Report text available as:

  • TXT
  • PDF   (PDF provides a complete and accurate display of this text.) Tip ?

116th Congress   }                                      {       Report
                        HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES
 1st Session     }                                      {      116-120
_______________________________________________________________________

                                     


        NATIONAL DEFENSE AUTHORIZATION ACT FOR FISCAL YEAR 2020

                               ----------                              

                              R E P O R T

                                 OF THE

                      COMMITTEE ON ARMED SERVICES
                        HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES

                                   ON

                               H.R. 2500

                             together with

                    ADDITIONAL AND DISSENTING VIEWS

      [Including cost estimate of the Congressional Budget Office]


                                     












[GRAPHIC(S) NOT AVAILABLE IN TIFF FORMAT]











                                     


 June 19, 2019.--Committed to the Committee of the Whole House on the 
              State of the Union and ordered to be printed








                                      

       
       
       
116th Congress   }                                      {       Report
                        HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES
 1st Session     }                                      {      116-120      
_______________________________________________________________________

                                     


        NATIONAL DEFENSE AUTHORIZATION ACT FOR FISCAL YEAR 2020

                               __________

                              R E P O R T

                                 OF THE

                      COMMITTEE ON ARMED SERVICES

                        HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES

                                   ON

                               H.R. 2500

                             together with

                    ADDITIONAL AND DISSENTING VIEWS

      [Including cost estimate of the Congressional Budget Office]

                                     










[GRAPHIC(S) NOT AVAILABLE IN TIFF FORMAT]











                                     

 June 19, 2019.--Committed to the Committee of the Whole House on the 
              State of the Union and ordered to be printed 
              
                                   ______
		 
                     U.S. GOVERNMENT PUBLISHING OFFICE 
		 
36-763                    WASHINGTON : 2019                 





















	      
                      COMMITTEE ON ARMED SERVICES
                     One Hundred Sixteenth Congress

                    ADAM SMITH, Washington, Chairman

SUSAN A. DAVIS, California           WILLIAM M. ``MAC'' THORNBERRY, 
JAMES R. LANGEVIN, Rhode Island          Texas
RICK LARSEN, Washington              JOE WILSON, South Carolina
JIM COOPER, Tennessee                ROB BISHOP, Utah
JOE COURTNEY, Connecticut            MICHAEL R. TURNER, Ohio
JOHN GARAMENDI, California           MIKE ROGERS, Alabama
JACKIE SPEIER, California            K. MICHAEL CONAWAY, Texas
TULSI GABBARD, Hawaii                DOUG LAMBORN, Colorado
DONALD NORCROSS, New Jersey          ROBERT J. WITTMAN, Virginia
RUBEN GALLEGO, Arizona               VICKY HARTZLER, Missouri
SETH MOULTON, Massachusetts          AUSTIN SCOTT, Georgia
SALUD O. CARBAJAL, California        MO BROOKS, Alabama
ANTHONY G. BROWN, Maryland, Vice     PAUL COOK, California
    Chair                            BRADLEY BYRNE, Alabama
RO KHANNA, California                SAM GRAVES, Missouri
WILLIAM R. KEATING, Massachusetts    ELISE M. STEFANIK, New York
FILEMON VELA, Texas                  SCOTT DesJARLAIS, Tennessee
ANDY KIM, New Jersey                 RALPH LEE ABRAHAM, Louisiana
KENDRA S. HORN, Oklahoma             TRENT KELLY, Mississippi
GILBERT RAY CISNEROS, Jr.,           MIKE GALLAGHER, Wisconsin
    California                       MATT GAETZ, Florida
CHRISSY HOULAHAN, Pennsylvania       DON BACON, Nebraska
JASON CROW, Colorado                 JIM BANKS, Indiana
XOCHITL TORRES SMALL, New Mexico     LIZ CHENEY, Wyoming
ELISSA SLOTKIN, Michigan             PAUL MITCHELL, Michigan
MIKIE SHERRILL, New Jersey           JACK BERGMAN, Michigan
KATIE HILL, California               MICHAEL WALTZ, Florida
VERONICA ESCOBAR, Texas
DEBRA A. HAALAND, New Mexico
JARED F. GOLDEN, Maine
LORI TRAHAN, Massachusetts
ELAINE G. LURIA, Virginia

                     Paul Arcangeli, Staff Director 
                     
                     
                     
                     
                     
                     
                     
                     
                     
                     
                     
                     
                     
                     
                     
                     
                     
                     
                     
                     
                     
                     
                            C O N T E N T S

                              ----------                              
                                                                   Page

Purpose of the Legislation.......................................     1
Rationale for the Committee Bill.................................     2
Hearings.........................................................     3
Committee Position...............................................     4
Explanation of the Committee Amendments..........................     4
Relationship of Authorization to Appropriations..................     4
Summary of Discretionary Authorizations in the Bill..............     5
Budget Authority Implication.....................................     5

