools and the inclusion of 
above cap fire suppression funding, the recommendation is a 
programmatic increase of $1,295,634,000 over the enacted level 
and $16,619,000 above the budget request.

                                                 [In thousands]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                         FY19                                FY20
                                 FY19     Cost  Pool   adjusted     FY20 PB   Cost  Pool   adjusted       Rec
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Fire Preparedness...........  $1,339,620  $(341,075)    $998,545  $1,339,620  $(261,324)  $1,078,296    $998,545
Fire Suppression............   1,165,366           0   1,165,366   1,011,000    (96,370)     914,630   1,011,000
Additional Suppression......     500,000           0     500,000           0           0           0           0
Fire Cap Adjustment.........  ..........  ..........  ..........   1,950,000           0   1,950,000   1,950,000
                             -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Total...................   3,004,986   (341,075)   2,663,911   4,300,620   (357,694)   3,942,926   3,959,545
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Wildland Fire Preparedness.--The Committee recommends 
$998,545,000 for Wildland Fire Preparedness, which is 
programmatically equal to the enacted level and $79,751,000 
below the budget request.
    Wildland Fire Suppression Operations.--The Committee 
recommends $1,011,000,000 for Wildland Fire Suppression 
Operations, which is a programmatic decrease of $154,366,000 
below the enacted level and $96,370,000 above the budget 
request. The recommended amount is the fiscal year 2015 10-year 
average cost for wildland fire suppression which is required 
for the Committee to provide an additional $1,950,000,000 in 
fire cap funding.

               ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISIONS, FOREST SERVICE

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFERS OF FUNDS)

    The Committee has included administrative provisions that 
provide further direction on the use and transfer of 
appropriated funds provided to the Forest Service.

                DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES


                         Indian Health Service

    The provision of Federal health services to Indians is 
based on a treaty and trust relationship between Indian Tribes 
and the U.S. Government first set forth in the 1830s by the 
U.S. Supreme Court under Chief Justice John Marshall. Numerous 
treaties, statutes, constitutional provisions, and 
international laws have reconfirmed this relationship. 
Principal among these is the Snyder Act of 1921, which provides 
the basic authority for most Indian health services provided by 
the Federal government to American Indians and Alaska Natives 
(AI/AN). The Indian Health Service (IHS) provides direct health 
care services in 25 hospitals, 50 health centers, two school 
health centers, and 26 health stations. Tribes and Tribal 
groups, through contracts and compacts with the IHS, operate 22 
hospitals, 280 health centers, six school health centers, and 
62 health stations (including 134 Alaska Native village 
clinics).

                         INDIAN HEALTH SERVICES

 
 
 
Appropriation enacted, 2019...........................    $4,103,190,000
Budget estimate, 2020.................................     4,286,541,000
Recommended, 2020.....................................     4,556,870,000
Comparison:
  Appropriation, 2019.................................      +453,680,000
  Budget estimate, 2020...............................      +270,329,000
 

    The Committee recommends $4,556,870,000 for Indian health 
services, $453,680,000 above the enacted level and $270,329,000 
above the request. All proposed cuts and program eliminations 
are restored and IHS is expected to continue all programs at 
fiscal year 2019 enacted levels except as otherwise discussed 
below and summarized in the table at the end of this report. 
The bill makes funds available for two years unless otherwise 
specified.
    Advance Appropriations.--In 2018, the Government Accounting 
Office (GAO) identified considerations for Congress when 
considering whether to advance appropriate funds to IHS, 
including whether IHS has the processes in place to develop and 
manage an advance appropriation. The Committee directs IHS to 
examine its existing processes and determine what changes are 
needed to develop and manage an advance appropriation and 
report to the Committee within 180 days of enactment of this 
Act on the processes needed and whether additional 
Congressional authority is required in order to develop the 
processes.
    Current Services.--The recommendation includes an increase 
of $81,333,000 for fixed cost increases, $20,830,000 above the 
budget request. The Committee directs IHS to submit the full 
estimated costs for current services based on the prior enacted 
level to the Committee each year at the same time IHS submits 
its annual budget justification.
    Staffing for New Facilities.--The recommendation includes a 
total of $90,400,000 for staffing newly opened health 
facilities, as requested. This amount represents the full 
amount required based upon updated estimates provided to the 
Committee. Funds for the staffing of new facilities are limited 
to facilities funded through the Health Care Facilities 
Construction Priority System or the Joint Venture Construction 
Program that have opened in fiscal year 2019 or will open in 
fiscal year 2020. None of these funds may be allocated to a 
facility until such facility has achieved beneficial occupancy 
status.
    Hospitals and Health Clinics.--The recommendation includes 
$2,420,578,000 for Hospitals and Health Clinics, $273,235,000 
above the enacted level and an increase of $57,300,000 above 
the budget request. Within this amount, the recommendation 
includes: $11,463,000 for new Tribes, as requested, and an 
increase of $9,494,000 above the enacted level; $2,000,000 for 
Quality and Oversight, as requested; $20,000,000 for the 
Community Health Aide Program (CHAP), as requested; $71,762,000 
for Staffing for New Facilities, as requested; and $56,497,000 
for current services. No funding has been provided through 
Hospitals and Health Clinics to recruit and retain health 
professionals as requested since an increase of $8,000,000 has 
been included in the Indian Health Professionals program.
    Domestic Violence Prevention Program.--The recommendation 
includes $12,967,000, as requested, for Domestic Violence 
Prevention, $4,000,000 above the enacted level.
    Tribal Epidemiology Centers.--The recommendation includes 
$6,433,000 for Tribal Epidemiology Centers, $2,000,000 above 
the enacted level and the budget request, in order to further 
data collection, evaluation and research to improve the health 
of Native Americans.
    105(l) Leases.--The recommendation includes $53,000,000 for 
section 105(l) lease costs, $17,000,000 above the enacted level 
and $42,000,000 above the budget request. These funds are to 
supplement existing funds available for operational costs at 
Village Built Clinics and tribal clinics operated under an 
Indian Self-Determination and Education Assistance Act compact 
or contract where health care is delivered in space acquired 
through a full-service lease. The Committee directs IHS to 
consider whether costs associated with these leases should be a 
separate line item in the budget and funded in the same manner 
as contract support costs and report its determination to the 
Committee within 90 days of enactment of this Act. 
Additionally, the Committee directs IHS to submit the estimated 
amounts for the current fiscal year and the next fiscal year 
estimate at the same time the budget request is submitted.
    Accreditation Emergencies.--The recommendation includes 
$58,000,000, as requested, to assist IHS-operated facilities 
that have been terminated or received notice of termination 
from the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) 
Medicare program while under operation by the IHS. Funding 
shall be allocated to such facilities in amounts to: restore 
compliance; supplement purchased/referred care, including 
transportation, in the event of temporary closure of such 
facility or one or more of its departments; and compensate for 
third-party collection shortfalls resulting from being out of 
compliance. Primary consideration should be given to facilities 
that have been without certification the longest. Shortfalls 
shall be calculated relative to the average of the collections 
in each of the two fiscal years preceding the year in which an 
agreement with CMS was terminated or put on notice of 
termination. Until all facilities have obtained CMS 
certification, the Committee rejects the proposal to allow 
these funds to be used for other purposes.
    The Committee is concerned about financial losses from loss 
of CMS accreditation or of the requirement to divert patients 
at Service-operated facilities. The Committee considers the 
loss or imminent loss of accreditation to be an emergency. 
Funds allocated to a facility may be made available to Tribes 
newly assuming operation of such facilities pursuant to the 
Indian Self-Determination and Education Assistance Act of 1975 
(P.L. 93-638) and shall be used by such Tribes to cover the 
following: replacement of third-party revenues lost as a result 
of decertification, replacement of third-party carryover funds 
expended to respond to decertification, and reasonable costs of 
achieving recertification, including recruitment costs 
necessary to stabilize staffing.
    Additionally, the Committee urges IHS to develop new 
strategies to improve how IHS programs, including those 
operated by Tribes under the Indian Self-Determination and 
Education Assistance Act of 1975 (P.L. 93-638), can be 
supported to avoid these challenges and to refocus on both the 
quality of health care delivery and the improvement in health 
outcomes for, and health status of, Indian health program 
beneficiaries. This requires full Tribal consultation and the 
participation of the Department of Health and Human Services, 
Center for Medicare and Medicaid Innovation, Centers for 
Medicare and Medicaid Services, and State Medicaid and S-CHIP 
programs.
    Hepatitis C & HIV/AIDS initiative.--The recommendation 
includes $25,000,000, as requested, for the Administration's 
new Ending the HIV Epidemic: A Plan for America and Eliminating 
Hepatitis C in Indian Country initiative. The Committee 
encourages IHS to confer with Urban Indian Organizations (UIOs) 
to determine how UIOs may participate in this Initiative.
    Electronic Health Records.--The recommendation includes 
$25,000,000, as requested, to improve the current IT 
infrastructure system in order to support the deployment of a 
new or modernized Electronic Health Records solution. The bill 
includes language prohibiting IHS from obligating or expending 
funds to select or implement a new IT infrastructure system 
unless IHS notifies the Committee at least 90 days before such 
funds are obligated or expended. The Committee expects IHS to 
include in the notification: (1) the criteria being used to 
select a new IT infrastructure system; (2) whether and how the 
new system will be interoperable with the Department of 
Veterans Affairs' (VA) new electronic health record system; and 
(3) the total projected cost for the modernization and the 
number of years required to implement the new system.
    Additionally, the Committee urges IHS to review the VA's 
new electronic health record system and determine whether that 
system, in whole or in part, may be feasible for IHS and 
tribally operated facilities. IHS should also compare the cost 
of adopting the VA system, in whole or in part, to an entirely 
new system and report to the Committee within 90 days of 
enactment of this Act on any additional costs required to 
modify the VA system to IHS and tribal needs, as well as any 
cost savings that may occur by adopting the new VA system, in 
whole or in part. Finally, the Committee encourages IHS to work 
with other Federal agencies to find funding to upgrade network 
bandwidth at hospitals, health centers, and health stations.
    Memorandum of Understanding.--The Committee is aware of the 
recent Government Accountability Office (GAO) report on the 
Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) between the VA and IHS. The 
Committee urges IHS to ensure performance measures related to 
the MOU are consistent with the key attributes of successful 
performance measures, including having measurable targets, as 
recommended by GAO.
    Dental Health.--The recommendation includes $227,562,000 
for Dental Health, $22,890,000 above the enacted level and 
$15,193,000 above the budget request. Of the increase, 
$5,572,000 is for current services and $4,841,000 is for 
Staffing for New Facilities, as requested.
    Dental Support Centers.--The Committee recognizes the 
importance of Dental Support Centers (DSCs) in providing 
technical support, training, and assistance in clinical and 
preventive efforts of the dental program. Many IHS dentists 
practice in isolated areas without immediate access to 
specialty services. DSCs are there to provide them with the 
necessary expertise and experience they need to address 
challenging oral health demands. Since being established in 
1999, IHS has only been able to fund DSCs in 8 of the 12 
service areas. Their funding has been frozen at $250,000 
throughout that time. Within the amounts provided, the 
Committee includes $2,500,000 above the enacted level to enable 
the Service to reach all 12 areas at an adequate funding level 
of $375,000, with the flexibility to regionalize the DSC 
operations as needed to provide their services efficiently.
    Electronic Dental Records.--The Committee applauds the 
Service for successfully installing an electronic dental record 
(EDR) system. The Committee understands that 240 dental centers 
have been brought into the system. With sufficient continued 
funding for maintenance and computer enhancements, the EDR 
could allow dentists and pharmacists to communicate directly 
about opioid prescriptions for oral pain. This will be a vital 
addition for addressing the opioid crisis in Indian Country. 
Within the amounts requested, the Committee includes $2,500,000 
to enable the Service to complete the implementation process 
for 10 dental centers and manage the current electronic dental 
record system. The Committee also understands that the Service 
is currently evaluating the electronic health records system to 
examine the needs of the program. The Committee directs the 
Service to include EDR in its assessment and incorporate EDR in 
overall efforts to enhance the electronic health records 
system.
    Mental Health.--The recommendation includes $125,332,000 
for mental health, $20,051,000 above the enacted level and 
$15,507,000 above the budget request. The Committee includes 
$2,708,000 for current services and $2,754,000 for Staffing for 
New Facilities, as requested. The Committee urges IHS to 
coordinate with the Bureau of Indian Affairs on how to help 
address the high recidivism rate in Indian Country detention/
correction facilities.
    Alcohol and Substance Abuse.--The recommendation includes 
$280,051,000 for Alcohol and Substance Abuse, $34,485,000 above 
the enacted level and $34,017,000 above the budget request. 
Within the amounts provided, $7,800,000 is for current services 
and $7,612,000 is for Staffing for New Facilities, as 
requested. The proposed transfer of the former National 
Institute of Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism Programs funding of 
$1,369,000 from Alcohol and Substance abuse to Urban Indian 
Health programs is accepted and has been reflected in the 
amount provided.
    Purchased/Referred Care.--The recommendation includes 
$969,479,000 for Purchased/Referred Care, $4,660,000 above the 
enacted level and $1,302,000 above the budget request. Within 
the increase of $4,660,000, up to $1,660,000 is to be 
distributed for medical inflation and $3,000,000 is to be 
distributed using the program formula. The Committee recommends 
$53,000,000 for the Indian Catastrophic Health Fund, equal to 
the enacted level.
    Indian Health Care Improvement Fund.--The recommendation 
includes $72,280,000 for the Indian Health Care Improvement 
Fund in order to continue to reduce health care disparities 
across the IHS system.
    Public Health Nursing.--The recommendation includes 
$95,307,000, for Public Health Nursing, $6,148,000 above the 
enacted level and $3,223,000 above the budget request. Within 
the amounts provided, the Committee includes $1,534,000 for 
current services, $3,431,000 for Staffing for New Facilities, 
as requested, and $1,183,000 for direct patient care services/
program adjustments, as requested.
    Health Education.--The Committee rejects the proposed 
elimination of funding for Health Education and instead, the 
recommendation includes $20,669,000 for Health Education, 
$101,000 above the enacted level and $20,669,000 above the 
budget request. The recommendation includes $101,000 for 
current services.
    Community Health Representatives.--The Committee rejects 
the proposed cut to the Community Health Representatives 
program and instead, the recommendation includes $62,913,000 
for Community Health Representatives, $25,000 above the enacted 
level and $38,913,000 above the budget request. The 
recommendation includes $25,000 for current services.
    Immunization (Alaska).--The recommendation includes 
$2,173,000 for Immunization (Alaska), $46,000 above the enacted 
level and equal to the budget request. The Committee includes 
$39,000 for current services, as requested, and $7,000 for 
program adjustments, as requested.
    Urban Indian Health.--The recommendation includes 
$81,000,000 for Urban Indian Health, $29,685,000 above the 
enacted level and $32,229,000 above the budget request. Within 
this amount, the Committee provides $1,429,000 for current 
services and $26,887,000 for direct patient care services/
program adjustments. The recommendation also reflects the 
proposed transfer of $1,369,000 from the former National 
Institute of Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism Programs funding from 
the Alcohol and Substance Abuse account to this account. The 
Service is expected to continue including current services 
estimates for Urban Indian Health in annual budget requests.
    The Committee recognizes nonprofit organizations such as 
the Siouxland Human Investment Partnership that help American 
Indians in urban areas outside of the Urban Indian Health 
Program, and encourages the Service to offer technical 
assistance to such organizations whenever possible and within 
Service authority.
    Indian Health Professions.--The Committee rejects the 
proposed program decrease and instead, the recommendation 
includes $90,656,000 for Indian Health Professions, $33,293,000 
above the enacted level and $47,044,000 above the budget 
request. Within the amounts provided, the Committee recommends 
$1,293,000 for current services. The bill language provides 
$50,000,000 for the loan repayment program.
    Tribal Management Grant Program.--The Committee rejects the 
proposed elimination of the Tribal Management Grant Program and 
instead, the recommendation includes $2,521,000 for the 
program, $56,000 above the enacted level. Within the amounts 
provided, the Committee recommends $56,000 for current 
services.
    Direct Operations.--The recommendation includes $75,385,000 
for Direct Operations, $3,847,000 above the enacted level and 
$1,254,000 above the budget request. Within the amounts 
provided, the Committee includes $2,461,000 for current 
services and $1,386,000 for program adjustments, as requested.
    Self-Governance.--The Committee rejects the proposed 
reduction to Self-Governance and instead, the recommendation 
includes $5,964,000 for Self-Governance, $158,000 above the 
enacted level and $1,157,000 above the budget request. Within 
the amounts provided, the Committee recommends $158,000 for 
current services.
    Indian Health Care Improvement Act.--It has been over nine 
years since the permanent reauthorization of the Indian Health 
Care Improvement Act (IHCIA), yet many of the provisions in the 
law remain unfunded. Tribes have specifically requested that 
priority areas for funding focus on diabetes treatment and 
prevention, behavioral health, and health professions. The 
Committee requests that the Service provide, no later than 90 
days after enactment, a detailed plan with specific dollars 
identified to fully fund and implement the IHCIA.
    Maternal and Child Health.--The Committee encourages IHS to 
establish a pilot program to determine the most effective ways 
to: (1) educate IHS health care providers on how to evaluate 
risk factors that could interfere with successfully meeting 
breastfeeding goals; (2) provide necessary support to AI/AN 
mothers to prevent or address delayed initiation of milk 
production during the critical period immediately following 
birth; and (3) provide support to AI/AN mothers to help them 
understand the benefits of long-term breastfeeding and improve 
clinically recommended rates, particularly when they return to 
work. The Committee also directs IHS, where possible and within 
scope of agency authority, to encourage breastfeeding support 
recommendations within the workplace which encourage job 
retention.