DIVISION A--DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE AUTHORIZATIONS.................     5
TITLE I--PROCUREMENT.............................................     5
    Aircraft Procurement, Army...................................     5
      Items of Special Interest..................................     5
        CH-47F Chinook Block II..................................     5
        UH-72A Light Utility Helicopter..........................     6
    Missile Procurement, Army....................................     7
      Items of Special Interest..................................     7
        Indirect Fire Protection Capability Increment 2 system of 
          systems................................................     7
        M240 medium machine gun industrial base..................     7
        TOW 2B missile system....................................     8
    Procurement of Weapons and Tracked Combat Vehicles, Army.....     8
      Items of Special Interest..................................     8
        Vehicle active protection systems........................     8
    Procurement of Ammunition, Army..............................     9
      Items of Special Interest..................................     9
        Army vertical lift munitions.............................     9
        M58 Mine Clearing Line Charge............................     9
        Self-propelled 155mm and 105mm artillery systems.........    10
    Other Procurement, Army......................................    10
      Items of Special Interest..................................    10
        Advanced medium mobile power sources.....................    10
        AN/PEQ-15 Pointer, Illuminator, Aiming Laser capability 
          enhancement/upgrade strategy...........................    11
        Global Positioning System denied environments............    11
        High Mobility Multipurpose Wheeled Vehicle 
          recapitalization.......................................    12
        Requirements and Capabilities for Military Shelter 
          Systems Ballistic Protection...........................    12
        Tactical Communications and Protective System............    12
        Transportable Tactical Command Communications............    13
    Aircraft Procurement, Navy...................................    13
      Items of Special Interest..................................    13
        Carrier strike group anti-submarine warfare capabilities.    13
        F/A-18 infrared search and track.........................    14
        MH-53E modernization and sustainment strategy............    14
        Navy Reserve F/A-18 aircraft.............................    15
        Recapitalization of Navy Reserve P-3C squadrons..........    15
    Weapons Procurement, Navy....................................    16
      Items of Special Interest..................................    16
        Advanced Low-Cost Munitions Ordnance.....................    16
    Shipbuilding and Conversion, Navy............................    16
      Items of Special Interest..................................    16
        Amphibious Forces Modernization..........................    16
        AN/SPY-6(V) on DDG-51 Flight IIA.........................    16
        Classified Briefing on Funding Requirements for Strategic 
          Weapons Systems........................................    17
        Composite materials......................................    17
        DDG Aegis modernization..................................    18
        Frigate requirements review..............................    18
        Future Fleet Architecture................................    18
        John Lewis fleet oiler replenishment ships...............    19
        MK 18 unmanned underwater vehicle........................    19
        Naval Oceanographic Office vessel requirements...........    19
        Navy Cyclone-class patrol craft replacement..............    20
        Navy study on lethality of surface combatant ships 
          against swarm technology...............................    20
        Report on operational energy planning assumptions for the 
          future surface combatant...............................    21
        Virginia-class submarine.................................    21
    Procurement, Marine Corps....................................    22
      Items of Special Interest..................................    22
        Rapid acquisition of Rifle Integrated Controller.........    22
    Aircraft Procurement, Air Force..............................    22
      Items of Special Interest..................................    22
        A-10 aircraft............................................    22
        Air National Guard F-16 Radar Upgrades...................    23
        B-1 readiness recovery plan..............................    23
        B-2 Spirit Defensive Management System...................    24
        C-130H aircraft propellers and engines...................    24
        E-8 Joint Surveillance Target Attack Radar System re-
          engining program.......................................    25
        F-15C/F-15EX.............................................    25
        MQ-9 Reaper funding profile..............................    26
        Tanker force structure and modernization.................    26
    Procurement, Defense-Wide....................................    27
      Items of Special Interest..................................    27
        F-35 Joint Strike Fighter program........................    27
        Mitigation of military aviation physiological incidents..    28
  LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS.........................................    29
    Subtitle A--Authorization of Appropriations..................    29
      Section 101--Authorization of Appropriations...............    29
    Subtitle B--Navy Programs....................................    29
      Section 111--Modification of Annual Report on Cost Targets 
        for Certain Aircraft Carriers............................    29
      Section 112--Repeal of Requirement to Adhere to Navy Cost 
        Estimates for Certain Aircraft Carriers..................    29
      Section 113--Ford Class Aircraft Carrier Support for F-35C 
        Aircraft.................................................    29
      Section 114--Prohibition on Use of Funds for Reduction of 
        Aircraft Carrier Force Structure.........................    29
      Section 115--Design and Construction of Amphibious 
        Transport Dock Designated LPD-31.........................    30
      Section 116--Limitation on Availability of Funds Pending 
        Quarterly Updates on the CH-53K King Stallion Helicopter 
        Program..................................................    30
      Section 117--Limitation on Availability of Funds for VH-92A 
        Helicopter...............................................    30
      Section 118--National Defense Reserve Fleet Vessel.........    31
    Subtitle C--Air Force Programs...............................    31
      Section 121--Modification of Requirement to Preserve 
        Certain C-5 Aircraft.....................................    31
      Section 122--Modification of Limitation on Use of Funds for 
        KC-46A Aircraft..........................................    31
      Section 123--F-15EX Aircraft Program.......................    31
      Section 124--Prohibition on Availability of Funds for 
        Reduction in KC-10 Primary Mission Aircraft Inventory....    31
      Section 125--Limitation on Availability of Funds for VC-25B 
        Aircraft.................................................    31
      Section 126--Limitation on Availability of Funds for 
        Retirement of RC-135 Aircraft............................    31
      Section 127--Report on Aircraft Fleet of the Civil Air 
        Patrol...................................................    32
    Subtitle D--Defense-Wide, Joint, and Multiservice Matters....    32
      Section 131--Economic Order Quantity Contracting and Buy-
        to-Budget Acquisition for F-35 Aircraft Program..........    32
      Section 132--Program Requirements for the F-35 Aircraft 
        Program..................................................    32
      Section 133--Reports on F-35 Aircraft Program..............    32
TITLE II--RESEARCH, DEVELOPMENT, TEST, AND EVALUATION............    33
    Research, Development, Test, and Evaluation, Army............    33
      Items of Special Interest..................................    33
        3-D Printed Electronics Army Innovation..................    33
        Accelerated integration to counter emerging threats......    33
        Advanced development of asset protection technologies....    33
        Advanced lightweight small arms and medium caliber 
          ammunitions............................................    34
        Advanced materials and components........................    34
        Advanced technology for cold regions.....................    34
        Army unfunded requirement for munitions storage..........    34
        Briefing on secure communications with remote-piloted and 
          unmanned ground vehicles...............................    35
        Carbon fiber wheels and graphitic foam for Army vehicles.    35
        Composite warhead technology.............................    36
        Defense Innovation and the Automotive Industry...........    36
        Expeditionary Maneuver Support Technologies..............    36
        Expeditionary mobile base camp technology................    37
        Foamable celluloid material..............................    37
        Future Vertical Lift.....................................    37
        Heavy Equipment Transporter System trailer development...    38
        HEROES program...........................................    38
        High performance advanced polymers.......................    38
        Humanitarian de-mining research and development..........    39
        Improved Turbine Engine Program..........................    39
        Improvement of combat helmet suspension systems..........    40
        Instrumentable Multiple Integrated Laser Engagement 
          System.................................................    40
        Modeling and Simulation for Ground Vehicle Development...    40
        Modern mobile sheltering systems.........................    41
        Multi-mission Medium Range Railgun Weapon System and 
          Integrated Power and Thermal Management System.........    41
        Multi-spectral thermal mitigation technologies...........    41
        National Academies review of technologies related to Army 
          Strategic Long-Range Cannon............................    42
        Real time transmission of weapons usage data.............    43
        Women in Army science, technology, engineering, and 
          mathematics careers....................................    43
    Research, Development, Test, and Evaluation, Navy............    43
      Items of Special Interest..................................    43
        Academic partnerships for undersea vehicle research......    43
        Advanced Manufacturing of Critical Scale Materials.......    44
        Advanced precision materials research....................    44
        Advanced radar research..................................    44
        Autonomous vehicle collaboration across maritime domains.    44
        Critical bandwidth gaps for Navy deployments.............    45
        Defense University Research Initiatives..................    45
        Energy resilience........................................    46
        Enterotoxigenic Escherichia Coli research................    46
        Hearing loss and prevention treatment....................    46
        High Energy Laser system integration.....................    47
        Navigation channel clearance for nuclear powered 
          ballistic missile submarines...........................    47
        Office of Naval Research Manufacturing Technology Program    48
        Warfighter safety and performance........................    48
    Research, Development, Test, and Evaluation, Air Force.......    49
      Items of Special Interest..................................    49
        Advanced composites for large structures.................    49
        Aerospace Career Training Expansion Report...............    49
        Aerospace Composites Manufacturing.......................    49
        Briefing on Surface to Air Electronic Warfare Threats....    50
        Digital twinning.........................................    50
        Distributed Common Ground System and 10 U.S.C. 2377......    50
        Educational partnership agreements for aerospace 
          propulsion.............................................    51
        Kessel Run Commercial Outreach...........................    51
        Light attack and armed reconnaissance experimentation....    52
        Low-cost attritable aircraft technology..................    52
        Major test range and facility enhancements...............    53
        Metals Affordability Initiative..........................    54
        Modular Open Systems Architecture Intelligence Sensor 
          Readiness Initiative...................................    54
        OC-135B Open Skies Treaty aircraft recapitalization......    54
        Open mission systems.....................................    55
        Persistent intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance.    56
        Thermal management and robust power generation systems...    56
        Unmanned aerial systems cyber operations research........    56
        Vertical lift demonstration..............................    57
        Wide area motion imagery.................................    57
    Research, Development, Test, and Evaluation, Defense-Wide....    57
      Items of Special Interest..................................    57
        Additive manufacturing...................................    57
        Advanced composites and manufacturing technologies.......    58
        AI-enabled Robotics in CBRN and Complex Environments.....    58
        Analysis of Science and Technology Reinvention 
          Laboratories...........................................    59
        Artificial intelligence in force protection activities...    60
        Autonomous distribution for critical supplies............    60
        Battery Development and Safety Enterprise................    60
        Chemical and Biological Decontamination Solutions........    61
        Commercializing defense technologies.....................    61
        Counterterrorism detection technology....................    61
        Cyber institutes at senior military colleges.............    62
        Cyber-physical research..................................    62
        Directed energy test range workloads.....................    63
        Electronic warfare planning for near-peer adversaries....    63
        Energy systems for forward and remote operating bases....    64
        Hacking for Defense......................................    64
        Hacking for Defense Support to Defense Innovation........    65
        Historically black colleges and universities and minority 
          serving institutions...................................    65
        Human simulation and human factors modeling..............    66
        Hybrid and electric air vehicle power and propulsion 
          systems................................................    66
        Hypersonic test infrastructure and workforce.............    67
        Implementation of existing authorities for the science 
          and technology reinvention laboratories................    68
        Integrated Silicon-Based Lasers..........................    68
        Investments in Science and Technology....................    69
        Joint Electromagnetic Spectrum Operations................    69
        Joint Threat Warning System..............................    70
        Lithium-ion batteries....................................    70
        Microelectronics.........................................    71
        Military rotorcraft safety...............................    71
        Moving Target Defense....................................    72
        National Academies Science, Technology, and Security 
          Roundtable.............................................    72
        National Consortium for the Study of Terrorism and 
          Responses to Terrorism.................................    73
        National Defense Education Program.......................    73
        Optical fiber in next generation information 
          infrastructure.........................................    74
        Pilot Program for Supply Chain Awareness and 
          Cybersecurity in the Defense Industrial Base...........    74
        Protecting Critical Technologies Task Force..............    74
        Protection of National Security Research.................    75
        Provision of Analysis to U.S. Humanitarian Demining 
          Organizations..........................................    76
        Radio frequency countermeasures for rotary wing aircraft.    76
        Report on Designation of a National Center of Excellence 
          for Pathogen and Microbiome Analysis...................    76
        Role of universities in rapid prototyping................    77
        Tactical data links......................................    77
        University and industry research centers.................    78
  LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS.........................................    78
    Subtitle A--Authorization of Appropriations..................    78
      Section 201--Authorization of Appropriations...............    78
    Subtitle B--Program Requirements, Restrictions, and 
        Limitations..............................................    79
      Section 211--Program on Enhancement of Preparation of 
        Dependents of Members of Armed Forces for Careers in 
        Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics........    79
      Section 212--Temporary Inclusion of Joint Artificial 
        Intelligence Center of the Department of Defense in 
        Personnel Management Authority to Attract Experts in 
        Science and Engineering..................................    79
      Section 213--Joint Hypersonics Transition Office...........    79
      Section 214--Modification of Proof of Concept 
        Commercialization Program................................    79
      Section 215--Contract for National Security Research 
        Studies..................................................    80
      Section 216--JASON Scientific Advisory Group...............    80
      Section 217--Direct Air Capture and Blue Carbon Removal 
        Technology Program.......................................    80
      Section 218--Foreign Malign Influence Operations Research 
        Program..................................................    80
      Section 219--Sensor Data Integration for Fifth Generation 
        Aircraft.................................................    80
      Section 220--Documentation Relating to Advanced Battle 
        Management System........................................    80
      Section 221--Documentation Relating to B-52 Commercial 
        Engine Replacement Program...............................    81
      Section 222--Diversification of the Science, Technology, 
        Research, and Engineering Workforce of the Department of 
        Defense..................................................    81
      Section 223--Policy on the Talent Management of Digital 
        Expertise and Software Professionals.....................    81
      Section 224--Development and Implementation of Digital 
        Engineering Capability and Automated Software Testing and 
        Evaluation...............................................    82
      Section 225--Process to Align Policy Formulation and 
        Emerging Technology Development..........................    82
      Section 226--Limitation on Transition of Strategic 
        Capabilities Office of the Department of Defense.........    82
    Subtitle C--Reports and Other Matters........................    83
      Section 231--Master Plan for Implementation of Authorities 
        Relating to Science and Technology Reinvention 
        Laboratories.............................................    83
      Section 232--Master Plan for Infrastructure Required to 
        Support Research, Development, Test, and Evaluation 
        Missions.................................................    83
      Section 233--Strategy and Implementation Plan for Fifth 
        Generation Information and Communications Technologies...    84
      Section 234--Department-Wide Software Science and 
        Technology Strategy......................................    84
      Section 235--Artificial Intelligence Education Strategy....    84
      Section 236--Biannual Report on the Joint Artificial 
        Intelligence Center......................................    84
      Section 237--Quarterly Updates on the Optionally Manned 
        Fighting Vehicle Program.................................    85
      Section 238--Grants for Civics Education Programs..........    85
      Section 239--Technology and National Security Fellowship...    85
      Section 240--National Security Commission on Defense 
        Research at Historically Black Colleges and Universities 
        and Other Minority Institutions..........................    85
TITLE III--OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE.............................    85
  ITEMS OF SPECIAL INTEREST......................................    85
    Energy Issues................................................    85
      Energy Efficiency Improvements for Shelters and Hard 
        Containers...............................................    85
      Enhancing Installation Energy Resiliency through Renewable 
        Energy...................................................    86
      Fuel Resiliency Issues within the Department of Defense....    86
      Geothermal Revenue Sharing Process Improvements............    87
      Maintenance Availability for Destroyers for Hybrid Electric 
        Drive Retrofit...........................................    87
      Medium Power Mobile Transformer Substations................    87
      Plug-in Hybrids and Electric Vehicles on Department of 
        Defense Installations....................................    88
      Report on Department of Defense and NATO Cooperation on 
        Energy Infrastructure....................................    88
      Review of Offshore Energy Development Projects.............    88
      Siting Clearinghouse Process for Wind Energy...............    89
    Logistics and Sustainment Issues.............................    89
      B-52 Stratofortress power plant sustainment................    89
      C-17 Sustainment...........................................    90
      Commercial Best Practices for Maintenance and Logistics....    90
      Comptroller General Report on F-35 Sustainment.............    91
      Comptroller General Report on Homeport of U.S. Aircraft 
        Carriers.................................................    91
      Comptroller General Report on Littoral Combat Ship 
        Operations and Sustainment...............................    92
      Comptroller General Report on Ship Repair Capabilities and 
        Capacity.................................................    93
      Conditions Based Maintenance Plus..........................    94
      Contracted Aerial Refueling Aircraft.......................    94
      Corrosion Control and Prevention...........................    95
      Optimized Fleet Response Plan..............................    95
      Planning, Programming, and Budgeting for Sustainment.......    96
      Report on the National Guard's Equipment Reimbursement 
        Policies.................................................    97
    Readiness Issues.............................................    97
      Allocation of Excess Property for Wildfire Fighting........    97
      Army Urban Training........................................    98
      Assessment of Air Combat Maneuvering Instrumentation and 
        Collision Awareness Systems..............................    98
      Cold Weather Organizational Clothing and Individual 
        Equipment................................................    99
      Comptroller General Assessment of Surface Fleet Manning, 
        Workload, and Training...................................    99
      Comptroller General Report on Army Rail Capability.........   100
      Comptroller General Report on Navy Collective Training for 
        High-End Combat Missions.................................   100
      Comptroller General's Report on the Army's Use of Global 
        Combat Support System....................................   101
      Corrosion Mitigation for Tactical Aircraft.................   102
      Department of Defense Fire and Emergency Services 
        Reductions...............................................   102
      Hearing Protection Measures................................   102
      Live, Virtual, and Constructive Training...................   103
      Minimal-Notice Examinations of Naval Vessels and Associated 
        Manpower Requirements....................................   103
      Mission Capability Rating Assessment.......................   103
      Navy Readiness Assessment Teams............................   104
      Northern Strike Exercise Funding...........................   105
      Report on Security Clearance Processing....................   105
      Use of Funds Provided for the Defense Community 
        Infrastructure Program...................................   105
      Utilization of Recycled Products in Military Clothing Items   106
      Value of Energy and Logistics Informed Exercises...........   106
      Women, Peace and Security Strategy in Military Training....   106
    Other Matters................................................   107
      Aircraft Noise Mitigation..................................   107
      Alternatives to Burn Pits..................................   107
      Aqueous Film Forming Foam Training.........................   108
      Authorities Available to the Department of Defense for 
        Tribal Mitigation........................................   108
      Best Practices for Cleanup and Disposal of PFOS- and PFOA-
        Contaminated Groundwater, Soils, and Filters and Gaps 
        That Require Further Study...............................   108
      Chase Aircraft at NASA Armstrong Flight Research Center....   109
      Climate Impacts on Installation Resiliency.................   109
      Defense Personal Property Program..........................   111
      Feasibility of Using Non-Fluorinated Fire Fighting Foam in 
        Training.................................................   111
      Health Impact to Service Members from Live-Fire Small Arms 
        Training Ranges..........................................   111
      Information Processing Efficiency..........................   112
      Kirtland Air Force Base Fuel Spill Remediation.............   112
      Military Munitions Response Program (MMRP).................   112
      National Guard Unit Equipped Flying Squadrons..............   113
      Reducing Costs Associated with Single-use Plastics.........   113
      Removal of Unexploded Ordnance on Tribal Lands.............   113
      Report on Fiscal Impacts of Intergovernmental Service 
        Agreements...............................................   114
      Report on Phytoremediation to Clear Heavy Metal 
        Contaminants.............................................   114
      Report on the Feasibility and Cost of Net-Zero Greenhouse 
        Emissions and Implementing H. Res. 109, the Green New 
        Deal.....................................................   114
      Survey to Locate and Identify the Remains of Native 
        American Children Buried at Carlisle Barracks............   115
      Tijuana Sewage Runoff Impact to Readiness..................   116
      Water Security under Sustainable Groundwater Management Act   116
      Water Usage Related to Landscaping.........................   116
  LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS.........................................   117
    Subtitle A--Authorization of Appropriations..................   117
      Section 301--Authorization of Appropriations...............   117
    Subtitle B--Energy and Environment...........................   117
      Section 311--Timeline for Clearinghouse Review of 
        Applications for Energy Projects That May Have an Adverse 
        Impact on Military Operations and Readiness..............   117
      Section 312--Authority to Make Final Finding on Designation 
        of Geographic Area of Concern for Purposes of Energy 
        Projects with Adverse Impacts on Military Operations and 
        Readiness................................................   117
      Section 313--Authority to Accept Contributions of Funds 
        from Applicants for Energy Projects for Mitigation of 
        Impacts on Military Operations and Readiness.............   117
      Section 314-- Department of Defense Improvement of 
        Previously Conveyed Utility Systems Serving Military 
        Installations............................................   117
      Section 315--Five-Year Authority for National Guard 
        Environmental Restoration Projects for Environmental 
        Responses................................................   118
      Section 316--Sale of Electricity from Alternate Energy and 
        Cogeneration Production Facilities.......................   118
      Section 317--Transfer Authority for Funding of Study and 
        Assessment on Health Implications of Per- and 
        Polyfluoroalkyl Substances Contamination in Drinking 
        Water by Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry   118
      Section 318--Replacement of Fluorinated Aqueous Film-
        Forming Foam with Fluorine-Free Fire-Fighting Agent......   118
      Section 319--Prohibition of Uncontrolled Release of 
        Fluorinated Aqueous Film-Forming Foam at Military 
        Installations............................................   118
      Section 320--Prohibition on Use of Fluorinated Aqueous Film 
        Forming Foam for Training Exercises......................   118
      Section 321--Real-Time Noise-Monitoring Study at Navy and 
        Air Force Installations where Tactical Fighter Aircraft 
        Operate..................................................   119
      Section 322--Development of Climate Vulnerability and Risk 
        Assessment Tool..........................................   119
      Section 323--Provision of Uncontaminated Water for 
        Agricultural Use on Land Contaminated by PFOS and PFOA 
        Used on Military Installations...........................   119
    Subtitle C--Logistics and Sustainment........................   119
      Section 331--Material Readiness Metrics and Objectives.....   119
      Section 332--Clarification of Authority regarding Use of 
        Working Capital Funds for Unspecified Minor Military 
        Construction Projects Related to Revitalization and 
        Recapitalization of Defense Industrial Base Facilities...   119
      Section 333--F-35 Joint Strike Fighter Sustainment.........   119
      Section 334--Report on Strategic Policy for Prepositioned 
        Materiel and Equipment...................................   120
      Section 335--Limitation on Use of Funds for Implementation 
        of Elements of Master Plan for Redevelopment of Former 
        Ship Repair Facility in Guam.............................   120
    Subtitle D--Reports..........................................   120
      Section 341--Readiness Reporting...........................   120
      Section 342--Extension of Deadline for Transition from 
        Service-Specific Defense Readiness Reporting Systems.....   120
      Section 343--Report on Navy Ship Depot Maintenance Budget..   120
      Section 344--Report on Runit Dome..........................   120
    Subtitle E--Other Matters....................................   121
      Section 351--Inclusion of Over-the-Horizon Radars in Early 
        Outreach Procedures......................................   121
      Section 352--Extension of Authority for Secretary of 
        Defense to Use Department of Defense Reimbursement Rate 
        for Transportation Services Provided to Certain Non-
        Department of Defense Entities...........................   121
      Section 353--Expanded Transfer and Adoption of Military 
        Animals..................................................   121
      Section 354--Extension of Authority of Secretary of 
        Transportation to Issue Non-Premium Aviation Insurance...   121
      Section 355--Defense Personal Property Program.............   121
      Section 356--Public Events about Red Hill Bulk Fuel Storage 
        Facility.................................................   121
      Section 357--Sense of Congress regarding Innovative 
        Readiness Training Program...............................   122
      Section 358--Pilot Program on Reduction of Effects of 
        Military Aviation Noise on Private Residences............   122
TITLE IV--MILITARY PERSONNEL AUTHORIZATIONS......................   122
  LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS.........................................   122
    Subtitle A--Active Forces....................................   122
      Section 401--End Strengths for Active Forces...............   122
      Section 402--Revisions in Permanent Active Duty End 
        Strength Minimum Levels..................................   122
    Subtitle B--Reserve Forces...................................   123
      Section 411--End Strengths for Selected Reserve............   123
      Section 412--End Strengths for Reserves on Active Duty in 
        Support of the Reserves..................................   123
      Section 413--End Strengths for Military Technicians (Dual 
        Status)..................................................   123
      Section 414--Maximum Number of Reserve Personnel Authorized 
        To Be on Active Duty for Operational Support.............   124
    Subtitle C--Authorization of Appropriations..................   124
      Section 421--Military Personnel............................   124
TITLE V--MILITARY PERSONNEL POLICY...............................   124
  ITEMS OF SPECIAL INTEREST......................................   124
      Appointment of Guardian ad Litem for Minor Victims.........   124
      Army Special Forces Officer Education......................   125
      Briefing on Bystander Intervention in Cases of Sexual 
        Misconduct...............................................   125
      Briefing on Department of Defense Student Loan Repayment 
        Program..................................................   126
      Cell Phone Use in Correction Facilities....................   126
      Comptroller General Report on Domestic Violence............   126
      Comptroller General Report on Hazing.......................   127
      Comptroller General Study on Military Adoptive and Foster 
        Families.................................................   128
      Cultural Sensitivity Training..............................   128
      Implementation of the Women, Peace and Security Act of 2017   129
      Inspector General Whistleblower Improvement Plan...........   129
      Marine Corps Integration of Recruit Basic Training.........   129
      Measure Officer Accountability.............................   129
      Prioritization of Sexual Assault and Sexual Harassment 
        Prevention and Response Resources........................   130
      Report on Access to Court Filings and Materials for Victims   131
      Report on Air National Guard Control Grades................   131
      Report on Army Active Component Support of the Reserve 
        Component................................................   132
      Report on Cyber Education Integration in Professional 
        Military Education.......................................   132
      Report on Implementation of Transition Assistance Program 
        Content..................................................   132
      Report on Integration of Women into Previously Closed 
        Special Operations Forces Career Fields and the 75th 
        Ranger Regiment..........................................   133
      Report on Junior Reserve Officers' Training Corps Community 
        Service..................................................   134
      Report on Passport Guidance for Emergency Contacts.........   134
      Report on Program on Enhancement of Preparation of 
        Dependents of Members of Armed Forces for Careers in 
        Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics........   134
      Report on Senior Officer Outside Employment................   134
      Report on the Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery...   135
      Report to the Defense Committees on the National Guard's 
        Role in Current and Future Space Strategy................   136
      Reserve Component Duty Status Reform.......................   136
      Special Education Services for Military Families...........   136
      Standardizing Training for Sexual Assault Prevention and 
        Response Practitioners...................................   137
  LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS.........................................   137
    Subtitle A--Officer Personnel Policy.........................   137
      Section 501--Management Policies for Joint Qualified 
        Officers.................................................   137
      Section 502--Grade of Chief of the Veterinary Corps of the 
        Army.....................................................   137
      Section 503--Authority of Promotion Boards to Recommend 
        that Officers of Particular Merit Be Placed Higher on 
        Promotion List...........................................   138
      Section 504--Availability on the Internet of Certain 
        Information about Officers Serving in General or Flag 
        Officer Grades...........................................   138
    Subtitle B--Reserve Component Management.....................   138
      Section 511--Grade of Certain Chiefs of Reserve Components.   138
      Section 512--Authority to Defer Mandatory Separation at Age 
        68 of Officers in Medical Specialties in the Reserve 
        Components...............................................   138
      Section 513--Repeal of Requirement for Review of Certain 
        Army Reserve Officer Unit Vacancy Promotions by 
        Commanders of Associated Active Duty Units...............   138
      Section 514--Guidance for Use of Unmanned Aircraft Systems 
        by the National Guard....................................   138
      Section 515--Junior Reserve Officers' Training Corps.......   138
      Section 516--JROTC Computer Science and Cybersecurity 
        Program..................................................   138
      Section 517--Programs of Scholarships for Members of Junior 
        Reserve Officers' Training Corps Units toward Obtaining 
        Private Pilot's Certificates.............................   139
      Section 518--Sense of Congress regarding Junior Reserve 
        Officers' Training Corps.................................   139
      Section 519--Sense of Congress regarding the National Guard 
        Youth Challenge Program..................................   139
    Subtitle C--General Service Authorities and Correction of 
        Military Records.........................................   139
      Section 521--Establishment of Board of Appeals regarding 
        Denied Requests for Upgraded Discharges and Dismissals...   139
      Section 522--Prohibition on Reduction in the Number of 
        Personnel Assigned to Duty with a Service Review Agency..   139
      Section 523--Advisory Committee on Record and Service 
        Review Boards............................................   140
      Section 524--Time Requirements for Certification of 
        Honorable Service........................................   140
      Section 525--Prohibition on Implementation of Military 
        Service Suitability Determinations for Foreign Nationals 
        Who Are Lawful Permanent Residents.......................   140
      Section 526--Strategic Plan for Diversity and Inclusion....   140
      Section 527--Independent Study on Barriers to Entry into 
        the Armed Forces for English Learners....................   140
      Section 528--Reenlistment Waivers for Persons Separated 
        from the Armed Forces Who Commit One Misdemeanor Cannabis 
        Offense..................................................   140
      Section 529--Sense of Congress regarding Accession 
        Physicals................................................   141
    Subtitle D--Military Justice.................................   141
      Section 531--Command Influence.............................   141
      Section 532--Statute of Limitations for Certain Offenses...   141
      Section 533--Guidelines on Sentences for Offenses Committed 
        under the Uniform Code of Military Justice...............   141
      Section 534--Expansion of Responsibilities of Commanders 
        for Victims of Sexual Assault Committed by Another Member 
        of the Armed Forces......................................   141
      Section 535--Increase in Investigative Personnel and Victim 
        Witness Assistance Program Liaisons......................   141
      Section 536--Increase in Number of Digital Forensic 
        Examiners for the Military Criminal Investigation 
        Organizations............................................   142
      Section 537--Pilot Programs on Defense Investigators in the 
        Military Justice System..................................   142
      Section 538--Pilot Program on Prosecution of Special Victim 
        Offenses Committed by Attendees of Military Service 
        Academies................................................   142
      Section 539--Timely Disposition of Nonprosecutable Sex-
        Related Offenses.........................................   142
      Section 540--Training for Sexual Assault Initial 
        Disposition Authorities on Exercise of Disposition 
        Authority for Sexual Assault and Collateral Offenses.....   142
    Subtitle E--Other Legal Matters..............................   142
      Section 541--Standard of Evidence Applicable to 
        Investigations and Reviews Related to Protected 
        Communications of Members of the Armed Forces and 
        Prohibited Retaliatory Actions...........................   142
      Section 542--Expansion of Special Victims' Counsel for 
        Victims of Sex-Related or Domestic Violence Offenses.....   143
      Section 543--Notification of Issuance of Military 
        Protective Order to Civilian Law Enforcement.............   143
      Section 544--Clarifications regarding Scope of Employment 
        and Reemployment Rights of Members of the Uniformed 
        Services.................................................   143
      Section 545--Military Orders Required for Termination of 
        Leases Pursuant to the Servicemembers Civil Relief Act...   143
      Section 546--Consultation regarding Victim's Preference in 
        Prosecution Jurisdiction.................................   143
      Section 547--Extension and Expansion of Defense Advisory 
        Committee on Investigation, Prosecution, and Defense of 
        Sexual Assault in the Armed Forces.......................   143
      Section 548--Defense Advisory Committee for the Prevention 
        of Sexual Misconduct.....................................   144
      Section 549--Safe to Report Policy Applicable across the 
        Armed Forces.............................................   144
      Section 550--Availability of Special Victims' Counsel and 
        Special Victim Prosecutors at Military Installations.....   144
      Section 550a--Notice to Victims of Alleged Sexual Assault 
        of Pendency of Further Administrative Action Following a 
        Determination Not to Refer to Trial by Court-Martial.....   144
      Section 550b--Training for Special Victims' Counsel on 
        Civilian Criminal Justice Matters in the States of the 
        Military Installations to Which Assigned.................   144
    Subtitle F--Member Education.................................   145
      Section 551--Authority for Detail of Certain Enlisted 
        Members of the Armed Forces as Students at Law Schools...   145
      Section 552--Education of Members of the Armed Forces on 
        Career Readiness and Professional Development............   145
      Section 553--Defense Language Institute Foreign Language 
        Center...................................................   145
      Section 554--Expansion of Department of Defense Starbase 
        Program..................................................   145
      Section 555--Degree Granting Authority for United States 
        Army Armament Graduate School............................   145
      Section 556--Congressional Nominations for Senior Reserve 
        Officers' Training Corps Scholarships....................   145
      Section 557--Consideration of Application for Transfer for 
        a Student of a Military Service Academy Who Is the Victim 
        of a Sexual Assault or Related Offense...................   145
      Section 558--Redesignation of the Commandant of the United 
        States Air Force Institute of Technology as the Director 
        and Chancellor of Such Institute.........................   146
      Section 559--Eligibility of Additional Enlisted Members for 
        Associate Degree Programs of the Community College of the 
        Air Force................................................   146
      Section 560--Safe-to-Report Policy Applicable to Military 
        Service Academies........................................   146
      Section 560a--Recoupment of Funds from Cadets and 
        Midshipmen Separated for Criminal Misconduct.............   146
    Subtitle G--Member Training and Transition...................   146
      Section 561--Prohibition on Gender-Segregated Training at 
        Marine Corps Recruit Depots..............................   146
      Section 562--Medical Personnel at Marine Corps Recruit 
        Depots...................................................   146
      Section 563--Assessment of Deaths of Recruits under the 
        Jurisdiction of the Secretary of the Navy................   147
      Section 564--Inclusion of Specific Email Address Block on 
        Certificate of Release or Discharge from Active Duty (DD 
        Form 214)................................................   147
      Section 565--Machine Readability and Electronic 
        Transferability of Certificate of Release or Discharge 
        from Active Duty (DD Form 214)...........................   147
      Section 566--Records of Service for Reserves...............   147
    Subtitle H--Military Family Readiness and Dependents' 
        Education................................................   147
      Section 571--Authorizing Members to Take Leave for a Birth 
        or Adoption in More Than One Increment...................   147
      Section 572--Deferred Deployment for Members Who Give Birth   147
      Section 573--Authority of the Secretary Concerned to 
        Transport Remains of a Covered Decedent to No More Than 
        Two Places Selected by the Person Designated to Direct 
        Disposition of the Remains...............................   147
      Section 574--Clarification regarding Eligibility to 
        Transfer Entitlement under Post-9/11 Educational 
        Assistance Program.......................................   147
      Section 575--Absentee Ballot Tracking Program..............   148
      Section 576--Annual State Report Card......................   148
      Section 577--Transportation of Remains of Casualties; 
        Travel Expenses for Next of Kin..........................   148
      Section 578--Meetings of Officials of the Department of 
        Defense with Survivors of Deceased Members of the Armed 
        Forces...................................................   148
      Section 579--Direct Employment Pilot Program for Members of 
        the National Guard and Reserve, Veterans, Their Spouses 
        and Dependents, and Members of Gold Star Families........   148
      Section 580--Continued Assistance to Schools with 
        Significant Numbers of Military Dependent Students.......   148
    Subtitle I--Decorations and Awards...........................   149
      Section 581--Expansion of Gold Star Lapel Button 
        Eligibility to Stepsiblings; Free Replacement............   149
      Section 582--Establishment of the Atomic Veterans Service 
        Medal....................................................   149
      Section 583--Review of World War I Valor Medals............   149
    Subtitle J--Miscellaneous Reports and Other Matters..........   149
      Section 591--Repeal of Quarterly Report on End Strengths...   149
      Section 592--Revision of Workplace and Gender Relations 
        Surveys..................................................   149
      Section 593--Modification of Elements of Reports on the 
        Improved Transition Assistance Program...................   149
      Section 594--Questions in Workplace Surveys regarding 
        Supremacist, Extremist, and Racist Activity..............   149
      Section 595--Command Matters in Connection with Transition 
        Assistance Programs......................................   150
      Section 596--Expressing Support for the Designation of a 
        ``Gold Star Families Remembrance Day''...................   150
TITLE VI--COMPENSATION AND OTHER PERSONNEL BENEFITS..............   150
  ITEMS OF SPECIAL INTEREST......................................   150
      Commissaries during Shutdowns..............................   150
      Department of Defense SkillBridge Program Applicability to 
        Service Member Spouses...................................   150
      Educational Opportunities for Service Member Dependents....   151
      Maternity Leave Parity for National Guard and Reserve 
        Components...............................................   151
      Report Assessing the Advisability of Permitting Military 
        Personnel to use Education Benefits for Nontraditional 
        Cyber-Related Education Programs.........................   151
      Report on Feasibility of Loan or Grant Program to Offset 
        the Cost of Child Care Center Accreditation in Areas with 
        Long Waitlists to Access On-Base Child Development 
        Centers..................................................   152
      Report on TSP Default Contribution Rate....................   152
      Review and Assessment of Transitional Compensation Program.   153
      Service Member Separation Survey Methodology...............   154
      Servicemember Statement of Benefits........................   154
      Spouse Employment Programs.................................   155
  LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS.........................................   155
    Subtitle A--Pay and Allowances...............................   155
      Section 601--Clarification of Continuation of Pays during 
        Hospitalization and Rehabilitation Resulting from Wounds, 
        Injury, or Illness Incurred while on Duty in a Hostile 
        Fire Area or Exposed to an Event of Hostile Fire or Other 
        Hostile Action...........................................   155
      Section 602--Basic Needs Allowance for Low-Income Regular 
        Members..................................................   156
      Section 603--Temporary Increase of Rates of Basic Allowance 
        for Housing Following Determination that Local Civilian 
        Housing Costs Significantly Exceed Such Rates............   156
      Section 604--Basic Allowance for Housing for a Member 
        without Dependents when Relocation would Financially 
        Disadvantage the Member..................................   156
      Section 605--Partial Dislocation Allowance.................   156
    Subtitle B--Bonuses and Special Incentive Pays...............   156
      Section 611--One-Year Extension of Certain Expiring Bonus 
        and Special Pay Authorities..............................   156
    Subtitle C--Family and Survivor Benefits.....................   156
      Section 621--Payment of Transitional Compensation for 
        Certain Dependents.......................................   156
      Section 622--Death Gratuity for ROTC Graduates.............   157
      Section 623--Continued Eligibility for Education and 
        Training Opportunities for Spouses of Promoted Members...   157
      Section 624--Occupational Improvements for Relocated 
        Spouses of Members of the Uniformed Services.............   157
      Section 625--Expansion of Authority to Provide Financial 
        Assistance to Civilian Providers of Child Care Services 
        or Youth Program Services Who Provide Such Services to 
        Survivors of Members of the Armed Forces Who Die in Line 
        of Duty..................................................   157
      Section 626--Space-Available Travel on Military Aircraft 
        for Children and Surviving Spouses of Members Who Die of 
        Hostile Action or Training Duty..........................   157
      Section 627--Consideration of Service on Active Duty to 
        Reduce Age of Eligibility for Retired Pay for Non-Regular 
        Service..................................................   157
      Section 628--Modification to Authority to Reimburse for 
        State Licensure and Certification Costs of a Spouse of a 
        Member Arising from Relocation...........................   158
      Section 629--Improvements to Child Care for Members of the 
        Armed Forces.............................................   158
      Section 630--Casualty Assistance for Survivors of Deceased 
        ROTC Graduates...........................................   158
    Subtitle D--Defense Resale Matters...........................   158
      Section 631--GAO Review of Defense Resale Optimization 
        Study....................................................   158
TITLE VII--HEALTH CARE PROVISIONS................................   158
  ITEMS OF SPECIAL INTEREST......................................   158
      Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy...........................   158
      Civilian Astronaut TRICARE.................................   159
      Co-Location of Department of Defense and Department of 
        Veterans Affairs Medical Facilities......................   159
      Defense Health Command Organizational Structure............   160
      Food Allergies in the Peer Reviewed Medical Research 
        Program..................................................   160
      Government Accountability Office Review on Health Care 
        Quality in the Military Health System....................   160
      Implementation Plan to Address the Impacts of Obesity on 
        the Defense Enterprise...................................   161
      Innovative Traumatic Brain Injuries Preventative Device 
        Research.................................................   162
      Malaria and Malaria Vaccine Development....................   162
      Military Wellness Information Synthesis....................   162
      Naval Medical Research Unit Dayton Disorientation Research 
        Device...................................................   163
      Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder Drug Therapy................   163
      Report on Access to Health Care Services for Reserve and 
        National Guard Who Disclose Sexual Assault...............   163
      Report on Expanding TRICARE benefits to include coverage to 
        allow for medical treatment for sexual dysfunction 
        related to sexual assault or harassment..................   164
      Report on Pre-Hospital Tactical Combat Trauma Training.....   164
      Report on Service Member Discharges Related to Human 
        Immunodeficiency Virus or Hepatitis B....................   164
      Research to Reduce Deaths Due to Hemorrhaging..............   165
      Service Member Diet and Nutrition..........................   165
      Translational Application of Mental Health Evidence Base...   166
      TRICARE Reserve Select Study...............................   166
      TRICARE Specialty Drug Network Accessibility...............   167
      Unhealthy Alcohol Use Report...............................   167
      University Affiliated Research Center......................   168
      Wounded Warrior Service Dog Program........................   168
  LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS.........................................   168
    Subtitle A--TRICARE and Other Health Care Benefits...........   168
      Section 701--Contraception Coverage Parity under the 
        TRICARE Program..........................................   168
      Section 702--Pregnancy Prevention Assistance at Military 
        Medical Treatment Facilities for Sexual Assault Survivors   168
      Section 703--Modification of Eligibility for TRICARE 
        Reserve Select for Certain Members of the Selected 
        Reserve..................................................   169
      Section 704--Lead Level Screenings and Testings for 
        Children.................................................   169
      Section 705--Exposure to Open Burn Pits and Toxic Airborne 
        Chemicals or Other Airborne Contaminants as Part of 
        Periodic Health Assessments and Other Physical 
        Examinations.............................................   169
      Section 706--Enhancement of Recordkeeping and 
        Postdeployment Medical Assessment Requirements Related to 
        Occupational and Environmental Hazard Exposure during 
        Deployment...............................................   169
      Section 707--Modifications to Post-Deployment Mental Health 
        Assessments for Members of the Armed Forces Deployed in 
        Support of a Contingency Operation.......................   169
      Section 708--Provision of Blood Testing for Firefighters of 
        Department of Defense to Determine Exposure to 
        Perfluoroalkyl and Polyfluoroalkyl Substances............   169
    Subtitle B--Health Care Administration.......................   170
      Section 711--Requirements for Certain Prescription Drug 
        Labels...................................................   170
      Section 712--Officers Authorized to Command Army Dental 
        Units....................................................   170
      Section 713--Improvements to Leadership of Interagency 
        Program Office of the Department of Defense and the 
        Department of Veterans Affairs...........................   170
      Section 714--Inclusion of Blast Exposure History in Medical 
        Records of Members of the Armed Forces...................   170
      Section 715--Comprehensive Policy for Provision of Mental 
        Health Care to Members of the Armed Forces...............   170
      Section 716--Limitation on the Realignment or Reduction of 
        Military Medical Manning End Strength....................   170
      Section 717--Strategy to Recruit and Retain Mental Health 
        Providers................................................   171
      Section 718--Monitoring Medication Prescribing Practices 
        for the Treatment of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder......   171
    Subtitle C--Reports and Other Matters........................   171
      Section 721--Establishment of Military Dental Research 
        Program..................................................   171
      Section 722--Pilot Program on Cryopreservation and Storage.   171
      Section 723--Encouragement of Participation in Women's 
        Health Transition Training Pilot Program.................   171
      Section 724--National Guard Suicide Prevention Pilot 
        Program..................................................   171
      Section 725--Reports on Suicide among Members of the Armed 
        Forces...................................................   172
      Section 726--Study on Military-Civilian Integrated Health 
        Delivery Systems.........................................   172
      Section 727--Study on Case Management at Military Medical 
        Treatment Facilities.....................................   172
      Section 728--Study on Infertility among Members of the 
        Armed Forces.............................................   172
TITLE VIII--ACQUISITION POLICY, ACQUISITION MANAGEMENT, AND 
    RELATED MATTERS..............................................   172
  ITEMS OF SPECIAL INTEREST......................................   172
      Assessment of Defense Sustainment Enterprise...............   172
      Assessment of Program Management Structure and Improvements   173
      Assessment of the Use of Tantalum..........................   174
      Assessment of Training Needs for Non-Acquisition Workforce 
        Personnel................................................   174
      Briefing on Sustainment Plan for Maintaining Access to MIL-
        PRF-19500 Parts..........................................   175
      Communication with the Marketplace.........................   175
      Comptroller General Report on Procurement Technical 
        Assistance Centers.......................................   176
      Comptroller General Report on the Joint Capabilities 
        Integration and Development System Timelines.............   176
      Comptroller General Report on the Use of Fixed-Price 
        Incentive Contracts......................................   177
      Defense Production Act Title III Funding...................   178
      Expansion of the GSA Pilot Authorized under FY18 NDAA 
        Section 846..............................................   178
      Innovative Construction Materials and Design Process for 
        Military Engineering in Cold Regions.....................   179
      Insight regarding Use of Lowest Price Technically 
        Acceptable Source Selection Criteria.....................   179
      Maintain Commercial Supply Stores..........................   180
      Modernizing Department of Defense Forms....................   181
      Pacific Telecommunications Security........................   181
      Procurement Technical Assistance Centers Training Standards   182
      Report on Domestic Nonavailability Waiver Process..........   182
      Report on Ownership or Trading of Stocks in Certain 
        Companies by Department of Defense Officers and Employees   182
      Report on Plan to Expand and Strengthen the Military Radar 
        Industrial Base..........................................   182
      Report on the Department's Market Research Practices for IT 
        Acquisition..............................................   183
      Report on the Procurement of Military Free Fall Parachutes.   183
      Review of Conflicts of Interest in Organizational Analysis 
        of the Department of Defense.............................   184
      Security of Department of Defense Telecommunication 
        Services.................................................   185
      Small Business Procurement Specialists at Military 
        Installations............................................   185
      Sourcing of Domestic Components for U.S. Navy Ships........   186
  LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS.........................................   186
    Subtitle A--Acquisition Policy and Management................   186
      Section 801--Establishment of Acquisition Pathways for 
        Software Applications and Software Upgrades..............   186
      Section 802--Software Development and Software Acquisition 
        Training and Management Programs.........................   186
      Section 803--Modifications to Cost or Pricing Data for 
        Certain Procurements.....................................   187
      Section 804--Modifications to Cost or Pricing Data on 
        Below-Threshold Contracts................................   187
      Section 805--Comptroller General Report on Price 
        Reasonableness...........................................   187
      Section 806--Requirement That Certain Ship Components Be 
        Manufactured in the National Technology and Industrial 
        Base.....................................................   187
      Section 807--Acquisition and Disposal of Certain Rare Earth 
        Materials................................................   187
      Section 808--Prohibition on Acquisition of Tantalum from 
        Non-Allied Foreign Nations...............................   188
      Section 809--Application of Miscellaneous Technology Base 
        Policies and Programs to the Columbia-Class Submarine 
        Program..................................................   188
      Section 810--Application of Limitation on Procurement of 
        Goods other than United States Goods to the FFG-Frigate 
        Program..................................................   188
      Section 811--Consideration of Price in Procurement of the 
        FFG(X) Frigate...........................................   188
      Section 812--Repeal of Continuation of Data Rights during 
        Challenges...............................................   188
      Section 813--Repeal of Authority to Waive Acquisition Laws 
        to Acquire Vital National Security Capabilities..........   188
      Section 814--Repeal of Transfer of Funds Related to Cost 
        Overruns and Cost Underruns..............................   188
    Subtitle B--Amendments to General Contracting Authorities, 
        Procedures, and Limitations..............................   189
      Section 821--Modifications to the Middle Tier of 
        Acquisition Programs.....................................   189
      Section 822--Briefing Relating to the ``Middle Tier'' of 
        Acquisition Programs.....................................   189
      Section 823--Rates for Progress Payments or Performance-
        Based Payments...........................................   189
      Section 824--Additional Requirements for Negotiations for 
        Noncommercial Computer Software..........................   189
      Section 825--Responsibility for Data Analysis and 
        Requirements Validation for Services Contracts...........   189
      Section 826--Annual Reports on Authority to Carry Out 
        Certain Prototype Projects...............................   190
      Section 827--Competition Requirements for Purchases from 
        Federal Prison Industries................................   190
      Section 828--Enhanced Post-Award Debriefing Rights.........   190
      Section 829--Standardizing Data Collection and Reporting on 
        Use of Source Selection Procedures by Federal Agencies...   190
      Section 830--Modification of Justification and Approval 
        Requirement for Certain Department of Defense Contracts..   191
    Subtitle C--Provisions Relating to Acquisition Workforce.....   191
      Section 841--Defense Acquisition Workforce Certification 
        and Education Requirements...............................   191
      Section 842--Public-Private Exchange Program for the 
        Acquisition Workforce....................................   192
      Section 843--Incentives and Consideration for Qualified 
        Training Programs........................................   193
      Section 844--Certification by Prospective Military 
        Construction Contractors of Good Faith Effort to Utilize 
        Qualified Apprentices....................................   193
    Subtitle D--Provisions Relating to Acquisition Security......   193
      Section 851--Supply Chain Security of Certain 
        Telecommunications and Video Surveillance Services or 
        Equipment................................................   193
      Section 852--Assured Security against Intrusion on United 
        States Military Networks.................................   193
      Section 853--Revised Authorities to Defeat Adversary 
        Efforts to Compromise United States Defense Capabilities.   194
      Section 854--Prohibition on Operation or Procurement of 
        Foreign-Made Unmanned Aircraft Systems...................   194
      Section 855--Supply Chain Risk Mitigation Policies to Be 
        Implemented through Requirements Generation Process......   194
    Subtitle E--Provisions Relating to the Acquisition System....   194
      Section 861--Modifications to the Defense Acquisition 
        System...................................................   194
    Subtitle F--Industrial Base Matters..........................   194
      Section 871--Consideration of Subcontracting to Minority 
        Institutions.............................................   194
      Section 872--Size Standard Calculations for Certain Small 
        Business Concerns........................................   194
      Section 873--Modifications to Small Business Subcontracting   195
      Section 874--Inclusion of Best in Class Designations in 
        Annual Report on Small Business Goals....................   195
      Section 875--Small Business Administration Cybersecurity 
        Reports..................................................   195
      Section 876--Cyber Counseling Certification Program for 
        Lead Small Business Development Centers..................   195
      Section 877--Exemption of Certain Contracts from the 
        Periodic Inflation Adjustments to the Acquisition-Related 
        Dollar Threshold.........................................   196
      Section 878--Improvements to Certain Defense Innovation 
        Programs.................................................   196
      Section 879--Pilot Program for Development of Technology-
        Enhanced Capabilities with Partnership Intermediaries....   196
      Section 880--Authorized Official to Carry Out the 
        Procurement Technical Assistance Cooperative Agreement 
        Program..................................................   196
      Section 881--Permanent Authorization and Improvement of 
        Department of Defense Mentor-Protege Program.............   196
    Subtitle G--Other Matters....................................   197
      Section 891--Requirement to Use Models of Commercial E-
        Commerce Portal Program..................................   197
      Section 892--Report and Database on Items Manufactured in 
        the United States for Major Defense Acquisition Programs.   197
      Section 893--Requirements Relating to Selected Acquisition 
        Reports..................................................   197
      Section 894--Contractor Science, Technology, Engineering, 
        and Math Programs........................................   197
      Section 895--Extension of Sunset Relating to Federal Data 
        Center Consolidation Initiative..........................   198
      Section 896--Requirements Relating to Certain Rail Rolling 
        Stock Procurements and Operations........................   198
      Section 897--Prohibition on Contracting with Persons That 
        Have Business Operations with the Maduro Regime..........   198
TITLE IX--DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE ORGANIZATION AND MANAGEMENT......   199
  LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS.........................................   199
    Subtitle A--Office of the Secretary of Defense and Related 
        Matters..................................................   199
      Section 901--Update of Authorities Relating to Nuclear 
        Command, Control, and Communications.....................   199
    Subtitle B--Other Department of Defense Organization and 
        Management Matters.......................................   199
      Section 911--Codification of Assistant Secretaries for 
        Environment, Installations, and Energy of the Army, Navy 
        and Air Force............................................   199
      Section 912--Limitation on Availability of Funds for 
        Consolidation of Defense Media Activity..................   199
      Section 913--Modernization of Certain Forms and Surveys....   199
    Subtitle C--Space Matters....................................   199
     Part I--United States Space Corps...........................   199
      Section 921--Establishment of United States Space Corps in 
        the Department of the Air Force..........................   199
      Section 922--Transfer of Personnel, Functions, and Assets 
        to the Space Corps.......................................   199
      Section 923--Reports on Space Corps........................   200
      Section 924--Space National Guard..........................   200
      Section 925--Effects on Military Installations.............   200
     Part II--Other Space Matters................................   200
      Section 931--United States Space Command...................   200
TITLE X--GENERAL PROVISIONS......................................   200
  ITEMS OF SPECIAL INTEREST......................................   200
    Other Matters................................................   200
      Assessment of Special Operations Force Structure...........   200
      Audit Leadership and Accountability........................   201
      Briefing on Improving Ground Combat Vehicle Assured 
        Mobility in Northern Regions.............................   201
      Briefing on National Guard Readiness and Ability to Meet 
        Modern Threats from Area Disasters and Weapons of Mass 
        Destruction..............................................   202
      Briefing on Support to Civil Authorities in Support of 
        Natural Disasters and Law Enforcement with Aerial 
        Platforms and Satellites.................................   203
      Chemical, Biological, Radiological, Nuclear Response 
        Enterprise...............................................   204
      Commercial Technology Support to Audit Efforts.............   205
      Designation of Gender Advisors.............................   205
      DOD Efforts to Improve Friendly Force Identification in 
        Close Air Support........................................   205
      Evaluation of Integration of a Geographic Combatant Command 
        and Theater Special Operations Command...................   206
      Feasibility of Providing Dedicated Security Contingency 
        Support for Non-Governmental Organizations...............   207
      Incorporation of Cleared U.S.-Flag Commercial Ship 
        Operators in Wargames and Exercises......................   208
      Independent Study on Detainee Medical Care at United States 
        Naval Station, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba......................   208
      Management of the Ammunition Industrial Base...............   209
      Navy Cost Savings Initiative...............................   209
      Office of the Chief Management Officer Human Capital 
        Analysis.................................................   209
      Operational Use of Publicly Available Information..........   210
      Report on Egypt's Counterterrorism Campaign in the Sinai...   211
      Report on Supporting Requirements for the Air Force's 
        Proposed Increase in Force Structure.....................   211
      Report on the Process for Repatriation of Individuals Who 
        Have Been Cleared for Transfer out of United States Naval 
        Station, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba............................   212
      Special Operations Forces Professionalism and Ethics.......   212
      Strategy for Operations in the Information Environment.....   213
      Trafficking of Wildlife and Wildlife Products..............   214
  LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS.........................................   214
    Subtitle A--Financial Matters................................   214
      Section 1001--General Transfer Authority...................   214
      Section 1002--Additional Requirements for Annual Report and 
        Briefing on Financial Improvement and Audit Remediation 
        Plan.....................................................   215
      Section 1003--Financial Improvement and Audit Remediation 
        Plan.....................................................   215
      Section 1004--Reporting Requirements Relating to Department 
        of Defense Audits........................................   215
      Section 1005--Annual Budget Justification Display for 
        Service-Common and Other Support and Enabling 
        Capabilities for Special Operations Forces...............   215
      Section 1006--Determination of Budgetary Effects...........   216
      Section 1007--Independent Public Accountant Audit of 
        Financial Systems of the Department of Defense...........   216
    Subtitle B--Counterdrug Activities...........................   216
      Section 1011--Modification of Authority to Provide Support 
        to Other Agencies for Counterdrug Activities and 
        Activities to Counter Transnational Organized Crime......   216
      Section 1012--Technical Correction and Extension of 
        Reporting Requirement regarding Enhancement of 
        Information Sharing and Coordination of Military Training 
        between Department of Homeland Security and Department of 
        Defense..................................................   216
      Section 1013--Repeal of Secretary of Defense Review of 
        Curricula and Program Structures of National Guard 
        Counterdrug Schools......................................   216
    Subtitle C--Naval Vessels and Shipyards......................   216
      Section 1021--Transportation by Sea of Supplies for the 
        Armed Forces and Defense Agencies........................   216
      Section 1022--Use of National Defense Sealift Fund for 
        Procurement of Two Used Vessels..........................   217
      Section 1023--Formal Schoolhouse Training for Shipboard 
        System Programs of Record................................   217
      Section 1024--Report on Shipbuilder Training and the 
        Defense Industrial Base..................................   217
    Subtitle D--Counterterrorism.................................   217
      Section 1031--Extension of Authority for Joint Task Forces 
        to Provide Support to Law Enforcement Agencies Conducting 
        Counter-Terrorism Activities.............................   217
      Section 1032--Prohibition on Use of Funds for Transfer or 
        Release of Individuals Detained at United States Naval 
        Station, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, to Certain Countries......   217
      Section 1033--Prohibition on Use of Funds for Transfer to 
        and Detention of Additional Individuals, Including United 
        States Citizens, at United States Naval Station, 
        Guantanamo Bay, Cuba.....................................   217
      Section 1034--Sense of Congress regarding the Provision of 
        Medical Care to Individuals Detained at United States 
        Naval Station, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba......................   218
      Section 1035--Independent Assessment on Gender and 
        Countering Violent Extremism.............................   218
    Subtitle E--Miscellaneous Authorities and Limitations........   218
      Section 1041--Scheduling of Department of Defense Executive 
        Aircraft Controlled by Secretaries of Military 
        Departments..............................................   218
      Section 1042--Explosive Ordnance Defense Disposal Program..   218
      Section 1043--Notification on the Provision of Defense 
        Sensitive Support........................................   219
      Section 1044--Modification and Technical Correction of 
        Authority for Deployment of Members of the Armed Forces 
        to the Southern Land Border of the United States.........   219
      Section 1045--Limitation on Use of Funds for the 
        Inactivation of Army Watercraft Units....................   219
      Section 1046--Prohibition on Use of Funds for Construction 
        of a Wall, Fence, or Other Physical Barrier along the 
        Southern Border of the United States.....................   219
      Section 1047--Expenditure of Funds for Department of 
        Defense Intelligence and Counterintelligence Activities..   219
      Section 1048--Limitation on Use of Funds to House Children 
        Separated from Parents...................................   220
      Section 1049--Limitation on Use of Funds for Providing 
        Housing for Unaccompanied Alien Children.................   220
    Subtitle F--National Defense Strategy Implementation.........   220
      Section 1051--Short Title..................................   220
      Section 1052--Report on Operational Concepts and Plans 
        Regarding Strategic Competitors..........................   220
      Section 1053--Actions to Increase Analytic Support.........   220
      Section 1054--Definitions..................................   220
    Subtitle G--Studies and Reports..............................   221
      Section 1061--Report on Transfers of Equipment to 
        Prohibited Entities......................................   221
      Section 1062--Elimination of Requirement to Submit Reports 
        to Congress in Paper Format..............................   221
      Section 1063--Modification of Annual Report on Civilian 
        Casualties in Connection with United States Military 
        Operations...............................................   221
      Section 1064--Inclusion of Certain Individuals Investigated 
        by Inspectors General in the Semiannual Report...........   221
      Section 1065--Annual Report on Joint Military Information 
        Support Operations Web Operations Center.................   221
      Section 1066--Mobility Capability Requirement Study........   222
      Section 1067--Assessment of Special Operations Force 
        Structure................................................   222
      Section 1068--Army Aviation Strategic Plan and 
        Modernization Roadmap....................................   222
      Section 1069--Report on Ground-Based Long-Range Artillery 
        to Counter Land and Maritime Threats.....................   222
      Section 1070--Independent Review of Transportation Working-
        Capital Fund.............................................   222
      Section 1071--Geographic Command Risk Assessment of 
        Proposed Use of Certain Aircraft Capabilities............   223
      Section 1072--Annual Report on Strikes Undertaken by the 
        United States Against Terrorist Targets Outside Areas of 
        Active Hostilities.......................................   223
      Section 1073--Termination of Requirement for Submittal to 
        Congress of Certain Recurring Reports....................   223
    Subtitle H--Other Matters....................................   223
      Section 1081--Technical, Conforming, and Clerical 
        Amendments...............................................   223
      Section 1082--Submission to Congress of Department of 
        Defense Execute Orders...................................   223
      Section 1083--Extension of National Security Commission on 
        Artificial Intelligence..................................   224
      Section 1084--National Commission on Military Aviation 
        Safety...................................................   224
      Section 1085--Extension of Postage Stamp for Breast Cancer 
        Research.................................................   224
      Section 1086--Processes and Procedures for Notifications 
        regarding Special Operations Forces......................   224
      Section 1087--Assessment of Standards, Processes, 
        Procedures, and Policy Relating to Civilian Casualties...   225
      Section 1088--Disposal of IPv4 Addresses...................   225
      Section 1089--Securing American Science and Technology.....   225
      Section 1090--Standardized Policy Guidance for Calculating 
        Aircraft Operation and Sustainment Costs.................   225
      Section 1091--Special Federal Aviation Regulation Working 
        Group....................................................   225
TITLE XI--CIVILIAN PERSONNEL MATTERS.............................   226
  ITEMS OF SPECIAL INTEREST......................................   226
      Civilian Sexual Assault Study..............................   226
      Department of Defense Report on Reduction in Force.........   226
      Direct Hire Authority Clarification for Support Defense 
        Activities...............................................   227
      Optimizing Total Force Management..........................   227
      Readiness and Borrowed Military Manpower...................   228
      The Department of Defense's Use of Term and Temporary 
        Hiring Authorities.......................................   228
  LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS.........................................   229
      Section 1101--Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency 
        Personnel Management Authority...........................   229
      Section 1102--Modification of Probationary Period for 
        Certain Department of Defense Employees..................   229
      Section 1103--Civilian Personnel Management................   229
      Section 1104--One-Year Extension of Temporary Authority to 
        Grant Allowances, Benefits, and Gratuities to Civilian 
        Personnel on Official Duty in a Combat Zone..............   229
      Section 1105--One-Year Extension of Authority to Waive 
        Annual Limitation on Premium Pay and Aggregate Limitation 
        on Pay for Federal Civilian Employees Working Overseas...   229
      Section 1106--Performance of Civilian Functions by Military 
        Personnel................................................   229
      Section 1107--Extension of Direct Hire Authority for 
        Domestic Industrial Base Facilities and Major Range and 
        Test Facilities Base.....................................   230
      Section 1108--Authority to Provide Additional Allowances 
        and Benefits for Certain Defense Clandestine Service 
        Employees................................................   230
      Section 1109--Prohibited Personnel Practices...............   230
      Section 1110--Enhancement of Antidiscrimination Protections 
        for Federal Employees....................................   230
      Section 1111--Modification of Direct Hire Authorities for 
        the Department of Defense................................   230
      Section 1112--Permitted Disclosures by Whistleblowers......   231
TITLE XII--MATTERS RELATING TO FOREIGN NATIONS...................   231
  ITEMS OF SPECIAL INTEREST......................................   231
      Assessment, Monitoring, and Evaluation Resources...........   231
      Briefing on Afghanistan Reconciliation.....................   231
      Briefing on Defense Department Plans for the European 
        Deterrence Initiative....................................   232
      Comptroller General Review of Posture to Counter Russian 
        Aggression...............................................   233
      Implementation of Taiwan's Defense Strategy................   233
      Insufficiency of the United States Strategy for Syria......   234
      North Atlantic Treaty Organization Cooperative Cyber 
        Defense Center of Excellence.............................   234
      North Atlantic Treaty Organization Strategic Communications 
        Center of Excellence.....................................   235
      Political Inclusion and the Safe Return of Iraqi Internally 
        Displaced Persons to Their Homes.........................   236
      Report on Chinese Efforts Targeting Democratic Elections 
        and U.S. Alliances and Partnerships and Strategy to 
        Counter Chinese Election Interference....................   236
      Report on Effective Security Sector Assistance Tools.......   237
      Report on Russian Efforts Targeting Democratic Elections 
        and U.S. Alliances and Partnerships and Strategy to 
        Counter Russian Election Interference....................   238
      Report on U.S. Central Command's Accounting For and 
        Management of Funds Received from Foreign Partners for 
        Services.................................................   239
      Report on U.S. Military Activity in Syria..................   239
      Report on U.S. Military Training with the Republic of Korea   239
      Report on U.S. Strategy to Respond to Russian Threats in 
        the Black Sea............................................   240
      Security Cooperation Programs and Activities...............   241
      Security Cooperation with the Pacific Island Countries.....   242
  LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS.........................................   242
    Subtitle A--Assistance and Training..........................   242
      Section 1201--Modification of Authority to Build Capacity 
        of Foreign Security Forces...............................   242
      Section 1202--Modification and Extension of Cross Servicing 
        Agreements for Loan of Personnel Protection and Personnel 
        Survivability Equipment in Coalition Operations..........   242
      Section 1203--Modification of Quarterly Report on 
        Obligation and Expenditure of Funds for Security 
        Cooperation Programs and Activities......................   242
      Section 1204--Integration of Gender Perspectives and 
        Meaningful Participation by Women in Security Cooperation 
        Authorities..............................................   243
    Subtitle B--Matters Relating to Afghanistan and Pakistan.....   243
      Section 1211--Extension and Modification of Authority for 
        Reimbursement of Certain Coalition Nations for Support 
        Provided to United States Military Operations............   243
      Section 1212--Modification and Extension of Afghan Special 
        Immigrant Visa Program...................................   243
      Section 1213--Extension of Authority to Transfer Defense 
        Articles and Provide Defense Services to the Military and 
        Security Forces of Afghanistan...........................   243
      Section 1214--Extension and Modification of Authority to 
        Acquire Products and Services Produced in Countries along 
        a Major Route of Supply to Afghanistan...................   243
      Section 1215--Authority for Certain Payments to Redress 
        Injury and Loss in Afghanistan, Iraq, Syria, Somalia, 
        Libya, and Yemen.........................................   244
      Section 1216--Extension of Semiannual Report on Enhancing 
        Security and Stability in Afghanistan....................   244
    Subtitle C--Matters Relating to Syria, Iraq, and Iran........   244
      Section 1221--Modification of Authority to Provide 
        Assistance to Counter the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria   244
      Section 1222--Extension and Modification of Authority to 
        Provide Assistance to the Vetted Syrian Opposition.......   244
      Section 1223--Extension and Modification of Authority to 
        Support Operations and Activities of the Office of 
        Security Cooperation in Iraq.............................   244
      Section 1224--Prohibition on Provision of Weapons and Other 
        Forms of Support to Certain Organizations................   245
      Section 1225--Rule of Construction Relating to Use of 
        Military Force Against Iran..............................   245
      Section 1226--Sense of Congress on Support for Ministry of 
        Peshmerga Forces of the Kurdistan Region of Iraq.........   245
    Subtitle D--Matters Relating to Russia.......................   245
      Section 1231--Prohibition on the Use of Funds to Suspend, 
        Terminate, or Withdraw the United States from the Open 
        Skies Treaty.............................................   245
      Section 1232--Extension of Limitation on Military 
        Cooperation between the United States and Russia.........   245
      Section 1233--Prohibition on Availability of Funds Relating 
        to Sovereignty of Russia over Crimea.....................   246
      Section 1234--Modification and Extension of Ukraine 
        Security Assistance Initiative...........................   246
      Section 1235--Report on Treaties Relating to Nuclear Arms 
        Control..................................................   246
      Section 1236--Sense of Congress on Updating and Modernizing 
        Existing Agreements to Avert Miscalculation between the 
        United States and Russia.................................   247
      Section 1237--Sense of Congress on Support for Georgia.....   247
      Section 1238--Sense of Congress on Support for Estonia, 
        Latvia, and Lithuania....................................   247
    Subtitle E--Matters Relating to the Indo-Pacific Region......   247
      Section 1241--Modification of Indo-Pacific Maritime 
        Security Initiative......................................   247
      Section 1242--Extension and Modification of Report on 
        Military and Security Developments Involving North Korea.   247
      Section 1243--Limitation on Use of Funds to Reduce the 
        Total Number of Members of the Armed Forces Serving on 
        Active Duty Who Are Deployed to South Korea..............   247
      Section 1244--Report on Direct, Indirect, and Burden-
        Sharing Contributions of Japan and South Korea...........   248
      Section 1245--Report on Strategy on the Philippines........   248
      Section 1246--Modification of Annual Report on Military and 
        Security Developments Involving the People's Republic of 
        China....................................................   248
      Section 1247--Modification of Annual Report on Military and 
        Security Developments Involving the People's Republic of 
        China....................................................   249
      Section 1248--Sense of Congress on Taiwan..................   249
      Section 1249--Enhancing Defense Cooperation with Singapore.   249
    Subtitle F--Matters Relating to Europe and NATO..............   249
      Section 1251--Extension and Modification of NATO Special 
        Operations Headquarters..................................   249
      Section 1252--Modification and Extension of Future Years 
        Plan and Planning Transparency for the European 
        Deterrence Initiative....................................   249
      Section 1253--Protection of European Deterrence Initiative 
        Funds from Diversion for Other Purposes..................   250
      Section 1254--Statement of Policy on United States Military 
        Investment in Europe.....................................   250
      Section 1255--Limitation on Transfer of F-35 Aircraft to 
        Turkey...................................................   250
      Section 1256--Report on Value of Investments in Dual Use 
        Infrastructure Projects by NATO Member States............   250
      Section 1257--Sense of Congress on Support for Poland......   250
    Subtitle G--Other Matters....................................   251
      Section 1261--Sense of Congress on United States Partners 
        and Allies...............................................   251
      Section 1262--Modification to Report on Legal and Policy 
        Frameworks for the Use of Military Force.................   251
      Section 1263--Limitation on Availability of Certain Funds 
        until Report Submitted on Department of Defense Awards 
        and Disciplinary Action as a Result of the 2017 Incident 
        in Niger.................................................   251
      Section 1264--Independent Assessment of Sufficiency of 
        Resources Available to United States Southern Command and 
        United States Africa Command.............................   251
      Section 1265--Rule of Construction Relating to Use of 
        Military Force...........................................   251
      Section 1266--Rule of Construction Relating to Use of 
        Military Force against Venezuela.........................   251
      Section 1267--Sense of Congress on Acquisition by Turkey of 
        Patriot System...........................................   251
    Subtitle H--Baltic Reassurance Act...........................   252
      Section 1271--Findings.....................................   252
      Section 1272--Sense of Congress............................   252
      Section 1273--Defense Assessment...........................   252
      Section 1274--Appropriate Congressional Committees Defined.   252
TITLE XIII--COOPERATIVE THREAT REDUCTION.........................   252
  LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS.........................................   252
      Section 1301--Funding Allocations..........................   252
      Section 1302--Specification of Cooperative Threat Reduction 
        Funds....................................................   252
TITLE XIV--OTHER AUTHORIZATIONS..................................   252
  LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS.........................................   252
    Subtitle A--Military Programs................................   252
      Section 1401--Working Capital Funds........................   252
      Section 1402--Chemical Agents and Munitions Destruction, 
        Defense..................................................   253
      Section 1403--Drug Interdiction and Counter-Drug 
        Activities, Defense-Wide.................................   253
      Section 1404--Defense Inspector General....................   253
      Section 1405--Defense Health Program.......................   253
      Section 1406--National Defense Sealift Fund................   253
    Subtitle B--Other Matters....................................   253
      Section 1411--Authority for Transfer of Funds to Joint 
        Department of Defense-Department of Veterans Affairs 
        Medical Facility Demonstration Fund for Captain James A. 
        Lovell Health Care Center, Illinois......................   253
      Section 1412--Authorization of Appropriations for Armed 
        Forces Retirement Home...................................   253
TITLE XV--AUTHORIZATION OF ADDITIONAL APPROPRIATIONS FOR OVERSEAS 
    CONTINGENCY OPERATIONS.......................................   254
  ITEMS OF SPECIAL INTEREST......................................   254
      National Guard and Reserve Equipment.......................   254
  LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS.........................................   254
    Subtitle A--Authorization of Appropriations..................   254
      Section 1501--Purpose......................................   254
      Section 1502--Procurement..................................   254
      Section 1503--Research, Development, Test, and Evaluation..   254
      Section 1504--Operation and Maintenance....................   255
      Section 1505--Military Personnel...........................   255
      Section 1506--Working Capital Funds........................   255
      Section 1507--Drug Interdiction and Counter-Drug 
        Activities, Defense-Wide.................................   255
      Section 1508--Defense Inspector General....................   255
      Section 1509--Defense Health Program.......................   255
    Subtitle B--Financial Matters................................   255
      Section 1511--Treatment as Additional Authorizations.......   255
      Section 1512--Special Transfer Authority...................   255
    Subtitle C--Other Matters....................................   255
      Section 1521--Afghanistan Security Forces Fund.............   255
TITLE XVI--STRATEGIC PROGRAMS, CYBER, AND INTELLIGENCE MATTERS...   256
  ITEMS OF SPECIAL INTEREST......................................   256
    Space Activities.............................................   256
      Centers of Innovation for Space Operational Testing........   256
      Department of Defense Resource-Sharing to Assist with 
        Natural Disasters........................................   256
      Efficient Acquisition of Commercial Satellite 
        Communications...........................................   257
      Global Enhanced Geospatial-Intelligence Delivery...........   257
      Global Positioning System III Satellite Acquisition........   258
      Improving Resilience of Space Architectures................   258
      Increasing Resilience by Leveraging Proliferated 
        Constellations in Low Earth Orbit........................   258
      Leveraging Commercial Satellite Remote Sensing.............   259
      Leveraging Reusable Spacecraft.............................   259
      National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency Aviation Mapping 
        Capability...............................................   260
      Next-Generation LEO-Based Satellite Technology.............   260
      Next-Generation Synthetic Aperture Radar...................   260
      North Atlantic Treaty Organization Ally Launch Services....   261
      Report on Commercial and Space-Based Radio Frequency 
        Mapping..................................................   261
      Report on Commercial or Non-Commercial Security Launch 
        Sustainability...........................................   261
      Rocket Systems Launch Program..............................   262
      Small Satellite Science, Security Applications, and 
        Evolutionary Concepts....................................   262
      Space and Atmospheric Burst Reporting System...............   262
      Telemetry Extension Satellite Communications Relay.........   263
      U.S. Reliance on Foreign In-Space Propulsion Systems.......   263
      Venture Class Launch Services..............................   263
    Missile Defense Programs.....................................   264
      Airborne Tracking and Targeting System.....................   264
      Boost-Phase Ballistic Missile Defense Analysis of 
        Alternatives.............................................   264
      Cybersecurity of Missile Defense Programs..................   264
      Hypersonic Carbon-Carbon Composites........................   265
      Low-Cost Patriot Interceptor...............................   265
      Missile Defense Agency Undefinitized Contract Actions......   266
      Multi-Agency Sensors for Ballistic Missile Defense.........   266
      On-Board Vehicle Power Technology..........................   267
      Review of Ground-Based Midcourse Defense Contract Structure   267
      Terminal High Altitude Area Defense Future Deployment......   268
    Nuclear Forces...............................................   268
      Air Force Global Strike Command Enterprise Analysis Center.   268
      Climate Change and the Nuclear Enterprise..................   269
      Comptroller General Review of Implications of 2018 Nuclear 
        Posture Review...........................................   269
      Delayed Life Extension Programs............................   270
      Domestic Production of Large Solid Rocket Motors...........   271
      Managing Risks of Nuclear Escalation.......................   271
      Nuclear Arms Control.......................................   272
      Radiation Exposure Compensation Act........................   272
      Report on Assessing China's ``No-First-Use'' of Nuclear 
        Weapons Policy...........................................   273
      Report on the Adequacy of the New START Treaty to Restrain 
        Current Threats..........................................   273
      Report on the Nuclear-Armed Sea-Launched Cruise Missile....   275
    Cyber-Related Matters........................................   275
      Air Combat Training System and Spectrum Allocation.........   275
      Allied 5G Network Security.................................   275
      Briefing on the Integration of Cyber Planning at Unified 
        Combatant Commands.......................................   276
      Comptroller General Report to Study the Department of 
        Defense's Current Inventory of Internet Protocol Version 
        4 Addresses..............................................   276
      Cyber Capability Development, Acquisition, and Sustainment.   277
      Cybersecurity of Army Space and Missile Defense Assets.....   277
      Cybersecurity of Biosecurity and Pathogen Threat Data......   277
      Cybersecurity of the Supply Chain..........................   278
      Department of Defense Cloud Strategy.......................   279
      Department of Defense Cyber Red Team Alternatives..........   279
      Efforts to Leverage Education Programs for the Department 
        of Defense Cyber Workforce...............................   279
      Military Cyber Operations and Activities with Allies and 
        Partners.................................................   280
      Persistent Cyber Training Environment......................   281
      Pilot Program Authority to Enhance Cybersecurity and 
        Resiliency of Critical Infrastructure....................   281
      Report on Information Security and Endpoint Accounting.....   282
      Report on Principal Cyber Advisor Resources and Manning....   282
      Shared Cybersecurity Services Program for the Department of 
        Defense..................................................   283
      Support for the Cyber Excepted Service.....................   283
      Synchronizing the Department of Defense Emergency 
        Operations Management Systems............................   284
      Utility Resilience Planning to Support Cybersecurity 
        Threats..................................................   284
    Intelligence Matters.........................................   285
      Airborne Intelligence, Surveillance, and Reconnaissance 
        Operational Assessment...................................   285
      China's Biological Weapons Program.........................   286
      Comprehensive Assessment of the Roles, Responsibilities, 
        and Organization of the Office of the Under Secretary of 
        Defense for Intelligence.................................   286
      Congressional Intelligence Notifications...................   287
      Current and Future Staffing Requirements of the Joint 
        Intelligence Operations Centers..........................   288
      Cyber Intrusions of the Defense Industrial Base and 
        Academic Institutions Affiliated with the Department of 
        Defense..................................................   288
      Development and Integration of Project Maven Services into 
        Department of Defense Activities.........................   289
      Explosive Ordnance Disposal Intelligence...................   289
      Governance of Data and Service Acquisitions Supporting 
        Defense Intelligence Requirements........................   290
      Information-Sharing Arrangements with India, Japan, and the 
        Republic of Korea........................................   291
      Intelligence Support to Defense Operations in the 
        Information Environment..................................   291
      Investments in Scientific and Technological Intelligence...   292
      List of Foreign Entities That Pose a Threat to Critical 
        Technologies.............................................   292
      Maturation of Defense Clandestine Service Capabilities.....   293
      Qualitative Analysis of Adversary Development of Emergent 
        Technologies.............................................   293
      Reviewing the Integrated Defense Intelligence Priorities...   294
      Strengthening the Integrity of the Military Intelligence 
        Program..................................................   294
      Tactical Exploitation of National Capabilities Program.....   294
      Transitioning the Function of Background Investigations to 
        the Department of Defense................................   295
      Unified Air Force Airborne Signals Intelligence Enterprise.   295
    Other Matters................................................   296
      Next Generation Inertial Measurement Unit..................   296
  LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS.........................................   297
    Subtitle A--Space Activities.................................   297
      Section 1601--National Security Space Launch Program.......   297
      Section 1602--Preparation to Implement Plan for Use of 
        Allied Launch Vehicles...................................   297
      Section 1603--Annual Determination on Plan on Full 
        Integration and Exploitation of Overhead Persistent 
        Infrared Capability......................................   297
      Section 1604--Space-Based Environmental Monitoring Mission 
        Requirements.............................................   297
      Section 1605--Prototype Program for Multi-Global Navigation 
        Satellite System Receiver Development....................   298
      Section 1606--Commercial Space Situational Awareness 
        Capabilities.............................................   298
      Section 1607--Independent Study on Plan for Deterrence in 
        Space....................................................   299
      Section 1608--Resilient Enterprise Ground Architecture.....   299
    Subtitle B--Defense Intelligence and Intelligence-Related 
        Activities...............................................   299
      Section 1611--Modifications to ISR Integration Council and 
        Annual Briefing Requirements.............................   299
      Section 1612--Survey and Report on Alignment of 
        Intelligence Collections Capabilities and Activities with 
        Department of Defense Requirements.......................   299
      Section 1613--Modification of Annual Authorization of 
        Appropriations for National Flagship Language Initiative.   300
    Subtitle C--Cyberspace-related Matters.......................   300
      Section 1621--Notification Requirements for Sensitive 
        Military Cyber Operations................................   300
      Section 1622--Quarterly Cyber Operations Briefings.........   300
      Section 1623--Cyber Posture Review.........................   300
      Section 1624--Tier 1 Exercise of Support to Civil 
        Authorities for a Cyber Incident.........................   300
      Section 1625--Evaluation of Cyber Vulnerabilities of Major 
        Weapon Systems of the Department of Defense..............   301
      Section 1626--Extension of the Cyberspace Solarium 
        Commission...............................................   301
      Section 1627--Authority to Use Operation and Maintenance 
        Funds for Cyber Operations-Peculiar Capability 
        Development Projects.....................................   302
      Section 1628--Notification of Delegation of Authorities to 
        the Secretary of Defense for Military Operations in 
        Cyberspace...............................................   302
      Section 1629--Limitation of Funding for Consolidated Afloat 
        Networks and Enterprise Services.........................   302
      Section 1630--Annual Military Cyberspace Operations Report.   302
      Section 1631--Report on Synchronization of Efforts Relating 
        to Cybersecurity in the Defense Industrial Base..........   303
      Section 1632--Briefings on the Status of the National 
        Security Agency and United States Cyber Command 
        Partnership..............................................   303
    Subtitle D--Nuclear Forces...................................   303
      Section 1641--Improvement to Annual Report on the 
        Modernization of the Nuclear Weapons Enterprise..........   303
      Section 1642--Briefings on Meetings Held by the Nuclear 
        Weapons Council..........................................   304
      Section 1643--Elimination of Conventional Requirement for 
        Long-Range Standoff Weapon...............................   304
      Section 1644--Extension of Annual Briefing on the Costs of 
        Forward-Deploying Nuclear Weapons in Europe..............   304
      Section 1645--Ten-Year Extension of Prohibition on 
        Availability of Funds for Mobile Variant of Ground-Based 
        Strategic Deterrent Missile..............................   304
      Section 1646--Prohibition on Availability of Funds for 
        Deployment of Low-Yield Ballistic Missile Warhead........   304
      Section 1647--Report on Military-to-Military Dialogue to 
        Reduce the Risk of Miscalculation Leading to Nuclear War.   304
      Section 1648--Plan on Nuclear Command, Control, and 
        Communications Systems...................................   305
      Section 1649--Independent Study on Policy of No-First-Use 
        of Nuclear Weapons.......................................   305
      Section 1650--Independent Study on Risks of Nuclear 
        Terrorism and Nuclear War................................   305
    Subtitle E--Missile Defense Programs.........................   305
      Section 1661--National Missile Defense Policy..............   305
      Section 1662--Development of Hypersonic and Ballistic 
        Missile Tracking Space Sensor Payload....................   305
      Section 1663--Requirement for Testing of Redesigned Kill 
        Vehicle Prior to Production..............................   306
      Section 1664--Development of Space-Based Ballistic Missile 
        Intercept Layer..........................................   306
      Section 1665--Organization, Authorities, and Billets of the 
        Missile Defense Agency...................................   306
      Section 1666--Missile Defense Interceptor Site in 
        Contiguous United States.................................   306
      Section 1667--Missile Defense Radar in Hawaii..............   306
      Section 1668--Limitation on Availability of Funds for Lower 
        Tier Air and Missile Sensor..............................   306
      Section 1669--Command and Control, Battle Management, and 
        Communications Program...................................   307
      Section 1670--Annual Assessment of Ballistic Missile 
        Defense System...........................................   307
    Subtitle F--Other Matters....................................   307
      Section 1681--Modification to Reports on Certain Solid 
        Rocket Motors............................................   307
      Section 1682--Repeal of Review Requirement for Ammonium 
        Perchlorate Report.......................................   307
      Section 1683--Repeal of Requirement for Commission on 
        Electromagnetic Pulse Attacks and Similar Events.........   307
      Section 1684--Conventional Prompt Global Strike Weapon 
        System...................................................   307
DIVISION B--MILITARY CONSTRUCTION AUTHORIZATIONS.................   308
  PURPOSE........................................................   308
      MILITARY CONSTRUCTION AND FAMILY HOUSING OVERVIEW..........   308
      Section 2001--Short Title..................................   308
      Section 2002--Expiration of Authorizations and Amounts 
        Required to Be Specified by Law..........................   308
      Section 2003--Effective Date...............................   309
TITLE XXI--ARMY MILITARY CONSTRUCTION............................   309
  SUMMARY........................................................   309
  ITEMS OF SPECIAL INTEREST......................................   309
      Explanation of Funding Adjustments.........................   309
      Army Test and Demonstration Program........................   310
  LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS.........................................   311
      Section 2101--Authorized Army Construction and Land 
        Acquisition Projects.....................................   311
      Section 2102--Family Housing...............................   311
      Section 2103--Authorization of Appropriations, Army........   311
      Section 2104--Modification of Authority to Carry Out 
        Certain Fiscal Year 2019 Projects........................   311
TITLE XXII--NAVY MILITARY CONSTRUCTION...........................   311
  SUMMARY........................................................   311
  ITEMS OF SPECIAL INTEREST......................................   311
      Explanation of Funding Adjustments.........................   311
      Naval Public Shipyards.....................................   314
  LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS.........................................   315
      Section 2201--Authorized Navy Construction and Land 
        Acquisition Projects.....................................   315
      Section 2202--Family Housing...............................   315
      Section 2203--Improvements to Military Family Housing Units   315
      Section 2204--Authorization of Appropriations, Navy........   315
      Section 2205--Modification of Authority to Carry Out 
        Certain Fiscal Year 2017 Project.........................   315
TITLE XXIII--AIR FORCE MILITARY CONSTRUCTION.....................   315
  SUMMARY........................................................   315
  ITEMS OF SPECIAL INTEREST......................................   316
      Explanation of Funding Adjustments.........................   316
      Airspace at the Utah Test and Training Range...............   318
      Long-Term Modernization of Lincoln Laboratory..............   318
      Tyndall Air Force Base Recovery............................   319
  LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS.........................................   319
      Section 2301--Authorized Air Force Construction and Land 
        Acquisition Projects.....................................   319
      Section 2302--Family Housing...............................   320
      Section 2303--Improvements to Military Family Housing Units   320
      Section 2304--Authorization of Appropriations, Air Force...   320
      Section 2305--Modification of Authorities to Carry Out 
        Phased Joint Intelligence Analysis Complex Consolidation.   320
      Section 2306--Modification of Authority to Carry Out 
        Certain Fiscal Year 2016 Project.........................   320
      Section 2307--Modification of Authority to Carry Out 
        Certain Fiscal Year 2017 Project.........................   320
      Section 2308--Modification of Authority to Carry Out 
        Certain Fiscal Year 2018 Projects........................   320
      Section 2309--Modification of Authority to Carry Out 
        Certain Fiscal Year 2019 Projects........................   321
TITLE XXIV--DEFENSE AGENCIES MILITARY CONSTRUCTION...............   321
  SUMMARY........................................................   321
  ITEMS OF SPECIAL INTEREST......................................   321
      Explanation of Funding Adjustments.........................   321
  LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS.........................................   323
      Section 2401--Authorized Defense Agencies Construction and 
        Land Acquisition Projects................................   323
      Section 2402--Authorized Energy Resiliency and Energy 
        Conservation Projects....................................   323
      Section 2403--Authorization of Appropriations, Defense 
        Agencies.................................................   323
TITLE XXV--INTERNATIONAL PROGRAMS................................   323
  SUMMARY........................................................   323
  LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS.........................................   323
    Subtitle A--North Atlantic Treaty Organization Security 
        Investment Program.......................................   323
      Section 2501--Authorized NATO Construction and Land 
        Acquisition Projects.....................................   323
      Section 2502--Authorization of Appropriations, NATO........   323
    Subtitle B--Host Country In-Kind Contributions...............   323
      Section 2511--Republic of Korea Funded Construction 
        Projects.................................................   323
TITLE XXVI--GUARD AND RESERVE FORCES FACILITIES..................   324
  SUMMARY........................................................   324
  ITEMS OF SPECIAL INTEREST......................................   324
      Explanation of Funding Adjustments.........................   324
  LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS.........................................   325
      Section 2601--Authorized Army National Guard Construction 
        and Land Acquisition Projects............................   325
      Section 2602--Authorized Army Reserve Construction and Land 
        Acquisition Projects.....................................   325
      Section 2603--Authorized Navy Reserve and Marine Corps 
        Reserve Construction and Land Acquisition Projects.......   325
      Section 2604--Authorized Air National Guard Construction 
        and Land Acquisition Projects............................   325
      Section 2605--Authorized Air Force Reserve Construction and 
        Land Acquisition Projects................................   325
      Section 2606--Authorization of Appropriations, National 
        Guard and Reserve........................................   325
TITLE XXVII--BASE REALIGNMENT AND CLOSURE ACTIVITIES.............   326
  SUMMARY........................................................   326
  ITEMS OF SPECIAL INTEREST......................................   326
      Explanation of Funding Adjustments.........................   326
  LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS.........................................   326
      Section 2701--Authorization of Appropriations for Base 
        Realignment and Closure Activities Funded through 
        Department of Defense Base Closure Account...............   326
TITLE XXVIII--MILITARY CONSTRUCTION GENERAL PROVISIONS...........   326
  ITEMS OF SPECIAL INTEREST......................................   326
      Child Play Areas at Exceptional Family Member Program 
        Installations............................................   326
      Defense Access Road Projects...............................   327
      Department of Defense Consultations with Native Hawaiians..   327
      Feasibility of Transitioning from 100-Year Floodplain to 
        Sea-Level Rise Modeling at Coastal Installations as a 
        Planning Assumption for Military Construction Projects...   328
      Mold Assessment, Mitigation, and Remediation Efforts in 
        Military Housing Report..................................   328
      Report on Integration of Information Regarding 
        Environmental Health Hazards into Defense Occupational 
        and Environmental Health Readiness System................   328
      Soo Locks, Sault Ste. Marie, Michigan......................   329
      Status of the Utilities Privatization Program..............   329
      U.S. Air Force Strategic Basing Process....................   330
  LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS.........................................   330
    Subtitle A--Military Construction Program Changes............   330
      Section 2801--Prohibition on Use of Military Construction 
        Funds for Construction of a Wall, Fence, or Other 
        Physical Barrier along the Southern Border of the United 
        States...................................................   330
      Section 2802--Modification and Clarification of 
        Construction Authority in the Event of a Declaration of 
        War or National Emergency................................   330
      Section 2803--Inclusion of Information regarding Military 
        Installation Resilience in Master Plans for Major 
        Military Installations...................................   330
      Section 2804--Improved Consultation with Tribal Governments 
        when Proposed Military Construction Projects Potentially 
        Impact Indian Tribes.....................................   331
      Section 2805--Amendment of Unified Facilities Criteria to 
        Promote Military Installation Resilience, Energy 
        Resilience, Energy and Climate Resiliency, and Cyber 
        Resilience...............................................   331
      Section 2806--Modification to Department of Defense Form 
        1391 regarding Consideration of Potential Long-Term 
        Adverse Environmental Effects............................   331
    Subtitle B--Military Family Housing Reforms..................   331
      Section 2811--Enhanced Protections for Members of the Armed 
        Forces and Their Dependents Residing in Privatized 
        Military Housing Units...................................   331
      Section 2812--Prohibition on Use of Nondisclosure 
        Agreements in Connection with Leases of Military Housing 
        Constructed or Acquired Using Alternative Authority for 
        Acquisition and Improvement of Military Housing..........   332
      Section 2813--Authority to Furnish Certain Services in 
        Connection with Use of Alternative Authority for 
        Acquisition and Improvement of Military Housing..........   332
      Section 2814--Modification to Requirements for Window Fall 
        Prevention Devices in Military Family Housing Units......   332
      Section 2815--Assessment of Hazards in Department of 
        Defense Housing..........................................   332
      Section 2816--Development of Process to Identify and 
        Address Environmental Health Hazards in Department of 
        Defense Housing..........................................   332
      Section 2817--Report on Civilian Personnel Shortages for 
        Appropriate Oversight of Management of Military Housing 
        Constructed or Acquired Using Alternative Authority for 
        Acquisition and Improvement of Military Housing..........   333
      Section 2818-- Inspector General Review of Department of 
        Defense Oversight of Privatized Military Housing.........   333
      Section 2819--Department of Defense Inspection Authority 
        regarding Privatized Military Housing....................   333
      Section 2820--Improvement of Privatized Military Housing...   334
    Subtitle C--Real Property and Facilities Administration......   334
      Section 2831--Improved Energy Security for Main Operating 
        Bases in Europe..........................................   334
      Section 2832--Access to Department of Defense Facilities 
        for Credentialed Transportation Workers..................   334
    Subtitle D--Land Conveyances.................................   334
      Section 2841--Land Conveyance, Hill Air Force Base, Utah...   334
      Section 2842--Release of Conditions and Reversionary 
        Interest, Camp Joseph T. Robinson, Arkansas..............   334
      Section 2843--Modification of Authorized Uses of Certain 
        Property Conveyed by the United States in Los Angeles, 
        California...............................................   334
    Subtitle E--Military Land Withdrawals........................   334
      Section 2851--Public Notice regarding Upcoming Periods of 
        Secretary of the Navy Management of Shared Use Area of 
        the Johnson Valley Off-Highway Vehicle Recreation Area...   334
    Subtitle F--White Sands National Park and White Sands Missile 
        Range....................................................   335
      Section 2861--Short Title..................................   335
      Section 2862--Definitions..................................   335
      Section 2863--Findings.....................................   335
      Section 2864--Establishment of White Sands National Park in 
        the State of New Mexico..................................   335
      Section 2865--Transfers of Administrative Jurisdiction 
        Related to the National Park and White Sands Missile 
        Range....................................................   335
      Section 2866--Boundary Modifications Related to the 
        National Park and Missile Range..........................   335
    Subtitle G--Other Matters....................................   335
      Section 2871--Installation and Maintenance of Fire 
        Extinguishers in Department of Defense Facilities........   335
      Section 2872--Definition of Community Infrastructure for 
        Purposes of Military Base Reuse Studies and Community 
        Planning Assistance......................................   335
      Section 2873--Report on Vulnerabilities from Sea Level Rise 
        to Certain Military Installations Located Outside the 
        Continental United States................................   336
      Section 2874--Black Start Exercises at Joint Bases.........   336
TITLE XXIX--OVERSEAS CONTINGENCY OPERATIONS MILITARY CONSTRUCTION   336
  SUMMARY........................................................   336
  ITEMS OF SPECIAL INTEREST......................................   336
      Explanation of Funding Adjustments.........................   336
  LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS.........................................   337
      Section 2901--Authorized Army Construction and Land 
        Acquisition Projects.....................................   337
      Section 2902--Authorized Navy Construction and Land 
        Acquisition Projects.....................................   338
      Section 2903--Authorized Air Force Construction and Land 
        Acquisition Projects.....................................   338
      Section 2904--Authorized Defense Agencies Construction and 
        Land Acquisition Projects................................   338
      Section 2905--Authorization of Appropriations..............   338
TITLE XXX--AUTHORIZATION OF EMERGENCY MILITARY CONSTRUCTION......   338
  LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS.........................................   338
      Section 3001--Authorization of Emergency Navy Construction 
        and Land Acquisition Projects............................   338
      Section 3002--Authorization of Emergency Air Force 
        Construction and Land Acquisition Projects...............   339
      Section 3003--Authorization of Emergency Army National 
        Guard and Army Reserve Construction and Land Acquisition 
        Projects.................................................   339
DIVISION C--DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY NATIONAL SECURITY AUTHORIZATIONS 
  AND OTHER AUTHORIZATIONS.......................................   339
TITLE XXXI--DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY NATIONAL SECURITY PROGRAMS......   339
  ITEMS OF SPECIAL INTEREST......................................000339
    National Nuclear Security Administration.....................   339
      Weapons Activities.........................................   339
        Nuclear warhead life extension program briefings.........   339
        Report on unobligated enriched uranium and domestic 
          uranium requirements...................................   339
        Reports of sexual assault in the protective force........   340
        Risks and sustainment plan for Plutonium Facility at Los 
          Alamos National Laboratory.............................   341
        Stockpile Stewardship 2.0................................   341
      Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation...........................   342
        Excess Plutonium Disposition.............................   342
        Nuclear Verification Plan................................   342
      Naval Reactors.............................................   343
        Low-Enriched Uranium Fuel for Naval Reactors.............   343
    Environmental and Other Defense Activities...................   344
      Defense Environmental Cleanup..............................   344
        Savannah River Advanced Manufacturing Collaborative......   344
  LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS.........................................   344
    Subtitle A--National Security Programs and Authorizations....   344
      Section 3101--National Nuclear Security Administration.....   344
      Section 3102--Defense Environmental Cleanup................   344
      Section 3103--Other Defense Activities.....................   344
      Section 3104--Nuclear Energy...............................   344
    Subtitle B--Program Authorizations, Restrictions, 
        Limitations, and Other Matters...........................   345
      Section 3111--Personnel Levels of the Office of the 
        Administrator for Nuclear Security.......................   345
      Section 3112--Office of Cost Estimating and Program 
        Evaluation...............................................   345
      Section 3113--Clarification of Certain Stockpile 
        Responsiveness Program Objectives........................   345
      Section 3114--Modification to Plutonium Pit Production 
        Capacity.................................................   345
      Section 3115--Annual Certification of Shipments to Waste 
        Isolation Pilot Plant....................................   345
      Section 3116--Repeal of Limitation on Availability of Funds 
        for Acceleration of Nuclear Weapons Dismantlement........   345
      Section 3117--Elimination of Limitation on Availability of 
        Funds Relating to Submission of Annual Report on Unfunded 
        Priorities...............................................   345
      Section 3118--Program for Research and Development of 
        Advanced Naval Nuclear Fuel System Based on Low-Enriched 
        Uranium..................................................   346
      Section 3119--Replacement of W78 Warhead...................   346
      Section 3120--National Laboratory Jobs Access Program......   346
TITLE XXXII--DEFENSE NUCLEAR FACILITIES SAFETY BOARD.............   346
  LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS.........................................   346
      Section 3201--Authorization................................   346
      Section 3202--Improvements to the Defense Nuclear 
        Facilities Safety Board..................................   346
TITLE XXXIV--NAVAL PETROLEUM RESERVES............................   346
  LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS.........................................   346
      Section 3401--Authorization of Appropriations..............   346
TITLE XXXV--MARITIME MATTERS.....................................   346
  ITEMS OF SPECIAL INTEREST......................................   347
      Reducing Reliance on Foreign Flagged Vessels...............   347
  LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS.........................................   347
    Subtitle A--Maritime Administration..........................   347
      Section 3501--Authorization of the Maritime Administration.   347
      Section 3502--Reauthorization of Maritime Security Program.   347
      Section 3503--Maritime Occupational Safety and Health 
        Advisory Committee.......................................   347
    Subtitle B--Tanker Security Fleet............................   347
      Section 3511--Tanker Security Fleet........................   347
DIVISION D--FUNDING TABLES.......................................   348
      Section 4001--Authorization of Amounts in Funding Tables...   348
      Summary of National Defense Authorizations for Fiscal Year 
        2020.....................................................   349
      National Defense Budget Authority Implication..............   355
TITLE XLI--PROCUREMENT...........................................   357
      Section 4101--Procurement..................................   357
      Section 4102--Procurement for Overseas Contingency 
        Operations...............................................   404
TITLE XLII--RESEARCH, DEVELOPMENT, TEST, AND EVALUATION..........   416
      Section 4201--Research, Development, Test, and Evaluation..   416
      Section 4202--Research, Development, Test, and Evaluation 
        for Overseas Contingency Operations......................   459
TITLE XLIII--OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE...........................   463
      Section 4301--Operation and Maintenance....................   463
      Section 4302--Operation and Maintenance for Overseas 
        Contingency Operations...................................   485
TITLE XLIV--MILITARY PERSONNEL...................................   496
      Section 4401--Military Personnel...........................   496
      Section 4402--Military Personnel for Overseas Contingency 
        Operations...............................................   497
TITLE XLV--OTHER AUTHORIZATIONS..................................   498
      Section 4501--Other Authorizations.........................   498
      Section 4502--Other Authorizations for Overseas Contingency 
        Operations...............................................   502
TITLE XLVI--MILITARY CONSTRUCTION................................   503
      Section 4601--Military Construction........................   503
      Section 4602--Military Construction for Overseas 
        Contingency Operations...................................   513
TITLE XLVII--DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY NATIONAL SECURITY PROGRAMS.....   515
      Section 4701--Department of Energy National Security 
        Programs.................................................   515

Department of Defense Authorization Request......................   528
Communications from Other Committees.............................   531
Congressional Budget Office Estimate.............................   547
Statement Required by the Congressional Budget Act...............   549
Committee Cost Estimate..........................................   550
Advisory of Earmarks.............................................   550
Oversight Findings...............................................   550
General Performance Goals and Objectives.........................   550
Statement of Federal Mandates....................................   551
Federal Advisory Committee Statement.............................   551
Applicability to the Legislative Branch..........................   551
Duplication of Federal Programs..................................   551
Committee Votes..................................................   551
Changes in Existing Law Made by the Bill, as Reported............   578
Additional Views.................................................   579
Dissenting Views.................................................   581














116th Congress   }                                      {       Report
                        HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES
 1st Session     }                                      {      116-120

======================================================================



 
        NATIONAL DEFENSE AUTHORIZATION ACT FOR FISCAL YEAR 2020

                                _______
                                

 June 19, 2019.--Committed to the Committee of the Whole House on the 
              State of the Union and ordered to be printed

                                _______
                                

    Mr. Smith of Washington, from the Committee on Armed Services, 
                        submitted the following

                              R E P O R T

                             together with

                    ADDITIONAL AND DISSENTING VIEWS

                        [To accompany H.R. 2500]

      [Including cost estimate of the Congressional Budget Office]

    The Committee on Armed Services, to whom was referred the 
bill (H.R. 2500) to authorize appropriations for fiscal year 
2020 for military activities of the Department of Defense and 
for military construction, to prescribe military personnel 
strengths for such fiscal year, and for other purposes, having 
considered the same, reports favorably thereon with amendments 
and recommends that the bill as amended do pass.
    The amendments are as follows:
    The amendment strikes all after the enacting clause of the 
bill and inserts a new text which appears in italic type in the 
reported bill.
    The title of the bill is amended to reflect the amendment 
to the text of the bill.