                         CONTRACT SUPPORT COSTS

 
 
 
Appropriation enacted, 2019...........................      $822,227,000
Budget estimate, 2020.................................       820,000,000
Recommended, 2020.....................................       820,000,000
Comparison:
  Appropriation, 2019.................................        -2,227,000
  Budget estimate, 2020...............................                 0
 

    The Committee recommends an indefinite appropriation 
estimated to be $820,000,000 for contract support costs 
incurred by the agency as required by law. The bill includes 
language making such sums as are necessary to meet the Federal 
government's full legal obligation, and prohibiting the 
transfer of funds to any other account for any other purpose.

                        INDIAN HEALTH FACILITIES

 
 
 
Appropriation enacted, 2019...........................      $878,806,000
Budget estimate, 2020.................................       803,026,000
Recommended, 2020.....................................       964,121,000
Comparison:
  Appropriation, 2019.................................       +85,315,000
  Budget estimate, 2020...............................      +161,095,000
 

    The Committee recommends $964,121,000 for Indian Health 
Facilities, $85,315,000 above the enacted level and 
$161,095,000 above the budget request. All proposed cuts are 
rejected and IHS is expected to continue all programs at fiscal 
year 2019 enacted levels, except as otherwise discussed below 
and summarized in the table at the end of this report.
    Current Services.--The recommendation includes an overall 
total of $11,858,000 for fixed cost increases, $3,515,000 above 
the budget request.
    Staffing for New Facilities.--The recommendation includes 
$7,073,000 for staffing newly opened health facilities, as 
requested. Funding for Staffing for New Facilities represents 
the full amount required based upon updated estimates provided 
to the Committee. Funds for the staffing of new facilities are 
limited to facilities funded through the Health Care Facilities 
Construction Priority System or the Joint Venture Construction 
Program that have opened in fiscal year 2019 or will open in 
fiscal year 2020. None of these funds may be allocated to a 
facility until such facility has achieved beneficial occupancy 
status.
    Maintenance and Improvement.--The recommendation includes 
$174,336,000 for Maintenance and Improvement, $6,809,000 above 
the enacted level and $5,768,000 above the budget request. The 
Committee includes $1,425,000 for current services.
    Sanitation Facilities Construction.--The recommendation 
includes $193,577,000 for Sanitation Facilities Construction, 
which is $1,544,000 above the enacted level and $325,000 above 
the budget request. Within the amounts provided, the Committee 
includes $1,544,000 for current services.
    Health Care Facilities Construction.--The recommendation 
includes $304,290,000 for Health Care Facilities Construction, 
$60,810,000 above the enacted level and $138,480,000 above the 
budget request. The Committee includes $810,000 for current 
services, $20,000,000 for staff quarters, $20,000,000 for small 
health clinics, $10,000,000 for general health care facilities 
construction, and $10,000,000 to incorporate green 
infrastructure.
    Green Infrastructure.--The Committee includes $10,000,000 
to incorporate planning, design, and operations of buildings to 
reduce costs, minimize environmental impacts, use renewable 
energy and incorporate green infrastructure and the most 
current energy efficiency codes and standards to the maximum 
extent practicable. The Committee directs IHS to submit a 
report to the Committee within 90 days of enactment of this Act 
explaining how it proposes to use the funds provided for green 
infrastructure and renewable energy.
    Facilities and Environmental Health Support.--The 
recommendation includes $266,831,000 for Facilities and 
Environmental Health Support, $14,771,000 above the enacted 
level and $15,418,000 above the budget request. The Committee 
recommends $7,698,000 for current services and $7,073,000 for 
Staffing for New Facilities, as requested.
    Equipment.--The recommendation includes $25,087,000 for 
Equipment, $1,381,000 above the enacted level and $1,104,000 
above the budget request. Of the increase, $381,000 is for 
current services, $1,000,000 is for the maintenance, upgrade, 
replacement and purchase of new medical equipment. The bill 
continues language allowing up to $500,000 to be used to 
purchase TRANSAM equipment from the Department of Defense.
    Indian Health Care Improvement Fund.--The bill includes 
language allowing funds in the Indian Health Care Improvement 
Fund to be used for activities in the Facilities account.
    Joint Venture Construction Program.--The Committee urges 
the Service to consult with Tribes to determine and establish 
open competitions on a regular cycle of between three and five 
years. Consistent with existing IHS policy, non-selected 
applications in any cycle should not be grandfathered in a 
queue but instead should be eligible to reapply in the next 
cycle. Special consideration should be given to applications 
from within States with few or no existing IHS or Tribal 
facilities.''

                     National Institutes of Health


          NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH SCIENCES

    The National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences 
(NIEHS), an agency within the National Institutes of Health, 
was authorized in section 311(a) of the Comprehensive 
Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 
and in section 126(g) of the Superfund Amendments and 
Reauthorization Act of 1986 to conduct certain research and 
worker training activities associated with the Nation's 
Hazardous Substance Superfund program.

 
 
 
Appropriation enacted, 2019...........................       $79,000,000
Budget estimate, 2020.................................        66,581,000
Recommended, 2020.....................................        80,000,000
Comparison:
  Appropriation, 2019.................................        +1,000,000
  Budget estimate, 2020...............................       +13,419,000
 

    The Committee recommends $80,000,000 for the National 
Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, $1,000,000 above 
the enacted level and $13,419,000 above the request. NIEHS is 
encouraged to allocate these additional resources to its Worker 
Training Program in a manner that best supports communities' 
capacity to respond to and recover from natural disasters.
    PFAS Research.--The Committee remains concerned about the 
significant knowledge gaps needed to respond to this class of 
emerging contaminants. The Committee encourages continued 
funding for research with academic institutions that will help 
identify and quantify exposure risks and pathways; develop and 
utilize environmental forensic techniques; and create 
predictive computer model simulations and pilot-scale field 
projects to expedite future remediation efforts.

            Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry


            TOXIC SUBSTANCES AND ENVIRONMENTAL PUBLIC HEALTH

    The Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry 
(ATSDR), an agency in the Department of Health and Human 
Services, was created in section 104(i) of the Comprehensive 
Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act 
(CERCLA) of 1980. The Agency's mission is to serve the public 
through responsive public health actions to promote healthy and 
safe environments and prevent harmful toxic exposures. ATSDR 
assesses hazardous exposures in communities near toxic waste 
sites and advises the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and 
other government agencies, community groups and industry 
partners on actions needed to protect people's health. In 
addition, ATSDR conducts toxicological and applied research to 
support environmental assessments, supports health surveillance 
systems and registries, develops and disseminates information 
on hazardous substances, provides education and training on 
hazardous exposures, and responds to environmental emergencies. 
Through a national network of scientists and public health 
practitioners in State health departments, regional EPA offices 
and headquarters, ATSDR helps to protect people from acute 
toxic exposures that occur from hazardous leaks and spills, 
environment-related poisonings, and natural and terrorism-
related disasters.

 
 
 
Appropriation enacted, 2019...........................       $74,691,000
Budget estimate, 2020.................................        62,000,000
Recommended, 2020.....................................        79,691,000
Comparison:
  Appropriation, 2019.................................        +5,000,000
  Budget estimate, 2020...............................       +17,691,000
 

    The Committee recommends $79,691,000 for the Agency for 
Toxic Substances and Disease Registry, $5,000,000 above the 
fiscal year 2019 enacted level and $17,691,000 above the budget 
request.
    The Committee supports the Agency's ongoing work assessing 
health threats from environmental hazards, including emerging 
contaminants such as PFAS chemicals. The Committee directs the 
Agency to increase its statistical and data analytical capacity 
to support the Agency's health mission. Additionally, the 
Committee urges the Agency to undertake additional health 
studies on PFAS chemicals, including studies evaluating cancer 
risks and reproductive effects associated with exposure to PFAS 
chemicals.

                         OTHER RELATED AGENCIES


                   Executive Office of the President


  COUNCIL ON ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY AND OFFICE OF ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY

    The Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) was established 
by Congress under the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 
(NEPA). The Office of Environmental Quality (OEQ), which 
provides professional and administrative staff for the Council, 
was established in the Environmental Quality Improvement Act of 
1970. CEQ has statutory responsibility for overseeing Federal 
agency implementation of the requirements of NEPA, also assists 
in coordinating environmental programs among the Federal 
agencies in the Executive Branch.

 
 
 
Appropriation enacted, 2019...........................        $2,994,000
Budget estimate, 2020.................................         2,750,000
Recommended, 2020.....................................         2,994,000
Comparison:
  Appropriation, 2019.................................                 0
  Budget estimate, 2020...............................          +244,000
 

    The Committee recommends $2,994,000 for the Council on 
Environmental Quality and Office of Environmental Quality, 
equal to the enacted level and $244,000 above the request.
    The Committee recognizes that CEQ plays a critical role in 
coordinating Federal efforts to protect our environment and 
natural resources. Given that role, the Committee urges CEQ to 
convene the Department of the Navy, the Department of the 
Interior, Environmental Protection Agency, and other agencies 
as appropriate, to support ongoing efforts to determine the 
potential environmental impacts of military aviation noise on 
national parks. In instances where it is determined that there 
are negative impacts due to aviation noise, the Committee 
encourages CEQ to coordinate with other agencies on implement 
strategies to mitigate the negative impacts of aviation noise, 
including, where practicable, reducing the levels of noise.

             Chemical Safety and Hazard Investigation Board


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

    The Chemical Safety and Hazard Investigation Board (CSB) is 
an independent Federal agency charged with investigating 
industrial chemical accidents. The board members are appointed 
by the President and confirmed by the Senate. The CSB conducts 
root-cause investigations of chemical accidents at fixed 
industrial facilities. CSB does not issue fines or citations, 
but does make recommendations.

 
 
 
Appropriation enacted, 2019...........................       $12,000,000
Budget estimate, 2020.................................        10,200,000
Recommended, 2020.....................................        12,000,000
Comparison:
  Appropriation, 2019.................................                 0
  Budget estimate, 2020...............................        +1,800,000
 

    The Committee recommends $12,000,000 for the Salaries and 
Expenses appropriation, equal to the enacted level and 
$1,800,000 above the budget request. Changes to the request 
include an increase of $1,800,000 to restore proposed 
programmatic reductions.

              Office of Navajo and Hopi Indian Relocation


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

    The Office of Navajo and Hopi Indian Relocation (ONHIR) was 
established by Public Law 93-531 to plan and conduct relocation 
activities associated with the settlement of a land dispute 
between the Navajo Nation and the Hopi Tribe.

 
 
 
Appropriation enacted, 2019...........................        $8,750,000
Budget estimate, 2020.................................         7,500,000
Recommended, 2020.....................................         7,500,000
Comparison:
  Appropriation, 2019.................................        -1,250,000
  Budget estimate, 2020...............................                 0
 

    The Committee recommends $7,500,000 for ONHIR to complete 
its mission and bring about the closure of ONHIR in accordance 
with its authorizing statutes. Of the amounts provided, 
$3,450,000 is for Operation of the Office, $1,000,000 is for 
Relocation Operations, and $3,050,000 are Discretionary Funds 
to assist with housing infrastructure and close-out of ONHIR, 
as requested. ONHIR is directed to continue to work closely 
with the Navajo Nation, the Hopi Tribe, the Department of the 
Interior, the Assistant Secretary--Indian Affairs, and the 
Department of Justice to plan and implement the timely, 
reasonable, and fair closure of ONHIR and transfer of any 
legacy responsibilities to the appropriate parties.

    Institute of American Indian and Alaska Native Culture and Arts 
                              Development


                        PAYMENT TO THE INSTITUTE

 
 
 
Appropriation enacted, 2019...........................        $9,960,000
Budget estimate, 2020.................................        10,210,000
Recommended, 2020.....................................        10,850,000
Comparison:
  Appropriation, 2019.................................          +890,000
  Budget estimate, 2020...............................          +640,000
 

    The Committee recommends $10,850,000 for the Institute of 
American Indian and Alaska Native Culture and Arts Development, 
$890,000 above the enacted level and $640,000 above the budget 
request. Within the amounts provided, $974,000 is for Finance 
and Administration to cover fixed cost increases, an increase 
of $84,000 above the enacted level and $59,000 above the budget 
request, and $3,472,000 is for Academic Division and Library, 
an increase of $806,000 above the enacted level and $581,000 
above the budget request. Within the amounts provided for the 
Academic Division and Library, the Committee includes $225,000, 
as requested, for the Summer Bridge program.

                        Smithsonian Institution

    The Smithsonian Institution is the world's largest museum 
and research complex, with 19 museums and galleries, nine 
research centers, 21 libraries, the National Zoological Park, 
and 214 Affiliates in 45 states, Puerto Rico, and Panama. 
Funded by both private and Federal sources, the Smithsonian is 
unique in the Federal establishment. Created by an Act of 
Congress in 1846 to carry out the trust included in James 
Smithson's will, it has been engaged for 173 years in the 
``increase and diffusion of knowledge.'' Last year, the 
Smithsonian attracted almost 29 million visits to its museums, 
galleries, and zoological park and another 4.5 million people 
visited Smithsonian traveling exhibitions. As custodian of the 
National Collections, the Smithsonian is responsible for more 
than 155 million objects, including scientific specimens, works 
of art, library volumes, archival materials, musical 
instruments, and live animals. These scientific and cultural 
collections are a vital resource for global research and 
conservation efforts. The collections are displayed for the 
enjoyment and education of visitors and are available for 
research by the staff of the Institution and by thousands of 
visiting students, scientists, and historians each year.

                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

 
 
 
Appropriation enacted, 2019...........................      $739,994,000
Budget estimate, 2020.................................       759,345,000
Recommended, 2020.....................................       852,345,000
Comparison:
  Appropriation, 2019.................................      +112,351,000
  Budget estimate, 2020...............................       +93,000,000
 

    The Committee recommends $852,345,000 for Salaries and 
Expenses of the Smithsonian Institution, $112,351,000 above the 
enacted level and $93,000,000 above the budget request. The 
recommendation includes the proposed budget increases, fixed 
costs, and the fiscal year 2020 pay increase. Additional 
information is provided in the detail table at the end of the 
report.
    The Committee does not include bill language proposed in 
the budget request to allow the Smithsonian Institution to 
expend Federal funds appropriated for lease or rent payments as 
payments to the Smithsonian Institution general trust funds 
(non-federal funding account) that can be used for expenses 
associated with the purchase of a building by the non-federal 
Smithsonian Institution Trust. The Committee is deeply 
concerned that the Smithsonian issued a Request for Proposal 
for a consolidated administrative headquarters facility in 
August 2018 without first speaking to Congress. An undertaking 
of this magnitude should be done transparently and include 
discussions of the business case for consolidation and building 
acquisition with appropriators and authorizers before the 
initiation of any actions.
    Additional Guidance.--The following additional direction 
and guidance is provided with respect to funding provided 
within this account:
    National Museum of African American History and Culture.--
The Committee maintains its longstanding support of the 
National Museum of African American History and Culture, and 
has provided funds, as requested.
    Latino Programs, Exhibitions, Collections and Public 
Outreach.--The Committee encourages the Smithsonian to continue 
to explore the creation of an American Latino Museum, and in 
the meantime supports the Smithsonian Latino Center and its 
goal of promoting the inclusion of Latino contributions in 
Smithsonian Institution programs, exhibitions, collections, and 
public outreach. In accordance with the recommendations 
provided to Congress and the President of the United States in 
the May 2011 report by the National Museum of the American 
Latino Commission (created by P.L. 110-229), the Committee 
urges collaboration among interested parties to advance these 
goals more fully by utilizing existing Smithsonian Institution 
locations on the National Mall for the long-term expansion of 
the Smithsonian Latino Center's programming, exhibition and 
collection space. The recommendation includes a total of 
$5,000,000 for the Latino Center to continue expanding exhibit 
activities and cultivate new Latino curators in anticipation of 
the gallery's opening. To this end, the Committee encourages 
collaboration among interested parties including Hispanic 
Serving Institutions. The Committee requests an update on the 
opening of the Molina Family Latino Gallery and related 
exhibits and collections within 60 days of enactment of this 
Act.
    Asian Pacific American Initiatives and Outreach.--The 
Committee provides funds as requested for the Institution's 
Asian Pacific American initiatives and continues to support the 
Institution's efforts to develop programs and expand outreach 
to promote a better understanding of the Asian Pacific American 
experience.
    American Women's Initiatives and Outreach.--The Committee 
provides funds as requested for the Smithsonian's American 
Women's Initiative and continues to support the development and 
expansion of this multi-year, pan-institutional celebration of 
the 100th anniversary of women's suffrage in America.
    Outreach.--The Committee acknowledges the Smithsonian's new 
strategic plan and its goal to reach a billion people by 2022 
with a ``digital first'' strategy. The Committee encourages the 
Institution to increase outreach and support activities through 
collaboration with local museums and other interested public 
and non-profit organizations. The Committee continues its 
support of Smithsonian's Traveling Exhibitions and Affiliations 
programs that share its expertise, art, science and historical 
artifacts throughout the Nation, as well as rich educational 
programming. These programs ensure that all Americans can learn 
and experience the magnificent history which millions find 
every year exhibited in Washington, D.C. The Committee also 
supports discussions with outside partners about utilizing 
technology to make the Smithsonian's artifacts and collections 
more accessible for teachers and students, so these resources 
can enhance school curriculums.
    Facilities Maintenance.--The Smithsonian-wide facility 
replacement value is currently $8.45 billion. The National 
Research Council recommends an annual maintenance budget in the 
range of two to four percent of a physical plant's current 
replacement value to avoid adding a deferred maintenance 
backlog. Therefore, the recommendation provides a program 
increase of $75,000,000 to the budget request for a total of 
$161,258,000. At this funding level, the Smithsonian will be 
able to fulfill its mission, sustain facility capital and 
maintenance investment and security needs, and reduce the 
deferred maintenance backlog.
    STEAM engagement and diversity.--The Committee commends the 
Smithsonian's efforts to provide authentic and inspiring STEAM 
experiences for teachers and students by drawing on the 
scientific and engineering assets of the Federal government 
including scientists, labs, satellites, museums, and research 
centers. The Committee notes the achievement gap persists for 
many low-income students and students of color and encourages 
the Smithsonian to ensure priorities are given to disadvantaged 
and dual language students. Supporting STEAM initiatives is 
crucial in preparing young Americans, especially those from 
low-income disadvantaged backgrounds, for the 21st century 
economy and beyond. The Committee encourages the Smithsonian to 
continue its involvement and leadership in the Federal CoSTEAM 
initiative which coordinates the efforts of STEAM engagement 
across mission agencies, and other non-profit collaborators. 
The Committee supports the Smithsonian's goal to transport our 
nation's aeronautical and space treasures and stories through 
digital technology, and cultivate the next generation of 
science, technology, engineering, art, mathematics and history 
learners by sharing high quality education content aligned with 
national education priorities.