                       PURPOSE OF THE LEGISLATION

    The bill would: (1) authorize appropriations for fiscal 
year 2020 for procurement and for research, development, test, 
and evaluation (RDT&E); (2) authorize appropriations for fiscal 
year 2020 for operation and maintenance (O&M) and for working 
capital funds; (3) authorize for fiscal year 2020 the personnel 
strength for each Active Duty component of the military 
departments, and the personnel strength for the Selected 
Reserve for each Reserve Component of the Armed Forces; (4) 
modify various elements of compensation for military personnel 
and impose certain requirements and limitations on personnel 
actions in the defense establishment; (5) authorize 
appropriations for fiscal year 2020 for military construction 
and family housing; (6) authorize appropriations for Overseas 
Contingency Operations; (7) authorize appropriations for fiscal 
year 2020 for the Department of Energy national security 
programs; and (8) authorize appropriations for fiscal year 2020 
for the Maritime Administration.

                    RATIONALE FOR THE COMMITTEE BILL

    H.R. 2500, the National Defense Authorization Act for 
Fiscal Year 2020, is the primary vehicle through which Congress 
fulfills its responsibility as mandated in Article I, Section 
8, of the Constitution of the United States, which grants 
Congress the power to provide for the common defense, to raise 
and support an Army, to provide and maintain a Navy, and to 
make rules for the government and regulation of the land and 
naval forces. Rule X of the House of Representatives provides 
the House Committee on Armed Services with jurisdiction over 
the Department of Defense generally and over the military 
application of nuclear energy. The committee bill includes 
findings and recommendations resulting from its oversight 
activities, conducted through hearings and briefings with 
Department of Defense and Department of Energy civilian and 
military officials, intelligence analysts, outside experts, and 
industry representatives, and it is informed by institutional 
experience. H.R. 2500 provides the Department of Defense and 
the Department of Energy with important policy authorities to 
speed decision making and improve agility, while improving 
readiness and increasing capabilities and capacities.
    H.R. 2500 addresses our country's greatest military threats 
by authorizing a defense enterprise that is inclusive, 
accountable, and responsible in the management of its 
resources. H.R. 2500 focuses on improving the lives of our men 
and women in uniform, including implementing reforms to improve 
the quality of military housing and addressing contamination 
from perfluorinated chemicals in drinking water on or near 
military bases. The committee believes our service members 
confront unique, complex challenges and deserve our support.
    The committee further believes that a challenging global 
security environment requires new ways to more affordably 
manage strategic risk by prioritizing the relevant military 
capabilities and capacities necessary to meet our greatest 
threats, adequately resource those priorities by accepting some 
risk with well-considered and agreed upon tradeoffs, and, at 
the same time, realize cost savings through oversight and 
control of unjustified costs. H.R. 2500 ensures America's 
military maintains its competitive edge on the global stage by 
executing crucial oversight focused on not only defense 
programs themselves, but also on how those programs are 
budgeted against a prioritized strategy, rather than arbitrary 
budgetary goals.
    H.R. 2500 increases accountability over how defense 
resources are allocated and spent. Funding allocated for 
defense programs should be spent on defense programs. Building 
and modernizing military capabilities and overall military 
readiness without diverting fiscal support away from 
congressionally authorized and appropriated projects, and 
critical training and maintenance functions.
    H.R. 2500 meets the committee's goal of facilitating a 
strong national defense apparatus that is resourced properly, 
accountable for its actions, and cognizant of the essential and 
direct oversight role of Congress. H.R. 2500 is consistent with 
the overall national defense spending level of $733 billion 
projected in the fiscal year 2019 Future Years Defense Program, 
and therefore would authorize approximately $724.9 billion in 
discretionary spending for the national defense programs within 
the committee's jurisdiction, including approximately $69.0 
billion of Overseas Contingency Operations funding. This 
authorization level allows our military to improve readiness, 
expand capabilities, and invest in the new software and 
technologies required to secure our country and protect us 
against our adversaries.

                                HEARINGS

    For the purposes of section 103(i) of H.Res. 6 of the 116th 
Congress--
    (1) the following hearings were used to develop or consider 
H.R. 2500:
    The committee held a hearing ``National Security Challenges 
and U.S. Military Activities in the Greater Middle East and 
Africa'' on March 7, 2019. The committee received testimony 
from General Joseph Votel, Commander of U.S. Central Command, 
General Thomas Waldhauser, Commander of U.S. Africa Command, 
and Ms. Kathyrn Wheelbarger, Acting Assistant Secretary of 
Defense for International Security Affairs.
    The committee held a hearing ``National Security Challenges 
and U.S. Military Activities in Europe'' on March 13, 2019. The 
committee received testimony from General Curtis M. 
Scaparrotti, Commander of U.S. European Command and Ms. Kathryn 
Wheelbarger, Acting Assistant Secretary of Defense for 
International Security Affairs.
    The committee held a hearing ``The Fiscal Year 2020 
National Defense Authorization Budget Request from the 
Department of Defense'' on March 26, 2019. The committee 
received testimony from the Honorable Patrick Shanahan, Acting 
Secretary of Defense and General Joseph Dunford, Chairman of 
the Joint Chiefs of Staff.
    The committee held a hearing ``National Security Challenges 
and U.S. Military Activities in the Indo-Pacific'' on March 27, 
2019. The committee received testimony from Admiral Phillip 
Davidson, Commander of U.S. Indo-Pacific Command, General 
Robert Abrams, Commander of U.S. Forces Korea, and the 
Honorable Randall Schriver, Assistant Secretary of Defense for 
Indo-Pacific Security Affairs.
    The committee held a hearing ``The Fiscal Year 2020 
National Defense Authorization Budget Request for the 
Department of Army and the Department of the Air Force'' on 
April 2, 2019. The committee received testimony from the 
Honorable Mark Esper, Secretary of the Army, the Honorable 
Heather Wilson, Secretary of the Air Force, General Mark 
Milley, Chief of Staff of the Army, and General David Goldfein, 
Chief of Staff of the Air Force.
    The committee held a hearing ``Member Day'' on April 3, 
2019. The committee received testimony from Members of Congress 
on their priorities for the National Defense Authorization Act 
for Fiscal Year 2020.
    The committee held a hearing ``The Fiscal Year 2020 
National Defense Authorization Budget Request for the 
Department of Navy'' on April 10, 2019. The committee received 
testimony from the Honorable Richard Spencer, Secretary of the 
Navy, Admiral John Richardson, Chief of Naval Operations, and 
General Robert Neller, Commandant of the Marine Corps.
    The committee held a hearing ``National Security Challenges 
and U.S. Military Activity in North and South America'' on May 
1, 2019. The committee received testimony from Admiral Craig 
Faller, Commander of U.S. Southern Command, General Terrence 
O'Shaughnessy, Commander of U.S. Northern Command, the 
Honorable Kenneth Rapuano, Assistant Secretary of Defense for 
Homeland Defense and Global Security, and Ms. Kathryn 
Wheelbarger, Acting Assistant Secretary of Defense for 
International Security Affairs
    In addition, the six subcommittees of the committee 
conducted 15 hearings and 6 markups to develop and consider 
H.R. 2500.

                           COMMITTEE POSITION

    On June 12, 2019, the Committee on Armed Services held a 
markup session to consider H.R. 2500. The committee ordered the 
bill H.R. 2500, as amended, favorably reported to the House of 
Representatives by a recorded vote of 33-24, a quorum being 
present.

                EXPLANATION OF THE COMMITTEE AMENDMENTS

    The committee adopted an amendment in the nature of a 
substitute during the consideration of H.R. 2500. The title of 
the bill is amended to reflect the amendment to the text of the 
bill. The remainder of the report discusses the bill, as 
amended.

            RELATIONSHIP OF AUTHORIZATION TO APPROPRIATIONS

    The bill does not provide budget authority. This bill 
authorizes appropriations; subsequent appropriations acts will 
provide budget authority. However, the committee strives to 
adhere to the recommendations as issued by the Committee on the 
Budget as it relates to the jurisdiction of this committee.
    The bill addresses the following categories in the 
Department of Defense budget: procurement; research, 
development, test, and evaluation; operation and maintenance; 
military personnel; working capital funds; and military 
construction and family housing. The bill also addresses the 
Armed Forces Retirement Home, Department of Energy National 
Security Programs, the Naval Petroleum Reserve, and the 
Maritime Administration.
    Active Duty and Reserve personnel strengths authorized in 
this bill and legislation affecting compensation for military 
personnel determine the remaining appropriation requirements of 
the Department of Defense. However, this bill does not provide 
authorization of specific dollar amounts for military 
personnel.

          SUMMARY OF DISCRETIONARY AUTHORIZATIONS IN THE BILL

    The President requested discretionary budget authority of 
$741.9 billion for programs within the jurisdiction of the 
committee for fiscal year 2020. Of this amount, $642.5 billion 
was requested for ``base'' Department of Defense programs, 
$66.7 billion was requested for Overseas Contingency Operations 
requirements covering the entire fiscal year, $23.2 billion was 
requested for Department of Energy national security programs 
and the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board, and $0.3 
billion was requested for defense-related activities associated 
with the Maritime Administration.
    The committee recommends an overall discretionary 
authorization of $724.9 billion in fiscal year 2020. The 
committee authorization is a $16.8 billion increase above the 
levels provided for in the John S. McCain National Defense 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2019 (Public Law 115-232).
    The table preceding the detailed program adjustments in 
division D of this report summarizes the committee's 
recommended discretionary authorizations by appropriation 
account for fiscal year 2020 and compares these amounts to the 
President's request.

                      BUDGET AUTHORITY IMPLICATION

    The President's total request for the national defense 
budget function (050) in fiscal year 2020 is $750.0 billion, as 
estimated by the Congressional Budget Office. In addition to 
funding for programs addressed in this bill, the total 050 
request includes discretionary funding for national defense 
programs not in the committee's jurisdiction, discretionary 
funding for programs that do not require additional 
authorization in fiscal year 2020, and mandatory programs.
    The table preceding the detailed program adjustments in 
division D of this report details changes to the budget request 
for all aspects of the national defense budget function.

            DIVISION A--DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE AUTHORIZATIONS

                          TITLE I--PROCUREMENT

                       Aircraft Procurement, Army


                       Items of Special Interest


CH-47F Chinook Block II

    The budget request contained $18.2 million in advanced 
procurement for the CH-47F Block II program. The CH-47F Block 
II program is designed to upgrade the current CH-47F Block I 
heavy-lift rotorcraft to improve readiness and commonality, 
extend the useful life of the Block I version, and restore 
additional payload capacity for the airframe. The committee 
understands the budget request fully funds the completion of 
the engineering and manufacturing development (EMD) phase of 
the Block II program, and that subject to successful completion 
of the EMD phase, the Army plans to conduct a Milestone C low-
rate production decision beginning in fiscal year 2021. 
However, the committee notes the current Future Years Defense 
Program (FYDP) provides no follow-on procurement funding for 
the CH-47 Block II program. Further, the committee notes that 
the formal analysis of alternatives for the CH-47 Block II 
indicated the Army must begin to remanufacture or recapitalize 
CH-47 Block I rotorcraft between fiscal years 2024 and 2028 and 
sustain full-rate production of 12 aircraft per year by fiscal 
year 2030 in order to maintain fleet readiness. Given the lack 
of programmed funding in the FYDP for CH-47 Block II 
production, the committee is concerned about potential impacts 
this could have on the heavy-lift rotorcraft industrial base, 
as well as the effects this could have on the Army's long-term 
plans to maintain fleet readiness beyond the FYDP.
    Therefore, the committee recommends $46.2 million, an 
increase of $28.0 million, in CH-47 Helicopter advanced 
procurement for the CH-47F Block II aircraft.
    Further, the committee directs the Secretary of the Army to 
provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services by 
September 2, 2019, on the potential readiness impacts to the 
current CH-47F fleet should Block II production be delayed 
post-FYDP, a cost-benefit analysis comparing CH-47 Block II 
upgrade program to CH-47F remanufacture and recapitalization 
efforts, the impacts to current MH-47G aircraft production 
given the delay of Block II production, analysis used to assess 
the strategic risk to the industrial base including the 
supplier base, and the current strategy for modernizing the 
heavy-lift rotorcraft fleet.

UH-72A Light Utility Helicopter

    The committee understands the UH-72A Lakota helicopter 
provides general aviation support for aviation units in the 
Active and Reserve Components. The committee supports the 
requirement to conduct mid-life sustainment and product 
improvement activities for the UH-72A, and supports funding to 
conduct the analysis, engineering, certification, and risk 
reduction activities necessary to update the UH-72A Life Cycle 
Support Plan. The committee also recognizes that the UH-72A was 
initially fielded without aircraft survivability equipment, 
which could potentially limit the Active Component and Army 
National Guard utilization of the UH-72A platform. As reflected 
in division D of this Act, the committee recommends additional 
funding for the National Guard and Reserve Component Equipment 
Account (NGREA). The committee understands that while no 
requirements have been formally identified for UH-72A Lakota 
ballistic armor or aircraft survivability equipment by the 
National Guard Bureau, should a requirement be put forth, the 
committee expects the Army National Guard to utilize NGREA 
funds.
    The committee directs the Secretary of the Army to provide 
a briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services by February 
1, 2020, on the Army's long-term sustainment strategy for the 
UH-72A Lakota helicopter fleet.

                       Missile Procurement, Army


                       Items of Special Interest


Indirect Fire Protection Capability Increment 2 system of systems

    The committee understands that the Indirect Fire Protection 
Capability Increment 2 system of systems (IFPC Inc 2) is a 
mobile, ground-based weapon system intended to defend fixed and 
semi-fixed sites and address numerous capability gaps for 
cruise missile defense (CMD), counter-unmanned aerial systems 
(C-UAS), and counter-rocket, artillery, and mortar (C-RAM). The 
committee notes that since March 2018, the Army has evaluated 
existing air defense systems in order to rapidly acquire and 
field an interim capability while concurrently evaluating 
solutions for an enduring IFPC Inc 2 system to meet the full 
spectrum of requirements and threats. The committee understands 
that based on the Army's analysis of cost, schedule, and 
performance, as well as the fielding requirements for an 
interim CMD capability required by section 112 of the John S. 
McCain National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2019 
(Public Law 115-232), the Army will field two interim IFPC 
batteries of Iron Dome in fiscal year 2020, while concurrently 
developing and evaluating a complete system solution--radar, 
launcher, and interceptor--for an enduring IFPC capability.
    The committee supports the Army's IFPC system acquisition 
strategy, including the immediate procurement of two Iron Dome 
batteries to meet the statutory schedule requirements for an 
interim capability, however, the committee requires additional 
fidelity into the acquisition strategy and plan for the 
enduring IFPC requirement. Accordingly, the committee directs 
the Secretary of the Army to provide a briefing to the House 
Committee on Armed Services by November 1, 2019, on the 
progress of fielding an Iron Dome interim IFPC system for CMD, 
as well as an update on the status of development of an 
enduring capability for IFPC Inc 2 to include the acquisition 
strategy for the enduring requirement with the associated 
funding profiles required to remain in compliance with section 
112 of the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 
2019 (Public Law 115-232).

M240 medium machine gun industrial base

    The committee remains concerned with the stability of the 
M240 medium machine gun small arms industrial base. The budget 
request included $0.9 million for M240 production, however no 
additional funds are projected in the Future Years Defense 
Program (FYDP). The committee understands that this lack of 
funding beyond 2020 may result in a shutdown of the M240 
production line, resulting in a significant negative impact on 
the U.S. small arms industrial base. The committee encourages 
the Army to develop and implement a long-term investment and 
sustainment plan for the family of M240 medium machine guns 
that ensures appropriate support for fielded weapons and 
mitigates risk to the small arms industrial base. As a part of 
this investment and sustainment plan, the committee encourages 
the Army to establish a recapitalization program, wherein 
legacy M240B models would be replaced by the modern, lighter-
weight, and more reliable M240L model.

TOW 2B missile system

    The committee is aware that the Army is developing the next 
version of its TOW 2B tactical missile system that will serve 
as the primary anti-armor weapon for the Optionally Manned 
Fighting Vehicle (OMFV) program. The committee also understands 
that the Army wants to accelerate development and fielding of 
the OMFV, but it is not clear that the development and fielding 
schedule for the new TOW 2B missile is aligned with the 
schedule for OMFV.
    Accordingly, the committee directs the Secretary of the 
Army to provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed 
Services by February 3, 2020, on the current plans for 
development and fielding of the TOW 2B missile, including how 
the Army will synchronize the availability of a new TOW 2B 
missile with fielding of the OMFV.

        Procurement of Weapons and Tracked Combat Vehicles, Army


                       Items of Special Interest


Vehicle active protection systems

    The committee understands the Army is working quickly to 
procure and field non-developmental item (NDI) vehicle active 
protection systems (V-APS) for combat and tactical vehicles to 
address immediate operational needs. The committee notes for 
example the Army will procure equipment sets of Trophy APS for 
installation on the M1 Abrams tanks of four armored brigades, 
including a brigade set for U.S. European Command's 
prepositioned stocks. While the committee supports the Army's 
NDI V-APS efforts and is encouraged by the successful testing, 
integration, and operational effectiveness of Trophy on Abrams 
tanks, the committee is concerned that the Army has no strategy 
to develop or acquire training devices related to Trophy or 
other V-APS systems under consideration for the Bradley and 
Stryker armored vehicles.
    The committee also understands the Army is concurrently 
developing an objective, long-term V-APS solution that would 
field an open architecture compliant V-APS system with other 
vehicle protection capabilities, and that current NDI V-APS 
systems, such as Trophy, are potential candidates for further 
development and integration. The committee expects the Army to 
benefit from the data collected during this expedited NDI V-APS 
effort to better inform their long-term strategy as well as 
look for ways to accelerate development and procurement. 
Additionally, the Committee needs to better understand if the 
Army is considering ``hybrid'' solutions that would include 
fielding an advanced APS, that would work in concert with 
passive protection technologies, such as improved armor, to 
deliver substantial survivability enhancements.
    Accordingly, the committee directs the Assistant Secretary 
of the Army for Acquisition, Logistics, and Technology to 
provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services not 
later than November 29, 2019, on the requirements and 
acquisition strategy for both near-term and long-term V-APS 
efforts, including technology, schedule, and funding profiles 
associated with development and acquisition of training devices 
for the various V-APS being developed, installed, or planned 
for installation on combat and tactical vehicles. The briefing 
should also include courses of action for accelerating the 
development of the objective V-APS long-term solution and 
options for expanding the fielding of NDI APS solutions to 
additional current or future combat vehicles, a detailed 
summary of recent Stryker APS testing to date, and an analysis 
of the relative merits of hybrid protection technologies.

                    Procurement of Ammunition, Army


                       Items of Special Interest


Army vertical lift munitions

    The committee expects that the Army's future vertical lift 
systems will be equipped to operate successfully against peer 
and near-peer adversaries. Such systems will need new weapon 
capabilities and munitions that can effectively engage 
adversary targets from standoff ranges that are beyond line-of-
sight or over-the-horizon. To be successful, these munitions 
must operate despite adversary technologies for jamming, 
spoofing, and GPS denial.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of the Army 
to submit a report to the Committees on Armed Services of the 
Senate and the House of Representatives by February 1, 2020, on 
Army vertical lift munition range and operating environment 
capabilities gaps, if any, and potential developmental and off-
the-shelf solutions associated with those gaps. The report 
shall include the following:
    (1) an identification and assessment of current U.S. 
vertical lift munition capabilities and capabilities gaps, if 
any, against near-peer adversaries;
    (2) an identification and assessment of U.S. and allied 
off-the-shelf and developmental solutions to meet these 
capability gaps, if any, including munitions that the United 
States has tested or will test;
    (3) an identification and assessment of any completed or 
planned testing of developmental munitions in calendar years 
2019 and 2020, including: an assessment of the effectiveness 
and suitability of the tested munitions; an assessment of 
whether the tested munitions could replace, supplement, or 
duplicate current capabilities; a comparison of the tested 
munitions capabilities to relevant currently fielded munitions; 
and plans, if any, to do a near-term fielding or operational 
evaluation of the tested munitions; and
    (4) an estimate of the cost and schedule for the Army to 
develop and produce new capabilities, and acquire and field as 
an interim solution any existing capabilities that have been 
tested and would provide an acceptable solution for capability 
gaps.

M58 Mine Clearing Line Charge

    The committee encourages the Army to accelerate 
modifications and upgrades to the M58 Mine Clearing Line Charge 
(MICLIC) system. The committee notes the current fielded MCLIC 
system has been operational since the 1970s and continues to be 
employed by the Army and Marine Corps. Furthermore, according 
to the report submitted to the committee by the Army, as 
required in the committee report accompanying the National 
Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2019 (H. Rept. 115-
676), the MICLIC's system operational readiness rate is 73 
percent, which is below the requirement of 78 percent. The 
committee also notes that employment success rates are only 50 
percent based on data from units rotating through Combat 
Training Centers. The committee notes with concern that the 
MICLIC has not seen any significant upgrade in capability since 
its introduction, and does not meet the mission readiness and 
employment requirements.
    The committee directs the Secretary of the Army to provide 
a briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services by November 
1, 2019, on the Army's plan for upgrading or replacing the M58 
MICLIC system. The briefing should include:
    (1) the updated capability requirements for a solution that 
addresses the readiness and reliability concerns of the current 
MICLIC;
    (2) a plan and timeline to upgrade the current system or 
field a newer variant; and
    (3) a funding profile over time for costs associated with 
the research, development, test, and production of a new 
system.

Self-propelled 155mm and 105mm artillery systems

    The committee understands the Army continues to examine the 
operational benefits of procuring a self-propelled 105mm and 
155mm howitzer mounted on the High Mobility Multipurpose 
Wheeled Vehicle (HMMWV) in order to address existing capability 
gaps for infantry brigade combat teams (IBCTs) indirect fires 
capabilities. The committee understands that recent 
demonstrations at Fort Sill as part of the Army's Maneuver and 
Fires Integration Experiment produced positive results. In the 
report to accompany the National Defense Authorization Act for 
Fiscal Year 2019 (H. Rept. 115-676) the committee directed the 
Army to assess the advisability and feasibility of accelerating 
the technology development and procurement of potential HMMWV-
mounted self-propelled 105mm and 155mm howitzers. The committee 
notes the Army indicated in this report that developing such a 
capability is both advisable and feasible and that the Fires 
Center of Excellence at Fort Sill is exploring options for 
rapid prototyping and operational assessments of a HMWWV-
mounted 155mm howitzer to address IBCT capability gaps. The 
committee supports these ongoing efforts and encourages the 
Army to continue further study and development of HMWWV-mounted 
self-propelled 105mm and 155mm howitzers.

                        Other Procurement, Army


                       Items of Special Interest


Advanced medium mobile power sources

    The budget request contained $58.5 million for generators 
and associated equipment of which $44.2 million was included 
for advanced medium mobile power sources (AMMPS). AMMPS is a 
modernization program to provide 5-60 kilowatt (kW) generators 
in either a skid, trailer mounted, or microgrid configuration. 
The committee notes AMMPS replaces legacy generators and will 
provide the Department of Defense with an upgraded standard 
fleet of tactical electric power. The committee understands 
AMMPS has improved fuel efficiency by an average of 21 percent 
with a return on investment in the range of 10 to 31 months 
from fuel savings. The committee also notes that AMMPS 
significantly reduces the logistics footprint and burden 
through utilization of 52 percent commonality of parts across 
all models as well as demonstrating improved reliability. The 
committee is encouraged by Department of Defense efforts to 
increase fuel efficiency, improve combat capability, decrease 
tactical risk, and reduce overall cost of generators. For 
example, the committee is aware the Army and Marine Corps are 
incorporating microgrid control capability on all current 30kW 
to 60kW generator set models that automatically starts and 
stops generators based on load demand. The committee encourages 
the military services to incorporate an energy storage module 
with generator sets to provide even more energy-efficient 
power.

AN/PEQ-15 Pointer, Illuminator, Aiming Laser capability enhancement/
        upgrade strategy

    The committee is aware of the Army's Soldier Lethality 
Cross-Functional Team's efforts to enhance the capability of 
the AN/PEQ-15 Pointer, Illuminator, Aiming Laser. The committee 
is concerned, however, that the AN/PEQ-15 is approaching 
obsolescence, is no longer under a formal sustainment program 
of record, and is not optimized for use with the Army's new 
ENVG-B night vision device. A solution is needed that will 
provide a capability bridge until a new family of weapons 
sights is developed, tested, produced, and fielded. The 
committee is aware that the Army has tested a possible AN/PEQ-
15 replacement through a limited user evaluation that 
distributed 700 test items to selected brigade combat teams. 
The committee supports the Army's rapid development and 
acquisition approach for such a bridge capability and directs 
the Assistant Secretary of the Army for Acquisition, Logistics, 
and Technology to provide a briefing to the House Committee on 
Armed Services not later than November 1, 2019, on the strategy 
for development and replacement of the AN/PEQ-15.

Global Positioning System denied environments

    The committee recognizes the need to improve the capability 
of U.S. forces to operate in denied environments where access 
to the Global Positioning System (GPS) is not assured. 
Potential adversaries are using advanced air defense systems 
and GPS-jamming and spoofing systems to deny or disrupt U.S. 
forces access, information gathering, precision strike, and 
navigation.
    The committee notes that section 1239 of the National 
Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2018 (Public Law 115-
91) required the Secretary of Defense to develop a strategy to 
counter this specific threat. The committee recognizes that the 
Department of Defense has made progress with GPS satellite-
related GPS III and M-Code development. The committee is 
concerned, however, that U.S. forces should avoid becoming 
reliant on a single solution or technology, especially with 
increasing ground-based threats to satellites.
    The committee is also concerned about an apparent 
capability gap in which current air-to-ground weapon programs 
do not provide adequate range or precision-strike capabilities 
needed for operating environments in which access to GPS is not 
assured. The committee encourages the Department of Defense to 
consider available off-the-shelf systems to meet this 
capability gap quickly.
    Accordingly, the committee directs the Under Secretary of 
Defense for Acquisition and Sustainment to provide a briefing 
to the House Committee on Armed Services not later than 
November 1, 2019, on efforts, including developmental and non-
developmental item acquisition programs, to address U.S. 
munition capability gaps for longer range systems operating in 
GPS-denied or -degraded environment.

High Mobility Multipurpose Wheeled Vehicle recapitalization

    The committee encourages the Secretary of the Army to use 
the funds made available for High Mobility Multipurpose Wheeled 
Vehicle (HMMWV) modernization or recapitalization to procure 
new HMMWVs or fully restore HMMWVs to a ``like-new'' zero-
hours, zero-miles condition through the installation of a new, 
modernized powertrain. The committee believes that modernizing 
or recapitalizing HMMWVs with a more capable powertrain could 
better support future advanced technology insertions as well as 
other capability upgrades to the HMMWV fleet, which in turn 
should reduce sustainment costs and logistics challenges 
associated with obsolete, expensive, or less-suitable parts.

Requirements and Capabilities for Military Shelter Systems Ballistic 
        Protection

    The committee notes that in forward deployed environments, 
service members must often work, eat, and rest in military 
shelter systems. The committee further notes the importance of 
providing service members with military shelter systems that, 
under certain threat conditions, offer protection against small 
arms fire and fragmentation. Under such operational conditions, 
military shelter systems may require ballistic protection that 
can be quickly transported, assembled, and disassembled as 
required to meet mission requirements.
    The committee directs the Secretary of the Army to provide 
the House Committee on Armed Services, no later than December 
1, 2019, with a briefing on the requirements for and 
capabilities of the Army's expeditionary military shelter 
systems. The briefing shall include an analysis of the 
ballistic protection capabilities and transportation 
requirements of such military shelter systems.

Tactical Communications and Protective System

    The committee is aware that the Tactical Communications and 
Protective System (TCAPS) and TCAPS-Lite programs provide 
active hearing protection simultaneously protecting service 
members' hearing while enabling situational awareness and 
mission command. The Army notes in their budget justification 
documents that these hearing protection systems are also 
intended to limit lost in-service time related to hearing 
injuries as well as reduce post-service disability 
compensation. The committee understands that the TCAPS and 
TCAPS-Lite programs have been cancelled and that combat 
earplugs will be relied upon to meet hearing protection 
requirements. The committee is concerned that combat earplugs 
have had significant issues related to performance and quality 
control in the past that likely resulted in hearing loss to 
military personnel.
    Considering the Army's decision to discontinue the TCAPS 
and TCAPS-Lite programs, the committee directs the Secretary of 
the Army to provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed 
Services no later than September 1, 2019, on the Army's plan to 
provide advanced, active hearing protection with an appropriate 
noise reduction rating that simultaneously enables situational 
awareness and mission command and control. This briefing should 
also address the level of protection and functionality combat 
earplugs provide for service members and how those levels of 
protection and functionality compare to a TCAPS headset and 
TCAPS-Lite active hearing devices. The committee encourages the 
Department of Defense to develop a list of evaluated, off-the-
shelf active hearing protection devices authorized for service 
and review this list as part of the required briefing.

Transportable Tactical Command Communications

    The committee recognizes that the Transportable Tactical 
Command Communications (T2C2) system provides satellite 
communications to early entry ground forces and provides 
increased capability in mission command, as well as significant 
advancements in situational awareness. The committee 
understands that T2C2 expeditionary satellite antennas provide 
increased operational flexibility and speed of maneuver while 
supporting forces in austere locations with high bandwidth 
requirements. Continued investment in the basic technology 
comprising the T2C2 system could enable immediate enhancements 
to the capability and allow the Army to standardize its 
expeditionary satellite system. The committee encourages the 
Army to consider the operational benefits of a common 
expeditionary terminal, based on T2C2, that would meet relevant 
tactical satellite communication requirements and potentially 
extend the operational footprint well beyond current 
technology, support intelligence, surveillance, and 
reconnaissance and mission command systems, and reduce demand 
on satellite resources. The committee believes the Army could 
realize significant advantages from developing a consistent and 
interoperable satellite communications capability across 
multiple programs and encourages further acceleration of those 
efforts in light of potential and considerable life-cycle cost 
savings.

                       Aircraft Procurement, Navy


                       Items of Special Interest


Carrier strike group anti-submarine warfare capabilities

    The committee is increasingly concerned with the aircraft 
carrier's organic anti-submarine warfare (ASW) capabilities. 
The carrier strike group's (CSG) primary ASW sensor continues 
to have a high component failure rate that has depleted the 
spares inventory, impacting deployed and non-deployed 
readiness. The Navy also recently canceled the Surface Ship 
Torpedo Defense (SSTD) program that would have provided a much-
needed defensive capability for the aircraft carrier. The 
budget request acknowledged the reliability issues of the 
Airborne Low Frequency Sonar (ALFS) system and is requesting 
funds for a variety of improvement initiatives to increase 
reliability. Rather than continuing to fund legacy systems, the 
committee believes that advances in anti-submarine warfare 
systems, manufactured in the United States and in use 
worldwide, could provide a better alternative. The committee is 
encouraged by advances in dipping sonar utilizing low frequency 
detection and beam-forming technologies, allowing multiple 
boundary interactions, and interoperability with shipboard 
sonars and sonobuoys. Moreover, these advances in technology 
are derived from U.S. sources.
    Therefore, the committee encourages the Secretary of the 
Navy to consider procuring one helicopter-mounted and one 
unmanned surface vessel-mounted low frequency (less than 2KHz) 
active sonar system to demonstrate other viable alternative 
technologies currently available for a CSG ASW risk reduction 
effort.
    The committee recommends $2.5 million for MH-60 
modifications and $2.5 million for the Littoral Combat Ship 
Anti-Submarine Warfare Mission Module to support a technology 
demonstration of alternative low frequency active sonars.

F/A-18 infrared search and track

    The budget request contained $1.2 billion for F-18 
aircraft, of which $85.8 million is for the infrared search and 
track (IRST) technology procurement.
    The committee notes that IRST is an evolutionary program 
that will provide the F/A-18E/F (Lot 26 and up) with an 
alternative fire control system to detect and track objects 
from a significant distance while operating in a contested 
environment involving high-electronic attack and radar-denied 
capabilities employed by adversaries. According to the 
Government Accountability Office, the IRST program entered low-
rate production in December 2018, with an unstable design and 
undemonstrated critical manufacturing processes, but despite 
those shortfalls, the Secretary of the Navy awarded contracts 
to procure 24 IRST systems to date, or 14 percent of the 170 
total planned systems. The committee notes the Navy did not 
conduct a production readiness review to assess design 
stability and manufacturing readiness that could have informed 
the decision whether or not to award low-rate production 
contracts. As a result, the Secretary may need to retrofit up 
to 18 early production IRST systems at a cost of $2.0 million 
each. The committee assesses that the Navy could reduce 
procurement of IRST systems in the near term without negatively 
affecting IRST production, and notes that the production 
readiness review is scheduled to occur at least 6 months prior 
to the IRST system deliveries associated with the December 2018 
contract award.
    Therefore, the committee recommends $1.1 billion, a 
decrease of $67.4 million, for F-18 aircraft and the associated 
IRST technology procurement.

MH-53E modernization and sustainment strategy

    The committee is concerned with the readiness and 
modernization trajectory of the Navy MH-53E fleet. Without 
sufficient resources and attention, MH-53E readiness levels 
will continue to decline. The committee notes that the Marine 
Corps CH-53E reset program has improved readiness levels and 
that the Army has achieved similar success using similar reset 
programs for a variety of rotorcraft platforms. Therefore, the 
committee directs the Secretary of the Navy to provide a 
briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services not later 
than September 1, 2019, on the MH-53E fleet modernization and 
sustainment strategy. This briefing shall include an assessment 
of the feasibility and cost of reversing MH-53 readiness 
declines through a reset program similar to the Marine CH-53E 
reset program.

Navy Reserve F/A-18 aircraft

    The committee remains concerned over the health and 
readiness of the Navy Reserve combat aircraft fleet, a 
strategic reserve available to the U.S. Navy. The Reserve fleet 
provides critical adversary support and strike fighter weapons 
training to Active Duty forces and must maintain a high 
mobilization readiness level for deployment in the event of war 
or national emergency. The aging aircraft the Reserve squadrons 
fly are no longer compatible with today's carrier air wing and 
these aircraft are increasingly less capable than the F/A-18E/F 
Super Hornets. The committee believes this could impact the 
ability of Navy Reserve squadrons in meeting requirements for 
advanced strike employment, as well as simulating current 
advanced threat aircraft. Recapitalizing and modernizing the 
Reserve squadrons with newer platforms would enable the Navy 
Reserve units to maintain dedicated advanced adversary 
squadrons with next generation capability in order to provide 
realistic threat-representative training for naval aviators and 
to maintain operational readiness that provides a relevant and 
deployable force multiplier to the Active Duty air wings.
    The committee encourages the Secretary of the Navy, in 
coordination with the Chief of the Navy Reserve, to continue to 
recapitalize the squadrons to maintain the Navy Reserve combat 
aircraft fleet.

Recapitalization of Navy Reserve P-3C squadrons

    The budget request contained $1.2 billion for six P-8A 
Poseidon aircraft. The budget request for fiscal year 2020 did 
not take into account the increased warfighter requirement of 
21 additional P-8A aircraft. This increase is driven by the 
proliferation of adversarial submarine fleets and their 
increasingly active operational tempo. The new requirement 
includes 12 aircraft to recapitalize the two maritime patrol 
and reconnaissance squadrons assigned to the Navy Reserve. 
These squadrons currently operate legacy P-3C Orion aircraft 
and the Chief of Navy Reserve estimates they will decommission 
by 2023 unless they are outfitted with new aircraft. The 
committee is encouraged by the Navy's recognition of the Navy 
Reserve force and the contribution they can provide to the 
increased requirement for the P-8A. However, the committee was 
discouraged that the Navy failed to budget for the additional 
aircraft to meet the warfighting requirement.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of the Navy 
to provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services 
by March 1, 2020, that outlines a plan to recapitalize the two 
Navy Reserve squadrons with P-8A aircraft prior to 2023. The 
briefing should include estimated acquisition costs, 
acquisition timelines, aircraft fielding schedules, and 
manpower impacts to the Navy Reserve. The committee also notes 
that this information should have been briefed at the beginning 
of the budget cycle.
    The committee recommends $1.75 billion for P-8A 
procurement, an increase of $541.2 million, to procure three 
additional aircraft in fiscal year 2020.

                       Weapons Procurement, Navy


                       Items of Special Interest


Advanced Low-Cost Munitions Ordnance

    The committee continues to support the accelerated 
development and deployment of the Advanced Low-Cost Munitions 
Ordnance (ALaMO), a guided 57mm projectile, with fire-and-
forget capability. This projectile is designed to counter the 
growing threats posed by small boat swarms, unmanned aerial 
systems, and other emerging threats. Furthermore, the committee 
supports expanding the testing to fully establish the ALaMO 
capabilities in additional tactical scenarios, including 
against both surface and air targets, and informing the 
operational utility across the threat spectrum.

                   Shipbuilding and Conversion, Navy


                       Items of Special Interest


Amphibious Forces Modernization

    While the Secretary of the Navy has been taking certain 
steps to modernize forces to operate in a contested 
environment, the committee believes that the Department of the 
Navy needs to aggressively assess and optimize future forces.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of the Navy 
to submit a brief to the House Committee on Armed Services by 
February 1, 2020 as to options to improve procurement protocols 
with legacy and future forces force structure requirements. 
Such briefing shall include each of the following: amphibious 
warfare concepts and requirements as they relate to 
shipbuilding and modernization; options to garner efficiencies 
into amphibious ship acquisition; an assessment to optimize the 
current and projected aviation and surface connectors strategy; 
options to expand aviation projection from amphibious vessels; 
options to expand command and control networks; options to 
incorporate vertical launch systems; and a fiscal assessment of 
these options.

AN/SPY-6(V) on DDG-51 Flight IIA

    The committee notes the President's budget request for the 
Air and Missile Defense Radar (AMDR) stated that fiscal year 
2020 funds ``are required to scale AMDR to backfit Active 
Electronically-Steered Array and digital beamforming technology 
on a Flight IIA DDG and to complete development of Advanced 
Distributed Radar (ADR) capability for integration into AMDR.'' 
The committee fully supports the funding of these efforts in 
fiscal year 2020 and encourages the Navy to accelerate the 
procurement of AN/SPY-6 radars for the modernization of DDG 51 
Flight IIA ships into fiscal year 2021. As such, the committee 
directs the Secretary of the Navy to provide a briefing to the 
House Committee on Armed Services by March 1, 2020, on the cost 
and technical feasibility of an accelerated plan for 
modernizing DDG 51 Flight IIA ships with AN/SPY-6 radars.

Classified Briefing on Funding Requirements for Strategic Weapons 
        Systems

    The committee notes the Navy provides the most survivable 
leg of the triad with Ohio Class SSBNs and the Trident II (D5) 
strategic weapon systems (SWS) they carry. SSBNs are 
responsible for a significant majority of the United States' 
operationally deployed nuclear warheads. The Chief of Naval 
Operations has made clear the priority the Navy places on the 
sustainment and modernization of the undersea leg of the triad, 
directing the Navy to ``be ready to deploy USS Columbia (SSBN 
826) as quickly as possible-beating the current schedule-in 
order to preserve our ability to defeat the threat.''
    If critical and necessary programs such as Increment 8 are 
further delayed due to funding issues, the Columbia class will 
be without critical subsystems such as a navigator and the 
United States will fail to meet international commitments to 
the United Kingdom under the Polaris Sales Agreement by not 
delivering inertial navigation equipment to the United Kingdom 
Shipyard in 2025.
    If critical and necessary programs such as Increment 15 are 
further delayed due to funding issues, future integration on 
the Columbia and Dreadnought systems and delivery of a required 
network cross-domain solution capability to meet DOD cyber 
requirements will not be met in time. Elimination of this 
funding will result in significant obsolescence-related risk to 
the Ohio fire control system in addition to increasing 
cybersecurity-related risk.
    Proposed reductions in Navy Strategic Systems Programs 
(SSP) support equipment impacts include additional maintenance 
costs on the current support equipment and an increase in the 
risk of being able to support missile processing and disposal 
requirements at the strategic weapon facilities. This, in turn, 
increases the risk of being unable to support SSBN onload/
offload requirements.
    If the Life Extension 2 funding cuts are sustained, the 
Navy's ability to field the next life extended missile on the 
Columbia Class is at significant risk. Additionally, the delay 
in schedule could impact international agreements with the 
United Kingdom as that government will procure the TRIDENT II 
D5LE2 SWS missiles for their Dreadnought platform.
    The committee directs the Secretary of the Navy to provide 
a classified briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services 
no later than December 1, 2019, on the ramifications of failing 
to adequately fund its strategic weapons system.

Composite materials

    The committee notes that composite materials may offer 
superior capabilities over legacy steel applications both in 
terms of long-term maintenance and increased operational 
availability. The committee believes that the Secretary of the 
Navy should assess composite options in the analysis of 
alternatives as they consider complex naval components and 
elements. Specifically, the committee believes that an 
assessment of composite shafting and deckhouse modules should 
be included in any future naval vessel acquisition to include 
the development of the Large Surface Combatant, the next block 
of Virginia-class submarines, and the development of the next 
generation attack submarine.

DDG Aegis modernization

    The committee recognizes the need and importance to deliver 
increased warfighting capability to the over seven dozen ships 
that comprise the existing fleet of Aegis destroyers via the 
ongoing destroyer modernization program as well as through new 
construction of the Flight III Arleigh Burke Aegis destroyers. 
Together, these efforts will provide our nation with the most 
powerful frontline warships, which will include robust 
integrated air and missile defense capabilities. However, the 
committee is concerned that there is an excessive amount of 
variance of Aegis baselines within the current fleet, and that 
the Navy should consider potential ways to accelerate 
modernization efforts that will reduce combat system variances. 
The committee also understands that there are new initiatives 
which leverage advances in digital technology, solid-state 
hardware, small and modular virtualization techniques, and 
other innovative hardware and software upgrades that can better 
sustain the in-service destroyers to the end of their extended 
service lives.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of the Navy 
to provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services 
not later than March 1, 2020, on initiatives that support a 
complementary approach to provide more rapid fielding of 
improvements for Aegis fleet readiness, lethality, and 
survivability.

Frigate requirements review

    The committee supports the Navy's efforts to leverage 
mature technologies and systems for the new Frigate class 
(FFG(X)), and continues to encourage the Secretary of the Navy 
to emphasize risk reduction efforts, commonality, and reduced 
life-cycle sustainment costs in developing a best-value 
solution. The committee also believes that the Navy should not 
trade warfighting capabilities for other considerations, 
particularly in anti-submarine warfare (ASW). Given ongoing 
efforts by adversarial nations to increase the capability, 
lethality, and size of their respective submarine fleets, the 
committee recognizes the projected role the FFG(X) will play in 
performing ASW missions. As such, it is imperative that the 
platform be deployed with the most capable ASW technology 
available.

Future Fleet Architecture

    The committee notes that the National Defense Strategy 
indicates that the United States is in a great powers 
competition to include the Russian Federation and the People's 
Republic of China. The committee also believes that this great 
powers competition will heavily rely on our naval force 
structure to optimally address Russia and China in both the 
Pacific and the Arctic, as well as impending tensions with the 
Iranian regime in the Persian Gulf. The committee believes that 
it is imperative to include a larger long-term force structure 
to address these global challenges. The committee also believes 
that to ensure a continued projection of naval power around the 
world, the Navy should include in their forthcoming 2019 Force 
Structure Assessment necessary vessels to address sufficient 
operations in the Arctic. Therefore, the committee directs the 
Secretary of the Navy to brief the House Committee on Armed 
Services by December 31, 2019 regarding the force structure 
plan to compete with adversaries in the Pacific and Arctic 
Oceans and the Persian Gulf. This briefing should also address 
the defense industrial base and any associated maritime sector 
weaknesses that need to be addressed to support the expanded 
force structure.

John Lewis fleet oiler replenishment ships

    The budget request included $1.1 billion for procurement of 
the John Lewis (T-AO) class fleet replenishment oiler. The 
committee continues to be supportive of the Navy's plan to 
procure the T-AO oilers. This ship will operate as the primary 
fuel pipeline from resupply ports to station ships, providing 
replenishment of bulk petroleum products, dry stores/packaged 
cargo, fleet freight, mail, and personnel to combatants and 
support forces underway. As a secondary mission, the T-AO will 
accompany and stay on-station with the carrier strike group to 
provide replenishment as required to customer ships. This ship 
will be a critical leg of the Navy's logistical framework. The 
committee understands that the Navy chose to accelerate the 
procurement of one T-AO from fiscal year 2021 to fiscal year 
2020 but due to long lead procurement items, this ship will not 
start construction until 2021.
    Therefore, the committee recommends $607.2 million, a 
reduction of $447.0 million, for the T-AO program.

MK 18 unmanned underwater vehicle

    The committee is encouraged by the Navy's ongoing efforts 
to explore, demonstrate, and prove the utility of unmanned 
underwater vehicles (UUVs) across multiple concepts of 
operation. The committee recognizes that the MK 18 program is a 
scalable and modular, open system architecture vehicle that is 
currently conducting operations and being equipped with the 
sensors that could allow it to perform additional U.S. Navy 
mine countermeasures UUV missions. Furthermore, the MK 18 could 
be adapted via the engineering change proposal process to meet 
numerous emerging technical needs that could satisfy cross-
domain requirements. The Navy is strongly encouraged to assure 
consideration of cross-domain employment of UUVs in this 
critical mission area.

Naval Oceanographic Office vessel requirements

    The committee notes that the Naval Oceanographic Office 
(NAVOCEANO) operates seven oceanographic ships. These seven 
ships are designated the T-AGS 60 class and are designed to 
provide multipurpose oceanographic capabilities in coastal and 
deep-ocean areas for NAVOCEANO. The committee is aware of 
existing commercial advances in autonomous survey vessel 
technology and notes that there are unmanned vessels currently 
being used to support surveying and other important commercial 
hydrography and oceanography missions. The committee is 
concerned that the Navy is not taking advantage of commercially 
available autonomous vessel technologies to facilitate its 
charting and mapping missions. The committee believes 
employment of an autonomous survey ship by the Navy 
Oceanographic Office would result in dramatic savings in both 
procurement and operation and maintenance costs while 
increasing the rate at which uncharted portions of the ocean 
floor become accurately mapped. The use of existing unmanned 
surface vessel (USV) designs and technology for an autonomous 
survey vessel would also allow the Navy to rapidly gain 
valuable experience in the operational use of USVs in a low 
threat environment.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of the Navy 
to provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services 
by March 1, 2020, that includes NAVOCEANO's ship requirements 
and an assessment of the opportunities to modernize this fleet 
to support autonomous operations.

Navy Cyclone-class patrol craft replacement

    The committee notes that the legacy Cyclone-class patrol 
vessels located in Bahrain are being decommissioned and 
eventually replaced with the littoral combat ship. The 
committee is aware that the U.S. Coast Guard's Sentinel-class 
fast response cutter is in serial production and that the U.S. 
Coast Guard is pursuing a 64-vessel program of record. The 
committee believes that there is merit in reviewing all 
available options to replace the Cyclone-class patrol vessels.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of the Navy 
to submit a report to the congressional defense committees not 
later than February 1, 2020, that assesses options for the 
replacement of the Cyclone-class patrol vessels. Specifically, 
this report shall include a comparison of the Cyclone-class 
patrol vessels, Independence variant littoral combat ship, 
Freedom-class variant littoral combat ship, the Sentinel-class 
fast response cutter, and larger surface combatants in terms of 
one-time procurement costs, annual recurring personnel costs, 
and annual recurring maintenance costs. Additionally, this 
report shall assess the ability to meet the mission 
requirements of the current patrol craft. This report may 
include a classified annex.

Navy study on lethality of surface combatant ships against swarm 
        technology

    The committee is concerned that the Navy may be assuming 
too much risk with respect to the development of swarm tactics 
by adversaries. The committee directs the Secretary of the Navy 
to conduct a study on the lethality of surface combatant ships, 
both large and small against swarm technology, and deliver a 
report to Congress not later than January 1, 2021. Such study 
shall include each of the following at a minimum:
    (1) a threat analysis of current threat capabilities from 
foreign adversaries regarding swarm tactics using manned or 
unmanned aerial vehicles, unmanned underwater vehicles, and 
unmanned surface vehicles within ten nautical miles of coast 
line, sea ports and adversary ships;
    (2) a description of the current capabilities used by the 
Navy that have the capability or are designed specifically to 
counter swarm technology through kinetic means; electronic 
warfare; or directed energy; and
    (3) a description of future requirements for large and 
small surface combatant ships, including the capability of 
defending against swarm tactics and advancing technology; the 
capability of engaging swarm targets from port and starboard 
sides with the same effects as the bow; the capability of 
adding additional systems onto the hull of a surface combatant 
ship, both large and small, to enhance lethality against swarm 
and other threats; and a comparison between directly manned 
weapon systems and remote weapon stations.

Report on operational energy planning assumptions for the future 
        surface combatant

    The committee understands that hybrid electric drive (HED) 
propulsion systems provide both greater efficiency and extended 
range. Equally important, such drives provide the power needed 
for future weapons systems that will be used on U.S. Navy 
vessels, and often come with lower life-cycle costs than 
conventional propulsion systems. Given these benefits, the 
committee believes the Navy should be pursuing HED propulsion 
systems more aggressively, to include consideration on the 
future large surface combatant.
    The committee directs the Secretary of the Navy to provide 
a report to the House Committee on Armed Services not later 
than February 1, 2020, on the propulsion systems being 
considered for the future surface combatant. In addition to 
describing the type of system, for example, integrated 
propulsion and hybrid electric drive, the report shall include 
initial cost, life-cycle cost, range, and the system's ability 
to provide adequate power for future weapons systems including 
directed energy and rail gun. The report should also include 
potential opportunities to prototype new propulsion systems in 
order to accelerate the technology, and field a more mature 
system that can be integrated into a ship.

Virginia-class submarine

    The committee has heard consistent testimony from combatant 
commanders about the important role that the attack submarine 
fleet plays in persistent operations around the world and in 
potential conflict scenarios against near-peer competitors. The 
committee has also repeatedly expressed concern about the 
current and looming shortfall in the Navy's attack submarine 
fleet. The 2016 Force Structure Assessment increased the 
required force structure of attack submarines from 48 to 66, 
the largest increase of any ship type in the assessment. At the 
same time, the fiscal year 2020 30-year shipbuilding plan shows 
that the attack submarine force will experience the largest and 
most persistent gap below its required level between fiscal 
year 2020 and fiscal year 2049, reaching a low of 42 submarines 
in 2027.
    The committee has heard testimony from Department of the 
Navy leadership on the benefits that increasing Virginia-class 
submarine production would have on the submarine industrial 
base. Navy leadership has testified that the industrial base 
has existing capacity to handle the increased workload as 
indicated in the fiscal year 2019 and fiscal year 2020 30-year 
shipbuilding plans. Navy leadership has testified that 
strengthening the submarine industrial base through increasing 
Virginia-class submarine procurement above the two-per-year 
build rate will be beneficial for the Columbia-class submarine 
program through increased capacity in advance of serial 
production beginning in the mid-2020s and addressing potential 
workload and workforce gaps in early procurement years. Navy 
leaders have also testified that the Virginia-class submarine 
program is among the best-performing acquisition programs in 
the Department of Defense. Therefore, the committee highly 
supports the addition of a third submarine in fiscal year 2020 
and believes there are additional savings that can be achieved 
across the class due to the increase in economic order 
quantity.

                       Procurement, Marine Corps


                       Items of Special Interest


Rapid acquisition of Rifle Integrated Controller

    The committee understands the Marine Corps is currently 
evaluating a rifle accessory control unit (RACU) using a two-
phase process through the Marine Corps Foreign Comparative Test 
(FCT) program that should result in fielding capability 
improvements in the operational performance and close-combat 
lethality of individual marines. The committee understands the 
phase 2 evaluation should conclude by the end of fiscal year 
2019 and that the Marine Corps will use the information and 
data gathered during the FCT program to inform future 
requirements. The committee recognizes the challenges that 
exist for an individual marine to operate separate situational 
awareness, communications, target designators, thermal sights, 
and other battle management devices and notes a RACU system 
would consolidate these disparate capabilities into one unified 
capability.
    The committee expects the Marine Corps to expeditiously 
complete the phase 2 evaluation and, subject to a successful 
evaluation, expects the capability to result in a validated 
requirement. The committee encourages the Commandant of the 
Marine Corps to consider a rapid acquisition strategy to 
accelerate the operational testing, procurement, and fielding 
of a RACU utilizing existing acquisition reform authorities.

                    Aircraft Procurement, Air Force


                       Items of Special Interest


A-10 aircraft

    The budget request contained $168.9 million for A-10 
aircraft modifications and upgrades, of which $100.0 million 
was included for the new A-10 wing replacement program to begin 
procurement of 112 sets of additional wings. This procurement 
would retrofit the remaining A-10 fleet giving the Air Force a 
total of 281 A-10 aircraft to 2030 and beyond.
    The committee continues to believe that sustainment of the 
281-aircraft A-10 fleet provides the Air Force a cost- and 
mission-effective close air support capacity and capability 
that will meet joint force requirements. The committee 
recognizes that A-10 fleet modernization requires future 
display system upgrades for better identification of friendly 
and enemy forces. Additional modernization also requires 
updates to weapon delivery and management systems, along with 
an upgraded electronic warfare suite, that will keep pace with 
advancements in threat surface-to-air technology and provide 
better protection for pilots. Finally, the committee encourages 
the Air Force to explore upgraded communications systems with 
improved interconnectivity and security to support data-
gathering enhancements for aircraft and engine structural 
integrity monitoring.
    The committee looks forward to receiving the test and 
evaluation report from the Director, Operational Test and 
Evaluation regarding the F-35A and A-10C test comparison 
required by section 134 of the National Defense Authorization 
Act for Fiscal Year 2017 (Public Law 114-328). The committee 
recalls that the committee report accompanying the National 
Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2019 (H. Rept. 115-
676) required the Secretary of the Air Force to submit a report 
to the House Committee on Armed Services on the cost of the 
additional 112 A-10 replacement wings using a second contract 
compared to the cost of exercising the option to procure the 
112 A-10 replacement wings on the original contract. The 
committee understands that this report will be made available 
after the new contract for A-10 wings is awarded later in 
fiscal year 2019. Finally, the committee encourages the 
Secretary of the Air Force to consider a multiyear contracting 
strategy for the next wing replacement program that could 
achieve significant cost savings for the A-10 wing replacement 
program.

Air National Guard F-16 Radar Upgrades

    The committee recognizes that F-16s will remain a critical 
component of the Air National Guard (ANG) inventory through the 
2040s making it essential to maintain the operational viability 
of these aircraft. The committee further recognizes that Active 
Electronically Scanned Array (AESA) radar upgrades for the F-16 
make the aircraft more survivable and lethal in a combat 
environment when deployed, provides increased capability for 
homeland defense and aerospace control alert missions, as well 
as reduces maintenance and logistics challenges.
    The committee strongly supports continuing the F-16 AESA 
radar upgrades for both the Air Force and ANG, including the 
use of National Guard and Reserve Equipment Account funding 
referenced elsewhere in this Act. Furthermore, the committee 
directs the Chief of Staff of the Air Force, in coordination 
with the Chief of the National Guard Bureau, to provide a 
report to the House Armed Services Committee not later than 
February 1, 2020, that details an operational risk assessment, 
requirements determination, and acquisition and fielding 
strategy with associated funding profiles for upgrading the 
ANG's F-16s with AESA radars.

B-1 readiness recovery plan

    The committee notes that the nation's ability to meet its 
long-range precision strike requirements may be placed at 
increased risk by aging structural problems with the B-1 bomber 
aircraft. The committee is concerned B-1 readiness does not 
have the priority and resources to improve B-1 mission capable 
rates. This is evidenced by fully mission capable aircraft 
currently in single digits and aircrew being rerouted from 
flying the B-1 to other aircraft due to lack of B-1 aircraft 
for training.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of the Air 
Force to provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed 
Services not later than March 1, 2020, on the Air Force's 
current plans to increase the readiness of the B-1 that shall 
include the following elements:
    (1) aircraft structural issues;
    (2) plan for continued structural deficiency data analysis 
and testing;
    (3) projected repair timelines; and
    (4) future mitigation strategies.
    Additionally, this briefing shall include the following 
information during any B-1 degradation period:
    (1) pilot and maintainer training plan; and
    (2) recovery timeline to meet future deployment tasking.

B-2 Spirit Defensive Management System

    The committee continues to support the B-2 Defensive 
Management System Modernization (DMS-M) program and notes the 
importance of this program to ensuring that our nation's only 
operational stealth bomber remains mission effective. DMS-M is 
the largest upgrade in the B-2's history and is essential to 
maintaining the aircraft's survivability by ensuring the fleet 
remains effective against modern integrated air defense 
systems. This upgrade is critically needed to guarantee that 
the nation's premier strike platform can hold at risk the most 
heavily defended targets and deter aggression anywhere in the 
world.
    The committee is concerned, however, about the significant 
DMS-M schedule delays and many substantial challenges 
highlighted in a recent Defense Digital Service Discovery 
Sprint report. Unless the B-2 DMS-M program makes significant 
changes there may continue to be delays that will impact the 
success of the program. During testimony at a Seapower and 
Projection Forces subcommittee hearing on March 14, 2019, the 
Air Force confirmed its commitment to the DMS-M program, and 
the committee agrees that the program is necessary to ensure 
the B-2 can operate in all future environments.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of the Air 
Force to provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed 
Services by February 28, 2020, on its efforts to address the 
major areas of concern across the DMS-M program identified by 
the Defense Digital Service. Such brief shall include the 
associated schedule and closure plan to address the following 
items: sufficient government software development expertise; 
contract definitization schedule; delivery schedule; 
determination of software baseline; and assessment of related 
program support of DMS-M.

C-130H aircraft propellers and engines

    The committee notes that the C-130H aircraft that are flown 
primarily by the Air National Guard and Air Force Reserve 
continue to provide critical tactical airlift capabilities and 
will continue to support this mission for years to come. The 
committee is disappointed with the amount of time it has taken 
for the Air Force to address a safety of flight issue with the 
legacy propeller system of the C-130H. The inherent danger 
associated with legacy propellers came to light in the mishap 
report from the KC-130T Hercules aircraft of the United States 
Marine Corps Reserve that crashed in Leflore County, 
Mississippi, killing 17 service members. The Air Force convened 
an additional review board which identified a potential hazard 
with propellers that were produced before 1971. This review 
appears arbitrary considering that the failed blade on the 
Marine Corps mishap C-130T was manufactured in 1983.
    Procurement of new composite propeller blades is the 
obvious solution to this serious safety of flight and readiness 
issue. The Air Force has moved slowly in addressing the issue 
and still refers to the propeller upgrade as a performance 
enhancement and not a safety requirement. A new composite blade 
would also decrease maintenance time and improve logistics 
support, which will result in increased readiness. Delays are 
unacceptable considering the inherent safety of flight and 
readiness risks surrounding this issue.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of the Air 
Force to provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed 
Services by October 31, 2019, on the long-awaited acquisition 
strategy for procuring new blades. This plan should include 
estimated costs, timelines, and a unit upgrade schedule, as 
well as a plan to expedite procurement for squadrons scheduled 
to deploy in CY2020. The briefing should also include the Air 
Force plan to incorporate C-130H T-56 Series 3.5 Engine 
Enhancement Packages. Congress has repeatedly added additional 
funds for these upgrades and the Air Force has yet to budget 
for them despite the demonstrated performance benefits and fuel 
efficiencies.

E-8 Joint Surveillance Target Attack Radar System re-engining program

    The budget request included $28.7 million for the E-8C 
Joint Surveillance Target and Attack Radar System (JSTARS) but 
no funding to address re-engining.
    The committee understands that recently-completed analyses 
of the E-8C JSTARS platform updated and extended the service 
life projection concluding that the JSTARS fleet can operate 
well into the 2030s and potentially beyond. As such, the 
committee supports the requested funding for E-8C JSTARS 
modernization and sustainment as necessary to ensure that the 
platform remains operational and capable for the remainder of 
its service life. However, the committee is concerned that the 
funding requested in the fiscal year 2020 Air Force budget 
fails to address the E-8C propulsion system, which the 
committee understands is the number one issue driving excessive 
non-mission capable maintenance metrics for the fleet. The 
committee is concerned that, without a substantive solution, 
issues associated with the propulsion system will continue to 
drive up costs and hinder availability.
    The committee recommends $56.7 million, an increase of 
$28.0 million, in Aircraft Procurement, Air Force, for JSTARS 
re-engining.

F-15C/F-15EX

    The budget request contained $1.1 billion for development 
and procurement of eight F-15EX aircraft.
    Air Force officials testified before the Subcommittee on 
Tactical Air and Land Forces on May 2, 2019, about their 
concerns with the current tactical aircraft inventory capacity 
and capability to fully execute and support the air superiority 
mission as required by the 2018 National Defense Strategy. The 
committee notes that the Air Force's capacity and capability 
concerns are based on the combination of having procured only 
187 F-22 aircraft compounded by the earlier than expected 
deterioration of the current fleet of F-15C aircraft, which the 
F-22 was intended to replace. The Air Force testified that two-
thirds of the F-15C fleet is past its certified service life 
and that 13 percent of the combat-coded aircraft are grounded 
due to failed aircraft structural integrity inspections. The 
committee understands that the Air Force considered a range of 
options to mitigate the identified capability and capacity gaps 
for the air superiority mission, to include extending the 
service life of the F-15C fleet and increasing the production 
rate of F-35A aircraft.
    The committee notes that analysis by the Department of 
Defense determined that a service life extension on the F-15C 
fleet would provide a limited return on investment for the 
amount of financial and other resources required to complete a 
successful life extension program to address the known 
structural integrity and mission systems issues or the cost and 
schedule risk associated with emergent fleet issues that are 
unknown but may be identified as each aircraft enters the 
service life inspection and extension program. The committee 
notes that the Navy realized unexpected and excessive cost and 
schedule growth during the service life extension program for 
the legacy fleet of F/A-18A/B/C/D aircraft.
    The committee understands that the Department's analysis 
evaluated increasing F-35A production quantities but determined 
that although the F-35A and F-15EX aircraft have similar 
procurement costs, the difference in operations and sustainment 
costs between the two aircraft is notable. Furthermore, the 
committee notes that the Department's analysis evaluated other 
aspects of current performance related to the F-35A program 
outlined by the committee elsewhere in this title and that the 
Department decided to forego this option due to affordability 
concerns.
    Therefore, the committee supports the Department's decision 
to procure the F-15EX aircraft to mitigate warfighter risk and 
to fill current and projected air superiority mission gaps. 
Additionally, the committee includes a provision elsewhere in 
this title that would require the Secretary of Defense to 
designate the F-15EX program as a major program within the F-15 
program element, and would require the Secretary to provide 
additional acquisition documentation to the congressional 
defense committees before proceeding apace with procurement of 
F-15EX aircraft.

MQ-9 Reaper funding profile

    The committee notes that the procurement profile for the 
MQ-9 Reaper unmanned aerial system includes inconsistent 
quantities from year to year. The committee understands that 
uneven, unpredictable procurement quantities create production 
inefficiencies and increase program costs. For example, the 
fiscal year 2020 budget request shows MQ-9 unit cost rising 
from $15.8 million in fiscal year 2019 to over $22.0 million in 
fiscal year 2020. The committee is concerned by these 
inefficiencies and encourages the Air Force to budget 
appropriately in the Future Years Defense Program for stable, 
predictable procurement quantities for the MQ-9 Reaper.

Tanker force structure and modernization

     The committee notes that the Department of Defense 
Mobility Capability Requirement Study identified a tanker force 
structure inventory requirement of 479 aircraft. Integral to 
this capability is the delivery of mission capable KC-46A 
aircraft and the continued development of additional tanker 
aircraft after the expiration of the current KC-46A contract 
with lot 13 in 2027. The committee notes that the Secretary of 
the Air Force has completed a capability-based assessment and 
signed out the initial capability document for the requirements 
associated with the next-generation tanker, but has not started 
an analysis of alternatives. The committee believes that the 
Secretary of the Air Force has several viable options to ensure 
future tanker capability, to include acquiring a non-
developmental commercial derivative tanker while ``bridging'' 
from the end of the KC-46A production to the new developmental 
tanker.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of the Air 
Force to submit a report to the congressional defense 
committees by September 30, 2020, on a 30-year vision for the 
tanker force structure. The report shall include the following:
    (1) the current KC-46A tanker acquisition timeline through 
lot 13;
    (2) future tanker production options to include an 
acquisition timeline comparison of a ``bridging'' non-
developmental commercial derivative tanker and new tanker 
development; and
    (3) modernization options for the entire tanker force 
structure through the 30-year vision timeline.
    Additionally, the committee continues to support the fixed-
price development and production of the KC-46A contract. The 
committee believes that there have been several lessons learned 
with unique fixed-price type contracts that were employed in 
this contract. Therefore, in accordance with a recommendation 
included in the Government Accountability Office (GAO) report 
entitled ``KC-46 Tanker Modernization: Aircraft Delivery Has 
Begun, but Deficiencies Could Affect Operations and Will Take 
Time to Correct'' (GAO-19-480), the committee directs the 
Secretary of the Air Force to submit a report to the 
congressional defense committees by March 1, 2020, on the 
lessons learned regarding the utilization of a fixed-price 
contract for development.

                       Procurement, Defense-Wide


                       Items of Special Interest


F-35 Joint Strike Fighter program

    The budget request contained $10.3 billion for the 
procurement of 78 F-35 aircraft, and associated spares, 
modifications, depot activations, and advanced procurement for 
fiscal year 2021 aircraft for the Air Force, Navy, and Marine 
Corps. The budget request contained $1.6 billion for research 
and development related to the conclusion of system design and 
development, deployability and suitability initiatives, Block 4 
and Continuous Capability Development and Delivery (C2D2), and 
dual-capable aircraft efforts. The committee notes that the 
unfunded priority lists for the Air Force, Navy, and Marine 
Corps contained 12 F-35A, 2 F-35C, and 2 F-35B/2 F-35C 
aircraft, respectively.
    The committee supports the F-35 program and believes it is 
a necessary and essential capability within the tactical 
aircraft portfolio for the United States and its foreign 
partners and allies. The committee is concerned, however, that 
many substantial challenges are unresolved across the F-35 
system enterprise as was highlighted in two recent Government 
Accountability Office reports (GAO-19-321 and GAO-19-341) as 
well as during testimony at the May 2, 2019, Subcommittee on 
Tactical Air and Land Forces hearing on Air Force acquisition 
and modernization programs. It is clear that unless the F-35 
program can demonstrate measurable progress in reducing costs 
and inefficiencies associated with the production line, 
concurrency with new parts procurement and fielded parts 
repairs, global supply chain management and distribution 
activities, operations and sustainment costs, the Autonomic 
Logistics Information System, and Block 4 development and 
subsequent fielding utilizing the C2D2 construct, the 
Department of Defense and other F-35 partners and customers may 
not be able to achieve total inventory objective requirements. 
The committee is also concerned about the F-35 program's 
readiness to achieve a favorable full-rate production review 
scheduled at the end of 2019. The program may not be 
demonstrating satisfactory control of manufacturing processes 
and production line efficiencies, acceptable performance and 
reliability related to post-production activities and validated 
requirements, and adequate and effective sustainment and 
support systems in place to meet demands of all F-35 customers.
    Consequently, the committee includes three provisions 
elsewhere in this title that would authorize the F-35 program 
to procure economic quantities of production material to reduce 
costs; increase congressional oversight and program 
transparency related to costs for capability development and 
fielding; and ensure that the F-35 program has established 
suitable, measurable, and achievable performance metrics across 
various elements of the program.