                           FACILITIES CAPITAL

 
 
 
Appropriation enacted, 2019...........................      $303,503,000
Budget estimate, 2020.................................       219,000,000
Recommended, 2020.....................................       219,000,000
Comparison:
  Appropriation, 2019.................................       -84,503,000
  Budget estimate, 2020...............................                 0
 

    The Committee recommends $219,000,000 for the Facilities 
Capital account, $84,503,000 below the enacted level, and equal 
to the budget request. The recommendation includes funding, as 
requested, for the continued renovation of the National Air and 
Space Museum as well as revitalization efforts at the Udvar-
Hazy Center, the National Zoological Park, and other priority 
areas including the Smithsonian Castle and Smithsonian Tropical 
Research Institute in Panama. Planning and design funding of 
$29,600,000, including $16,000,000 for the Smithsonian Castle 
and Arts and Industries Buildings, is provided as requested.
    National Air and Space Museum Revitalization.--The 
Committee supports the multi-year, multi-phase renovation of 
the National Air and Space Museum (NASM), including the 
replacement of the building's facade and internal building 
systems, and accepts the budget request. With this 
recommendation the Committee has provided 86 percent of the 
total funding needed and the amount that can be utilized in 
fiscal year 2020.
    The NASM faces mechanical, structural, and security 
challenges that necessitate action to ensure the facility's 
long-term viability. The NASM is the most visited museum in the 
United States and second most visited museum in the world with 
between seven and eight million visitors annually. Given the 
scale of the project, the Committee directs the Institution to 
provide the Committee on a timely basis the most updated and 
comprehensive information on project and funding requirements. 
The Government Accountability Office is directed to continue 
its ongoing review and analysis of the project's cost estimate, 
as directed in the Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2017 (P.L. 
115-31). Further, the Committee commends the Smithsonian for 
its efforts to identify partnership and philanthropic 
opportunities that will provide additional non-Federal sources 
of funding to assist in offsetting the costs of this and other 
projects.

                        NATIONAL GALLERY OF ART

    The National Gallery of Art is one of the world's great 
galleries. Its magnificent works of art, displayed for the 
benefit of millions of visitors annually, and its two iconic 
buildings and sculpture garden, serve as an example of a 
successful cooperative endeavor between private individuals and 
institutions and the Federal government. With the special 
exhibitions shown in the Gallery, and through the many 
exhibitions which travel across the country, the Gallery brings 
great art treasures to Washington, DC, and to the Nation. 
Through its educational and teacher training programs and its 
website, the Gallery provides art history materials, rich 
online educational materials, direct loans, and broadcast 
programs to millions of Americans in every State.

                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

 
 
 
Appropriation enacted, 2019...........................      $144,202,000
Budget estimate, 2020.................................       139,000,000
Recommended, 2020.....................................       147,022,000
Comparison:
  Appropriation, 2019.................................        +2,820,000
  Budget estimate, 2020...............................        +8,022,000
 

    The Committee recommends $147,022,000 for Salaries and 
Expenses of the National Gallery of Art, an increase of 
$2,820,000 above the enacted level and $8,022,000 above the 
budget request.
    Bill Language.--The Committee has included bill language 
specifying the amount provided for Special Exhibitions.

            REPAIR, RESTORATION AND RENOVATION OF BUILDINGS

 
 
 
Appropriation enacted, 2019...........................       $24,203,000
Budget estimate, 2020.................................        15,114,000
Recommended, 2020.....................................        34,603,000
Comparison:
  Appropriation, 2019.................................       +10,400,000
  Budget estimate, 2020...............................       +19,489,000
 

    The Committee recommends $34,603,000 for Repair, 
Restoration and Renovation of buildings at the National Gallery 
of Art, $10,400,000 above the enacted level and $19,489,000 
above the budget request. Additional funds have been included 
to address urgent repairs and renovations as identified in the 
Master Facilities Plan. The recommendation also includes bill 
language and $1,000,000 for design of an off-site art storage 
facility in partnership with the Smithsonian Institution.
    Bill Language.--The Committee has included bill language, 
as requested, relating to lease agreements of no more than 10 
years that addresses space needs created by ongoing renovations 
in the Master Facilities Plan.

             John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts

    The John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts is a 
living memorial to the late President Kennedy and is the 
National Center for the Performing Arts. The Center houses nine 
stages and seven theaters which have a total of more than 7,300 
seats. The Center consists of over 1.5 million square feet of 
usable floor space with visitation averaging 8,000 on a daily 
basis. The support systems in the building often operate at 
capacity 18 hours a day, seven days a week, 365 days a year.

                       OPERATIONS AND MAINTENANCE

 
 
 
Appropriation enacted, 2019...........................       $24,490,000
Budget estimate, 2020.................................        25,690,000
Recommended, 2020.....................................        25,690,000
Comparison:
  Appropriation, 2019.................................        +1,200,000
  Budget estimate, 2020...............................                 0
 

    The Committee recommends $25,690,000 for Operations and 
Maintenance, $1,200,000 above the enacted level and equal to 
the budget request.

                     CAPITAL REPAIR AND RESTORATION

 
 
 
Appropriation enacted, 2019...........................       $16,800,000
Budget estimate, 2020.................................        14,000,000
Recommended, 2020.....................................        17,800,000
Comparison:
  Appropriation, 2019.................................        +1,000,000
  Budget estimate, 2020...............................        +3,800,000
 

    The Committee recommends $17,800,000 for Capital Repair and 
Restoration, $1,000,000 above the enacted level and $3,800,000 
above the budget request.

            Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

    The Woodrow Wilson Memorial Act of 1968, P.L. 90-637, 
established the Woodrow Wilson International Center for 
Scholars to symbolize and strengthen the fruitful relation 
between learning and public affairs. This institution serves 
the public through non-partisan, policy-relevant research and 
dialogue, to increase understanding and enhance the 
capabilities and knowledge of leaders, citizens, and 
institutions worldwide. The Center hosts 150 world-class 
scholars per year to do their own advanced study, research and 
writing which facilitates debate and discussions on relevant, 
major long-term issues facing this Nation and the world.

 
 
 
Appropriation enacted, 2019...........................       $12,000,000
Budget estimate, 2020.................................         8,139,000
Recommended, 2020.....................................        14,000,000
Comparison:
  Appropriation, 2019.................................        +2,000,000
  Budget estimate, 2020...............................        +5,861,000
 

    The Committee recommends $14,000,000 for Salaries and 
Expenses of the Woodrow Wilson International Center for 
Scholars, an increase of $2,000,000 above the enacted level and 
$5,861,000 above the budget request. The Committee does not 
support the budget request to eliminate annual direct federal 
appropriations and instead provides additional funding to cover 
fixed costs, staffing vacancies, and equipment replacement.

           National Foundation on the Arts and the Humanities


                    National Endowment for the Arts


                       GRANTS AND ADMINISTRATION

 
 
 
Appropriation enacted, 2019...........................      $155,000,000
Budget estimate, 2020.................................        29,333,000
Recommended, 2020.....................................       167,500,000
Comparison:
  Appropriation, 2019.................................       +12,500,000
  Budget estimate, 2020...............................      +138,167,000
 

    The Committee recommends $167,500,000 for the National 
Endowment for the Arts (NEA), $12,500,000 above the enacted 
level and $138,167,000 above the budget request.
    The Committee recognizes the broad bipartisan support for 
the NEA and its work to promote access to the arts in every 
community across America. Each year, every district receives 
NEA funding to support art programs that can enhance economic 
development, create jobs, and expand arts learning.
    The Committee remains committed to supporting proven 
national initiatives with broad geographic reach. The Big Read, 
Challenge America, and Shakespeare in American Communities are 
among the cost-effective grant programs that extend the arts to 
underserved populations in both urban and rural communities 
across the United States. Through the innovative program, 
``Creative Forces: NEA Military Healing Arts Network,'' the 
NEA, in partnership with the Departments of Defense and 
Veterans Affairs, provides creative arts therapies and arts 
engagement strategies that promote healing and support the 
reintegration of service members and veterans recovering from 
traumatic brain injuries and psychological health issues.
    The Committee strongly supports arts education and the 
NEA's work with STEAM, adding the Arts to STEM (Science, 
Technology, Engineering, and Mathematic) education initiatives. 
The Committee encourages the NEA to continue its research 
efforts and work with cultural institutions, arts 
organizations, and other Federal agencies in furthering STEAM 
initiatives. STEAM programs give students the opportunity to 
explore creative new ways to solve problems, display data, and 
apply critical thinking techniques that foster innovation and 
prepare young Americans for the 21st century and beyond.
    The bill includes funding to continue the longstanding 
collaborative relationship between the NEA and the States. 
State art agencies match NEA grant funds to support programs 
that respond to local needs in arts education, community 
development, cultural preservation, and arts access. More than 
4,000 communities benefit annually from these programs.
    Bill Language.--As in previous years, sections 413 and 414 
of this bill provide grant program direction to the NEA. With 
the exception of established honorific programs, grant funding 
to individual artists is strictly prohibited. The Committee 
directs that priority be given to providing services or grant 
funding for projects, productions, or programs that encourage 
public knowledge, education, understanding, and appreciation of 
the arts.

                 National Endowment for the Humanities


                       GRANTS AND ADMINISTRATION

 
 
 
Appropriation enacted, 2019...........................      $155,000,000
Budget estimate, 2020.................................        37,891,000
Recommended, 2020.....................................       167,500,000
Comparison:
  Appropriation, 2019.................................       +12,500,000
  Budget estimate, 2020...............................      +129,609,000
 

    The Committee recommends $167,500,000 for the National 
Endowment for the Humanities (NEH), $12,500,000 above the 
enacted level and $129,609,000 above the budget request. The 
Committee expects the NEH to obligate and expend funds as 
directed in the table that is included at the end of this 
report.
    The Committee recognizes the broad bipartisan support for 
the NEH mission to serve and strengthen our nation by making 
the humanities available to all Americans. NEH programs support 
cultural infrastructure projects, education programs, and 
initiatives; advance scholarly research; and provide for 
exhibitions, documentaries, and the preservation of historic 
collections.
    The Committee acknowledges the importance of NEH dialogue 
programs in advancing a civil discourse on challenging issues. 
The NEH supports dialogue programs in every state that help 
individuals and communities engage thoughtfully on regional and 
national issues of local importance.
    The Committee encourages the NEH to provide opportunities 
for documentaries that promote the importance of and educate 
the public on the historic preservation process.
    The Committee includes funding to advance cross-cutting NEH 
initiatives. The Committee understands that this funding will 
be used to support three programmatic areas: the celebration of 
the U.S. Semiquincentennial, the advancement of civic 
education, and NEH's ``Standing Together'' initiative which 
promotes a deeper understanding of the military experience and 
supports returning veterans and their families.
    The Committee commends the NEH for its support of grant 
programs to benefit wounded warriors and to ensure educational 
opportunities for veterans and service members transitioning to 
civilian life. In partnership with NEH, State humanities 
councils have developed and delivered local programs that 
support veterans, their families and caregivers. The Committee 
encourages the NEH to fully support efforts to connect the 
humanities to the experience of veterans and provide 
educational opportunities to these American heroes.
    The Committee commends the NEH for its ongoing support to 
American Indian and Alaska Native communities in preserving 
their cultural and linguistic heritage through the Documenting 
Endangered Languages program and a variety of preservation and 
access grants that enable American Indian and Alaska Native 
communities to preserve cultural artifacts and make them 
broadly accessible. The Committee also commends the NEH for 
providing educational opportunities for Tribal communities 
through the Humanities Initiatives at Tribal Colleges and 
Universities program.
    The bill includes funding to continue the longstanding 
collaborative relationship between the NEH and State humanities 
councils. The Committee commends the NEH for its ongoing, 
successful collaboration with State humanities councils in each 
of the 50 states as well as Washington, D.C., the Commonwealth 
of Puerto Rico, the U.S. Virgin Islands, Guam, the Commonwealth 
of the Northern Mariana Islands, and American Samoa. State 
humanities councils support public humanities programming in 
more than 6,000 rural and urban communities and nearly every 
congressional district. These programs increase public 
awareness of national issues such as the opioid epidemic, help 
veterans reintegrate into their communities, promote family 
literacy, and record and preserve the stories, language, and 
histories of our native cultures. The Committee urges the NEH 
to provide program funding to support the work of State 
humanities councils consistent with the guidance provided in 
the Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2018.

                        Commission of Fine Arts

    The Commission of Fine Arts was established in 1910 to 
advise the government on questions of art and architecture and 
preserve the symbolic significance of the nation's capital. The 
Commission's work includes advice on designs for parks, public 
buildings, public art, as well as the design of national 
monuments, coins and medals, and overseas American military 
cemeteries. In addition, the Commission conducts design reviews 
of semipublic and private structures within the Old Georgetown 
Historic District and within certain areas of the National 
Capital that are adjacent to areas of Federal interest. The 
Commission also administers the National Capital Arts and 
Cultural Affairs program.

                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

 
 
 
Appropriation enacted, 2019...........................        $2,771,000
Budget estimate, 2020.................................         3,050,000
Recommended, 2020.....................................         3,282,000
Comparison:
  Appropriation, 2019.................................          +511,000
  Budget estimate, 2020...............................          +232,000
 

    The Committee recommends $3,282,000 for Salaries and 
Expenses of the Commission of Fine Arts, $511,000 above the 
enacted level and $232,000 above the budget request. Within the 
increase, funding has been included to provide an additional 
FTE for IT and cybersecurity support.

               NATIONAL CAPITAL ARTS AND CULTURAL AFFAIRS

 
 
 
Appropriation enacted, 2019...........................        $2,750,000
Budget Estimate, 2020.................................                 0
Recommended, 2020.....................................         5,000,000
Comparison:
  Appropriation, 2019.................................        +2,250,000
  Budget estimate, 2020...............................        +5,000,000
 

    The National Capital Arts and Cultural Affairs (NCACA) 
program was established in Public Law 99-190 to support 
organizations that perform, exhibit, and/or present the arts in 
the Nation's Capital. NCACA provides grants to support Ford's 
Theater, the National Symphony Orchestra, the National Museum 
of Women in the Arts, and other arts organizations. The 
Committee recommends $5,000,000, which is $2,250,000 more than 
the enacted level and $5,000,000 more than the budget request.

               Advisory Council on Historic Preservation


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

    The National Historic Preservation Act of 1966 established 
the Advisory Council on Historic Preservation (ACHP). The ACHP 
was granted permanent authorization as part of the National 
Historic Preservation Act Amendments of 2006 (Public Law 109-
453). The ACHP promotes the preservation, enhancement, and 
productive use of our Nation's historic resources and advises 
the President and Congress on national historic preservation 
policy.

 
 
 
Appropriation enacted, 2019...........................        $6,890,000
Budget estimate, 2020.................................         7,000,000
Recommended, 2020.....................................         7,388,000
Comparison:
  Appropriation, 2019.................................          +498,000
  Budget estimate, 2020...............................          +388,000
 

    The Committee recommends $7,388,000 for Salaries and 
Expenses of the Advisory Council on Historic Preservation 
(ACHP), $498,000 above the enacted level and $388,000 above the 
budget request.

                  National Capital Planning Commission


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

    The National Capital Planning Act of 1952 designated the 
National Capital Planning Commission as the central planning 
agency for the Federal government in the National Capital 
Region. The three major functions of the Commission are to 
prepare the federal elements of the National Capital 
Comprehensive Plan; prepare the Federal Capital Improvement 
Program; and review plans and proposals submitted to the 
Commission.

 
 
 
Appropriation enacted, 2019...........................        $8,099,000
Budget estimate, 2020.................................         7,948,000
Recommended, 2020.....................................         8,124,000
Comparison:
  Appropriation, 2019.................................           +25,000
  Budget estimate, 2020...............................          +176,000
 

    The Committee recommends $8,124,000 for Salaries and 
Expenses of the National Capital Planning Commission, $25,000 
above the enacted level and $176,000 above the budget request.

                United States Holocaust Memorial Museum


                       HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL MUSEUM

    In 1980, Congress passed legislation creating a 65-member 
Holocaust Memorial Council with the mandate to create and 
oversee a living memorial/museum to victims of the Holocaust. 
The museum opened in April 1993. Construction costs for the 
museum came solely from donated funds raised by the U.S. 
Holocaust Memorial Museum Campaign, and appropriated funds were 
used for planning and development of programmatic components, 
overall administrative support, and annual commemorative 
observances. Since the opening of the museum, appropriated 
funds have been provided to pay for the ongoing operating costs 
of the museum as authorized by Public Law 102-529 and Public 
Law 106-292. Private funds support educational outreach 
throughout the United States.