Mitigation of military aviation physiological incidents

    The budget request for the Department of the Navy contained 
$278.0 million to address physiological episode (PE) mitigation 
and repairs for the Naval Aviation Enterprise, and the total 
funding included in the 2020 to 2024 Future Years Defense 
Program for the Department of the Navy is $788.4 million. The 
budget request for the Department of the Air Force contained 
$6.9 million in PE64706F for life support systems to address 
physiological episode mitigation for the Air Force aviation 
enterprise. The committee understands the Air Force plans to 
request reprogramming authority during fiscal year 2019 to 
realign $87.1 million for procurement of the Enhanced On-Board 
Oxygen Generation System for 445 T-6 training aircraft.
    The committee commends the ongoing efforts of the 
Department of the Navy to address modifications to F/A-18 
aircraft to mitigate PEs and notes that it has been designated 
as the number one safety priority to resolve within the Naval 
Aviation Enterprise. The committee notes these efforts include 
replacement of the F/A-18 cockpit altimeter; upgrade of the F/
A-18 On-Board Oxygen Generation System (OBOGS); redesign of the 
F/A-18 aircraft life support systems required to meet OBOGS 
input specifications; and installation of equipment associated 
with improved F/A-18 physiological monitoring and alert 
systems.
    The committee is aware that since approximately 2010, the 
Air Force has experienced increases in the rate of 
physiological episodes affecting aircrew in the F-22, F-15C, F-
35A, and T-6A aircraft. The committee notes the Air Force 
Physiological Episodes Action Team assessed that for more than 
a decade, the Air Force has underinvested in basic aerospace 
physiology science, research, and development. While the Air 
Force has made progress in some areas of human-machine-
environment interface during that time period, other areas were 
not as well studied, which left gaps in Air Force data 
resulting in limited understanding of aircrew life support 
requirements related to PE for aircrew flying high-performance 
tactical aircraft.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of the Air 
Force, in consultation with the Secretary of the Navy, to 
provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services not 
later than March 1, 2020, that determines the availability and 
feasibility of procuring PE sensor devices in pilot helmets 
that warn of imminent incapacitation and can also collect and 
report data on human performance during flight.

                         LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS


              Subtitle A--Authorization of Appropriations


              Section 101--Authorization of Appropriations

    This section would authorize appropriations for procurement 
at the levels identified in section 4101 of division D of this 
Act.

                       Subtitle B--Navy Programs


Section 111--Modification of Annual Report on Cost Targets for Certain 
                           Aircraft Carriers

    This section would amend section 126(c) of the National 
Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2017 (Public Law 114-
328), that requires an annual report on cost reduction efforts 
for CVN-79 and CVN-80. This section would amend Public Law 114-
328 to include CVN-81, and reflect changes made to the cost cap 
language.

Section 112--Repeal of Requirement to Adhere to Navy Cost Estimates for 
                       Certain Aircraft Carriers

    This section would repeal section 122 of the John Warner 
National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2007 (Public 
Law 109-364), as amended by section 121 of the National Defense 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2014 (Public Law 113-66), 
section 122 of the National Defense Authorization Act for 
Fiscal Year 2016 (Public Law 114-92), and section 121(a) of the 
National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2018 (Public 
Law 115-91).

  Section 113--Ford Class Aircraft Carrier Support for F-35C Aircraft

    This section would require the Secretary of the Navy to 
ensure that the aircraft carrier to be designated CVN-79 is 
capable of deploying with the F-35 prior to accepting delivery.

  Section 114--Prohibition on Use of Funds for Reduction of Aircraft 
                        Carrier Force Structure

    This section would limit the Secretary of Defense from 
reducing the aircraft carrier force structure below the level 
required by section 5062 of title 10, United States Code.
    The committee continues to believe that the nation's 
preeminent power projection capability is embodied with the 
aircraft carrier strike group. The ability to rapidly relocate 
a strategic asset and launch long-range, deep penetrating 
strike from a location that is not hampered by sovereign 
limitations represents the linchpin in our nation's national 
security. The committee concurs with the Navy's assessment that 
the aircraft carrier is more survivable today than at any point 
in the last 75 years.
    The committee continues to support an expansion of the 
aircraft carrier force structure to obtain the Navy's 
requirement of 12 aircraft carriers. The committee is 
supportive of the two-carrier procurement authorized in section 
121 of the John S. McCain National Defense Authorization Act 
for Fiscal Year 2019 (Public Law 115-232) and is supportive of 
further efforts to reduce the span between aircraft carrier 
construction.
    Additionally, the budget request contained no funds for the 
Refueling and Complex Overhaul (RCOH) of the USS Harry S. 
Truman. The committee is encouraged that the administration 
reversed its recommendation to retire the USS Harry S. Truman 
before the planned RCOH and agrees with the overwhelming view 
within Congress that maintaining this strategic asset for 
another 25 years is crucial to national security. Therefore, 
the committee recommends $17.0 million to begin procurement of 
the long lead items associated with the USS Harry S. Truman 
RCOH.

   Section 115--Design and Construction of Amphibious Transport Dock 
                           Designated LPD-31

    This section would authorize the Secretary of the Navy to 
enter into a contract for the amphibious transport dock ship 
designated LPD-31. Additionally, the Secretary would be 
authorized to use incremental funding authority to complete the 
construction.

  Section 116--Limitation on Availability of Funds Pending Quarterly 
         Updates on the CH-53K King Stallion Helicopter Program

    This section would limit obligation or expenditure of 50 
percent of the procurement funds for the CH-53K King Stallion 
helicopter until 30 days after the Secretary of the Navy 
provides the House Committee on Armed Services the first 
required quarterly briefing on program status and resolution of 
technical deficiencies as compared to the CH-53K joint 
integrated program schedule. This section does not apply to any 
funds authorized to be appropriated by this Act for the 
development of the CH-53K.

 Section 117--Limitation on Availability of Funds for VH-92A Helicopter

    This section would limit the fiscal year 2020 available 
funding for the VH-92A helicopter to no more than 75 percent 
until the Secretary of the Navy provides the House Committee on 
Armed Services a report on the program's status. This report 
must include the estimated impact of relocating the aircraft 
manufacturing process on the manufacturing readiness level, 
cost, schedule, and sustainment of the program.

           Section 118--National Defense Reserve Fleet Vessel

    This section would direct the Secretary of the Navy to 
enter into a contract for one sealift vessel, subject to 
certain requirements.

                     Subtitle C--Air Force Programs


   Section 121--Modification of Requirement to Preserve Certain C-5 
                                Aircraft

    This section would amend section 141(d) of the National 
Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2013 (Public Law 112-
239) to reinstate the requirement for the Secretary of the Air 
Force to continue to preserve certain C-5 aircraft in a storage 
condition that would allow a recall of retired aircraft to 
future service in the Air Force Reserve, Air National Guard, or 
Active Force structure.

  Section 122--Modification of Limitation on Use of Funds for KC-46A 
                                Aircraft

    This section would amend section 146 of the John S. McCain 
National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2019 (Public 
Law 115-232), to limit the use of funds for KC-46A aircraft 
pending submittal of certification, to include a military 
flight release.

                  Section 123--F-15EX Aircraft Program

    This section would require the Secretary of Defense to 
designate the F-15EX program as a major subprogram and subject 
it to relevant reporting requirements and criteria pertinent to 
a major subprogram. The section would allow the Secretary of 
the Air Force to procure two F-15EX aircraft for prototype 
development but would prohibit the procurement of any 
additional aircraft until 30 days after the Secretary submits 
F-15EX program plans for development, acquisition, and fielding 
to the congressional defense committees.

 Section 124--Prohibition on Availability of Funds for Reduction in KC-
                 10 Primary Mission Aircraft Inventory

    This section would prohibit the retirement of any primary 
inventory KC-10 aircraft in fiscal year 2020.

  Section 125--Limitation on Availability of Funds for VC-25B Aircraft

    This section would prohibit the Secretary of the Air Force 
from obligating or expending any funds to exercise the over-
and-above clause of the VC-25B contract until the Secretary 
submits a certification to the congressional defense 
committees.

 Section 126--Limitation on Availability of Funds for Retirement of RC-
                              135 Aircraft

    This section would prohibit any use of funds authorized to 
be appropriated in fiscal year 2020 for the Air Force to 
retire, or prepare to retire, any RC-135 aircraft until 60 days 
after the date on which the Secretary of Defense certifies to 
the congressional defense committees that equivalent RC-135 
capacity and capability exists to meet combatant commander 
requirements for indications and warning, intelligence 
preparation of the operational environment, and direct support 
to kinetic and non-kinetic operations.

     Section 127--Report on Aircraft Fleet of the Civil Air Patrol

    This section would require the Secretary of the Air Force 
to submit a report to the congressional defense committees not 
later than 90 days after the date of the enactment of this Act 
on the Civil Air Patrol (CAP) that identifies and assesses the 
suitability of the current CAP aircraft fleet size, types of 
aircraft, and operating locations to meet mission requirements.

       Subtitle D--Defense-Wide, Joint, and Multiservice Matters


  Section 131--Economic Order Quantity Contracting and Buy-to-Budget 
                 Acquisition for F-35 Aircraft Program

    This section would authorize the Secretary of Defense to 
procure economic order quantities of material and equipment for 
the F-35 program. This section would also authorize the 
Secretary to procure F-35 aircraft exceeding the quantity 
otherwise authorized by this Act if procurement of additional 
aircraft would not require additional funds to be authorized or 
appropriated.

    Section 132--Program Requirements for the F-35 Aircraft Program

    This section would require the Secretary of Defense to 
designate Block 4 capability as a major subprogram of the F-35 
program and subject Block 4 to relevant reporting requirements 
and criteria pertinent to a major subprogram. This section 
would require the Secretaries of the Air Force and the Navy to 
develop a joint service cost position for F-35 life-cycle 
costs, and require the Director, Cost Assessment and Program 
Evaluation to develop an independent life-cycle cost estimate 
for comparison. This section would also require the Secretary 
of Defense to revise the Department of Defense's program 
element structure for F-35 beginning with the fiscal year 2021 
President's budget request and subsequent budget requests to 
provide sufficient transparency regarding future F-35 costs. 
Finally, this section would require the Comptroller General of 
the United States to provide an annual report for five 
consecutive years, submitted each year not later than 30 days 
after the President's annual budget submission to Congress, 
that reviews the F-35 program.

             Section 133--Reports on F-35 Aircraft Program

    This section would require the Secretary of Defense to 
provide reports to the congressional defense committees on F-35 
reliability and maintainability metrics, Block 4 capability 
development and fielding activities, and modernization and 
upgrade plans for the F-35 Autonomic Logistics Information 
System.

         TITLE II--RESEARCH, DEVELOPMENT, TEST, AND EVALUATION

           Research, Development, Test, and Evaluation, Army


                       Items of Special Interest


3-D Printed Electronics Army Innovation

    The committee understands additive manufacturing (AM) is 
making innovative technological improvements that could yield 
major advances in Army indirect fire weapons' range and lethal 
effects. This technology can combine existing and new materials 
into 3-D printed circuit architectures producing smarter, 
lighter, and denser projectiles to double current ranges and 
achieve higher precision. The flexibility inherent in AM allows 
for ready incorporation of new materials into complex 
structural designs that cannot be produced by any other method. 
As the technology matures, AM can also be used in other Army 
priorities such as technology for new and lighter smart armor 
and other purposes.
    The committee notes that the Army continues to invest in AM 
technology to rapidly design, prototype, and manufacture 
critical novel printed armaments components. The goal is to 
demonstrate the ability to print munitions completely on a 
single production line and assess this capability for potential 
implementation in an ammunition plant. This demonstration will 
also allow for an assessment of the potential to print 
replacement parts, customizable grenades, printed electronics 
and antennas. The committee supports the Army's investment in 
additive manufacturing technology and will continue to monitor 
its potential for industrial application as well as practical 
in-field use.

Accelerated integration to counter emerging threats

    The committee supports the accelerated integration 
capability to counter emerging threats being initiated by the 
Program Executive Office, Missiles and Space. The Army is 
developing a government-owned capability to provide cyber-
robust, networked new missile capabilities into the Army 
Integrated Air and Missile Defense systems designed to operate 
within rapidly evolving threat environments and timelines. The 
committee understands this is being accomplished through a 
unique approach to adapt and respond to real-time threats, 
dramatically accelerating the timeline to employ resilience in 
networked weapon systems. Therefore, the committee directs the 
Secretary of the Army to provide a briefing to the Committee on 
Armed Services of the House of Representatives by March 2, 
2020, on the status of progress being made through this 
accelerated program.

Advanced development of asset protection technologies

    The committee notes the Army's progress in developing 
advanced technologies for asset protection, such as Thermal 
Indicating Paints, Active Sensor Systems, Novel Power 
Solutions, Printed and Embedded Sensors for Army Weapons 
systems, Flexible Electronics, and others to support the 
warfighter. The committee directs the Secretary of the Army to 
provide a briefing to the committee not later than December 1, 
2019 on the Army's plans and programs, if any, to develop, 
demonstrate, manufacture and deploy advanced multi-functional 
materials and technologies that can be combined for 
customizable asset protection systems and increased weapon 
system capabilities.

Advanced lightweight small arms and medium caliber ammunitions

    The committee is encouraged by the Navy's progress on 
design, development and testing of advanced lightweight small 
arms and medium caliber ammunitions. The committee directs the 
Secretary of the Navy to report to the committee by December 1, 
2019 what efforts are underway to continue to explore and 
refine the use of advanced lightweight polymer cased ammunition 
technology to reduce the weight burden, enhance operational 
reliability, improve mobility and enhance survivability of the 
warfighter.

Advanced materials and components

    The budget request contained $35.1 million in PE 62144A for 
ground technology.
    The committee is aware that research conducted under this 
program is developing materials and manufacturing processes 
that combine multiple classes of materials for innovative and 
pioneering use cases. As a result, advanced hybrid materials 
and novel manufacturing methods, including high entropy alloys, 
are being developed for critical programs including the Army's 
Long Range Precision Fires and Next Generation Combat Vehicles 
modernization efforts.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $5.0 
million in PE 62144A for ground technology advanced materials 
and manufacturing research technology.

Advanced technology for cold regions

    Over several years, the Department of Defense has 
identified the need to operate in the Arctic and other cold 
region environments is critical to our national security and 
homeland security interests. To realize a successful National 
Defense Strategy, a number of engineering challenges must be 
solved to evolve the Department's ability to construct, 
maintain, and retrofit horizontal and vertical infrastructure 
in cold regions. Once developed, these novel approaches to 
designing, building, and maintaining rapid, cost effective, 
small-footprint infrastructure will enable U.S. forces to 
better defend the homeland and exercise sovereignty by rapidly 
projecting capabilities to remote cold regions when needed. 
Therefore, the committee supports innovative construction 
materials for cold regions by further developing and testing 
initial prototypes of mapping systems and construction 
materials under austere conditions, and developing, 
calibrating, and verifying performance prediction models.

Army unfunded requirement for munitions storage

    The committee recognizes the important work the Armaments 
Center, a science and technology reinvention laboratory at 
Picatinny Arsenal, plays in the ammunition life cycle to ensure 
our warfighters are appropriately equipped to complete their 
missions. The committee notes that the Under Secretary of 
Defense for Research and Engineering's February 2019 Report to 
Congress on Unfunded Requirements for Laboratory Military 
Construction Projects included for this center an unfunded 
laboratory minor science and technology military construction 
project for an Igloo Storage Installation. The committee 
directs the Secretary of the Army to provide a briefing to the 
House Committee on Armed Services not later than November 30, 
2019, on what the Army's plans are to ensure that the required 
construction and maintenance is implemented to support this 
mission.

Briefing on secure communications with remote-piloted and unmanned 
        ground vehicles

    The committee is aware that the Army is developing new 
ground combat vehicles that can be operated remotely or 
unmanned. At the same time, potential adversaries continue to 
develop capabilities that may compromise control of these 
remotely operated systems, as well as other components of the 
Army's communications networks.
    The committee notes the Army is researching technologies 
that will protect and harden communication networks in 
contested environments, but is concerned about the integration 
of these systems relative to the maturity of remotely-piloted 
vehicles like the Optionally Manned Fighting Vehicle and the 
Robotic Combat Vehicle.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of the Army 
to provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services 
by September 30, 2019, on the Army's efforts to develop 
technologies that will protect control of remotely-piloted or 
unmanned vehicles, as well as other communications 
technologies, while operating in contested environments.

Carbon fiber wheels and graphitic foam for Army vehicles

    The committee notes the evolution of the Army's testing and 
evaluation of Lightweight Metal Matrix Composite Technology as 
outlined in the report by the Assistant Secretary of the Army 
for Acquisition, Logistics, and Technology submitted to the 
congressional defense committees in accordance with the 
committee report accompanying the John S. McCain National 
Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2019 (S. Rept. 115-
262). The Army's report makes clear that its interest with 
respect to new materials for lightweight wheels and associated 
brake systems has transitioned to a more viable dual-use carbon 
fiber and graphite byproduct suitable for brake pads and liners 
throughout the tactical wheeled vehicle fleet.
    The committee encourages the Army to continue to develop, 
prototype, and test affordable mesophase pitch carbon fiber and 
graphitic carbon foam components for the Next Generation Combat 
Vehicle and the tactical wheeled vehicle fleet to confirm their 
potential to reduce vehicle weight and improve fuel consumption 
and payload capacity over standard aluminum and steel designs. 
Accordingly, the committee directs the Assistant Secretary of 
the Army for Acquisition, Logistics, and Technology to provide 
a briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services not later 
than November 29, 2019, on the progress of the Army's 
development and testing efforts related to mesophase pitch 
carbon fiber and graphitic carbon foam vehicle components.

Composite warhead technology

    The committee is aware of the Army's effort to facilitate 
rapid prototyping and demonstrations of composite ordinance 
packages consisting of composite warheads with multiple lethal 
effects payloads. The committee supports the Army's research 
and development efforts that study how composite and carbon-
fiber warhead technologies are applicable to new hypersonic 
strike missiles. The committee encourages the Army to continue 
to explore the durability and weight benefits that composite 
warhead technology provides, thereby extending the range of the 
Army's long range precision fires.

Defense Innovation and the Automotive Industry

    The committee commends universities and industry for their 
work in maturing technologies and producing materiel solutions 
to ensure our military maintains its technological edge. The 
commercial market driving the development of technologies is 
dynamic, and our military benefits greatly from the innovations 
that come from partnerships with small businesses and 
universities. As there are many lessons to be learned from 
independent research and the commercial market like the 
automotive industry, Science and Technology Reinvention 
Laboratories (STRLs) carry out a significant portion of basic 
and developmental research in collaboration with academia and 
the private sector. Government-funded research efforts to 
address military threats are critical to reducing technology 
development risk. If successful, they can attract private 
sector partners that lead to manufacturing and 
commercialization or production of defense systems. The 
committee encourages the Department to work with industry, and 
in particular the automotive industry, to establish public/
public and public/private (P4) Innovation Centers focused on 
the defense and automotive industries. The Innovation Centers 
could also serve as ``learning labs'' for Science, Technology, 
Engineering, and Math (STEM) based programs. The committee 
directs the Under Secretary of Defense for Research and 
Engineering and the Secretary of the Army, with support from 
the Director of the Defense Innovation Unit, by March 31, 2020 
to provide a briefing to the armed services committees on how 
the Department is working with the automotive industry to 
identify innovative technologies and learn lessons applicable 
to the development and production of defense systems. The 
briefing should include discussion of any plans to establish 
Innovation Centers as described above, including in or around 
the Detroit Arsenal or the Ground Vehicle Support Center in 
Warren, MI.

Expeditionary Maneuver Support Technologies

    The committee supports the development of Expeditionary 
Maneuver Support Technologies (EMST) for the next generation of 
command posts and supporting technologies, allowing combatant 
commanders to meet their increased operational requirements. 
This is necessary research for concealment, camouflage, 
deception, shielding, secure communications and other non-
logistics based technologies above the individual soldier 
level, in order to support large scale maneuver operations. The 
committee encourages the Department to continue the development 
of advanced intelligent materials will be used as the 
pathfinder component for production of these new EMST systems, 
provide a logistical cost savings to the Department of Defense, 
and enhanced protection for the units in the field.

Expeditionary mobile base camp technology

    The committee understands that the Army has a need for 
rapidly deployable expeditionary structures that offer 
protection from battlefield threats. The committee therefore 
recommends that the Department of Defense examine:
    (1) next-generation rapidly deployable shelter systems 
which utilize thermoplastics-based design concepts;
    (2) the feasibility of 3-D printing shelter components 
using small and large scale printing technologies and bio-
filled materials; and
    (3) applications for expeditionary smart materials 
including photovoltaics, smart textile materials, and 
thermoplastic multifilament and monofilament yarns.

Foamable celluloid material

    The committee is aware that the Army has made investments 
and achieved progress in developing modern ammunition material 
and manufacturing technologies that have the potential to 
improve ammunition performance and reduce life-cycle costs. 
Given this progress, the committee encourages the Army to 
rapidly transition technologies when ready from development to 
production for operational use availability. For example, the 
committee understands there could be substantial performance 
improvement and cost savings derived from advanced technologies 
such as foamable celluloid combustible propellant cases for 
tank, artillery, and mortar ammunition. The committee, 
therefore, encourages the Army to complete the development and 
qualification of this new capability in order to make a timely 
production and fielding decision. Further, the committee 
directs the Assistant Secretary of the Army for Acquisition, 
Logistics, and Technology to provide a briefing to the House 
Committee on Armed Services not later than August 15, 2019, on 
plans for the continued development and potential for 
production and fielding of new ammunition technology, such as 
foamable celluloid combustible propellant cases, for tanks, 
artillery, and mortars.

Future Vertical Lift

    The budget request included $459.0 million in PE 63801A for 
Future Vertical Lift (FVL) platform research and development. 
Of this amount, $427.0 million was requested for development of 
the Future Attack Reconnaissance Aircraft (FARA), a new scout 
helicopter, while $30.2 million was requested for the Future 
Long-Range Assault Aircraft (FLRAA), the planned replacement 
for the UH-60 Black Hawk helicopter.
    Future Vertical Lift (FVL) is the Army's initiative to 
develop and field next-generation rotary wing aviation 
technologies and platforms through rapid prototyping and 
streamlined acquisition processes. The committee supports FVL's 
near-term goals and objectives of developing modern 
capabilities to replace the OH-58 Kiowa scout reconnaissance 
helicopter and the UH-60 Black Hawk utility helicopter.
    The committee understands the Army awarded five Other 
Transaction Authority contracts in April 2019 for FARA 
prototypes and intends to down-select to two competitors in 
March 2020. However, the Army failed to include funds to bridge 
the gap between the Joint Multi-Role Technology Demonstration 
(JMR-TD) for transformational vertical lift capabilities and 
the planned start of the Future Long-Range Assault Aircraft. 
Instead, the Army included $75.0 million in its unfunded 
priority list to accelerate FLRAA through an extension of the 
JMR-TD program. The committee believes additional details are 
required in order to make an informed evaluation of the Army's 
near and long term objectives for the Army aviation enterprise. 
The committee expects the aviation modernization strategy 
required elsewhere in this Act to help clarify these questions.

Heavy Equipment Transporter System trailer development

    The committee encourages the Army to continue development 
and procurement of a Heavy Equipment Transporter (HET) trailer 
solution for current and future combat vehicles. The committee 
notes that the Army's current trailer is rated for 70 tons, but 
modernized M1A2 Abrams Main Battle Tanks will weigh in excess 
of 80 tons. Given the gross vehicle weight limitations on 
current trailer systems, the committee is concerned that these 
trailers cannot transport the most modern version of the Abrams 
tank. The committee believes the Army requires a new, more 
capable trailer and therefore encourages the Army immediately 
to begin to plan, program, and fund the accelerated 
modification of fielded HET trailers. The committee directs the 
Secretary of the Army to provide a briefing to the House 
Committee on Armed Services by November 1, 2019, that details 
courses of action to accelerate needed modernization of current 
HET trailers.

HEROES program

    The budget request contained $115.2 million in PE 62143A 
for Soldier Lethality Technology.
    The committee is aware of the work being done by the U.S. 
Army's Combat Capabilities Development Command (CCDC) Soldier 
Center in improving the protection, survivability, mobility, 
and combat effectiveness of the Army. The committee is also 
aware that the Harnessing Emerging Research Opportunities to 
Empower Soldiers (HEROES) program is an ongoing joint research 
and development initiative involving both academia and industry 
that accelerates research and innovation through integration of 
intellectual assets and research facilities. The committee 
believes programs like HEROES provide benefit to research in 
areas of advanced ballistic polymers for body armor, fibers to 
make uniforms more fire resistant, and lightweight structures 
for advanced shelters that provide tangible benefits to the 
warfighter. To ensure the Army remains at the cutting edge of 
technology in these critical areas, the committee recommends an 
increase of $5.0 million in PE 62143A for the HEROES program.

High performance advanced polymers

    The committee is aware of Army work being done to improve 
the protection, survivability, mobility, and combat 
effectiveness of its vehicles, specifically in extreme 
temperatures. The committee is also aware of the efforts to 
develop advanced polymers for ground vehicles including the 
Stryker, Joint Light Tactical Vehicle, and the medium tactical 
vehicles. The committee believes additional research in 
advanced ballistic polymers that improves upon current resin 
systems to: maintain ballistic performance in hot and humid 
environments; keep fibers in uniforms more fire resistant; and 
create lightweight structures for advanced shelters all 
provides tangible benefits to the warfighter. Therefore, the 
committee encourages the Army to continue its support of such 
programs.

Humanitarian de-mining research and development

    The budget request contained $10.8 million in PE 63920D8Z 
for humanitarian de-mining research and development.
    The committee supports the humanitarian de-mining research 
and development program overseen by the Deputy Assistant 
Secretary for Stability and Humanitarian Affairs. This program 
develops and tests systems to detect and clear landmines, 
unexploded ordnance, and improvised explosives devices. The 
committee understands this research and development improves 
technology used by the military, informs military equipment 
procurement decisions, and supports stabilization and 
humanitarian projects funded by the Department of State while 
also fostering a collaborative relationship with host nation 
governments. The committee is aware of the value of this 
program.
    Therefore, the committee recommends $15.8 million, an 
increase of $5.0 million, in PE 63920D8Z for humanitarian de-
mining research and development.

Improved Turbine Engine Program

    The budget request included $206.4 million in PE 67139A for 
the Improved Turbine Engine Program (ITEP)
    The committee continues to support development of the 
Army's Improved Turbine Engine Program. ITEP was initiated as a 
competitive development and acquisition program to provide a 
more fuel efficient and powerful helicopter engine enhancing 
the performance and operational readiness of the Army's UH-60 
Black Hawk and AH-64 Apache fleets. The committee has supported 
significant Army investments into competitive technology 
development programs for turbine engines over the past decade 
and is encouraged by the significant progress the Army has made 
in maturing technologies that would lower ITEP programmatic 
risks. The committee also notes that ITEP will benefit the 
Army's future vertical lift development efforts, in particular, 
the Future Attack Reconnaissance Aircraft (FARA) program.
    The committee understands that the engineering and 
manufacturing development phase of ITEP is fully funded through 
fiscal year 2024 and that maintaining schedule to meet both the 
current and future platform integration timelines is crucial to 
the Army's aviation modernization enterprise. The committee 
expects the Army to maintain the current ITEP schedule as any 
delays will affect the planned delivery of new capability and 
Army aviation future readiness.
    The committee recommends $206.4 million, the full amount 
requested, in PE 67139A for ITEP.

Improvement of combat helmet suspension systems

    The budget request contained $118.5 million in PE 63118A 
for Soldier Lethality Advanced Technology, including $14.8 
million for body armor and integrated head borne advanced 
technology projects.
    The committee supports continued efforts to improve the 
performance of personal protective capabilities to increase 
warfighter performance and safety. The committee understands 
that recent technology development in helmet pad suspension 
systems, like microlattice technology, may result in next-
generation helmet suspension systems capable of absorbing 
impacts more effectively while maintaining user comfort and 
sustaining performance requirements.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $5.0 
million in PE 63118A for body armor and integrated head borne 
advanced technology projects to improve helmet suspension pad 
systems using microlattice technology.

Instrumentable Multiple Integrated Laser Engagement System

    The committee is aware of the important role that the 
Instrumentable Multiple Integrated Laser Engagement System has 
in training Army and Marine Corps elements on force-on-force 
training at the National Training Center and other training 
centers worldwide. The committee is also aware of the 
criticality of this training to force readiness levels, 
particularly as the military services pivot towards peer 
adversaries. The committee supports the Army's efforts to 
develop innovative technologies, such as the Synthetic Training 
Environment program, and is interested in the Army's plan to 
continue to improve the Instrumentable Multiple Integrated 
Laser Engagement System through the relevancy program and serve 
as a bridge to future virtual training solutions. Therefore, 
the committee encourages the Army to continue to support the 
Instrumentable Multiple Integrated Laser Engagement Relevancy 
Program as a cost-effective and capable bridge to future 
virtual training solutions.

Modeling and Simulation for Ground Vehicle Development

    The committee notes that modeling and simulation (M&S) has 
demonstrated its utility as a tool for vehicle technology 
development by providing program managers with necessary 
information related to reliability and performance challenges 
in advance of making significant investment decisions for 
future development. The committee also notes that M&S is 
particularly relevant in the development of unmanned vehicle 
systems that could use artificial intelligence. As the Army 
continues to modernize its ground combat and tactical vehicle 
systems, the committee encourages maximization of M&S to 
realize potential savings in experimentation and prototyping, 
predict and control program costs and, where possible, 
accelerate the speed of development and fielding of new ground 
vehicle capabilities. Therefore, the committee directs the 
Assistant Secretary of the Army for Acquisition, Logistics, and 
Technology to provide a briefing to the House Committee on 
Armed Services no later than December 1, 2019 on how M&S is 
being incorporated into the development of next generation 
combat vehicles to include the Optionally-Manned Fighting 
Vehicle and Robotic Combat Vehicle programs, as well as 
identify any barriers and challenges that may exist regarding 
the full utilization of M&S for ground combat and tactical 
vehicle development.

Modern mobile sheltering systems

    The committee encourages the Department of the Army to 
explore the utilization of modern sheltering systems. 
Investment in rapidly deployable, hard-walled systems with 
integrated technologies and the use of modern and modular 
materials could advance the development of a modernized shelter 
that meets current and future operational requirements. 
Additionally, investment in new technologies for sheltering 
systems that are agile, durable, modular, customizable, and 
scalable could create new opportunities for shelter systems 
suitable not only for multi-domain combat operations, but also 
easily adaptable for use in disaster response and humanitarian 
relief operations.

Multi-mission Medium Range Railgun Weapon System and Integrated Power 
        and Thermal Management System

    The committee recognizes progress made by the Army to 
mature the multi-mission medium range railgun weapon system 
(MMRRWS) and the Integrated Power and Thermal Management System 
(IPTMS). The committee understands that MMRRWS, if successful, 
would support integrated air missile defense, mobile short-
range air defense, and indirect and direct fires applications. 
This capability would launch a guided projectile significantly 
farther and with more lethality than traditional systems, and 
will address critical gaps in U.S. air defense against growing 
threats from peer and near-peer competitors. The committee 
further understands IPTMS was developed specifically to support 
the Army's Maneuver-Short Range Air Defense (M-SHORAD) 
requirement. Adopting IPTMS could potentially accelerate 
development of a directed energy capable M-SHORAD capability as 
early as 2021. The committee encourages the Army to continue to 
leverage internal investments in developing MMRRWS and IPTMS in 
order to fully evaluate the potential of railgun technology on 
mobile platforms.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of the Army 
to provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services 
not later than February 1, 2020, on the current capability of 
MMRRWS and IPTMS, ongoing development and technology maturation 
of these systems, the results of any technology demonstrations 
of these capabilities, and the integration of MMRWS and IPTMS 
and their components with existing or planned M-SHORAD systems.

Multi-spectral thermal mitigation technologies

    The budget request contained $118.5 million in PE 63118A 
for soldier lethality advanced technologies.
    The committee is aware that the military services have 
established baseline standards for flame resistant uniforms 
that provide near-infrared thermal sensor protection for 
service members who are deployed in hostile areas. The 
committee understands that recent technical developments in 
sensor technologies and sensor mitigation are advancing at a 
pace well ahead of the current research, development, and 
procurement efforts. As a result, long-range detection and 
identification of our service members from hostile near-peer as 
well non-state actors is an emerging force protection threat. 
As such, the committee encourages the military services to 
explore multi-spectral sensor mitigation technologies, and to 
incorporate them into current and future uniform requirements 
and testing in use by the armed services.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of the Army, 
in coordination with the Secretaries of the Navy and the Air 
Force, to provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed 
Services by March 1, 2020, on the infra-red protection of 
current uniform standards against emerging sensor technologies, 
including an analysis of the feasibility, availability, and 
cost of material solutions that could mitigate these emerging 
thermal sensor technologies.
    Further, the committee recommends an increase of $5.0 
million in PE 63118A for soldier lethality advanced 
technologies.

National Academies review of technologies related to Army Strategic 
        Long-Range Cannon

    The committee notes that modernization of long-range 
precision fires is the Army's highest priority for meeting the 
requirements of the National Defense Strategy and the 
operational challenges associated with peer and near-peer 
potential adversaries. One of the technologies the Army is 
pursuing is a Strategic Long-Range Cannon capable of firing a 
projectile at hypersonic speed up to 1,000 miles. The committee 
is interested to learn more about this imaginative concept and 
the technical challenges associated with development of such a 
capability especially with respect to propellant, projectiles, 
and cannon. Accordingly, the committee directs the Secretary of 
the Army to enter into an arrangement with the Board on Army 
Research and Development of the National Academies of Sciences, 
Engineering, and Medicine to conduct a study that identifies 
and evaluates the technology approaches, policies, and concepts 
of operations of the Strategic Long-Range Cannon (SLRC) 
program. The study shall include:
    (1) an identification and evaluation of attributes of 
potential peer or near-peer adversaries operating environments 
and concepts that would enhance or reduce the effectiveness of 
SLRC;
    (2) an identification and evaluation of limitations and 
vulnerabilities of current ground-based capabilities for long-
range fires as well as existing and proposed countermeasures;
    (3) an identification and evaluation of key and essential 
technologies needed to achieve documented goals and 
capabilities of SLRC along with associated technologies 
required to support manufacturability and sustainability; and
    (4) provide a technology maturation roadmap, including an 
estimated funding profile over time, needed to achieve an 
effective operational SLRC that describes both the critical and 
associated supporting technologies, systems integration, 
prototyping and experimentation, and test and evaluation.
    The Secretary shall submit the study to the congressional 
defense committees not later than August 31, 2020. The study 
submitted shall be classified at levels appropriate to and 
sufficient for access to data necessary for a comprehensive 
review of the subject and related technologies but must include 
an unclassified summary of findings and recommendations. The 
Secretary may submit comments, if any, to accompany the study's 
classified or unclassified findings and recommendations.