 
 
 
Appropriation enacted, 2019...........................       $59,000,000
Budget estimate, 2020.................................        59,000,000
Recommended, 2020.....................................        61,388,000
Comparison:
  Appropriation, 2019.................................        +2,388,000
  Budget estimate, 2020...............................        +2,388,000
 

    The Committee recommends $61,388,000 for the Holocaust 
Memorial Museum, $2,388,000 above the enacted level and the 
budget request.
    Salaries and Expenses.--The recommendation includes 
$56,409,000 for salaries and expenses, including $388,000 for 
fixed cost increases. The recommendation includes the requested 
$4,000,000 increase to salaries and expenses for one-time 
expenditures in the areas of information technology, financial 
management, and National Institute of Holocaust Documentation.
    Repair and Rehabilitation.--The recommendation includes 
$3,000,000 for Repair and Rehabilitation, $1,000,000 below 
enacted and $2,000,000 above the budget request. The 
recommendation fully funds the projects identified in the 
budget request and includes an additional $2,000,000 for repair 
and rehabilitation projects in the Ross Administrative 
building.
    Outreach Initiatives.--The recommendation includes 
$1,264,000 for Outreach Initiatives, equal to the enacted level 
and equal to the budget request.
    Equipment Replacement.--The recommendation includes 
$715,000 for Equipment Replacement, $1,000,000 below the 
enacted level and equal to the budget request.
    The Committee recognizes that learning how and why the 
Holocaust happened continues to be an important component of 
civic education in the United States. The Committee is aware 
that Holocaust memory and education must adapt to the impending 
absence of the eyewitnesses whose testimony has been integral 
to Holocaust education. This challenges Holocaust educators to 
create thought provoking experiences in both digital and 
physical spaces that elevate the voices, memories and personal 
stories of victims and survivors. Ensuring the future of 
Holocaust memory will require the preservation of evidence and 
free access to digital primary resources for researchers, 
educators, students, and public audiences. The Committee notes 
efforts of the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum and 
others to support the growth and vitality of Holocaust 
education and scholarship.

                Dwight D. Eisenhower Memorial Commission

    The Dwight D. Eisenhower Memorial Commission was created by 
Congress in 1999 through Public Law 106-79 for the purpose of 
establishing a permanent national memorial to Dwight D. 
Eisenhower, Supreme Commander of the Allied Forces in Europe in 
World War II and 34th President of the United States. The 
Commission consists of 12 members, four members of the House of 
Representatives, four Senators, and four private citizens 
appointed by the President.

                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

 
 
 
Appropriation enacted, 2019...........................        $1,800,000
Budget estimate, 2020.................................         1,800,000
Recommended, 2020.....................................         1,800,000
Comparison:
  Appropriation, 2019.................................                 0
  Budget estimate, 2020...............................                 0
 

    The bill includes $1,800,000 for the Salaries and Expenses 
account, equal to enacted level and the budget request. The 
Committee notes that the final installment of construction 
funding necessary to complete the memorial was provided in the 
Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2018 (Public Law 115-141).

                 Women's Suffrage Centennial Commission

    The Women's Suffrage Centennial Commission was established 
by Congress in the Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2017, P.L. 
115-31. The Commission is tasked with ensuring a suitable 
observance of the centennial of the passage and ratification of 
the 19th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution on August 18, 1920, 
that guaranteed women the right to vote.

                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

 
 
 
Appropriation enacted, 2019...........................        $1,000,000
Budget estimate, 2020.................................                 0
Recommended, 2020.....................................                 0
Comparison:
  Appropriation, 2019.................................        -1,000,000
  Budget estimate, 2020...............................                 0
 

    The bill does not provide funding in fiscal year 2020 for 
the salaries and expenses of the Women's Suffrage Centennial 
Commission because Congress has provided a total of $4,000,000 
for the Commission to date. This funding allows the 14-member 
Commission to move forward with planning commemorative events, 
educational exhibitions, traveling exhibits and pop up 
displays, and other activities to educate Americans about 
women's suffrage and celebrate this historic event. Current 
cost projections estimate the Commission's expenses will not 
exceed $4,000,000.

                   World War I Centennial Commission

    The U.S. World War I Centennial Commission was created by 
an Act of Congress in 2013 as an independent agency of the 
Legislative Branch of the United States government. Members of 
the 12-member Commission were appointed by the President and 
the leaders of the Senate and the House of Representatives, as 
well as the American Legion, the Veterans of Foreign Wars, and 
the National World War I Museum. The Commission's mission is to 
plan, develop, and execute programs, projects and activities to 
commemorate the Centennial of World War I.

                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

 
 
 
Appropriation enacted, 2019...........................        $7,000,000
Budget estimate, 2020.................................        21,093,058
Recommended, 2020.....................................         6,000,000
Comparison:
  Appropriation, 2019.................................        -1,000,000
  Budget estimate, 2020...............................       -15,093,058
 

    The Committee recommends $6,000,000 for salaries and 
expenses of the World War I Centennial Commission, $1,000,000 
below the enacted level and $15,093,058 below the budget 
request. The recommendation does not include the $15,093,058 
requested for deferred maintenance because the project was 
funded by the National Park Service in fiscal year 2019, after 
the 2020 budget submission.
    The recommendation changes the period of availability for 
funds appropriated in this account from no-year to two-year 
because the Commission anticipates submitting its final request 
for salary and expenses in fiscal year 2021, and a final 
request in fiscal year 2022 for funds to shut down the 
Commission, making a no-year appropriation unnecessary.

                      TITLE IV--GENERAL PROVISIONS

    Section 401 continues a provision prohibiting activities to 
promote public support or opposition to legislative proposals.
    Section 402 continues a provision providing for annual 
appropriations unless expressly provided otherwise in this Act.
    Section 403 continues a provision providing restrictions on 
departmental assessments unless approved by the Committee on 
Appropriations.
    Section 404 continues a limitation on accepting and 
processing applications for patents and on the patenting of 
Federal lands.
    Section 405 continues a provision regarding the payment of 
contract support costs for prior fiscal years.
    Section 406 addresses the payment of contract support costs 
for fiscal year 2020.
    Section 407 continues a provision providing that the 
Secretary of Agriculture shall not be considered in violation 
of certain provisions of the Forest and Rangeland Renewable 
Resources Planning Act solely because more than 15 years have 
passed without revision of a forest plan, provided that the 
Secretary is working in good faith to complete the plan 
revision.
    Section 408 continues a provision limiting preleasing, 
leasing, and related activities within the boundaries of 
National Monuments.
    Section 409 continues a provision which restricts funding 
for acquisition of lands or interests in lands from being used 
for declarations of taking or complaints in condemnation.
    Section 410 continues a provision which prohibits no-bid 
contracts and grants except under certain circumstances.
    Section 411 continues a provision which requires public 
disclosure of certain reports.
    Section 412 continues a provision which delineates the 
grant guidelines for the National Endowment for the Arts.
    Section 413 continues a provision which delineates the 
program priorities for programs managed by the National 
Endowment for the Arts.
    Section 414 continues a provision requiring the Department 
of the Interior, Environmental Protection Agency, Forest 
Service, and Indian Health Service to provide the Committees on 
Appropriations quarterly reports on the status of balances of 
appropriations.
    Section 415 continues a provision through fiscal year 2021 
authorizing the Secretary of the Interior and the Secretary of 
Agriculture to consider local contractors when awarding 
contracts for certain activities on public lands.
    Section 416 extends certain authorities through fiscal year 
2020 allowing the Forest Service to renew grazing permits.
    Section 417 prohibits the use of funds to maintain or 
establish a computer network unless such network is designed to 
block access to pornography websites.
    Section 418 extends the authority of the Forest Service 
Facility Realignment and Enhancement Act.
    Section 419 sets requirements for the use of American iron 
and steel for certain loans and grants.
    Section 420 reauthorizes funding for one year for the John 
F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts.
    Section 421 provides authority for the Secretary of the 
Interior to enter into training agreements and to transfer 
excess equipment and supplies for wildfires.
    Section 422 provides a one-year extension of the current 
recreation fee authority.
    Section 423 incorporates Reprogramming Guidelines in the 
bill.
    Section 424 requires the submission of certain project 
lists to the Committee by a date certain.

              House of Representatives Report Requirements

    The following items are included in accordance with various 
requirements of the Rules of the House of Representatives:

                          FULL COMMITTEE VOTES

    Pursuant to the provisions of clause 3(b) of rule XIII of 
the Rules of the House of Representatives, the results of each 
roll call vote on an amendment or on the motion to report, 
together with the names of those voting for and those voting 
against, are printed below:


         STATEMENT OF GENERAL PERFORMANCE GOALS AND OBJECTIVES

    Pursuant to clause 3(c)(4) of rule XIII of the Rules of the 
House of Representatives, the following is a statement of 
general performance goals and objectives for which this measure 
authorizes funding:
    The Committee on Appropriations considers program 
performance, including a program's success in developing and 
attaining outcome-related goals and objectives, in developing 
funding recommendations.

                          RESCISSION OF FUNDS

    Pursuant to clause 3(f)(2) of rule XIII of the Rules of the 
House of Representatives, the following table is submitted 
describing the rescission recommended in the accompanying bill:

------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                             Amounts
                Department and activity                 Precommended for
                                                           rescission
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Bureau of Land Management: Management of Lands and           $14,000,000
 Resources............................................
Bureau of Land Management: Construction...............        $5,000,000
United States Fish and Wildlife Service: Resource             $4,000,000
 Management...........................................
United States Fish and Wildlife Service: Cooperative         $10,000,000
 Endangered Species Conservation Fund.................
Office of the Special Trustee for American Indians....        $3,000,000
------------------------------------------------------------------------

                           TRANSFERS OF FUNDS

    Pursuant to clause 3(f)(2) of rule XIII of the Rules of the 
House of Representatives, the following table is submitted 
describing the transfer of funds in the accompanying bill.

                                 APPROPRIATION TRANSFERS RECOMMENDED IN THE BILL
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                    Account to which
 Account from which transfer is made        Amount (000's)          transfer is made          Amount (000's)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Department of the Interior, National   not specified..........  Department of            not specified
 Park Service.                                                   Transportation,
                                                                 Federal Highway
                                                                 Administration.
Department of the Interior, BIA/BIE,   not specified..........  Indian forest land       not specified
 Operation of Indian Programs.                                   assistance accounts.
Department of the Interior, Bureau of  not specified..........  Bureau of Reclamation..  not specified
 Indian Affairs Construction.
Department of the Interior, Office of  not specified..........  Bureau of Indian         not specified
 the Secretary.                                                  Affairs, Bureau of
                                                                 Indian Education
                                                                 ``Operation of Indian
                                                                 Programs'', Office of
                                                                 the Special Trustee
                                                                 ``Federal Trust
                                                                 Programs''.
Department of the Interior, Office of  not specified..........  Secretary of             not specified
 Insular Affairs.                                                Agriculture.
Department of the Interior, Office of  not specified..........  Department of the        not specified
 the Special Trustee for American                                Interior, BIA/BIE,
 Indians.                                                        Operation of Indian
                                                                 Programs; Office of
                                                                 the Solicitor,
                                                                 Salaries and Expenses;
                                                                 Office of the
                                                                 Secretary,
                                                                 Departmental
                                                                 Operations.
Department of the Interior, Wildland   not specified..........  Department of the        not specified
 Fire Management.                                                Interior, for
                                                                 repayment of advances
                                                                 made during
                                                                 emergencies.
Department of the Interior, Wildland   up to $50,000..........  National Forest          not specified
 Fire Management.                                                Foundation,
                                                                 Administrative
                                                                 Provision.
Department of the Interior, Intra-     not specified..........  Department of the        not specified
 Bureau.                                                         Interior, Intra-
                                                                 Bureau, for emergency
                                                                 purposes as specified.
Department of the Interior,            not specified..........  Department of the        not specified
 Department-Wide.                                                Interior, Department-
                                                                 Wide, for emergency
                                                                 purposes as specified.
Bureau of Indian Affairs and Bureau    not specified..........  Indian trust management  not specified
 of Indian Education, and Office of                              and reform activities.
 the Special Trustee.
Environmental Protection Agency,       not specified..........  Other Federal Agencies.  not specified
 Hazardous Substance Superfund.
Environmental Protection Agency,       $9,586.................  Environmental            $9,586
 Hazardous Substance Superfund.                                  Protection Agency,
                                                                 Office of Inspector
                                                                 General.
Environmental Protection Agency,       $30,496................  Environmental            $30,496
 Hazardous Substance Superfund.                                  Protection Agency,
                                                                 Science and Technology.
Environmental Protection Agency,       up to $320,000.........  Any Federal Department   up to $320,000
 Administrative Provisions.                                      or Agency for Great
                                                                 Lakes Initiative.
Forest Service, Wildland Fire          not specified..........  Forest Service           not specified
 Management.                                                     Operations, permanent
                                                                 funds or trusts.
Forest Service, Wildland Fire          not specified..........  Forest Service, Capital  not specified
 Management.                                                     Improvement and
                                                                 Maintenance.
Forest Service Operations, cost pools  not specified..........  Wildland Fire            $300,000
                                                                 Management.
Forest Service, Wildland Fire          up to $50,000..........  Secretary of the         up to $50,000
 Management, Administrative Provision.                           Interior.
Forest Service, Wildland Fire          1,950,000..............
 Management.
Forest Service, Administrative         not specified..........  Department of the        not specified
 Provisions.                                                     Interior, Bureau of
                                                                 Land Management.
Forest Service, Administrative         up to $82,000..........  USDA, Working Capital    up to $82,000
 Provisions.                                                     Fund.
Forest Service, Administrative         up to $14,500..........  USDA, Greenbook........  up to $14,500
 Provisions.
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

   DISCLOSURE OF EARMARKS AND CONGRESSIONALLY DIRECTED SPENDING ITEMS

    Neither the bill nor the report contains any congressional 
earmarks, limited tax benefits, or limited tariff benefits as 
defined by clause 9 of rule XXI.

          Compliance With Rule XIII, Cl. 3(e) (Ramseyer Rule)

  In compliance with clause 3(e) of rule XIII of the Rules of 
the House of Representatives, changes in existing law made by 
the bill, as reported, are shown as follows (existing law 
proposed to be omitted is enclosed in black brackets, new 
matter is printed in italics, existing law in which no change 
is proposed is shown in roman):

                      TITLE 31, UNITED STATES CODE



           *       *       *       *       *       *       *
SUBTITLE V--GENERAL ASSISTANCE ADMINISTRATION

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


CHAPTER 69--PAYMENT FOR ENTITLEMENT LAND

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


Sec. 6906. Funding

  For [fiscal year 2019] fiscal year 2020--
          (1) each county or other eligible unit of local 
        government shall be entitled to payment under this 
        chapter; and
          (2) sums shall be made available to the Secretary of 
        the Interior for obligation or expenditure in 
        accordance with this chapter.

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

                              ----------                              


                 CONSOLIDATED APPROPRIATIONS ACT, 2005

(Public Law 108-447)

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


DIVISION J--OTHER MATTERS

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


TITLE V--NATIONAL AVIATION HERITAGE AREA

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


SEC. 512. SUNSET PROVISION

  The authority of the Secretary to provide assistance under 
this title terminates [on the date that is 15 years after the 
date that funds are first made available for this title.] after 
September 30, 2022.

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


TITLE VI--OIL REGION NATIONAL HERITAGE AREA

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


SEC. 608. SUNSET.

  The Secretary may not make any grant or provide any 
assistance under this title after [the expiration of the 15-
year period beginning on the date that funds are first made 
available for this title.] September 30, 2022.

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

                              ----------                              


                   SECTION 109 OF PUBLIC LAW 103-449

SEC. 109. AUTHORIZATION OF APPROPRIATIONS.

  (a) In General.--There is authorized to be appropriated under 
this title not more than $1,000,000 for any fiscal year. Not 
more than a total of [$15,000,000] $17,000,000 may be 
appropriated for the Corridor under this title after the date 
of the enactment of the Quinebaug and Shetucket Rivers Valley 
National Heritage Corridor Reauthorization Act of 1999.
  (b) Fifty Percent Match.--Federal funding provided under this 
title may not exceed 50 percent of the total cost of any 
assistance or grant provided or authorized under this title.
                              ----------                              


  SECTION 608 OF THE OMNIBUS PARKS AND PUBLIC LANDS MANAGEMENT ACT OF 
                                  1996

                          (Public Law 104-333)

SEC. 608. AUTHORIZATION OF APPROPRIATIONS.

  (a)  In General.--There is authorized to be appropriated 
under this title not more than $1,000,000 for any fiscal year. 
Not more than a total of [$15,000,000] $17,000,000 may be 
appropriated for the Corridor under this title.
  (b) 50 Percent Match.--Federal funding provided under this 
title, after the designation of this Corridor, may not exceed 
50 percent of the total cost of any assistance or grant 
provided or authorized under this title.
                              ----------                              


                           PUBLIC LAW 106-554



           *       *       *       *       *       *       *
TITLE VIII--ERIE CANALWAY NATIONAL HERITAGE CORRIDOR

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


SEC. 810. AUTHORIZATION OF APPROPRIATIONS.

  (a) In General.--
          (1) Corridor.--There is authorized to be appropriated 
        for the Corridor not more than $1,000,000 for any 
        fiscal year, to remain available until expended. Not 
        more than a total of [$12,000,000] $14,000,000 may be 
        appropriated for the Corridor under this title.
          (2) Matching requirement.--Federal funding provided 
        under this paragraph may not exceed 50 percent of the 
        total cost of any activity carried out with such funds. 
        The non-Federal share of such support may be in the 
        form of cash, services, or in-kind contributions, 
        fairly valued.
  (b) Other Funding.--In addition to the sums authorized in 
subsection (a), there are authorized to be appropriated to the 
Secretary of the Interior such sums as are necessary for the 
Secretary for planning and technical assistance.

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

                              ----------                              


     DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR, ENVIRONMENT, AND RELATED AGENCIES 
                        APPROPRIATIONS ACT, 2006

(Public Law 109-54)

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


TITLE II--ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


                       ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISIONS

  For fiscal year 2006, notwithstanding 31 U.S.C. 6303(1) and 
6305(1), the Administrator of the Environmental Protection 
Agency, in carrying out the Agency's function to implement 
directly Federal environmental programs required or authorized 
by law in the absence of an acceptable tribal program, may 
award cooperative agreements to federally-recognized Indian 
Tribes or Intertribal consortia, if authorized by their member 
Tribes, to assist the Administrator in implementing Federal 
environmental programs for Indian Tribes required or authorized 
by law, except that no such cooperative agreements may be 
awarded from funds designated for State financial assistance 
agreements.
  The Administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency is 
authorized to collect and obligate pesticide registration 
service fees in accordance with section 33 of the Federal 
Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act (as added by 
subsection (f)(2) of the Pesticide Registration Improvement Act 
of 2003), as amended.
  Notwithstanding CERCLA 104(k)(4)(B)(i)(IV), appropriated 
funds for fiscal year 2006 may be used to award grants or loans 
under section 104(k) of CERCLA to eligible entities that 
satisfy all of the elements set forth in CERCLA section 101(40) 
to qualify as a bona fide prospective purchaser except that the 
date of acquisition of the property was prior to the date of 
enactment of the Small Business Liability Relief and Brownfield 
Revitalization Act of 2001.
  For fiscal years 2006 through [2020] 2025, the Administrator 
may, after consultation with the Office of Personnel 
Management, employ up to fifty persons at any one time in the 
Office of Research and Development under the authority provided 
in 42 U.S.C. 209.
  Beginning in fiscal year 2006 and thereafter, and 
notwithstanding section 306 of the Toxic Substances Control 
Act, the Federal share of the cost of radon program activities 
implemented with Federal assistance under section 306 shall not 
exceed 60 percent in the third and subsequent grant years.

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

                              ----------                              


     DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR, ENVIRONMENT, AND RELATED AGENCIES 
                        APPROPRIATIONS ACT, 2012

(Public Law 112-74)

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


   DIVISION E--DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR, ENVIRONMENT, AND RELATED 
AGENCIES APPROPRIATIONS ACT, 2012

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


                                TITLE IV

GENERAL PROVISIONS

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


                        CONTRACTING AUTHORITIES

  Sec. 412. In awarding a Federal contract with funds made 
available by this Act, notwithstanding Federal Government 
procurement and contracting laws, the Secretary of Agriculture 
and the Secretary of the Interior (the ``Secretaries'') may, in 
evaluating bids and proposals, through [fiscal year 2020] 
fiscal year 2021, give consideration to local contractors who 
are from, and who provide employment and training for, 
dislocated and displaced workers in an economically 
disadvantaged rural community, including those historically 
timber-dependent areas that have been affected by reduced 
timber harvesting on Federal lands and other forest-dependent 
rural communities isolated from significant alternative 
employment opportunities:  Provided, That notwithstanding 
Federal Government procurement and contracting laws the 
Secretaries may award contracts, grants or cooperative 
agreements to local non-profit entities, Youth Conservation 
Corps or related partnerships with State, local or non-profit 
youth groups, or small or micro-business or disadvantaged 
business:  Provided further, That the contract, grant, or 
cooperative agreement is for forest hazardous fuels reduction, 
watershed or water quality monitoring or restoration, wildlife 
or fish population monitoring, road decommissioning, trail 
maintenance or improvement, or habitat restoration or 
management:  Provided further, That the terms ``rural 
community'' and ``economically disadvantaged'' shall have the 
same meanings as in section 2374 of Public Law 101-624 (16 
U.S.C. 6612):  Provided further, That the Secretaries shall 
develop guidance to implement this section:  Provided further, 
That nothing in this section shall be construed as relieving 
the Secretaries of any duty under applicable procurement laws, 
except as provided in this section.

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

                              ----------                              


    FOREST SERVICE FACILITY REALIGNMENT AND ENHANCEMENT ACT OF 2005



           *       *       *       *       *       *       *
TITLE V--FOREST SERVICE FACILITY REALIGNMENT AND ENHANCEMENT

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


SEC. 503. AUTHORIZATION FOR CONVEYANCE OF FOREST SERVICE ADMINISTRATIVE 
                    SITES.

  (a) Conveyances Authorized.--In the manner provided by this 
title, the Secretary may convey an administrative site, or an 
interest in an administrative site, that is under the 
jurisdiction of the Secretary.
  (b) Means of Conveyance.--The conveyance of an administrative 
site under this title may be made--
          (1) by sale;
          (2) by lease;
          (3) by exchange;
          (4) by a combination of sale and exchange; or
          (5) by such other means as the Secretary considers 
        appropriate.
  (c) Size of Conveyance.--An administrative site or compound 
of administrative sites disposed of in a single conveyance 
under this title may not exceed 40 acres.
  (d) Certain Lands Excluded.--The following Federal land may 
not be conveyed under this title:
          (1) Any land within a unit of the National Forest 
        System that is exclusively designated for natural area 
        or recreational purposes.
          (2) Any land included within the National Wilderness 
        Preservation System, the Wild and Scenic River System, 
        or a National Monument.
          (3) Any land that the Secretary determines--
                  (A) is needed for resource management 
                purposes or to provide access to other land or 
                water;
                  (B) is surrounded by National Forest System 
                land or other publicly owned land, if 
                conveyance would not be in the public interest 
                due to the creation of a non-Federal inholding 
                that would preclude the efficient management of 
                the surrounding land; or
                  (C) would be in the public interest to 
                retain.
  (e) Congressional Notifications.--
          (1) Notice of anticipated use of authority.--As part 
        of the annual budget justification documents provided 
        to the Committee on Appropriations of the House of 
        Representatives and the Committee on Appropriations of 
        the Senate, the Secretary shall include--
                  (A) a list of the anticipated conveyances to 
                be made, including the anticipated revenue that 
                may be obtained, using the authority provided 
                by this title or other conveyance authorities 
                available to the Secretary;
                  (B) a discussion of the intended purposes of 
                any new revenue obtained using this authority 
                or other conveyance authorities available to 
                the Secretary, and a list of any individual 
                projects that exceed $500,000; and
                  (C) a presentation of accomplishments of 
                previous years using this authority or other 
                conveyance authorities available to the 
                Secretary.
          (2) Notice of changes to conveyance list.--If the 
        Secretary proposes to convey an administrative site 
        under this title or using other conveyance authorities 
        available to the Secretary and the administrative site 
        is not included on a list provided under paragraph 
        (1)(A), the Secretary shall submit to the congressional 
        committees specified in paragraph (3) written notice of 
        the proposed conveyance, including the anticipated 
        revenue that may be obtained from the conveyance.
          (3) Notice of use of authority.--At least once a 
        year, the Secretary shall submit to the Committee on 
        Agriculture, the Committee on Appropriations, and the 
        Committee on Resources of the House of Representatives 
        and the Committee on Agriculture, Nutrition, and 
        Forestry, the Committee on Appropriations, and the 
        Committee on Energy and Natural Resources of the Senate 
        a report containing a description of all conveyances of 
        National Forest System land made by the Secretary under 
        this title or other conveyance authorities during the 
        period covered by the report.
  (f) Duration of Authority.--The authority of the Secretary to 
initiate the conveyance of an administrative site under this 
title expires on September 30, [2019] 2020.
  (g) Repeal of Pilot Conveyance Authority.--Effective 
September 30, 2006, section 329 of the Department of the 
Interior and Related Agencies Appropriations Act, 2002 (16 
U.S.C. 580d note; Public Law 107-63), is repealed. 
Notwithstanding the repeal of such section, the Secretary may 
complete the conveyance under such section of any 
administrative site whose conveyance was initiated under such 
section before that date.

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

                              ----------                              


                       JOHN F. KENNEDY CENTER ACT



           *       *       *       *       *       *       *
SEC. 13. AUTHORIZATION OF APPROPRIATIONS.

  [(a) Maintenance, Repair, and Security.--There is authorized 
to be appropriated to the Board to carry out section 
4(a)(1)(H), $24,490,000 for fiscal year 2019.
  [(b) Capital Projects.--There is authorized to be 
appropriated to the Board to carry out subparagraphs (F) and 
(G) of section 4(a)(1), $16,800,000 for fiscal year 2019.]
  (a) Maintenance, Repair, and Security.--There is authorized 
to be appropriated to the Board to carry out section 
4(a)(1)(H), $25,690,000 for fiscal year 2020.
  (b) Capital Projects.--There is authorized to be appropriated 
to the Board to carry out subparagraphs (F) and (G) of section 
4(a)(1), $17,800,000 for fiscal year 2020.
  (c) John F. Kennedy Center Plaza.--There is authorized to be 
appropriated to the Secretary of Transportation for capital 
costs incurred in the planning, design, engineering, and 
construction of the project authorized by section 12 (including 
roadway improvements related to the North and South 
Interchanges and construction of the John F. Kennedy Center 
Plaza, but not including construction of any buildings on the 
plaza) a total of $400,000,000 for fiscal years 2003 through 
2010. Such sums shall remain available until expended.
  (d) Photovoltaic System.--There are authorized to be 
appropriated to the Board such sums as are necessary to carry 
out section 7, to remain available until expended.
  (e) Limitation on Use of Funds.--No funds appropriated 
pursuant to this section may be used for any direct expense 
incurred in the production of a performing arts attraction, for 
personnel who are involved in performing arts administration 
(including any supply or equipment used by the personnel), or 
for production, staging, public relations, marketing, 
fundraising, ticket sales, or education. Funds appropriated 
directly to the Board shall not affect nor diminish other 
Federal funds sought for any performing arts function and may 
be used to reimburse the Board for that portion of costs that 
are Federal costs reasonably allocated to building services and 
theater maintenance and repair.

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

                              ----------                              


                FEDERAL LANDS RECREATION ENHANCEMENT ACT

TITLE VIII--FEDERAL LANDS RECREATION ENHANCEMENT ACT

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


SEC. 810. SUNSET PROVISION.

  The authority of the Secretary to carry out this Act shall 
terminate [September 30, 2019] September 30, 2021.

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


                 CHANGES IN APPLICATION OF EXISTING LAW

    Pursuant to clause 3(f)(1)(A) of rule XIII of the Rules of 
the House of Representatives, the following statements are 
submitted describing the effect of provisions in the 
accompanying bill, which directly or indirectly change the 
application of existing law. In most instances these provisions 
have been included in prior appropriations Acts.
    The bill includes the following changes in application of 
existing law:

                              OVERALL BILL

    Providing that certain appropriations remain available 
until expended, or extending the availability of funds beyond 
the fiscal year where programs or projects are continuing but 
for which legislation does not specifically authorize such 
extended availability. This authority tends to result in 
savings by preventing the practice of committing funds on low 
priority projects at the end of the fiscal year to avoid losing 
the funds.
    Limiting, in certain instances, the obligation of funds for 
particular functions or programs. These limitations include 
restrictions on the obligation of funds for administrative 
expenses, travel expenses, the use of consultants, and 
programmatic areas within the overall jurisdiction of a 
particular agency.
    Limiting official entertainment or reception and 
representation expenses for selected agencies in the bill.
    Continuing ongoing activities of certain critical Federal 
agencies or programs, which require re-authorization or other 
legislation which has not been enacted.

                  TITLE I--DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR


                       Bureau of Land Management


                   MANAGEMENT OF LANDS AND RESOURCES

    Providing funds to the Bureau for the management of lands 
and resources.
    Permitting the use of fees for processing applications for 
permit to drill.
    Permitting the use of mining fee collections for program 
operations.
    Permitting the use of fees from communication site rentals.

                            LAND ACQUISITION

    Requiring that funding for the program is derived from the 
Land and Water Conservation Fund.

                   OREGON AND CALIFORNIA GRANT LANDS

    Providing funds for the Oregon and California Grant Lands.
    Authorizing the transfer of certain collections from the 
Oregon and California Land Grants Fund to the Treasury.

                           RANGE IMPROVEMENTS

    Allowing certain funds to be transferred to the Department 
of the Interior for range improvements.

               SERVICE CHARGES, DEPOSITS, AND FORFEITURES

    Allowing the use of certain collected funds for certain 
administrative costs and operation of termination of certain 
facilities.
    Allowing the use of funds on any damaged public lands.
    Authorizing the Secretary to use monies from forfeitures, 
compromises or settlements for improvement, protection and 
rehabilitation of public lands under certain conditions.

                       MISCELLANEOUS TRUST FUNDS

    Allowing certain contributed funds to be advanced for 
administrative costs and other activities of the Bureau.

                       ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISIONS

    Permitting the Bureau to enter into agreements with public 
and private entities, including States.
    Permitting the Bureau to manage improvements to which the 
United States has title.
    Permitting the payment of rewards for information on 
violations of law on Bureau lands.
    Providing for cost-sharing arrangements for printing 
services.
    Permitting the Bureau to conduct certain projects for State 
governments on a reimbursable basis.
    Prohibiting the use of funds for the destruction of wild 
horses and burros.

                United States Fish and Wildlife Service


                          RESOURCE MANAGEMENT

    Provides funding for Endangered Species Act programs with a 
specified limitation.

                            LAND ACQUISITION

    Requiring that funding shall be derived from the Land and 
Water Conservation Fund.
    Providing that funding for projects may not be used for 
administrative costs.

            COOPERATIVE ENDANGERED SPECIES CONSERVATION FUND

    Providing that a portion of the appropriation shall be 
derived from the Land and Water Conservation Fund.

                    STATE AND TRIBAL WILDLIFE GRANTS

    Providing for a State and Tribal wildlife grants program.

                       ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISIONS

    Providing that programs may be carried out by direct 
expenditure, contracts, grants, cooperative agreements and 
reimbursable agreements with public and private entities.
    Providing for repair of damage to public roads.
    Providing options for the purchase of land not to exceed 
$1.
    Permitting cost-shared arrangements for printing services.
    Permitting the acceptance of donated aircraft.
    Providing that fees collected for non-toxic shot review and 
approval shall be available without further appropriation for 
the expenses of non-toxic shot review related expenses.

                         National Park Service


                 OPERATION OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM

    Designating funds for Everglades restoration.
    Providing for repair, rehabilitation and maintenance of 
National Park Service assets.

                  National Recreation and Preservation

    Providing for expenses not otherwise provided for.

                         Historic Preservation

    Providing for expenses derived from the Historic 
Preservation Fund.

                              Construction

    Providing funds for construction, improvements, repair or 
replacement of physical facilities, and management planning and 
compliance for areas administered by the National Park Service.
    Providing that a single procurement may be issued for any 
project funded in fiscal year 2020 with a future phase 
indicated in the National Park Service 5-year Line Item 
Construction Plan.
    Providing that the solicitation and contract shall contain 
the availability of funds clause.
    Providing that fees may be made available for the cost of 
adjustments and changes within the original scope of effort for 
projects funded by the Construction appropriation.
    Providing that the Secretary of the Interior shall consult 
with the Committees on Appropriations in accordance with 
reprogramming thresholds prior to making any changes authorized 
by this section.

                 LAND ACQUISITION AND STATE ASSISTANCE

    Requiring that funding for the program is derived from the 
Land and Water Conservation Fund.

                          CENTENNIAL CHALLENGE

    Providing funds for Centennial Challenge projects with no 
less than 50 percent of the cost of each project derived from 
non-Federal sources.

                       ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISIONS

    Allowing certain franchise fees to be available for 
expenditure without further appropriation to extinguish or 
reduce liability for certain possessory interests.
    Providing for the retention of administrative costs under 
certain Land and Water Conservation Fund programs.
    Allowing National Park Service funds to be transferred to 
the Federal Highway Administration for purposes authorized 
under 23 U.S.C. 204 for reasonable administrative support 
costs.

                    United States Geological Survey


                 SURVEYS, INVESTIGATIONS, AND RESEARCH

    Providing funds to classify lands as to their mineral and 
water resources.
    Providing funds to give engineering supervision to power 
permittees and Federal Energy Regulatory Commission licensees.
    Providing funds to publish and disseminate data relative to 
the foregoing activities.
    Limiting funds for the conduct of new surveys on private 
property without permission.
    Limiting funds for cooperative topographic mapping or water 
resource data collection and investigations.

                       ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISIONS

    Allowing funds to be used for certain contracting, 
construction, maintenance, acquisition, and representation 
expenses.
    Permitting the use of certain contracts, grants, and 
cooperative agreements.
    Recognizing students and recent graduates as Federal 
employees for the purposes of travel and work injury 
compensation.

                   Bureau of Ocean Energy Management

    Permitting funds for granting and administering mineral 
leases and environmental study; enforcing laws and contracts; 
and for matching grants.
    Providing that funds may be used which shall be derived 
from non-refundable cost recovery fees collected in 2020.
    Permitting the use of certain excess receipts from Outer 
Continental Shelf leasing activities.
    Providing for reasonable expenses related to volunteer 
beach and marine cleanup activities.

             Bureau of Safety and Environmental Enforcement

    Permitting funds for granting and administering mineral 
leases and environmental study; enforcing laws and contracts; 
and for matching grants.
    Providing that funds may be used which shall be derived 
from non-refundable cost recovery fees.
    Permitting the use of certain excess receipts from Outer 
Continental Shelf leasing activities.
    Permitting the use of funds derived from non-refundable 
inspection fees.
    Requiring that not less than 50 percent of inspection fees 
expended be used on personnel, expanding capacity and reviewing 
applications for permit to drill.

                           OIL SPILL RESEARCH

    Providing that funds shall be derived from the Oil Spill 
Liability Trust Fund.

          Office of Surface Mining Reclamation and Enforcement


                       REGULATION AND TECHNOLOGY

    Permitting payment to State and Tribal personnel for travel 
and per diem expenses for training.
    Allowing that certain funds made available under title V of 
Public Law 95-87 may be used for any required non-Federal share 
of the cost of certain projects.
    Permitting the use of certain offsetting collections from 
permit fees.

                    ABANDONED MINE RECLAMATION FUND

    Allowing the use of debt recovery to pay for debt 
collection.
    Allowing that certain funds made available under title IV 
of Public Law 95-87 may be used for any required non-Federal 
share of the cost of certain projects.
    Allowing funds to be used for travel expenses of State and 
Tribal personnel while attending certain OSM training.
    Providing that funds shall be used for economic and 
community development in conjunction with reclamation 
priorities.

                        Bureau of Indian Affairs


                      OPERATION OF INDIAN PROGRAMS

    Limiting funds for official reception and representation 
expenses.
    Limiting funds for welfare assistance payments, except for 
disaster relief.
    Allowing Tribal priority allocation funds to be used for 
unmet welfare assistance costs.
    Allowing the transfer of certain forestry funds.
    Allowing the use of funds to purchase uniforms or other 
identifying articles of clothing for personnel.

                         CONTRACT SUPPORT COSTS

    Providing for such sums as are necessary to fully fund 
contract support costs.
    Prohibiting the transfer of funds provided for contract 
support costs to any other account.