Real time transmission of weapons usage data

    The committee recognizes the importance of the Next 
Generation Squad Weapon program and notes the potential of new 
technology involving smart weapons capable of real time 
transmission of weapons usage data. The committee directs the 
Assistant Secretary of the Army for Acquisition to provide a 
briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services no later than 
November 1, 2019 on the utility of real time transmission of 
squad level weapons usage data for training and combat 
operations, logistics, and maintenance, to include potential or 
existing technology.

Women in Army science, technology, engineering, and mathematics careers

    The committee is aware of the important role the Picatinny 
Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) 
Education Office has in providing assistance to schools, 
support for students and leadership in developing activities to 
insure preparedness through education. As part of a continuing 
effort to encourage young women to pursue technical careers, in 
2019 Picatinny Arsenal hosted its sixth year of ``Introduce a 
Girl to Engineering,'' which attracted 100 students from 28 
schools. Women comprise only 16 percent of the scientists and 
engineering workforce of the Combat Capabilities Development 
Command. Therefore, the committee encourages the Army to 
continue efforts to promote STEM education at Army labs and 
urges the Secretary of the Army to further utilize the 
Manufacturing Engineering Education program to promote women in 
STEM Army careers with awards under the selection criteria 
provided by section 2196 (g)8 of title 10, United States Code.
    The committee encourages the Secretary to use the 
Department of Defense's Science, Mathematics, and Research for 
Transformation Program to further encourage women to enter the 
Army's science and engineering workforce.

           Research, Development, Test, and Evaluation, Navy


                       Items of Special Interest


Academic partnerships for undersea vehicle research

    The budget request contained $57.1 million in PE 62747N for 
undersea warfare applied research. The committee encourages the 
Department of the Navy to focus investments in research 
projects that are relevant to specific engineering and 
manufacturing needs, as well as defined systems capabilities. 
The committee also supports partnerships with industry and 
academia that are focused on well-defined short- and long-term 
submarine and autonomous undersea vehicle research needs, 
accelerated technology transition, and strong workforce 
development to develop a healthy industrial base with capacity 
needed to develop and build the Navy's next generation of 
advanced nuclear submarines and other undersea vehicles and 
systems. Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of 
$10.0 million in PE 62747N for innovative research and 
manufacturing partnerships between academia and industry.

Advanced Manufacturing of Critical Scale Materials

    To ensure the next generation of submarines incorporates 
the most cutting edge technologies, the Navy must advance the 
qualification and certification of Advanced Manufacturing (AM) 
processes, materials, and components to allow the Navy to 
integrate AM capabilities into current and future systems and 
platforms. The committee directs the Secretary of the Navy to 
report to the committee by December 1, 2019 on what efforts are 
underway to integrate AM. Further, as part of this report, the 
committee directs the Navy to include specific information 
about the testing and qualification of processes, materials, 
and components required to meet Columbia Class requirements and 
milestones.

Advanced precision materials research

    The committee is aware that research conducted under this 
program is developing critical components and combining 
multiple classes of materials for innovative and pioneering use 
cases, including the use of metal powders and substrates for 
military specifications. As a result, advanced hybrid materials 
and novel manufacturing methods, including wire-arc 
manufacturing and lightweight materials are being developed for 
critical programs including the Navy's Cross Platform System 
Development Program.

Advanced radar research

    The committee notes there have been major advances in the 
field of radar development with respect to phased array radar 
technology in a digital design. The development of this 
technology is a critical enabler for the Navy in the 
development of tools to increase target detection as well as 
improve electronic warfare and adaptive sensing capabilities. 
The committee directs the Chief of Naval Research to submit a 
report to the House Committee on Armed Services not later than 
April 30, 2020, on its support of partnerships with laboratory-
based antenna test facilities that help the Navy understand, 
characterize, and calibrate advanced all-digital radars that 
are under development.

Autonomous vehicle collaboration across maritime domains

    The budget request contained $119.5 million in PE 62123N 
for applied research into autonomous vehicle collaboration 
across maritime domains.
    The committee supports the Navy's investment in unmanned 
systems, such as autonomous underwater and surface vehicles. 
While autonomous systems are part of a strategy to maintain 
military technological advantage, there are lingering gaps in 
the performance of maritime autonomous vehicles intended to 
serve key Navy missions.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $10.0 
million in PE 62123N for applied research into autonomous 
vehicle collaboration across maritime domains, particularly for 
rapid prototyping and experimentation enabling coordination 
between unmanned underwater and surface vehicles.

Critical bandwidth gaps for Navy deployments

    The committee recognizes that the Department of Defense 
requires the capability to utilize in real time the massive 
amount of data compiled from technically advanced weapons 
systems. Current limitations in bandwidth and geographically 
challenging environments hinder the Department's ability to 
securely share in real time large volumes of data between 
warfighting units at the network's edge and command-and-control 
facilities. Nowhere is this problem more acute than for naval 
ships operating at sea. To address one specific gap, the Navy 
has established the Maritime Dynamic Over the Horizon Targeting 
System (MDOTS). MDOTS will utilize advanced commercially 
integrated technologies to generate a secure high-bandwidth 
network for a new over-the-horizon weapons system. The Navy has 
plans to test this system in 2019 and the committee is aware 
that other programs in the Department could also benefit from 
this capability.
    One other example of a critical gap is in operational 
support to the F-35 Joint Strike Fighter. The F-35 generates 
massive amounts of data that must be shared in real-time with 
the pilot and command-and-control facilities to maximize 
effectiveness, intelligence, and readiness. The Navy's 
communications infrastructure currently lacks the high-
bandwidth capabilities to enable the sharing of this volume of 
data.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Assistant Secretary of 
the Navy for Research, Development, and Acquisition to explore 
the potential for using the MDOTS for a pilot project to 
establish a high-bandwidth networking capability to support 
Dynamic Over the Horizon Targeting at sea and on land. In 
addition, the committee directs the Assistant Secretary to 
review the Navy's existing networking capabilities, and 
identify critical gaps in support for deployments across the 
Navy and Marine Corps portfolio of programs. The committee 
further directs the Assistant Secretary to provide a briefing 
to the House Committee on Armed Services by March 1, 2020, that 
identifies priority gaps to be addressed.

Defense University Research Initiatives

    The budget request contained $116.8 million in PE 601103N 
for University Research Initiatives.
    Through a competitive grant process managed by the Office 
of Naval Research, the Defense University Research 
Instrumentation Program (DURIP) funds the purchase and 
development of research equipment and infrastructure by 
academic institutions necessary for high-quality Navy relevant 
science. This instrumentation plays a vital role in allowing 
defense-critical research projects to acquire needed technical 
resources specifically engineered to meet their requirements 
and is critical in accelerating the development of operational 
capabilities for the warfighter. The technologies developed and 
acquired through the DURIP process ensure that the next 
generation of scientists and engineers are trained with 
cutting-edge capabilities for the military National Security 
Innovation Base workforce.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $5.0 
million in PE 601103N to support the Navy's cutting-edge DURIP 
research.

Energy resilience

    The budget request contained $119.5 million in PE 62123N 
for Force Protection Applied Research.
    The committee recognizes the need for additional research 
to assist the Navy in its efforts to create a more robust 
energy infrastructure. To achieve military energy resiliency, 
these challenges can be best met by leveraging experienced 
energy university researchers working in concert with industry 
partners and the Navy. Specific areas of interest include: 
addressing electrical power intermittency, integrating 
renewable energy sources into the grid, energy storage, 
improved micro-grids, grid security, local generation of zero-
carbon fuels, and the inspection and structural health 
monitoring of critical energy infrastructure.
    The committee recommends an increase of $5.0 million in PE 
62123N for energy resilience applied research.

Enterotoxigenic Escherichia Coli research

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is one of the most 
prevalent pathogens responsible for diarrheal disease. Among 
U.S. warfighters deployed in the Middle East, ETEC has been the 
leading pathogen contributing to bacterial diarrhea. The Naval 
Medical Research Center (NMRC) Infectious Diseases Directorate 
(IDD) has established an Enteric Diseases Department to develop 
effective countermeasures to prevent or abate bacterial 
diarrhea. Infectious diarrhea historically has been a 
substantial cause of morbidity for deployed U.S. warfighters 
and continues to impact those currently serving overseas in the 
global war on terror. Similar pathogens also are responsible 
for travelers' diarrhea in civilian populations and endemic 
diarrheal diseases in young children in resource limited 
regions around the world. According to NMRC, acute infections 
often resolve on their own in 3 to 5 days but half of the 
service members infected report a decrease in job performance 
and 1-in-10 will go on to develop post-infectious irritable 
bowel syndrome. The Navy, Defense Advanced Research Projects 
Agency and academia have been working together to develop a 
platform for the delivery of immune molecules, mostly 
antibodies, which are safe and effective in rapidly 
establishing immune protection from ETEC diarrhea.
    The committee supports continued preclinical studies needed 
to facilitate an Investigational New Drug (IND) submission, to 
include:
    (1) process Development (formulation, stability) and 
Quality (assay development) studies;
    (2) manufacture of preclinical materials sufficient for all 
IND-enabling pharmacology, toxicology and efficacy tests;
    (3) IND-enabling safety studies including pharmacology and 
toxicology;
    (4) IND-enabling animal efficacy studies to determine 
optimum dose and robustness of response; and
    (5) development of protocols in preparation of First-in-
Human studies.

Hearing loss and prevention treatment

    The budget request contained $63.8 million in PE 62236N for 
Warfighter Sustainment Applied Research, which includes funding 
to address noise induced hearing loss. The committee recognizes 
members of the Armed Forces often experience hearing loss at 
higher rates and that tinnitus is one of the most prominent 
disabilities amongst veterans. Therefore, the committee 
recommends $63.8 million, the amount requested, in PE 62236N 
for Warfighter Sustainment Applied Research and urges the 
Department of the Navy to develop hearing loss drug therapies 
and related clinical applications.

High Energy Laser system integration

    The committee is encouraged by the Navy's rapid 
demonstration of Laser Weapon Systems (LaWSs) on surface ships. 
In a short period of time, the Navy has deployed the 30 
kilowatts (kW) LaWS on the USS Ponce (Afloat Forward Staging 
Base (Interim)-15) followed by the 150 kW Laser Weapon System 
Demonstrator (LWSD) on the USS Portland (Landing Platform/Dock-
27) in 2019. The improvements in power and beam quality make 
this a near 100 fold improvement in lethality. The committee is 
also encouraged by the 60 kW HELIOS program for integration on 
Destroyer Designated Guided ships by 2020. However, there 
appears to be more opportunity to integrate High Energy Laser 
(HEL) systems on large capital ships including aircraft 
carrier, fixed wing, nuclear powered (CVNs) and large 
amphibious ships to increase defensive capability and lethality 
of our expeditionary forces as evidenced by the deployment of 
LWSD on the USS Portland. The committee directs the Secretary 
of the Navy to submit a report to the congressional defense 
committees not later than April 1, 2020, describing a path 
forward for integration of HEL Systems 150-300 kW on large 
capital warships, including CVNs and large amphibious ships.

Navigation channel clearance for nuclear powered ballistic missile 
        submarines

    The committee recognizes that 70 percent of the United 
States nuclear deterrent is committed to ballistic missile 
submarines (SSBNs) concentrated at just two Navy bases in 
Bangor, Washington, and Kings Bay, Georgia. Each time an SSBN 
departs or returns to its respective home port, it must travel 
through shallow, restricted waterways that are open to 
commercial and private traffic. The committee is aware that 
U.S. Strategic Command has a requirement to survey these 
waterways in order to monitor for threats and obstructions 
which could damage transiting submarines and is interested in 
steps being taken by the Navy to meet this requirement to 
protect critical strategic assets.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of the Navy 
to submit a report to the congressional defense committees by 
October 1, 2019, on measures instituted to ensure the safety 
and security of ballistic missile nuclear submarines operating 
in the approaches to Navy bases in Bangor, Washington, and 
Kings Bay, Georgia. The report should include:
    (1) security measures mandated by the Department of Defense 
related to the operation of ballistic missile submarines 
entering and leaving the ports of Bangor, Washington, and Kings 
Bay, Georgia;
    (2) current operational posture and capabilities employed 
to meet the mandated security requirements and any requirements 
not currently met; and
    (3) specific measures to ensure the navigation channels for 
these ports are free of obstructions and other threats to 
transiting ballistic missile submarines.

Office of Naval Research Manufacturing Technology Program

    The budget request contained $60.1 million in PE 63680N for 
the Navy's Manufacturing Technology (ManTech) program.
    The Office of Naval Research's (ONR) ManTech program 
supports the productivity and responsiveness of the U.S. 
Defense Industrial Base by funding development, optimization, 
and transition of enabling manufacturing technologies to key 
naval suppliers. Submarine and undersea vehicle industries are 
a key part of this industrial base. The contribution of 
subsurface vehicles to continued undersea dominance are 
measured in decades of service life and are based on the 
creation and implementation of near- and long-term 
technological advances. However, global access to technology, 
accelerated rate of technology development, and implementation 
and budget constraints threaten to undermine our dominance in 
this crucial area.
    ManTech fosters partnerships between academia, industry, 
and government research and development communities in support 
of undersea vehicles and technologies, with the goal of 
creating and rapidly transitioning innovative technologies and 
specially trained personnel to enable continued U.S. dominance 
in undersea warfare and weapon systems.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $20.0 
million in PE 63680N for ONR's ManTech program to enhance joint 
private and academic partnerships and performance and reduce 
costs of the shipbuilding process while ensuring that advanced 
technologies are incorporated into the next-generation of 
undersea vehicles.

Warfighter safety and performance

    The budget request contained $63.8 million in PE 62236N for 
Warfighting Sustainment Applied Research.
    The committee is aware that this program funds critical 
technology efforts to improve warfighter safety and enhance 
individual performance under adverse conditions. The program 
also funds ongoing research efforts to prevent occupational 
injury in hazardous, deployed environments, including studies 
on decompression sickness, oxygen toxicity, optimization of 
diver performance, and assessment of the impact of thermal 
stress on operational performance. The committee encourages the 
Navy to continue studies and research into new technologies 
that improve care for sailors in extreme environments and 
mitigate the effects of undersea stresses on human safety, 
performance, and resilience.
    Therefore, the committee recommends $68.8 million, an 
increase of $5.0 million, in PE 62236N for warfighter safety 
and performance.

         Research, Development, Test, and Evaluation, Air Force


                       Items of Special Interest


Advanced composites for large structures

    The committee is aware of the current constraints on large-
scale space and hypersonic vehicle fabrication, material 
process equipment, and composites. The committee is also aware 
of the demand for new epoxy resins and composite materials that 
can expand the process envelope for aerospace composite 
structures and operate in extreme temperatures, including space 
environments. Developing advanced, on-demand composite fabrics 
can reduce material waste, shorten production lead times, and 
provide additional manufacturing flexibility for large vehicle 
sections. The committee believes additional research is needed 
on epoxy and composite fabric formulas and equipment to 
understand the material properties and effects to meet space 
and hypersonic vehicle system requirements.

Aerospace Career Training Expansion Report

    The committee recognizes the important role depots provide 
in achieving the Air Force's mission to fly, fight and win in 
air, space and cyberspace, and believes in the value of 
ensuring that the depot feeder communities have strong science, 
technology, engineering, and math (STEM) educational and 
workforce development opportunities. Critical investments in 
workforce are necessary to be better prepared to meet the 
future needs of the aerospace and defense industry sector. 
Diverse aerospace training programs and stackable credentials 
can also provide a clear sequenced pathway to ensure success 
and goal-oriented outcomes.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Under Secretary of 
Defense for Research and Engineering and the Under Secretary of 
Defense for Acquisition and Sustainment, with support from the 
Assistant Secretary of the Air Force for Acquisition, 
Technology and Logistics, to provide a report to the 
congressional defense committees not later than February 28, 
2020 on the Department's innovation, acquisition, and STEM 
programs that could be extended to the communities supporting 
Air Force depots. The report should include, but not be limited 
to, programs such as: Hacking4Defense within the National 
Security Innovation Network; the program on enhancement of 
preparation of dependents of members of armed forces for 
careers in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics as 
laid out in Chapter 111 of title 10 United States Code; small 
business programs such as Small Business Innovation Research 
(SBIR) and Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) as defined 
under section 9 of the Small Business Act (15 U.S.C. 638); 
university research programs; public/public and public/private 
programs under the authority of the Air Force Research 
Laboratory; and Defense Acquisition University virtual or 
regional campuses.

Aerospace Composites Manufacturing

    The budget request contained $43.1 million in PE 63680F for 
the Manufacturing Technology Program, including funds to 
initiate the program on Transforming Aerospace Composites 
Manufacturing.
    Transforming Aerospace Composites Manufacturing enables key 
cost reductions, low cost tooling, and agile rapid response 
requirements identified as a critical need for new unmanned 
aerial systems and other future vehicles without sacrificing 
high performance requirements. The committee believes this 
investment is critical for maintaining the United States' 
technological edge by allowing for rapid innovation and reduced 
lead time as well as reduced procurement cost of these high 
performance systems.
    Therefore, the committee recommends $53.1 million, an 
increase of $10.0 million, in PE 63680F for cost reduction for 
aerospace composite structures.

Briefing on Surface to Air Electronic Warfare Threats

    The committee recognizes that advanced enemy threat systems 
continue to evolve and modernize and as a result could be 
immune to current U.S. defensive systems, including Air Force 
electronic warfare (EW) jamming systems. The committee further 
recognizes that existing radar guided surface-to-air systems 
can detect and identify legacy jamming signals, which could 
significantly increase U.S. military aircraft vulnerabilities 
for deployed military air crews. Therefore, the committee 
directs the Secretary of the Air Force to conduct an 
advisability and feasibility analysis of developing open 
standards compliant advanced threat system exploitation 
techniques that could rapidly defeat advanced threat systems 
within an open system framework. The committee believes this 
technology could provide increased protection to U.S. military 
aircraft, resulting in increased mission effectiveness and air 
crew survivability. The committee further directs the Secretary 
of the Air Force to provide a briefing to the House Committee 
on Armed Services by February 1, 2020 on the results of this 
analysis, as well as update the committee on current actions 
being taken to improve current EW jamming systems.

Digital twinning

    The committee notes that ``digital twin'' technology has 
the ability to combine numerous technologies within a weapon 
system, such as the F-35 Joint Strike Fighter, to create a 
full-scale digital replica of the original weapon system. This 
digital replica could assist the Department of Defense in 
conducting predictive analyses to determine and more fully 
comprehend performance, reliability, and maintenance 
requirements before issues impact a weapon system's performance 
during development and manufacturing, or after the system is 
fielded.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of Defense 
to provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services 
not later than March 1, 2020, that explains how the F-35 
program is implementing the use of digital twinning technology 
across the F-35 system enterprise.

Distributed Common Ground System and 10 U.S.C. 2377

    The committee notes the significant progress that the Army 
has made in deploying the distributed common ground system of 
the Army. The transition to ``Capability Drops''' and the 
increased use of readily available technology integration have 
improved program outcomes and accelerated deployment timelines.
    The committee encourages the other military services and 
agencies of the Department of Defense to review the Army's 
approach to determine whether that approach would improve 
outcomes for their own distributed common ground system 
programs. In particular, the committee urges program managers 
for the other distributed common ground system programs to 
learn more about the Army's approach to the requirements of 10 
U.S.C. 2377 and directs the Secretary of the Air Force to brief 
the committee on the acquisition strategy for the distributed 
common ground system of the Air Force, with particular 
attention to the process used to determine whether commercial 
technologies can meet requirements pursuant to 10 U.S.C. 2377, 
not later than September 30, 2019.

Educational partnership agreements for aerospace propulsion

    The budget request contained $198.8 million in PE 62203F 
for aerospace propulsion research and development.
    The committee recognizes that confronting emerging threats 
to vital U.S. assets in space is critical to the national 
security of the United States. The committee further 
understands the U.S. Air Force is pursuing advanced science and 
technology research to maintain secure operations to and in 
space and that effort will require additional rocket and space 
focused engineers over the next decade.
    The committee commends the Air Force for its ongoing effort 
to accelerate its strategic capabilities in space operations 
through next generation access to space and maneuverability 
through the use of Educational Partnership Agreements (EPAs) 
(10 U.S.C. 2194). The committee supports the use of EPAs, which 
are a vital resource that provides authorized funding directed 
to academic institutions to stimulate growth in science, 
technology, engineering and mathematics education. EPAs play a 
critical role in encouraging and enhancing study in scientific 
disciplines at all levels of education and in generating future 
generations of scientists and engineers within the United 
States.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $10.0 
million in PE 62203F to accelerate Educational Partnership 
Agreements that advance the mission of the Air Force Research 
Laboratory to pioneer transformative aerospace technologies and 
accelerate its long-term strategic objectives in key areas such 
as energy security, energy optimization, reusability, 
maneuverability, and multi-mission mobility.

Kessel Run Commercial Outreach

    The committee notes the Air Force's continued use of agile 
development methods in the Kessel Run program. The committee 
encourages continued commercial outreach and commercial market 
research by the Kessel Run program in order to ensure that 
innovative commercial solutions are available to meet Air Force 
needs, while focusing on national security-unique challenges 
with in-house development teams.
    The committee directs the Air Force to provide a briefing 
on Kessel Run plans not later than September 1, 2019. Such a 
briefing should include:
    (1) an update on current priorities for Kessel Run;
    (2) measures to ensure compliance with section 2377 of 
title 10, United States code, section 855 of the National 
Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2016 (Pub. L. 114-92, 
129 Stat. 919), and other attempts to ensure the use of 
innovative commercial technologies;
    (3) plans to transition Kessel Run technologies into 
established programs of record.

Light attack and armed reconnaissance experimentation

    The budget request contained $35.0 million in PE27100F for 
continuation of Light-Attack Armed Reconnaissance (LAAR) 
experimentation.
    The committee notes that the Air Force plans to apply 
$100.0 million in fiscal year 2018 appropriated funding, and 
plans to request reprogramming authority to realign $25.0 
million in fiscal year 2019 appropriated funding, to purchase 
six test article LAAR platforms (three AT-6 and three A-29 
aircraft) to continue Phase 3 experimentation activities.
    The committee notes that the Air Force is not ready to make 
a decision on a potential procurement for LAAR without 
completing additional analyses on all potential solutions in 
order to find a solution that fits tactical, operational, and 
strategic requirements for a wide variety of allies and 
partners. The Air Force determined after the conclusion of 
Phase 2 experimentation that the results gained thus far have 
not provided enough information, nor has the LAAR experiment 
strategy explored other platforms that could fill lesser 
contingency and international partner mission requirements. The 
committee further notes that the Air Force believes continued 
experimentation during Phase 3 will allow for additional 
consideration of current and emerging unmanned, rotorcraft, and 
turbojet technologies to assess cost-effectiveness and 
capability sufficiency to ensure that a future LAAR platform or 
platforms will maximize meeting a diverse set of mission 
requirements and capability gaps.
     The committee appreciates the deliberate and methodical 
approach the Secretary of the Air Force is taking through 
experimentation and data analysis to fully inform a future 
procurement decision for LAAR capabilities and this new mission 
area. However, prior to entering Phase 3 experimentation 
activities, the committee expects the Secretary to establish 
and document the Phase 3 experimentation strategy, design, 
goals, objectives, and metrics. The committee also expects the 
Secretary to consult with the Commander, Special Operations 
Command to assess how both general purpose forces and special 
operations forces can leverage experimentation activities. The 
committee directs the Secretary of the Air Force to provide a 
briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services not later 
than September 1, 2019, on the scope and plans for Phase 3 
experimentation.

Low-cost attritable aircraft technology

    The committee supports the intent of the Assistant 
Secretary of the Air Force for Acquisition, Technology, and 
Logistics to accelerate the Air Force Research Laboratory's 
Low-Cost Attritable Aircraft Technology (LCAAT) program for 
collaborative pairing with manned platforms, potentially 
including the 35. The committee views the combined application 
of commercial technology, autonomy, and artificial intelligence 
as imperative for solving current military challenges. Teams of 
low-cost collaborative systems provide new mechanisms to ensure 
survivability and mission success without leveraging exquisite 
technology and the associated high cost and long development 
timelines.
    Integration and technology demonstrations reduce the risk 
and time required to transition technologies into operational 
systems. Accordingly, further prototyping and technology 
enhancements are necessary to transition the LCAAT demonstrator 
aircraft system into a fully operational capability. Continued 
testing and the development and integration of technology is 
required to provide a runway takeoff capability; airborne 
weapons deployment capability (in support of manned platforms); 
human machine interface enhancements; development and 
integration of a secure Common Data Link-based network system; 
and development of operation and maintenance systems, 
processes, and tests to operationalize the evolving Manned-
Unmanned Teaming capability.
    Accordingly, the committee directs the Assistant Secretary 
of the Air Force for Acquisition, Technology, and Logistics to 
submit a report to the House Committee on Armed Services not 
later than April 1, 2020, on the Air Force's efforts for the 
design, test, and integration of these air vehicles.

Major test range and facility enhancements

    The budget request contained $717.9 million in PE 65807F 
for Department of the Air Force test and evaluation support. 
The committee notes that this amount is $25.1 million, or 
approximately 3 percent, higher than the budget for fiscal year 
2019.
    In the committee report accompanying the National Defense 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2018 (H. Rept. 115-200), the 
committee reported on a briefing it received on a comprehensive 
assessment of Major Range and Test Facility Base needs and 
investments to meet the testing required for advanced 
generation aircraft and air armaments, including offensive 
hypersonic weapons, autonomous systems, and advanced sub-
surface systems. The committee noted that among its findings 
were that advanced generation aircraft and weapons introduce 
test and evaluation profile and data gathering gaps, and that 
greater research and development, operations and support 
investments are required to fill those gaps. The committee is 
further concerned that with a growing volume of test and 
training requirements, more instrumentation throughout test 
ranges, especially open-water test ranges, that support testing 
activities is required for efficient use of air, surface, and 
subsurface test areas to reduce the competition for range space 
between operational readiness priorities and fielding new 
system capabilities. The committee assesses that technologies 
such as Telemetry Extension Satellite Communications Relay 
projects could assist range safety, testing and evaluation 
personnel executing over water missions supporting test events 
of long-range weapons, aircraft, and sea-surface platforms. The 
committee notes these technologies focus on prototype 
integration and modification of wave gliders by using an array 
of sensors, antennas, receivers, and transmitters to gather and 
transmit secure data. The committee is further concerned that 
the potential development of open-water energy projects has the 
potential to encroach and negatively impact military test and 
training operations, and expects the Secretary of the Air Force 
to thoroughly evaluate impacts of such projects on Air Force 
test missions.
    Therefore, the committee recommends $743.4 million, an 
increase of $25.5 million, in PE 65807F for Air Force test and 
evaluation support to enhance open-air range test capabilities 
in the development of next-generation platforms and air 
armaments and to mitigate growing open-water test range 
challenges and risks.

Metals Affordability Initiative

    The budget requested contained $36.6 million in PE 63112F 
for Advanced Materials for Weapons System.
    The committee recognizes the importance of this program in 
providing affordable materials and manufacturing technologies 
across the entire life-cycle of aerospace materials. 
Specifically, the Air Force Research Lab-managed Metals 
Affordability Initiative has reduced metallic aircraft 
component costs and accelerated the implementation and transfer 
of technologies across a wide range of aircraft platforms. The 
committee notes the value of this public-private partnership 
and the risk sharing model that has directly led to a nearly 
$2.4 billion return on the U.S. Government's investment. The 
committee recommends the Secretary of the Air Force create a 
dedicated funding line for the Metals Affordability Initiative 
to show the Air Force's clear commitment to this program.
    The committee recommends $41.6 million, an increase of $5.0 
million, in PE 63112F for Advanced Materials for Weapons 
System.

Modular Open Systems Architecture Intelligence Sensor Readiness 
        Initiative

    The committee is pleased by the recent memorandum from the 
Secretaries of the military departments supporting a move to 
Modular Open Systems Architectures (MOSA). Many of today's Air 
Force Command, Control, Communications, Computer, Intelligence, 
Surveillance, and Reconnaissance (C4ISR) gathering systems are 
built by single vendors who have a lock on future enhancements 
and capability drops. Obsolescence and vendor-lock lower the 
Air Force's capability and increase its operation and 
maintenance costs. Platform agnostic MOSA standards have the 
ability to enable airborne C4ISR systems to be fielded at a 
quicker pace while lowering logistics and procurement costs. 
The committee believes that the Department should endeavor to 
move away from stove piped systems and reduce dependence on 
single vendors and that MOSA would enable the Air Force to swap 
out capabilities and take advantage quickly of new innovations. 
The committee encourages the Air Force to establish a 3- to 5-
year technical refresh cycle, versus the current 10-plus year 
cycles, and work to reduce its logistical overhead by taking 
advantage of common hardware and software, reduced maintenance, 
enhancement, and upgrade costs.

OC-135B Open Skies Treaty aircraft recapitalization

    The committee notes that the current fleet of OC-135B 
aircraft conducting the Open Skies Treaty flights are over 55 
years old and experience significant sustainment and 
reliability issues, resulting in an average mission completion 
rate of 65 percent between 2007 and 2017. Further, the range of 
the legacy OC-135 aircraft is insufficient to fully execute 
mission options within the treaty's 96-hour in-country 
observation period. In addition to maintenance and range 
limitations, the current wet-film imaging used to collect data 
will become obsolete sometime around 2022. To avoid any gap in 
Open Skies Treaty collection capability, the committee supports 
the Air Force's plan to upgrade the fleet with digital visual 
imaging systems (DVIS) for the near-term, and ultimately 
replace the OC-135 Open Skies aircraft with two commercially-
available small airliner class aircraft with integrated DVIS 
sensors.
    The committee supports recapitalization of the OC-135 but 
remains concerned about the Air Force's ability to stay on 
schedule and meet the fiscal year 2022 aircraft certification 
and treaty compliance date. Unanticipated technical challenges 
with the DVIS sensors have already affected the schedule and 
could cause additional delays if not remedied soon.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of the Air 
Force to provide a report to the House Committee on Armed 
Services by October 1, 2019, on the Open Skies Treaty aircraft 
recapitalization. The report shall include:
    (1) an assessment of the DVIS data technical package 
maturity and the cost and feasibility of integrating it onto 
the replacement commercial aircraft;
    (2) the plan for and status of developing or acquiring 
associated ground processing systems;
    (3) the plan for management of programmatic risk and an 
assessment of the ability to meet the fiscal year 2022 deadline 
for an upgraded, treaty-compliant system;
    (4) existing or planned mitigation options should the Air 
Force not be able to achieve current DVIS and treaty compliance 
milestones, and should there be any future delay to the upgrade 
or replacement of the OC-135; and
    (5) a copy of any assessment conducted by an independent 
organization employed by the program for technical assistance.

Open mission systems

    The committee supports the Department of Defense and each 
of the military services in their commitment to open-systems 
standards and the inclusion of those standards to the maximum 
extent possible in requirements, programming, and development 
activities for future weapon system modifications and new start 
development programs as agreed to in the January 2019 
memorandum of understanding.
    However, the committee notes that the military services are 
independently pursuing open-standards that are unique to each 
service, as the Air Force has focused efforts on the Open 
Mission Systems/Universal Command and Control Interface 
standard, the Army has focused on the VICTORY standard, and the 
Navy has focused on the Future Airborne Capability Environment 
standard. The committee further notes the open-standards as 
currently defined may not be interoperable and do not 
explicitly include requirements to ensure interoperability 
across services, thereby coupling warfighting capability to a 
specific standard and a specific service.
    To accelerate and simplify the incremental delivery of new 
capabilities into systems across all military services, the 
committee recommends that the Department consider a cross-
service interoperability requirement in future releases of 
their open standards and create a plan for identifying and 
managing compatibility across releases of the standards. The 
committee further recommends that the Department identify 
current and future programs that would benefit from cross-
service interoperability, such as the Air Force's Common Range 
Integrated Instrumentation System and the Navy's Tactical 
Combat Training System Increment II, and utilize these programs 
for experimentation, demonstration, and deployment of cross-
service interoperable open standards.

Persistent intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance

    The committee remains concerned about the worldwide 
shortage of available intelligence, surveillance, and 
reconnaissance (ISR) assets to support combatant commander 
requirements. While the committee is encouraged by the 
Department of Defense's renewed prioritization in acquiring and 
fielding ISR assets, the committee also notes that the 
Department and each of the military services are developing and 
fielding programs to provide joint persistent ISR to the 
warfighter. The committee understands that one of the pathways 
identified in the Air Force's recently released Intelligence, 
Surveillance, and Reconnaissance Flight Plan is the use of 
multi-role and cross-domain ISR collection capability to 
increase readiness and lethality. The committee notes that 
these include high altitude assets and penetrating, persistent, 
multi-role capabilities. Therefore, the committee encourages 
the continued prioritization and funding for research and 
development of advanced ISR assets to include high-altitude, 
multi-day capable unmanned platforms, to fill existing 
persistent ISR capability gaps.

Thermal management and robust power generation systems

    The budget request contained $198.8 million in PE 62203F, 
and $128.9 million in 62102F for the development and 
demonstration of electrical power, thermal management, and 
distribution for aerospace applications and materials.
    The committee recognizes the Air Force is highly focused on 
developing next generation weapon systems, both for aircraft 
self-protection and to provide offensive capability for future 
aircraft. In order to meet these goals, the Air Force will need 
a power generation system that can meet these new power demands 
in addition to other electrical and avionic subsystems power 
requirements and will also need an efficient modular cooling 
system capable of handling increased thermal loads, 
specifically for hypersonic vehicles. The committee encourages 
the Air Force to focus developmental work on the aerospace 
electrical power and modular cooling technologies required for 
future aircraft concepts and cost-effective upgrades to current 
aircraft.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $5.0 
million in PE 62203F to accelerate design, fabrication, and 
testing to support robust electrical power and thermal 
management systems for future aircraft needs, and an increase 
of $10.0 million in PE 62102F for advanced thermal protections 
systems.

Unmanned aerial systems cyber operations research

    The committee recognizes the critical importance of 
developing new technologies to detect and counter adversarial 
unmanned aerial systems (UAS) and UAS swarms. The committee 
notes that countering UAS operations presents a special series 
of unmet communications, command and control, cyber, 
computation, and intelligence challenges at the tactical edge. 
Due to this emerging threat, the committee directs the Director 
of the Air Force Research Laboratory Information Directorate to 
provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services by 
October 30, 2019, on their continued research and development 
into the countering of unmanned aerial systems using advanced 
technologies to facilitate UAS detection and geolocation, 
determination of individual and swarm behavior, dissection of 
swarms to identify critical nodes, situational awareness, 
elucidation of threats and mission intent, and counter UAS 
capabilities.

Vertical lift demonstration

    The budget request contained $102.9 million in PE 63211F 
for aerospace technology development.
    The committee is aware of the Air Force's requirement for 
advanced technologies that provide the capability to operate 
from forward bases in highly contest environments with 
unimproved landing zones and limited maintenance facilities. A 
new class of runway independent aircraft could greatly enhance 
speed, range, and agility to support operations within these 
highly contested areas. The committee encourages the Air Force 
to continue research, development, and demonstration of next 
generation aircraft that are scalable, autonomous, and capable 
of vertical lift flight with high speed cruise performance.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $5.0 
million in PE 63211F for aerospace technology vertical lift 
demonstrations.