                              CONSTRUCTION

    Providing for the transfer of Navajo irrigation project 
funds to the Bureau of Reclamation.
    Providing that six percent of Federal Highway Trust Fund 
contract authority may be used for construction management 
costs.
    Providing Safety of Dams funds on a non-reimbursable basis.
    Allowing reimbursement of construction costs from the 
Office of Special Trustee.

                 INDIAN GUARANTEED LOAN PROGRAM ACCOUNT

    Limiting funds for administrative expenses and for 
subsidizing total loan principal.

                       ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISIONS

    Allowing the use of funds for direct expenditure, 
contracts, cooperative agreements, compacts, and grants.
    Allowing contracting for the San Carlos Irrigation Project.
    Limiting the use of funds for certain contracts, grants and 
cooperative agreements.
    Providing that there is no impact on the trust 
responsibility for Tribes that return appropriations.
    Specifying distribution of indirect and administrative 
costs for certain Tribes.

                       Bureau of Indian Education

    Providing forward-funding for school operations of Bureau-
funded schools and other education programs.
    Limiting funds for education-related administrative cost 
grants.
    Requiring the use of administrative and cost accounting 
principles for certain school construction projects and 
exempting such projects from certain requirements.
    Requiring conformance with building codes and health and 
safety standards.
    Specifying the procedure for dispute resolution.
    Limiting the control of construction projects when certain 
time frames have not been met.

                       ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISIONS

    Allowing the use of funds for direct expenditure, 
contracts, cooperative agreements, compacts, and grants.
    Limiting the use of funds for certain contracts, grants and 
cooperative agreements.
    Providing that there is no impact on the trust 
responsibility for Tribes that return appropriations.
    Prohibiting funding of Alaska schools.
    Limiting the number of schools and the expansion of grade 
levels in individual schools.
    Specifying distribution of indirect and administrative 
costs for certain Tribes.
    Limiting the expansion of satellite school locations.

                          Departmental Offices


             OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY, SALARIES AND EXPENSES

    Allowing the use of certain funds for official reception 
and representation expenses.
    Permitting payments to former Bureau of Mines workers.
    Designating funds for consolidated appraisal services to be 
derived from the Land and Water Conservation Fund.
    Designating funds for Indian land, mineral, and resource 
valuation activities.
    Permitting funds for Indian land, mineral, and resource 
valuation activities to be transferred to and merged with the 
Bureau of Indian Affairs ``Operation of Indian Programs'' and 
Bureau of Indian Education ``Operation of Indian Education 
Programs'' account and the Office of the Special Trustee for 
American Indians ``Federal Trust Programs'' account.
    Allowing funds to remain available until expended.

                       ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISIONS

    Allowing certain payments authorized for the Payments in 
Lieu of Taxes Program to be retained for administrative 
expenses.
    Providing that the amounts provided are the only amounts 
available for payments authorized under chapter 69 of title 31, 
United States Code.
    Providing that in the event sums appropriated are 
insufficient to make the full payments then the payment to each 
local government shall be made proportionally.
    Providing that the Secretary may make adjustments to 
payment to individual units of local government to correct for 
prior overpayments or underpayments.
    Providing that no Payments in Lieu of Taxes Program payment 
be made to otherwise eligible units of local government if the 
computed amount of the payment is less than $100.

                            Insular Affairs


                       ASSISTANCE TO TERRITORIES

    Designating funds for various programs and for salaries and 
expenses of the Office of Insular Affairs.
    Allowing audits of the financial transactions of the 
Territorial and Insular governments by the GAO.
    Providing grant funding under certain terms of the 
Agreement of the Special Representatives on Future United 
States Financial Assistance for the Northern Mariana Islands.
    Providing for capital infrastructure in various 
Territories.
    Allowing appropriations for disaster assistance to be used 
as non-Federal matching funds for hazard mitigation grants.

               ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISIONS, INSULAR AFFAIRS

    Allowing, at the request of the Governor of Guam, for 
certain discretionary or mandatory funds to be used to assist 
securing certain rural electrification loans through the U.S. 
Department of Agriculture.

             Office of Special Trustee for American Indians


                         FEDERAL TRUST PROGRAMS

    Limiting the amount of funding available for the historical 
accounting of Indian trust fund accounts.
    Allowing transfers to other Department of the Interior 
accounts.
    Providing no-year funding for certain Indian Self-
Determination Act grants.
    Exempting quarterly statements for Indian trust accounts 
$15 or less.
    Requiring annual statements and records maintenance for 
Indian trust accounts.
    Limiting use of funds to correct administrative errors in 
Indian trust accounts.
    Permitting the use of recoveries from erroneous payments 
pursuant to Indian trust accounts.
    Exempting reconciliation of Special Deposit Accounts with 
low balances in certain circumstances.
    Allowing for limited aggregation of trust accounts of 
individuals whose whereabouts are unknown.

                        DEPARTMENT-WIDE PROGRAMS


                        Wildland Fire Management

    Providing funds for wildland fire management.
    Permitting the repayments of funds transferred from other 
accounts for firefighting.
    Designating funds for hazardous fuels and burned area 
rehabilitation.
    Permitting the use of funds for lodging and subsistence of 
firefighters.
    Permitting the use of grants, contracts and cooperative 
agreements for hazardous fuels reduction, including cost-
sharing and local assistance.
    Permitting cost-sharing of cooperative agreements with non-
Federal entities under certain circumstances.
    Providing for local competition for hazardous fuel 
reduction activities.
    Permitting reimbursement to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife 
Service and the National Marine Fisheries Service for 
consultation activities under the Endangered Species Act.
    Providing certain terms for leases of real property with 
local governments.
    Providing for the transfer of funds between the Department 
of the Interior and the Department of Agriculture for wildland 
fire management.
    Providing funds for support of Federal emergency response 
actions.
    Allowing for international forestry assistance to or 
through the Department of State.

                    CENTRAL HAZARDOUS MATERIALS FUND

    Providing funds for response action, including associated 
activities, performed pursuant to the Comprehensive 
Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act.

                          WORKING CAPITAL FUND

    Allowing funds for the financial and business management 
system and information technology improvement.
    Prohibiting use of funds to establish reserves in the 
working capital fund with exceptions.
    Allowing assessments for reasonable charges for training 
services at the National Indian Program Center and use of these 
funds under certain conditions.
    Providing space and related facilities or the lease of 
related facilities, equipment or professional services of the 
National Indian Program Training Center to state, local and 
Tribal employees or other persons for cultural, educational or 
recreational activities.
    Providing that the Secretary may enter into grants and 
cooperative agreements to support the Office of Natural 
Resource Revenue's collection and disbursement of royalties, 
fees, and other mineral revenue proceeds, as authorized by law.

                        ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISION

    Allowing acquisition and sale of certain aircraft.

                  OFFICE OF NATURAL RESOURCES REVENUE

    Designating funds for mineral revenue management 
activities.
    Allowing certain refunds of overpayments in connection with 
certain Indian leases.

             GENERAL PROVISIONS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

    Allowing transfer of funds for certain reconstruction of 
facilities, aircraft or utilities in emergency situations.
    Allowing transfer of funds in certain emergency situations, 
including oil spill response, if other funds provided in other 
accounts will be exhausted within 30 days and a supplemental 
appropriation is requested as promptly as possible.
    Permitting the Department to use limited funding for 
certain services.
    Permitting the transfer of funds between the Bureau of 
Indian Affairs and Bureau of Indian Education and the Office of 
Special Trustee for American Indians and limiting amounts for 
historical accounting activities.
    Authorizing the redistribution of Tribal Priority 
Allocation funds to address unmet needs.
    Authorizing the acquisition of lands and leases for Ellis, 
Governors and Liberty Islands.
    Providing the authority for the Secretary to collect 
nonrefundable inspection fees.
    Requires Bureau of Safety and Environmental Enforcement and 
Bureau of Ocean Energy Management to disclose certain waivers.
    Permitting the Secretary of the Interior to enter into 
long-term agreements for wild horse and burro holding 
facilities.
    Requiring the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to mark 
hatchery salmon.
    Continuing a provision allowing the Bureau of Indian 
Affairs and Bureau of Indian Education to more efficiently and 
effectively perform reimbursable work.
    Permitting the transfer of excess wild horses and burros 
for work purposes.
    Continuing a provision allowing the establishment of the 
Department of the Interior Experienced Services Program.
    Extending the authority for the Secretary to accept public 
and private contributions for the orderly development and 
exploration of Outer Continental Shelf resources.
    Extending funding for Payments in Lieu of Taxes.
    Providing funds for payment to the Republic of the Marshall 
Islands.
    Requiring funds to be available for obligation within 60 
days of enactment.
    Prohibiting use of funds on certain activities before plan 
is published.
    Authorizing transfer of funds in accordance with 
reprogramming guidelines to split the Bureau of Indian 
Education and the Bureau of Indian Affairs.

               TITLE II--ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY


                         SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY

    Providing for operating expenses in support of research and 
development.
    Designating funding for National Priorities research as 
specified in the report accompanying this Act.

                 ENVIRONMENTAL PROGRAMS AND MANAGEMENT

    Allowing hire and maintenance of passenger motor vehicles 
and operation of aircraft and purchase of reprints and library 
memberships in societies or associations which issue 
publications to members only or at a price to members lower 
than to subscribers who are not members.
    Limiting amounts for official representation and reception 
expenses.
    Allowing application of certain offsetting fees collected 
under the Toxic Substances Control Act to be applied against 
appropriations provided for that purpose. Allocation of certain 
appropriated funds for the Chemical Risk Review and Reduction 
program project.
    Designating funding for National Priorities as specified in 
the report accompanying this Act.
    Designating funding for Geographical programs as specified 
in the report accompanying this Act.

                     HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCE SUPERFUND

    Allowing distribution of funds to purchase services from 
other agencies under certain circumstances.
    Allowing for the operation of aircraft.
    Providing for the transfer of funds within certain agency 
accounts.

                LEAKING UNDERGROUND STORAGE TANK PROGRAM

    Providing for grants to Federally-recognized Indian Tribes.

                        INLAND OIL SPILL PROGRAM

    Allowing for the operation of aircraft.

                   STATE AND TRIBAL ASSISTANCE GRANTS

    Limiting funding amounts for certain programs.
    Specifying funding for capitalization grants for the Clean 
Water and Drinking Water State Revolving Funds and allowing 
certain amounts for additional subsidies.
    Designating funds for specific sections of law.
    Providing waivers for certain uses of Clean Water and 
Drinking Water State Revolving Funds for State administrative 
costs for grants to federally-recognized Indian Tribes and 
grants to specific Territories and Freely Associated States.
    Requiring that 10 percent Clean Water and 14 percent of 
Drinking Water funds shall be used by States for forgiveness of 
principal or negative interest loans.
    Prohibiting the use of funds for jurisdictions that permit 
development or construction of additional colonia areas.
    Requiring state matching funds for certain grants to Alaska 
Native Villages, and specifying certain allocation of funds.
    Limiting the portion of grant funding that can be provided 
for brownfields planning, and requiring a minimum percentage of 
grants to persistent poverty communities.
    Providing certain grants under authority of Section 103, 
Clean Air Act.
    Providing funding for environmental information exchange 
network initiatives grants, statistical surveys of water 
resources and enhancements to State monitoring programs, Tribal 
grants, and underground storage tank projects.

                       ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISIONS

    Allowing awards of grants to federally-recognized Indian 
Tribes.
    Authorizing the collection and obligation of pesticide 
registration service fees.
    Authorizing the collection and obligations of TSCA fees.
    Authorizing the collection and obligations of Electronic 
Manifest fees.
    Allowing the transfer of funds from the ``Environmental 
Programs and Management'' account to support the Great Lakes 
Restoration Initiative and providing for certain interagency 
agreements and grants to various entities in support of this 
effort.
    Providing amounts for construction, alteration, repair, 
rehabilitation, and renovation of facilities.
    Providing for grants to federally recognized Tribes.
    Providing amounts for competitive grants under the National 
Estuary Program.
    Extending the authority for hiring scientists under Title 
42 special hiring authority.

                      TITLE III--RELATED AGENCIES


                             Forest Service


  OFFICE OF THE UNDER SECRETARY FOR NATURAL RESOURCES AND ENVIRONMENT

    Providing funds for the office of the Under Secretary for 
Natural Resources and Environment.

                       FOREST SERVICE OPERATIONS

    Providing funds for Forest Service Operations.

                     FOREST AND RANGELAND RESEARCH

    Providing funds for forest and rangeland research.
    Designating funds for the forest inventory and analysis 
program.

                       STATE AND PRIVATE FORESTRY

    Providing for forest health management, including 
treatments of certain pests or invasive plants, and for 
restoring damaged forests, and for cooperative forestry, 
education and land conservation activities, and conducting an 
international program.
    Deriving certain funds from the Land and Water Conservation 
Fund.

                         NATIONAL FOREST SYSTEM

    Providing funds for the National Forest System.
    Depositing funds in the Collaborative Forest Landscape 
Restoration Fund.
    Designating funds for forest products.

                  CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT AND MAINTENANCE

    Providing funds for construction, reconstruction, and 
maintenance and acquisition of buildings and other facilities 
and infrastructure; and for construction, capital improvement, 
decommissioning, and maintenance of forest roads and trails.
    Requiring that funds becoming available in fiscal year 2020 
for the road and trails fund (16 U.S.C. 501) shall be 
transferred to the Treasury.

                            LAND ACQUISITION

    Requiring that funding for the program is derived from the 
Land and Water Conservation Fund.

         ACQUISITION OF LANDS FOR NATIONAL FORESTS SPECIAL ACTS

    Requiring that funding for the program is derived from 
forest receipts.

            ACQUISITION OF LANDS TO COMPLETE LAND EXCHANGES

    Requiring that funding for the program is derived from 
funds deposited by State, county, or municipal governments and 
non-Federal parties pursuant to Land Sale and Exchange Acts.

                         RANGE BETTERMENT FUND

    Providing that fifty percent of monies received for grazing 
fees shall be used for range improvements and limiting 
administrative expenses to six percent.

                     GIFTS, DONATIONS AND BEQUESTS

    Providing for gifts, donations and bequest per Federal law.

          MANAGEMENT OF NATIONAL FORESTS FOR SUBSISTENCE USES

    Providing funds for subsistence uses per the Alaska 
National Interest Lands Conservation Act.

                        WILDLAND FIRE MANAGEMENT

    Permitting the use of funds for emergency rehabilitation 
and to support emergency response and wildfire suppression.
    Allowing the use of wildland fire funds to repay advances 
from other accounts.
    Allowing reimbursement of States for certain wildfire 
emergency activities.
    Designating funds for suppression.
    Providing for cooperative agreements and grants.

                       ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISIONS

    Permitting the purchase of passenger motor vehicles and 
proceeds from the sale of aircraft may be used to purchase 
replacement aircraft.
    Allowing funds for certain employment contracts.
    Allowing funds to be used for purchase and alteration of 
buildings.
    Allowing for acquisition of certain lands and interests.
    Allowing expenses for certain volunteer activities.
    Providing for the cost of uniforms.
    Providing for debt collections on certain contracts.
    Limiting the transfer of wildland fire management funds 
between the Department of the Interior and the Department of 
Agriculture.
    Allowing funds to be used through the Agency for 
International Development for work in foreign countries and to 
support other forestry activities outside of the United States.
    Allowing the Forest Service, acting for the International 
Program, to sign certain funding agreements with foreign 
governments and institutions as well as with certain domestic 
agencies.
    Authorizing the expenditure or transfer of funds for wild 
horse and burro activities.
    Prohibiting the transfer of funds under the Department of 
Agriculture transfer authority under certain conditions.
    Limiting the transfer of funds for the Working Capital Fund 
and Department Reimbursable Program (also known as Greenbook 
charges).
    Limiting funds to support the Youth Conservation Corps and 
Public Lands Corps.
    Limiting the use of funds for official reception and 
representation expenses.
    Providing for matching funds for the National Forest 
Foundation.
    Allowing funds to be used for technical assistance for 
rural communities.
    Allowing funds for payments to counties in the Columbia 
River Gorge National Scenic Area.
    Allowing funds to be used for the Older Americans Act.
    Permitting funding assessments for facilities maintenance, 
rent, utilities, and other support services.
    Prohibiting the use of funds for the destruction of wild 
horses and burros.
    Limiting funds to reimburse the Office of General Counsel 
at the Department of Agriculture.
    Permitting eligible employees to be considered a Federal 
Employee.
    Requiring regular reporting of unobligated balances.

                         Indian Health Service


                         INDIAN HEALTH SERVICES

    Providing that Tribal contract and grant funding is deemed 
obligated at the time of grant or contract award and remains 
available until expended.
    Providing no-year funds for contract medical care including 
the Indian Catastrophic Health Emergency Fund.
    Providing for loan repayment under sections 104 and 108 of 
the Indian Health Care Improvement Act with certain conditions 
and making the funds available for certain other purposes.
    Providing for operational funds for leased space and 
accreditation emergencies.
    Providing that scholarship funds recovered for breach of 
contract shall be deposited into a Fund and remain available 
until expended.
    Providing that certain contracts and grants may be 
performed in two fiscal years.
    Providing for use of collections and reporting of 
collections under Title IV of the Indian Health Care 
Improvement Act.
    Providing no-year funding for scholarship funds.
    Providing for the collection of individually identifiable 
health information relating to the Americans with Disabilities 
Act by the Bureau of Indian Affairs.
    Permitting the use of Indian Health Care Improvement Fund 
monies for facilities improvement and providing no-year funding 
availability.

                         CONTRACT SUPPORT COSTS

    Providing for such sums as are necessary to fully fund 
contract support costs.
    Prohibiting the transfer of funds provided for contract 
support costs to any other account.

                        INDIAN HEALTH FACILITIES

    Providing that facilities funds may be used to purchase 
land, modular buildings and trailers.
    Providing for TRANSAM equipment to be purchased from the 
Department of Defense.
    Prohibiting the use of funds for sanitation facilities for 
new homes funded by the Department of Housing and Urban 
Development.

                       ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISIONS

    Providing for per diem expenses for senior level positions.
    Providing for payments for telephone service in private 
residences in the field, purchase of motor vehicles, aircraft 
and reprints.
    Providing for purchase and erection of modular buildings.
    Providing funds for uniforms.
    Allowing funding to be used for attendance at professional 
meetings.
    Providing that health care may be extended to non-Indians 
at Indian Health Service facilities, subject to charges, and 
for the expenditure of collected funds.
    Providing for transfers of funds from the Department of 
Housing and Urban Development to the Indian Health Service.
    Prohibiting limitations on certain Federal travel and 
transportation expenses.
    Requiring departmental assessments to be identified in 
annual budget justifications.
    Allowing de-obligation and re-obligation of funds applied 
to self-governance funding agreements.
    Prohibiting the expenditure of funds to implement new 
eligibility regulations.
    Permitting certain reimbursements for goods and services 
provided to Tribes.
    Providing that reimbursements for training, technical 
assistance, or services include total costs.
    Allowing housing allowances for civilian medical personnel.
    Prohibiting changes in organizational structure without 
advance notification to Congress.

            Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry


            TOXIC SUBSTANCES AND ENVIRONMENTAL PUBLIC HEALTH

    Providing for the conduct of health studies, testing, and 
monitoring.
    Limiting the number of toxicological profiles.

                   Executive Office of the President


  COUNCIL ON ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY AND OFFICE OF ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY

    Limiting the use of funds for official reception and 
representation expenses.
    Designating the appointment and duties of the chairman.

             CHEMICAL SAFETY AND HAZARD INVESTIGATION BOARD

    Permitting use of funds for hire of passenger vehicles, 
uniforms or allowances with per diem rate limitations.
    Limiting the number of senior level positions.
    Designating the individual appointed to the position of 
Inspector General of the Environmental Protection Agency as the 
Inspector General of the Board.
    Directing use of personnel and limiting position 
appointments within the Board.

              Office of Navajo and Hopi Indian Relocation

    Providing that funds in this and prior appropriations Acts 
shall be used to relocate persons certified as eligible.
    Providing that no person can be evicted unless a 
replacement home is provided.
    Providing that no relocatee is provided with more than one 
new or replacement home.

                        Smithsonian Institution


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

    Limiting certain lease terms.
    Providing for purchase of passenger vehicles and certain 
rental, repair and cleaning of uniforms.
    Designating funds for certain programs and providing no-
year funds.
    Providing that funds may be used to support American 
overseas research centers.
    Allowing for advance payments to independent contractors 
performing research services or participating in official 
Smithsonian presentations.

                           FACILITIES CAPITAL

    Designating funds for maintenance, repair, rehabilitation, 
and construction and for consultant services.

                        National Gallery of Art


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

    Allowing payment in advance for membership in library, 
museum, and art associations or societies.
    Allowing for purchase, repair, and cleaning of uniforms for 
guards and employees and allowances therefor.
    Allowing purchase or rental of devices for protecting 
buildings and contents thereof, and maintenance, alteration, 
improvement, and repair of buildings, approaches, and grounds.
    Providing no-year funds for special exhibitions.
    Providing for restoration and repair of works of art by 
contract under certain circumstances.

            REPAIR, RESTORATION, AND RENOVATION OF BUILDINGS

    Providing lease agreements of no more than 10 years 
addressing space needs created by renovations under the Master 
Facilities Plan.
    Providing funds for construction design
    Permitting the Gallery to perform work by contract under 
certain circumstances.

             John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts


                       OPERATIONS AND MAINTENANCE

    Providing funds to the John F. Kennedy Center for the 
Performing Arts Kennedy Center for operational and maintenance 
costs.

                     CAPITAL REPAIR AND RESTORATION

    Providing funds to the John F. Kennedy Center for the 
Performing Arts Kennedy Center for facility repair.

            Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

    Providing funds to the Woodrow Wilson Center for Scholars.
    Allowing for hire of passenger vehicles and services.

                    National Endowment for the Arts


                       GRANTS AND ADMINISTRATION

    Providing funds for the support of projects and productions 
in the arts, including arts education and public outreach 
activities.

                 National Endowment for the Humanities


                       GRANTS AND ADMINISTRATION

    Specifying funds to carry out the matching grants program.
    Allowing obligation of National Endowment for the 
Humanities current and prior year funds from gifts, bequests, 
and devises of money for which equal amounts have not 
previously been appropriated.

  ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISIONS, NATIONAL FOUNDATION ON THE ARTS AND THE 
                               HUMANITIES

    Prohibiting the use of funds for grants and contracts which 
do not include the text of 18 U.S.C. 1913.
    Prohibiting the use of appropriated funds and permitting 
the use of non-appropriated funds for reception expenses.
    Allowing the chairperson of the National Endowment for the 
Arts to approve small grants under certain circumstances.

                        Commission of Fine Arts


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

    Permitting the charging and use of fees for its 
publications and accepting gifts related to the history of the 
Nation's Capital.
    Providing that one-tenth of one percent of funds provided 
may be used for official reception and representation expenses.

               National Capital Arts and Cultural Affairs

    Providing funding for the National Capital Arts and 
Cultural Affairs.

                  National Capital Planning Commission

    Providing funding for the National Capital Planning 
Commission.
    Providing that one-quarter of one percent may be used for 
official reception and representational expenses.

                United States Holocaust Memorial Museum

    Designating funds for equipment replacement.
    Designating funds for repair, rehabilitation and for 
exhibition design and production and providing no year 
availability for these funds.

                Dwight D. Eisenhower Memorial Commission


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

    Providing funding for the Dwight D. Eisenhower Memorial 
Commission.

                   World War I Centennial Commission


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

    Providing funding for the World War I Centennial 
Commission.
    Providing that the Commission may accept support from any 
executive branch agency for activities of the Commission.

                      TITLE IV--GENERAL PROVISIONS

    Prohibiting the use of funds to promote or oppose 
legislative proposals on which congressional action is 
incomplete.
    Providing for annual appropriations unless expressly 
provided otherwise in this Act.
    Providing for disclosure of administrative expenses, 
assessments and requirements for operating plans.
    Continuing a limitation on accepting and processing 
applications for patents and on the patenting of Federal lands; 
permitting processing of grandfathered applications; and 
permitting third-party contractors to process grandfathered 
applications.
    Continuing a provision regarding the payment of contract 
support costs for prior fiscal years.
    Addressing the payment of contract support costs for fiscal 
year 2020.
    Continuing a provision allowing Forest Service land 
management plans to be more than 15 years old if the Secretary 
is acting in good faith to update such plans and prohibiting 
the use of funds to implement new wilderness directives under 
the planning rule.
    Limiting leasing and preleasing activities within National 
Monuments.
    Limiting takings for acquisition of lands except under 
certain conditions.
    Prohibiting funds to enter into certain no-bid contracts 
except under certain conditions.
    Requiring reports to Congress to be posted on public agency 
websites.
    Continuing a provision that delineates grant guidelines for 
the National Endowment for the Arts.
    Continuing a provision that delineates program priorities 
for the programs managed by the National Endowment for the 
Arts.
    Requiring that the Department of the Interior, the EPA, the 
Forest Service, and the Indian Health Service provide the 
Committees on Appropriations a quarterly report on the status 
of balances of appropriations.
    Extending authorities for awarding contracts for certain 
activities on public lands.
    Extending certain authorities allowing the Forest Service 
to renew grazing permits.
    Prohibiting the use of funds to maintain or establish a 
computer network unless such network blocks the viewing, 
downloading, and exchanging of pornography.
    Extending the Forest Service Facility Realignment and 
Enhancement Act.
    Setting requirements for the use of American iron and steel 
for certain loans and grants.
    Extending by one year the authorization for the John F. 
Kennedy Center.
    Allowing the Secretary of the Interior to enter into 
training agreements and to transfer excess equipment and 
supplies for wildfires.
    Providing a one-year extension of the Federal Lands 
Recreation Enhancement Act.
    Established reprogramming guidelines in the bill.

                  Appropriations Not Authorized by Law

    Pursuant to clause 3(f)(1)(B) of rule XIII of the Rules of 
the House of Representatives, the following table lists the 
appropriations in the accompanying bill which are not 
authorized by law:

                                             [Dollars in Thousands]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                  Appropriations
                                         Last year of                              in last year   Appropriations
                                        authorization     Authorization level           of         in this bill
                                                                                   authorization
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Bureau of Land Management               .............  .........................  ..............  ..............
All discretionary programs............        2002     Such sums................      1,862,170       1,375,788
U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service........  .............  .........................  ..............  ..............
Coastal Barrier Resources Act of 1982;        2010     2,000....................          1,390           1,390
 amended by Improvement Act of 2000 &
 Reauthorization Act of 2005.
Endangered Species Act (16 U.S.C. 1531        1992     41,500...................         42,373        *287,503
 et seq.).
Marine Mammal Protection Act (16              1999     14,768...................          2,008           5,470
 U.S.C. 1361-1407).
National Aquaculture Development Act          2018     1,000....................            210             210
 (16 U.S.C 2801 et seq).
National Fish and Wildlife Foundation         2010     25,000...................          7,537           7,022
 Establishment Act (16 U.S.C. 3701 et
 seq.).
National Invasive Species Act (16             2002     6,000....................          6,000          26,301
 U.S.C. 4701 et seq.).
National Wildlife Refuge Volunteer            2014     2,000....................          1,705           2,092
 Improvement Act.
North American Wetlands Conservation          2012     75,000...................         35,554          50,000
 Act (16 U.S.C. 4401-4406).
Nutria Eradication and Control Act of         2008     4,000....................            500           1,725
 2003 (P.L. 108-16).
U.S. Geological Survey................  .............  .........................  ..............  ..............
Energy Resources Program (50 U.S.C.           2015     1,000....................            400             400
 167n, P.L. 113-40)--Helium
 Stewardship Act of 2013.
Science Synthesis, Analysis, and              2010     30,000...................          1,332          24,125
 Research (42 U.S.C. 15908 sec 351,
 P.L. 109-58).
Water Resources Research Act Program          2011     12,000...................          6,486          10,000
 (42 U.S.C. 10301--10303, P.L. 109-
 471).
Bureau of Indian Affairs..............  .............  .........................  ..............  ..............
Indian Child Protection and Family            1997     30,000...................         26,116          55,800
 Violence Prevention Act (25 U.S.C.
 3210, 104 Stat. 4531, P.L. 101 630,
 Title IV.).
Indian Tribal Justice Act, as amended         2015     58,400...................         28,517          77,781
 by TLOA (Tribal Law and Order Act of
 2010, P.L. 111-211).
The Higher Education Act of 1965 (20          2013     N/A......................         52,398          25,000
 U.S.C. 1001 et seq P.L. 110-315).
Tribally Controlled Colleges or               2013     N/A......................         64,947          86,696
 University Assistance Act of 1978 (20
 U.S.C. 1018 et seq P.L. 110-315).
The Higher Education Act of 1965 (25          2013     N/A......................          6,434          10,000
 USC 1862 (a) and (b)).
Office of Insular Affairs.............  .............  .........................  ..............  ..............
Brown Tree Snake Control and                  2010     No more than 3,000.......          3,500           3,500
 Eradication Act of 2004 (P.L. 108-
 384).
Environmental Protection Agency.......  .............  .........................  ..............  ..............
Clean Air Act.........................        1997     Such sums................        450,000         685,784
Hazardous Substance Superfund.........        1994     5,100....................      1,480,853       1,214,648
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


                                             [Dollars in Thousands]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                  Appropriations
                                         Last year of                              in last year   Appropriations
                                        authorization     Authorization level           of         in this bill
                                                                                   authorization
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Lake Champlain Basin..................        2008     11,000...................          3,000          11,000
Lake Pontchartrain Basin..............        2017     20,000...................          1,000             948
Chesapeake Bay Restoration............        2005     40,000...................         23,000          85,000
State and Tribal Assistance Grants      .............  .........................  ..............  ..............
Alaska and Rural Native Villages......        2010     13,000...................         10,000          20,000
Clean Water SRF.......................        1994     600,000..................      1,196,000       1,784,000
Diesel Emissions Reduction Grants.....        2016     100,000..................         50,000          50,000
Lead Containment Control Act of 1988..        1992     Such sums................         15,000          15,000
Mexico Border.........................        2011     NA.......................         17,000          30,000
Non-Point Source Management Program...        1991     130,000..................         51,000         175,915
Pollution Control.....................        1990     75,000...................         73,000         240,806
Pollution Prevention Act..............        1993     8,000....................          8,000           4,765
Radon Abatement Act...................        1991     10,000...................          9,000           8,051
Underground Storage Tanks.............        1988     25,000...................          7,000           1,498
State Hazardous Waste Program Grants..        1988     60,000...................         67,000          99,693
Toxic Substances Control Act..........        1983     1,500....................              0           4,919
Tribal General Assistance Program.....        1992     Such sums................              0          10,506
Underground Injection Control Grants..        2003     15,000...................         11,000          10,506
Council on Environmental Quality,             1986     480......................            670           2,994
 Office of Environmental Quality.
Office of Navajo and Hopi Indian              2008     30,000...................          9,000           7,500
 Relocation.
John F. Kennedy Center................        2018     36,400...................         40,515   ..............
National Endowment for the Arts.......        1993     Such sums................        174,460   ..............
National Endowment for the Humanities.        1993     Such sums................        177,413   ..............
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
*Appropriations in this bill for Endangered Species Act implementation are an estimate and this amount does not
  include Coastal Barrier Resources Act funding.

                   COMPARISON WITH BUDGET RESOLUTION

    Section 308(a)(1)(A) of the Congressional Budget Act 
requires the report accompanying a bill providing new budget 
authority to contain a statement comparing the levels in the 
bill to the suballocations submitted under section 302(b) of 
the Act for the most recently agreed to concurrent resolution 
on the budget for the applicable fiscal year.

                                            [In millions of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                         302(b) Allocation                   This Bill
                                                 ---------------------------------------------------------------
                                                      Budget                          Budget
                                                     Authority        Outlays        Authority        Outlays
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Comparison of amounts in the bill with Committee
 allocations to its subcommittees. Subcommittee
 on Interior, Environment, and Related Agencies
    Discretionary...............................          37,277          35,650       39,527\1\          37,778
    Mandatory...................................              64              65           64\1\              65
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
\1\Includes outlays from prior-year budget authority.
NOTE--Consistent with the funding recommended in the bill for wildfire suppression operations, in accordance
  with section 251(b)(2) of the Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit Control Act of 1985, and after the bill is
  reported to the House, the Chairman of the Committee on the Budget will provide a revised section 302(a)
  allocation reflecting an additional $2,250,000,000 in discretionary budget authority and outlays That new
  allocation will eliminate the technical difference prior to Floor consideration.

                      FIVE-YEAR OUTLAY PROJECTIONS

    In compliance with section 308(a)(1)(B) of the 
Congressional Budget and Impoundment Control Act of 1974 
(Public Law 93-344), as amended, the following table contains 
five-year projections associated with the budget authority 
provided in the accompanying bill.

                                            [In millions of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                                      Outlays
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Projection of outlays associated with the
 recommendation:
    2020........................................  ..............  ..............             \1\          25,820
    2021........................................  ..............  ..............  ..............           8,608
    2022........................................  ..............  ..............  ..............           3,310
    2023........................................  ..............  ..............  ..............           1,111
    2024 and future years.......................  ..............  ..............  ..............             264
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
\1\Excludes outlays from prior-year budget authority.

          FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE TO STATE AND LOCAL GOVERNMENTS

    In accordance with section 308(a)(1)(C) of the 
Congressional Budget Act of 1974, as amended, the Congressional 
Budget Office has provided the following estimates of new 
budget authority and outlays provided by the accompanying bill 
for financial assistance to State and local governments.

                        [In millions of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                              Budget
                                             Authority        Outlays
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Financial assistance to State and local         7,543\1\           2,272
 governments for 2020...................
------------------------------------------------------------------------
\1\Excludes outlays from prior-year budget authority.

                          PROGRAM DUPLICATION

    Pursuant to clause 3(c)(5) of rule XIII of the Rules of the 
House of Representatives, no provision of this bill establishes 
or reauthorizes a program of the Federal Government known to be 
duplicative of another Federal program, a program that was 
included in any report from the Government Accountability 
Office to Congress pursuant to section 21 of Public Law 111-
139, or a program related to a program identified in the most 
recent Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance.

                           Committee Hearings

    In compliance with Sec. 103(i) of H. Res. 6 (116th 
Congress) the following hearings were used to develop the 
fiscal year 2020 Interior, Environment, and Related Agencies 
Appropriations Bill:

------------------------------------------------------------------------
             Date                Title of Hearing        Witnesses
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Feb. 6, 2019..................  Government         Julia Matta, Managing
                                 Accountability     Associate General
                                 Office, The        Counsel, GAO; Sam
                                 Power of the       Berger, Vice
                                 Purse: A Review    President for
                                 of Agency          Democracy and
                                 Spending           Government Reform,
                                 Restrictions       Center for American
                                 During a           Progress; Phil
                                 Shutdown.          Francis, Chair,
                                                    Coalition to Protect
                                                    America's National
                                                    Parks
Feb. 26, 2019.................  Public Witness     Robert L Lynch, Arts
                                 Day hearing        President & CEO,
                                 (morning).         Americans for the
                                                    Arts; Master Gunnery
                                                    Sergeant Christopher
                                                    Stowe, United States
                                                    Marine Corps
                                                    (retired); Dr. Ford
                                                    W. Bell, DVM,
                                                    American Alliance of
                                                    Museums; Jessica
                                                    Unger, Emergency
                                                    Programs
                                                    Coordinator,
                                                    Foundation for
                                                    Advancement in
                                                    Conservation; Pam
                                                    Breaux, CEO,
                                                    National Assembly of
                                                    State Arts Agencies;
                                                    Flordelino
                                                    Lagundino, Artistic
                                                    Director, Park
                                                    Square Theatre;
                                                    Alexander Tittle,
                                                    Board Member,
                                                    Minnesota Humanities
                                                    Center; Kevin
                                                    Cromar, American
                                                    Thoracic Society;
                                                    Dr. Albert Rizzo,
                                                    Chief Medical
                                                    Officer, American
                                                    Lung Association;
                                                    Miles Keogh,
                                                    Executive Director,
                                                    National Association
                                                    of Clean Air
                                                    Agencies; Peggy
                                                    Shepard, Executive
                                                    Director, Co-
                                                    Founder, WE ACT for
                                                    Environmental
                                                    Justice; Michele
                                                    Roberts, National Co-
                                                    Coordinator of EJHA,
                                                    Environmental
                                                    Justice Health
                                                    Alliance for
                                                    Chemical Policy
                                                    Reform; Howard A.
                                                    Learner, Executive
                                                    Director,
                                                    Environmental Law &
                                                    Policy Center; Chad
                                                    Lord, Policy
                                                    Director, Healing
                                                    Our Waters--Great
                                                    Lakes Coalition;
                                                    Kasey White,
                                                    Director of
                                                    Geoscience Policy,
                                                    The Geological
                                                    Society of America;
                                                    Dr. Dan Devlin,
                                                    President, National
                                                    Institutes for Water
                                                    Resources; John
                                                    Palatiello, Partner,
                                                    Miller Wenhold
                                                    Capitol Strategies,
                                                    John M. Palatiello &
                                                    Associates, Inc.;
                                                    David Jonas Bardin;
                                                    Tom Cassidy, Vice
                                                    President for
                                                    Government
                                                    Relations, National
                                                    Trust for Historical
                                                    Preservation; Jim
                                                    Lighthizer,
                                                    President, American
                                                    Battlefield Trust;
                                                    Sara Capen, Chair,
                                                    The Alliance of
                                                    National Heritage
                                                    Areas
Feb. 26, 2019.................  Public Witness     Edward W. Shepard,
                                 Day hearing        President, Public
                                 (afternoon).       Lands Foundation;
                                                    Terry T. Baker, CEO,
                                                    Society of American
                                                    Foresters; Bill
                                                    Imbergamo, Executive
                                                    Director, Federal
                                                    Forest Resource
                                                    Coalition; Alexandra
                                                    Murdoch, Vice
                                                    President of Policy,
                                                    American Forests;
                                                    Kameran Onley,
                                                    Director of
                                                    Government
                                                    Relations, The
                                                    Nature Conservancy;
                                                    Jason Dinsmore,
                                                    Executive Director,
                                                    Minnesota
                                                    Conservation
                                                    Federation; Richard
                                                    Ring, Executive
                                                    Council Member,
                                                    Coalition to Protect
                                                    America's National
                                                    Parks; Robert
                                                    (Randy) Petzel,
                                                    President, Refuge
                                                    Friends, Inc.;
                                                    Richard G. Micka,
                                                    Chair, International
                                                    Wildlife Refuge
                                                    Alliance; Caroline
                                                    Brouwer, Director of
                                                    Government Affairs,
                                                    National Wildlife
                                                    Refuge Association;
                                                    Adam Kolton,
                                                    Executive Director,
                                                    Alaska Wilderness
                                                    League; Diane
                                                    Hoskins, Campaign
                                                    Director, Oceana;
                                                    Robin A. Kemper,
                                                    President, American
                                                    Society of Civil
                                                    Engineers; Charlie
                                                    Wiplinger,
                                                    Recreational
                                                    Aviation Foundation;
                                                    Lia Biondo,
                                                    Washington, D.C.
                                                    Liasion, Society for
                                                    Range Management;
                                                    Michael Mace,
                                                    Director of Animal
                                                    Collections &
                                                    Strategy, San Diego
                                                    Zoo Global; Steve
                                                    Holmer, Vice
                                                    President of Policy
                                                    for American Bird
                                                    Conservancy,
                                                    American Bird
                                                    Conservancy; Jocelyn
                                                    Ziemian, Senior
                                                    Legislative
                                                    Specialist, Federal
                                                    Affairs, Humane
                                                    Society Legislative
                                                    Fund; Kate Wall,
                                                    Senior Legislative
                                                    Manager,
                                                    International Fund
                                                    for Animal Welfare;
                                                    Kelly Aylward,
                                                    Washington Office
                                                    Director, Bronx Zoo-
                                                    based Wildlife
                                                    Conservation Society
Mar. 6, 2019..................  American Indian/   Maureen Rosette,
                                 Alaska Native      President, National
                                 Public Witnesses   Council of Urban
                                 (morning).         Indian Health;
                                                    Abigail Echo-Hawk,
                                                    Director, Urban
                                                    Indian Health
                                                    Institute; Andrew C.
                                                    Joseph, Chairman,
                                                    Northwest Portland
                                                    Area Indian Health
                                                    Board; Esther
                                                    Lucero, Chief
                                                    Executive Officer,
                                                    Seattle Indian
                                                    Health Board; Dr.
                                                    Mark LeBeau, Chief
                                                    Executive Officer,
                                                    California Rural
                                                    Indian Health Board;
                                                    Sonya Tetnowski,
                                                    Chief Executive
                                                    Officer, Indian
                                                    Health Center of
                                                    Santa Clara Valley;
                                                    Teresa Sanchez,
                                                    Board Member,
                                                    Riverside San-
                                                    Bernardino County
                                                    Indian Health Board,
                                                    Inc.; Victoria
                                                    Kitcheyan, Acting
                                                    Chairperson,
                                                    National Indian
                                                    Health Board; Kevin
                                                    R. DuPuis, Chairman,
                                                    Fond du Lac Band of
                                                    Lake Superior
                                                    Chippewa; Dylan
                                                    Jennings, Council
                                                    Member, Bad River
                                                    Band of the Lake
                                                    Superior Chippewa;
                                                    Robert Miguel,
                                                    Chairman, Ak-Chin
                                                    Indian Community;
                                                    Roberty Flying Hawk,
                                                    Chairman, Yankton
                                                    Sioux Tribe; Harold
                                                    Frazier, Chairman,
                                                    Cheyenne River Sioux
                                                    Tribe; Dr. Monica
                                                    Mayer, Councilwoman,
                                                    Mandan Hidatsa and
                                                    Arikara Nation;
                                                    Melanie Fourkiller,
                                                    Senior Policy
                                                    Analyst, Choctaw
                                                    Nation of Oklahoma;
                                                    Dr. Donna Galbreath,
                                                    Medical Director of
                                                    Quality Assurance,
                                                    Southcentral
                                                    Foundation; Dr.
                                                    Shaquita Bell,
                                                    Chair, American
                                                    Academy of
                                                    Pediatrics Committee
                                                    on Native American
                                                    Child Health
Mar. 6, 2019..................  American Indian/   Douglas Cox,
                                 Alaska Native      Chairman, Menominee
                                 Public Witnesses   Indian Tribe; Ray
                                 (afternoon).       Peters,
                                                    Intergovernmental
                                                    Affairs Liaison,
                                                    Squaxin Island
                                                    Tribe; Edward
                                                    Manuel, Chairman,
                                                    Tohono O'odham
                                                    Nation; W. Ron
                                                    Allen, Tribal
                                                    Chairman & CEO,
                                                    Jamestown S'Klallam
                                                    Tribe; Rodney Mike,
                                                    Chairman, Duckwater
                                                    Shoshone Tribe;
                                                    Joseph James,
                                                    Chairman, Yurok
                                                    Tribal Council;
                                                    Rhonda Pitka,
                                                    Commissioner,
                                                    Council of
                                                    Athabascan Tribal
                                                    Governments; Michael
                                                    J. ``Mic'' Isham,
                                                    Executive
                                                    Administrator, Great
                                                    Lakes Indian Fish
                                                    and Wildlife
                                                    Commission; Jaime
                                                    Pinkham, Executive
                                                    Director, Columbia
                                                    River Inter-Tribal
                                                    Fish Commission;
                                                    Edward Johnstone,
                                                    Treasurer, Northwest
                                                    Indian Fisheries
                                                    Commission; Patty
                                                    Brown Schwalenberg,
                                                    Executive Director,
                                                    Chugach Regional
                                                    Resources Commission
Mar. 7, 2019..................  American Indian/   Tyson Johnston, Vice-
                                 Alaska Native      President, Quinault
                                 Public Witnesses   Indian Nation;
                                 (morning).         Joseph Wildcat,
                                                    President, Lac du
                                                    Flambeau Band of
                                                    Lake Superior
                                                    Chippewa Indians;
                                                    Vernon Stearns,
                                                    President,
                                                    Intertribal Timber
                                                    Council; Valerie J.
                                                    Grussing, Executive
                                                    Director, National
                                                    Association of
                                                    Tribal Historic
                                                    Preservation
                                                    Officers; Bryan
                                                    Newland, President,
                                                    Chippewa Ottawa
                                                    Resource Authority;
                                                    Ervin Carlson,
                                                    President,
                                                    InterTribal Buffalo
                                                    Council; Timothy
                                                    Nuvangyaoma,
                                                    Chairman, Hopi;
                                                    Terry Rambler,
                                                    Chairman, San Carlos
                                                    Apache Tribe;
                                                    Jonathan Nez,
                                                    President, Navajo
                                                    Nation; Julian Bear
                                                    Runner, President,
                                                    Oglala Sioux Tribe;
                                                    Rodney Bordeaux,
                                                    President, Rosebud
                                                    Sioux Tribe; Ella
                                                    Robertson,
                                                    Chairwoman, Sisseton
                                                    Wahpeton; Maulian
                                                    Dana, Ambassador,
                                                    Penobscot Nation;
                                                    Cheryle A. Kennedy,
                                                    Chairwoman, The
                                                    Confederated Tribes
                                                    of Grand Ronde
                                                    Community of Oregon;
                                                    Rick Peterson,
                                                    Chairman, Red Cliff
                                                    Band of Lake
                                                    Superior Chippewa;
                                                    David Z. Bean, Vice
                                                    Chairman, Puyallup
                                                    Tribe; Jefferson
                                                    Keel, President,
                                                    National Congress of
                                                    American Indians;
                                                    Genevieve Jackson,
                                                    President, Dine
                                                    Biolta School Board
                                                    Association; Carrie
                                                    L. Billy, President,
                                                    American Indian
                                                    Higher Education
                                                    Consortium;
                                                    Angelique Albert,
                                                    Executive Director,
                                                    American Indian
                                                    Graduate Center
Mar. 7, 2019..................  American Indian/   Diana Cournoyer,
                                 Alaska Native      Interim Executive
                                 Public Witnesses   Director, National
                                 (afternoon).       Indian Education
                                                    Association (NIEA);
                                                    Marlene Watashe,
                                                    Dine Grant Schools
                                                    Association; Maxine
                                                    Coho, Vice
                                                    President, Ramah
                                                    Navajo School Board,
                                                    Inc.; Leander
                                                    ``Russ''' McDonald,
                                                    President, United
                                                    Tribes Technical
                                                    College; Darrell
                                                    Seki, Tribal
                                                    Chairman, Red Lake
                                                    Band of Chippewa
                                                    Indians; Aaron
                                                    Payment,
                                                    Chairperson, Sault
                                                    Ste. Marie Tribe of
                                                    Chippewa Indians;
                                                    Ira Taken Alive,
                                                    Vice Chairman,
                                                    Standing Rock Sioux
                                                    Tribe; Jason
                                                    Schlender, Vice
                                                    Chairman, Lac Courte
                                                    Oreilles Band of
                                                    Lake Superior
                                                    Chippewa Indians;
                                                    Floyd G. Azure,
                                                    Chairman,
                                                    Assiniboine and
                                                    Sioux Tribes of the
                                                    Fort Peck
                                                    Reservation; William
                                                    Harris, Chief,
                                                    Catawba Indian
                                                    Nation; Luke Duncan,
                                                    Chairman, Ute Indian
                                                    Tribe; Casey
                                                    Mitchell, Secretary,
                                                    Nez Perce Tribe;
                                                    Aurene Martin, Board
                                                    Member, National
                                                    Indian Child Welfare
                                                    Association; Robert
                                                    Black, Executive
                                                    Director, Navajo
                                                    Hopi Land Commission
                                                    Office.
Mar. 26, 2019.................  Department of the  Scott J. Cameron,
                                 Interior FY20      Principal Deputy
                                 budget oversight   Assistant Secretary
                                 hearing.           for Policy,
                                                    Management and
                                                    Budget, Department
                                                    of the Interior
Mar. 27, 2019.................  Members of         The Honorable Peter
                                 Congress Witness   J. Visclosky (IN01),
                                 Day hearing.       Member of Congress;
                                                    The Honorable Bill
                                                    Posey (FL08), Member
                                                    of Congress; The
                                                    Honorable Mike
                                                    Gallagher (WI08),
                                                    Member of Congress;
                                                    The Honorable James
                                                    Comer (KY01), Member
                                                    of Congress; The
                                                    Honorable Debra A.
                                                    Haaland (NM01),
                                                    Member of Congress.
Mar. 28, 2019.................  Forest Service     Vicki Christiansen,
                                 FY20 budget        Chief, U.S. Forest
                                 oversight          Service.
                                 hearing.
Apr. 2, 2019..................  Environmental      Andrew Wheeler,
                                 Protection         Administrator,
                                 Agency FY20        Environmental
                                 budget oversight   Protection Agency.
                                 hearing.
Apr. 3, 2019..................  National Park      Dan Smith, Deputy
                                 Service, Fish &    Director, National
                                 Wildlife           Park Service;
                                 Service, and       Margaret Everson,
                                 U.S. Geological    Principal Deputy
                                 Survey FY20        Director, Fish &
                                 budget oversight   Wildlife Service;
                                 hearing.           Dr. Jim Reilly,
                                                    Director, U.S.
                                                    Geological Survey.
Apr. 4, 2019..................  Bureau of Land     Dr. Brian Steed,
                                 Management,        Acting Director,
                                 Bureau of Ocean    Bureau of Land
                                 Energy             Management; Dr.
                                 Management, and    Walter Cruickshank,
                                 Bureau of Safety   Acting Director,
                                 and                Bureau of Ocean
                                 Environmental      Energy Management;
                                 Enforcement FY20   Mr. Scott Angelle,
                                 budget oversight   Director, Bureau of
                                 hearing.           Safety and
                                                    Environmental
                                                    Enforcement.
Apr. 9, 2019..................  Indian Health      Rear Admiral Michael
                                 Service FY20       D. Weahkee,
                                 budget oversight   Principal Deputy
                                 hearing.           Director, Indian
                                                    Health Service.
Apr. 30, 2019.................  Bureau of Indian   Tara Katuk Mac Lean
                                 Affairs and        Sweeney, Assistant
                                 Bureau of Indian   Secretary for Indian
                                 Education FY20     Affairs, U.S.
                                 budget oversight   Department of the
                                 hearing.           Interior.
May 7, 2019...................  Department of      David Bernhardt,
                                 Interior FY20      Secretary,
                                 budget oversight   Department of the
                                 hearing.           Interior.
------------------------------------------------------------------------

             Comparative Statement of New Budget Authority

    The following table provides the amounts recommended by the 
Committee compared with the budget estimates by account.



                             MINORITY VIEWS

    We appreciate the efforts of Full Committee Chairwoman 
Lowey and Chair McCollum in producing an Interior, Environment, 
and Related Agencies Appropriations Bill that addresses 
priorities of Members on both sides of the aisle. Chair 
McCollum is to be commended for the transparent, reasonable, 
and even-handed manner in which she has conducted the business 
of the Subcommittee. Although we have genuine policy 
differences with the Majority, and a divergence in views over 
the level of funding necessary to address the critical needs of 
this bill, we hope that as the process moves forward, we can 
continue to work together in a bipartisan, collaborative 
manner.
    We are pleased to see that the bill includes significant 
funding for wildfire suppression, which will help prevent the 
devastation we have seen in recent years, along with 
initiatives to protect the Great Lakes, reduce harmful algal 
blooms and eradicate invasive Asian carp. The bill also steps 
up efforts to stop the international trafficking of endangered 
species.
    We are also pleased to see that the bill leverages federal 
dollars to finance more than $8 billion in water infrastructure 
projects and continues to drive down the maintenance backlog at 
our national parks and other public lands and museums. Lastly, 
we are pleased with the needed attention this bill provides to 
Indian Country. There are many unmet needs within Indian 
Country--in education, health care, law enforcement, and other 
areas--and this bill does a great deal to address these 
priorities.
    Unfortunately, despite the many positive initiatives funded 
across the bill, we are unable to support it as written due to 
concerning policy proposals and funding levels. There are 
several bipartisan policy provisions that were included in 
prior years that have fallen out of this bill. Adding these 
policies back in the bill will be essential to reaching a 
bipartisan agreement.
    Another area of concern is energy. Although this bill makes 
positive strides towards renewable energy, it takes a step 
backwards on conventional energy. America needs both right now, 
and we need to be producing it at home rather than overseas. A 
strong and vibrant economy, and the well-paying jobs that go 
along with it, is inextricably linked with reliable and 
affordable energy sources.
    A final area of concern is the funding level in the absence 
of any topline budget agreement that begins to tackle our 
national debt. While we have an obligation to be good stewards 
of our environment and public lands for future generations, we 
also have an obligation to be good stewards of our tax dollars, 
which will also have a profound impact on the generations to 
come. In that respect, this legislation falls short. This bill 
is $1.7 billion above the fiscal year 2019 enacted level at a 
time when the national debt is at an all-time high. No doubt 
there are must-do programs in this bill that would benefit from 
increases, but that sentiment alone does not give the Federal 
Government license to continue to borrow and spend without any 
overarching plan for fiscal responsibility.
    While we have real policy differences and spending concerns 
relating to this legislation, it is our hope that between now 
and conference negotiations with the Senate later this year, we 
can address the most disconcerting issues and seek bipartisan 
consensus on a reasonable, sustainable subcommittee allocation. 
Our sincere desire is to work with Chair McCollum to fashion a 
responsible, balanced conference report worthy of broad, 
bipartisan support.

                                   David P. Joyce.
                                   Kay Granger.