Wide area motion imagery

    The committee notes that the Gorgon Stare wide area 
surveillance capability continues to support daily operations 
in both Afghanistan and Iraq with critical intelligence, 
surveillance, and reconnaissance (ISR), and that other 
combatant commands have requested the Gorgon Stare capability. 
The committee is concerned that, despite daily operational 
tasking and despite the Air Force's designation of Gorgon Stare 
as a program of record in 2014, there is still no formal budget 
request for this combat-proven ISR system. The committee notes 
that prior year congressional funding has resulted in the 
system developing beyond line-of-sight communications and 
multi-intelligence capabilities.
    Accordingly, the committee directs the Chairman of the 
Joint Chiefs of Staff to provide a briefing to the House 
Committee on Armed Services by November 1, 2019, on the plan 
for apportionment of Gorgon Stare into the Department's ISR 
forces and the full extent of combatant command requirements 
for Gorgon Stare ISR wide-area support to worldwide operations.

       Research, Development, Test, and Evaluation, Defense-Wide


                       Items of Special Interest


Additive manufacturing

    Defense-wide Manufacturing Science and Technology (DMS&T) 
is the joint, defense-wide component of the Department of 
Defense's Manufacturing Technology (ManTech) program directed 
by section 2521 of title 10, United States Code. Investments in 
ManTech provide for a healthy industrial base necessary for 
national security. The committee is aware that eight Department 
Manufacturing Innovative Institutes are funded under DMS&T, 
including an institute focused on additive manufacturing. The 
committee believes that additive manufacturing supports 
improved life-cycle maintenance and readiness, especially when 
capabilities are provided in-theater. Therefore, the committee 
directs the Under Secretary of Defense for Research and 
Engineering to provide a briefing to the House Committee on 
Armed Services not later than October 1, 2019, on the DMS&T 
program investments in additive manufacturing and the value and 
efficiencies such investments may have, especially when 
capabilities are provided in-theater.

Advanced composites and manufacturing technologies

    The budget request contained $10.1 million in PE 67210D8Z 
for industrial base analysis and sustainment.
    The committee believes that advances in structural 
materials, composites, metals, ceramics, thermoplastics, 
nanomaterials, metamaterials, hybrid composites, and cellulose 
nanocomposites have the potential to transform manufacturing 
requirements for military weapon systems. These materials can 
be low-cost, low-weight, low-logistics, recyclable, corrosion 
resistant, and strong enough to have the potential to be used 
as a substitute in many military vehicles' primary structural 
applications and maintenance to maximize force projection 
through speed, range, enhanced mobility, and payload.
    Additionally, the Department of Defense, through the 
Manufacturing Technology program, has worked in recent years to 
advance technology development for defense-essential 
manufacturing capabilities, cutting across all of the military 
services. Specifically, the Department has identified 
manufacturing technology requirements that would have the 
largest cost-effective impact on warfighter capability 
improvements.
    These technologies potentially could enable the strategic 
goals of timely, affordable delivery of revolutionary 
technologies to the warfighter. Therefore, the committee 
recommends that the Department perform research, development, 
and testing on these advanced materials in order to demonstrate 
shorter development and manufacturing cycle times, more 
reliable joining methods, and optimization for desired 
performance and economical manufacturing.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $5.0 
million in PE 67210D8Z for industrial base analysis and 
sustainment for smart digital manufacturing.

AI-enabled Robotics in CBRN and Complex Environments

    The committee supports Department of Defense efforts to 
advance artificial intelligence (AI) and machine learning 
technologies in support of the National Defense Strategy and 
notes its commitment to rapid innovation and delivery of 
emerging capabilities to achieve military superiority over 
near-peer competitors. However, the committee also observes 
with interest the emerging application of AI enabled 
technologies to facilitate human-machine teaming for special 
operations forces operating in dangerous and non-permissive 
environments. For this reason, the committee encourages the 
Department to pursue collaborative partnerships with small 
businesses, industry, and academia to aggressively develop and 
field AI enabled robotics to enable safer and more effective 
maneuver operations. The goal of these efforts should be to put 
revolutionary technology in the hands of warfighters to speed 
decision-making, increase lethality, and better enable complex 
tactical operations in contested or denied environments, 
especially those where chemical, biological, radiological or 
nuclear (CBRN) threats are present or where positioning, 
navigation and timing (PNT) services are degraded. Therefore, 
the committee directs the Undersecretary pf Defense for 
Research and Engineering, in coordination with the Commander of 
U.S. Special Operations Command, to provide a briefing to the 
House Committee on Armed Services by November 1, 2019, on its 
strategy to leverage AI-enabled robotics in support of special 
operations forces and CBRN environments.

Analysis of Science and Technology Reinvention Laboratories

    The committee recognizes that the Department of Defense's 
organic science and technology (S&T), research, development, 
and test ecosystem, to include the test centers and 
laboratories, struggles to compete with the tech sector in 
attracting and maintaining a talented workforce. These entities 
also face challenges in obtaining resources for military 
construction projects and other improvements as the Department 
has not prioritized investment in organic institutions. In 
fact, the Defense Science Board reported in 2017 that most 
Department laboratory directors feel they are unable to 
maintain their facilities and infrastructure at a reasonable 
standard.
    The committee believes that the Department's in-house 
ecosystem is vital to maintaining a technological advantage for 
our warfighters, sustaining a healthy industrial base, and 
protecting the research and development of critical 
technologies. Many prior years' National Defense Authorization 
Acts have granted the Directors of the Science and Technology 
Reinvention Laboratories (STRLs) authorities to promote 
modernization and allow for hiring of technical talent. The 
committee understands most of these authorities have not been 
fully implemented by the Department and elsewhere in this Act, 
the committee includes two legislative provisions that would 
require the Secretary of Defense to establish plans for 
implementation.
    The committee believes that comprehensive data and analysis 
relating to the STRLs available to senior leaders will promote 
better decision making and resource allocation to ensure these 
entities remain viable. Therefore, the committee directs the 
Director of Cost Assessment and Program Evaluation to conduct 
an independent analysis of the Department's STRL 
infrastructure, modernization, and workforce. The analysis 
shall include the components that comprise total costs at each 
facility; accounting practices with regards to direct and 
indirect costs as compared to other typical S&T entities; 
effects of labor cost-rate growth; the use of research and 
development funding for military construction projects; the 
loss of buying power on spending for materials, equipment and 
other non-labor resources; and any other matters deemed 
appropriate by the Director to maintain high-quality 
institutions. The Under Secretary of Defense for Research and 
Engineering shall provide the Director with the information and 
resources necessary. The Director shall provide the analysis to 
the House Committee on Armed Services by September 1, 2021.

Artificial intelligence in force protection activities

    The committee is encouraged by the ongoing rapid fielding 
of commercially-available technologies that utilize artificial 
intelligence (AI) and sensor fusion to deliver enhanced force 
protection for Department of Defense personnel and 
installations. Recent advances in commercially available 
technology, including artificial intelligence, computer vision, 
and sensor technology, have made it possible to develop, 
manufacture, and deploy more effective and cost-efficient 
Reconnaissance, Surveillance, and Target Acquisition 
technologies. Accordingly, the committee believes that AI can 
significantly improve situational awareness and security for 
Department of Defense personnel through faster and better 
processing and exploitation of sensor data, recognition and 
classification of potential threats, and dissemination of that 
information to human operators for the purposes of enhanced 
self-defense. The committee further believes that AI-based 
technologies for personnel security and base defense can 
provide more effective capability and will improve operators' 
ability to detect, classify, and respond to threats. The 
committee believes that the application of AI to improve the 
safety of Department of Defense personnel and installations is 
central to improving the security of military personnel and 
encourages the Department to consider these technologies in the 
continuous effort to enhance force protection.

Autonomous distribution for critical supplies

    The committee is aware that the 2015 Joint Concept for 
Logistics 2.0 highlighted the growing gap between increasing 
logistics requirements and constrained logistics resources in 
the context of globally integrated operations. To close this 
gap, the Department of Defense is investigating advanced 
technologies suitable for distributed logistics. The committee 
understands that the Defense Innovation Unit has been 
prototyping commercial, autonomous drone services to deliver 
critical, life-saving supplies like blood and medical products 
to military units in combat zones. The committee supports the 
continued development and expansion of autonomous distribution 
systems for these efforts to move faster, reduce costs, and 
ultimately save lives. Therefore, the committee directs the 
Under Secretary of Defense for Research and Engineering to 
provide a report to the congressional defense committees by 
February 15, 2020, on efforts to modernize logistical 
operations since the publication of the 2015 Joint Concept for 
Logistics 2.0. The report shall include a summary of any 
prototyping efforts and an assessment of all missions and 
requirements that could be met through autonomous distribution 
technologies.

Battery Development and Safety Enterprise

    The committee recognizes the importance of battery research 
and development as a readiness enabler. The committee notes 
that the military departments must be able to provide rapid, 
safe, and effective deployment of batteries and battery systems 
to support and enhance modern systems ranging from directed 
energy weapons to microgrids. The committee further notes that 
research to develop advanced energy storage including safe 
storage and transport, facilitates the ability to field systems 
in austere environments. The committee commends the Navy for 
establishing the Battery Development and Safety Enterprise 
Office to address these issues in a systematic way with the 
added benefit of reducing life-cycle costs of battery usage 
enterprise-wide.
    The committee recommends an additional $13.0 million in PE 
63724N for the Navy's Battery Development and Safety Enterprise 
Office. The committee encourages the Department of Defense to 
consider establishing a Battery Center of Excellence to benefit 
all services, encourage information sharing, and leverage 
efficiencies using the Navy's Battery Development and Safety 
Enterprise Office as its foundation.

Chemical and Biological Decontamination Solutions

    The committee is aware of the Department of Defense's 
continuing interest in chemical and biological decontamination 
technologies. The Department has invested significantly in 
research and development efforts in academia, Department of 
Defense laboratories, and commercial industry. The committee 
understands there are a number of different domestic and 
foreign providers of chemical and biological decontamination 
solutions for the Department. The committee is interested in 
understanding the costs, benefits, and variances of these 
different solutions, including any impact on the domestic 
industrial base. Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary 
of Defense to provide a briefing to the House Committee on 
Armed Services by February 1, 2020, on the evaluation criteria 
for chemical and biological decontamination solutions procured 
by the Department, including an assessment of the cost, 
benefits, and any impact to domestic suppliers.

Commercializing defense technologies

    The committee recognizes the value of defense research to 
the technological advancement and its history of ground 
breaking innovations that includes global positioning system 
navigation, the precursor of the Internet, and radar. These 
technologies that originated in the Department of Defense have 
had wide ranging impacts on society through their 
commercialization. The committee further recognizes that while 
significant effort has recently been made to streamline the use 
of commercial technology within the Department and in each of 
the military services, less attention has been given to 
commercializing defense technologies and continuing the 
Department's long record of successful innovation. The 
committee encourages the Department to create initiatives for 
commercialization of defense research, to include using public 
and private means and leverage the authorities provided in 
section 2359 of title 10, United States Code.

Counterterrorism detection technology

    The budget request contained $70.5 million in 63122D8Z for 
the Combating Terrorism Technical Support Office.
    The committee recognizes the importance of identifying and 
developing capabilities to combat terrorism, particularly in 
the global fight against terrorism and protecting Americans at 
home and abroad. The committee believes it is imperative that 
the Department of Defense continue to advance technological 
solutions to improve counterterrorism measures and deliver 
these capabilities to Department of Defense components and 
interagency partners. The committee is especially interested in 
the use of artificial intelligence enabled capabilities, 
including national language processing, phonetic identification 
across languages, and financial data tracking, that would 
provide the interagency real-time indications and warnings of 
possible threats or sanction violations.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $3.0 
million in PE 63122D8Z for Combating Terrorism Technical 
Support Office detection technologies.

Cyber institutes at senior military colleges

    The budget request included no funds for cyber institutes.
    Section 1640 of the John S. McCain National Defense 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2019 (Public Law 115-232) 
authorized the Secretary of Defense to establish cyber 
institutes at each of the senior military colleges for purposes 
of accelerating and focusing the development of foundational 
expertise in critical cyber operational skills for future 
military and civilian senior leaders. The committee understands 
that the cyber institutes have not yet been established, but 
that the senior military colleges, as defined by section 1640, 
have a formal proposal for establishment.
    The committee notes that women and minorities remain 
underrepresented in the cyber security sector in both military 
and civilian settings. To increase diversity and opportunity, 
the committee expects the Department to use the cyber 
institutes to conduct effective outreach, recruiting, and 
retention programs focused on increasing matriculation in and 
completion of cyber security programs by women and 
underrepresented minorities. The committee directs the 
Secretary of Defense to provide a briefing to House Committee 
on Armed Services not later than 180 days after the designation 
of cyber institutes on the strategy of each cyber institute to 
achieve diversity in the cyber security sector.
    The committee recommends an increase of $12.0 million in PE 
303140D8Z for such institutes in order to facilitate 
development of critical cyber operational skills for future 
civilian and military leaders.

Cyber-physical research

    The budget request contained $121.5 million for applied 
research.
    The 2018 Department of Defense Cyber Strategy highlights 
the Department's plan to strengthen the security and resilience 
of networks and systems that contribute to current and future 
U.S. military advantages and to support the development of the 
U.S. cyber workforce. As no system can be completely isolated 
from all cyber-attacks, which continue to occur at 
unprecedented levels, there is also an evolving national 
requirement for cyber-physical security. Cyber-physical 
security is a combination of cybersecurity and systems 
engineering designed to ensure that critical cyber-physical 
systems, such as marine vessels, submarines, unmanned vehicles, 
and power grids, become more resilient to avoid or survive 
damage if they are attacked. Failure to protect these systems 
against inherent communication and control issues (e.g., 
network congestion and real-time computing constraints) as well 
as malicious acts (e.g., cyberattacks) can have catastrophic 
consequences.
    Therefore, the committee recommends $129.5 million, an 
increase of $8.0 million, in PE 0602123N for applied research 
into cyber-physical security.

Directed energy test range workloads

    The committee remains concerned that U.S. Major Range and 
Test Facility Bases (MRTFBs) have inadequate infrastructure to 
support next generation weapon systems. The committee also 
recognizes the need to transition new and game-changing 
directed energy technologies to the warfighter. The Department 
of Defense established the Nation's first High Energy Laser 
System Test Facility (HELSTF) in 1975, but the technology has 
seen significant advancements over the course of four decades. 
As directed energy weapon systems mature, the need to validate 
their performance becomes increasingly important. The workload 
and number of directed energy demonstrations and exercises have 
increased significantly since 1975 and the projected workload 
for fiscal years 2018-22 for HELSTF is large and growing, and 
has expanded to include High Power Microwave (HPM) testing. 
Additionally, there are currently no available enduring 
frequency agile and tunable HPM assets for evolving doctrine or 
HPM Directed Energy Concept of Operations development any at 
MRTFBs.
    The committee directs the Assistant Director for Directed 
Energy in the Office of the Under Secretary of Defense for 
Research and Engineering to provide a briefing to the House 
Committee on Armed Services not later than September 30, 2019, 
on the test and evaluation infrastructure and test asset needs 
to meet directed energy requirements over the next 5 years. 
Included in this briefing should be the plans for HELSTF and 
other service MRTFB test sites, to include HPM testing, 
required for directed energy experimentation in order to 
develop the tactics, techniques, and procedures required to 
incorporate the emerging capabilities into the Department's 
inventory. This presentation should also include mitigation 
procedures for operations in the national aerospace system 
against above-the-horizon targets.

Electronic warfare planning for near-peer adversaries

    The Department of Defense's 2013 Electromagnetic Spectrum 
Strategy recognizes that Department operations in all domains 
are fundamentally dependent on our use and control of the 
electromagnetic spectrum. All joint functions such as movement 
and maneuver, fires, command and control, intelligence, 
protection, sustainment, and information are accomplished with 
systems that use the spectrum. The safety and security of U.S. 
citizens, the effectiveness of U.S. combat forces, and the 
lives of U.S. military members, our allies, and non-combatants 
depend on spectrum access. More recently, in December 2018, the 
Government Accountability Office issued an Emerging Threats 
report that similarly echoed that adversaries are developing 
electronic attack weapons to target U.S. systems with sensitive 
electronic components, such as military sensors, communication, 
navigation, and information systems. These weapons are intended 
to degrade U.S. capabilities and could restrict situational 
awareness or may affect military operations. The committee is 
concerned about the extent to which the Department is planning 
and preparing to defend itself and operate in an environment 
where peer and near-peer adversaries could use existing and 
emerging capabilities that degrade use of the electromagnetic 
spectrum.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Comptroller General of 
the United States to assess the Department's electronic warfare 
and electromagnetic spectrum operations strategy and 
implementation efforts. The assessment should include the 
current electronic warfare threat from peer or near-peer 
adversaries and actions the Department has taken in response to 
include the protection of critical warfighting capabilities; 
the extent to which the Department has incorporated current and 
emerging electromagnetic spectrum risks into service and 
combatant command operational planning efforts and exercises; 
the status and effectiveness of the Electronic Warfare 
Executive Committee established by the Secretary of Defense in 
2015; the Department's implementation of the 2013 
Electromagnetic Spectrum Strategy; and any other matters the 
Comptroller General determines to be relevant.
    The committee further directs the Comptroller General to 
provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services not 
later than March 1, 2020, on preliminary findings, and to 
present final results in a format and timeframe agreed to at 
the time of the briefing.

Energy systems for forward and remote operating bases

    The committee is aware of the Defense Science Board Study 
examining energy systems for forward and remote operating bases 
and encourages the Department of Defense to continue to invest 
in alternatives to improve the energy effectiveness of 
expeditionary forces. The committee is also aware of the 
Defense Science Board conclusion to explore the use of micro-
nuclear reactors as an expeditionary energy source. The 
Department's Strategic Capabilities Office has released a 
Request for Information as to the feasibility of small nuclear 
reactor prototype demands that could meet the increasing energy 
demands of expeditionary operational units. The committee 
recognizes the urgent need to provide energy to remote 
operating locations to minimize the use of fuel and resupply 
land transport missions, as well as provide a rapidly 
deployable energy source during humanitarian relief operations, 
and urges the Department to consider options to meet this 
demand, including benefits, risks, operational requirements, 
safety and costs.

Hacking for Defense

    The budget request contained $25.0 million in PE 63950D8Z 
for the Hacking for Defense (H4D) National Security Technology 
Accelerator within the National Security Innovation Network 
program.
    The committee believes that the H4D program is an 
innovative, educational, low cost, and exciting introduction to 
challenging national security problems for college students. 
H4D is a university course developed by U.S. military combat 
veterans and taught at 22 universities around the country, in 
which students apply cutting edge research and problem solving 
techniques to real-world security problems. Currently in its 
third year, the requested funding will make it possible to 
scale up H4D training and ensure that courses are available 
year-round in every State.
    Therefore, the committee recommends $30.0 million, an 
increase of $5.0 million, in PE 63950D8Z for the H4D National 
Security Technology Accelerator within the National Security 
Innovation Network program.

Hacking for Defense Support to Defense Innovation

    The committee notes that Hacking for Defense (H4D) is 
authorized as a National Security Innovation and 
Entrepreneurial Education Program in the National Defense 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2018 (Public Law No. 115-91) 
to enable Department of Defense innovation. H4D is a university 
course developed by U.S. military combat veterans and private 
sector entrepreneurs taught at universities across the United 
States in which students apply cutting-edge problem solving 
techniques to real-world national security and defense 
problems. The committee believes that H4D also enhances 
innovation education at military universities, including the 
United States Military Academy at West Point, the United States 
Air Force Academy, the National Defense University, the Defense 
Acquisition University, and other professional military 
education programs. The committee finds that H4D supports 
solution development directly for the warfighter, improves U.S. 
military readiness, and stimulates growth within the National 
Security Innovation Base, consistent with the 2018 National 
Defense Strategy. Further, the committee believes H4D fosters 
the growth of an emerging generation of national security 
leaders and mission-driven entrepreneurs by improving and 
expanding the Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM) 
skill sets within the United States workforce.
    The committee believes that the Department of Defense 
should fully resource H4D and its growing ecosystem of national 
security innovators and entrepreneurs through the provision of 
the annual funding required to enhance existing H4D university 
courses. The committee notes that the National Security 
Innovation Network (formerly the MD5 National Security 
Technology Accelerator) plans to deliver H4D at up to 25 
universities in Academic Year 2020-2021, as described in the 
President's Budget Request for Fiscal Year 2020, and which the 
committee supports. Further, the committee directs the 
Secretary of Defense to provide a report to the congressional 
defense committees by December 1, 2019 on the plan to expand 
H4D as described in the President's Budget Request for Fiscal 
Year 2020, and on the funding and other resources required to 
expand Hacking for Defense to at least 25 additional 
universities by Academic Year 2025-2026.

Historically black colleges and universities and minority serving 
        institutions

    The budget request contained $30.7 million in PE 61228D8Z 
for research work with historically black colleges and 
universities and minority serving institutions (HBCU/MI).
    The committee recognizes the important role this program 
plays in bolstering the research capabilities at HBCU/MIs. Not 
only is such work important in meeting the research needs of 
the Department of Defense, the committee also believes it 
provides an added benefit by diversifying the Department's 
supply of scientists, engineers, and researchers working on the 
its most challenging problems.
    The committee also acknowledges the ongoing efforts of the 
Department to increase the participation of women from 
underserved populations in science, technology, engineering, 
and mathematics (STEM) related areas of research. The committee 
urges the Department to continue funding for Center of 
Excellence efforts at historically black colleges and 
universities that support training and education of minority 
women in STEM fields of interest to the military, particularly 
through research funding, fellowships and internships, and 
cooperative work experiences at the Defense Laboratories. The 
committee recommends that the Department consider increasing 
investments in these kinds of activities in future budgets to 
support Administration initiatives on HBCU/MIs.
    The committee additionally recommends that the Department 
strengthen its engagement and investments via the quantity and 
value of grants, studies, technical support contracts, and 
subcontracts with HBCU/MIs with a goal of elevating the quality 
of research and scientific activity at those institutions to 
the R1 and R2 level of the Carnegie Classification of 
Institutions of Higher Education. Therefore, the committee 
directs the Under Secretary of Defense for Research and 
Engineering to submit a report to the congressional defense 
committees by March 1, 2020, on how the Department can expose 
HBCU/MIs to new levels of research and scientific problems for 
the benefit of the Department.
    In addition, the committee recommends $50.7 million, an 
increase of $20.0 million, in PE 61228D8Z for additional 
research between HBCU/MIs, and increased teaming opportunities 
between these institutions and other research universities with 
experience supporting the Department's unique requirements. 
This amount is above the enacted budget of fiscal year 2019.

Human simulation and human factors modeling

    Section 227 of the John S. McCain National Defense 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2019 (Public Law 115-232) 
required the Secretary of Defense to develop and provide for 
the carrying out of human factors modeling and simulation 
activities with the purpose of accelerating research and 
development to enhance capabilities for human performance, 
human-systems integration, and training for the warfighter. The 
committee directs the Secretary of Defense to provide a 
briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services not later 
than January 30, 2020, on the status of this requirement. 
Specifically, the committee would like to know the extent of 
the activities implemented, the effects as yet of these 
activities with respect to their purpose, which activity 
participants, locations of the activities, and the plan to 
sustain these activities going forward.

Hybrid and electric air vehicle power and propulsion systems

    The committee understands that hybrid and electric power 
and propulsion systems and vehicles hold the potential to 
significantly increase range and endurance for military 
aviation. The committee believes such aviation capabilities 
could support the National Defense Strategy. The Department of 
Defense requires a process to certify airworthiness to allow 
flight testing of these systems. However, the committee notes 
that the Department lacks adequate design, test, and 
certification procedures and facilities for aviation-purposed 
electric motors, motor controllers, traction bus systems, and 
large primary power battery systems. The committee is concerned 
that without a certification process in place, the military may 
miss the opportunity to capitalize on these advanced systems to 
reduce logistical requirements and costs.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of Defense 
to provide a report to the House Committee on Armed Services by 
February 1, 2020, on establishing procedures and facilities for 
airworthiness certification of hybrid and electric power and 
propulsion aviation systems. The report should include 
estimated cost and schedule to implement a certification 
process.

Hypersonic test infrastructure and workforce

    The committee acknowledges the joint-effort to expand and 
develop conventional prompt strike capabilities (CPS), which 
was codified in a memorandum of agreement between the 
Department of Defense, military services, and the Missile 
Defense Agency to deliver hypersonic boost glide technology. To 
achieve success in the multiple service efforts to deliver CPS 
capabilities, the committee recognizes the importance of state-
of-the-art facilities and infrastructure to support research, 
development, prototyping, testing, and deployment.
    The committee notes that recent advances have been made in 
high temperature manufacturing, hypersonic wind tunnel 
capability and material testing technology. Specifically, the 
committee is encouraged by the Department's efforts to expand 
the number of hypersonic wind tunnel and testing facilities, 
specifically at Arnold Air Force Base Engineering Development 
Center and the joint-investment at several universities, 
including Purdue, Notre Dame, and Texas A&M. However, even with 
these increases, current facilities will be stressed to provide 
the level of testing needed across the joint-efforts.
    In addition to the high demand for testing infrastructure, 
the U.S. currently lacks the workforce with sufficient 
knowledge and experience in hypersonic materials manufacturing 
and testing to develop these next generation systems. 
Therefore, the committee directs the Under Secretary of Defense 
for Research and Engineering, in coordination with the military 
services and Missile Defense Agency, to provide a report to the 
House Committee on Armed Services not later than December 31, 
2019, on the health of hypersonic testing technologies and 
workforce. The report should include an analysis of current 
capacity to meet existing requirements, options to improve 
testing facilities, with cost, schedule, and operational 
considerations, and efforts that are being taken to address 
workforce gaps.
    The committee also acknowledges that System Integration 
Labs are necessary to support testing of hypersonic weapon 
systems, specifically for the U.S. Army as it proceeds with the 
long range hypersonic weapon. Therefore, the committee directs 
the Commander of U.S. Army Space and Missile Defense Command to 
provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services not 
later than December 31, 2019, on capability and capacity 
assessments to support future ground testing. The briefing 
should include an analysis of integrated hardware and software 
processes and system integration and development.

Implementation of existing authorities for the science and technology 
        reinvention laboratories

    The committee understands that the Department of Defense's 
in-house science and technology (S&T) ecosystem, to include the 
science and technology reinvention laboratories (STRLs), 
suffers from the common struggle to compete with the tech 
sector in attracting talented Innovation, Science, Technology, 
Engineering, Math (iSTEM) trained researchers and scientists. 
Yet the committee is frustrated that the military services have 
yet to use many of the authorities and responsibilities granted 
in previous National Defense Authorization Acts, such as:
    (1) personnel hiring authorities, including the authorities 
provided under: section 1599h, 2358a, and 2360 of title 10, 
United States Code; section 1109 of the National Defense 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2016 (Public Law 114-92;); 
and section 1124 of the National Defense Authorization Act for 
Fiscal Year 2017 (Public Law 114-328);
    (2) the authority to enter into partnerships with 
institutions of higher education, including the authorities 
provided under section 2194 of title 10, United States Code; 
section 236 of Public Law 114-328;
    (3) the authority to reengineer management and business 
processes, including the authorities provided under section 
2368 of title 10, United States Code; sections 211 and 233 of 
Public Law 114-328;
    (4) the authority to carry out prize competitions, 
including the authority provided under section 2374a of title 
10, United States Code;
    (5) the authority to make technology transfers, including 
the authority provided under section 233 of the National 
Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2018 (Public Law 115-
91); and
    (6) defense-wide authorities, including the authorities 
provided under sections 217 and 232 of Public Law 115-91.
    Therefore, elsewhere in this title, the committee includes 
a provision that would require the Secretary of Defense to 
develop a master plan for using current authorities and 
responsibilities to strengthen and modernize the workforce and 
capabilities of the Department's STRLs to enhance the ability 
of the laboratories to execute missions in the most efficient 
and effective manner. The provision would require the Under 
Secretary of Defense for Research and Engineering to submit the 
master plan for using these authorities and a report on the 
Department's progress in implementing these authorities to the 
congressional defense committees not later than October 30, 
2020.

Integrated Silicon-Based Lasers

    The committee is aware that the Department of Defense's 
weapons platforms, such as aircraft and radars, are still 
largely burdened with difficult to install and maintain, slow, 
expensive, and heavy copper wire cabling. The Department's 
initial investments in Integrated Silicon-Based Lasers have 
identified opportunities for transforming the state-of-the-art 
in the manufacture of integrated photonics devices. Integrated 
Photonics, the use of light for applications traditionally 
addressed through electronics, is used in a wide range of areas 
including telecommunications; 5G cell towers; cell phones; 
military laser-based radars; data communications; sensing; and 
could be used to replace heavy coaxial cabling in aircraft with 
fiber optic cables that are significantly smaller and lighter.
    The committee directs the Under Secretary of Defense for 
Research and Engineering to submit a report to the House 
Committee on Armed Services by April 30, 2020, on how future 
military and commercial applications could use integrated 
photonics to benefit from higher bandwidth of data transfer, 
faster data transmission, and lower energy loss due to optical 
fiber being more energy efficient and lower weight than copper.

Investments in Science and Technology

    The Department of Defense's Science and Technology (S&T) 
ecosystem is complex and is comprised of agencies, offices, 
laboratories, federally funded research and development 
centers, university affiliated research centers, academic 
partnerships, test and evaluation entities, and partnerships 
with the private sector to include small businesses. The 
Department's S&T ecosystem is charged with delivering the best 
capabilities to the warfighter in the near-, mid-, and long-
term.
    However, Defense Planning Guidance issued by the Under 
Secretary of Defense for Policy has for many years mandated 
only a base of zero percent real growth in the annual S&T 
budget. The fiscal year 2020 budget request for S&T was only 
2.7 percent of the Department of Defense's base budget request 
and only 3.2 percent above the fiscal year 2019 requested 
funding level. Adjusted for inflation, the fiscal year 2020 
request was only 1 percent higher than the fiscal year 2019 
budget request.
    The committee is concerned that the lack of growth 
negatively impacts the ability of the Department to keep pace 
with the real-world cost increases in the S&T ecosystem, such 
as the ability to attract highly specialized technical labor 
like scientists and engineers with advanced degrees and PhDs, 
and maintain a technological edge.
    The committee is disappointed that this year's Defense 
Planning Guidance removed the base requirement of zero percent 
real growth. The committee is concerned that future budgets 
will show negative real growth and the Department's investments 
in its future technological edge will be even more dire. 
Therefore, the committee directs the Director, Cost Assessment 
and Program Evaluation, with analytical and resource support 
from the Under Secretary of Defense for Research and 
Engineering, to conduct a study and provide a briefing to the 
House Committee on Armed Services not later than September 1, 
2021, on the effects of the Department submitting future budget 
requests with negative real growth in the Department's funding 
for S&T efforts.

Joint Electromagnetic Spectrum Operations

    Joint Electromagnetic Spectrum Operations (JEMSO) include 
all activities in military operations to successfully plan and 
execute joint or multinational operations to control the 
electromagnetic operational environment. Electronic warfare 
planning and management tools can be customized for different 
services and fielded in almost any deployment environment. 
Joint electronic warfare planning and management tool 
technology demonstrations are good initial steps towards 
managing technologies across a broader integrated electronic 
warfare system, which have the potential to neutralize and 
exploit enemy signals and equip combat forces with essential 
electronic warfare mission-planning capabilities. The committee 
therefore recommends expeditiously establishing joint 
electromagnetic spectrum operations cells at the combatant 
commands and ensuring they are equipped with the right 
resources and technology to successfully meet mission needs.

Joint Threat Warning System

    The committee recognizes that the Joint Threat Warning 
System (JTWS) provides credible threat warning and intelligence 
information to special operations forces (SOF). The committee 
notes that this program has been critical to enhancing the 
situational awareness of SOF elements by alerting them to 
threats to the force and illuminating targeting opportunities. 
The committee is concerned that the program does not include an 
air-variant precision high frequency band capability. This gap 
in coverage exposes SOF operators to unknown threats and 
decreases their situational awareness. Therefore, the committee 
directs the Commander, U.S. Special Operation Command to 
provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services not 
later than December 1, 2019, on efforts to address this 
critical air-variant high frequency gap in coverage.

Lithium-ion batteries

    The budget request contained $10.0 million in 67210D8Z for 
industrial base analysis and sustainment support.
    The committee understands that a viable, domestic source of 
lithium-ion batteries is critical to national security and 
Department of Defense manufacturing. Advances in battery cell 
manufacturing using modern equipment has the potential to 
increase the readiness and performance of essential Department 
of Defense warfighting capability that relies on safe, high-
performance portable power. The committee notes that the 
advances in modern manufacturing equipment will ensure the 
supply of domestically produced lithium-ion batteries and 
secure a competitive domestic industrial base. Additionally, 
the committee understands that the military services have an 
important role communicating that rapid, safe, and effective 
deployment of batteries and battery systems is essential to 
support and enhance the lethality of weapons systems. The 
committee further notes that development of advanced energy 
storage systems that facilitate safe storage and transport of 
these batteries is a critical element of this effort. The 
committee understands that energy storage and thermal 
management are essential to both future weapon systems and 
microgrids. The committee applauds the Navy's effort to address 
these issues through the establishment of a battery office 
dedicated to addressing these issues and reducing the cost of 
battery usage enterprise-wide through the development and 
implementation of batteries and battery storage systems.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $4.0 
million in PE 67210D8Z for industrial base analysis and 
sustainment support related to lithium-ion battery 
manufacturing.

Microelectronics

    The committee recognizes that microelectronics technology 
provides critical capabilities to Department of Defense, other 
government organizations' systems, and the commercial 
marketplace. With China's declared policy and commitment of 
dominating microelectronics market by 2025, the committee 
remains concerned with the Department of Defense's long-term 
strategy to maintain supply chain integrity and assurance 
against counterfeit parts and ensure continued access to 
trusted microelectronics. The committee is also concerned about 
the Department of Defense's lack of a robust industrial base 
and domestic supply chain for radiation-hardened 
microelectronics. The Department relies extensively on weapon 
and communications systems that must operate in high ambient 
radiation levels for national security, surveillance, 
battlefield communications, and missile defense. While there 
have been a number of attempts to address the challenges 
associated with the domestic microelectronics industry, the 
onset of 5G and the national security concerns associated with 
use of commercial microelectronics devices in military and 
other sensitive national security systems have increased the 
immediacy and level of concern. The committee supported the 
requirement in section 231 of the National Defense 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2017 (Public Law 114-328) 
requiring the development of a microelectronics strategy. 
However, with the introduction and proliferation of 5G 
technologies, the strategy must be updated.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of Defense 
to provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services 
not later than February 15, 2020, on the Department's Trusted 
Microelectronics strategy. The briefing should include the 
original elements of the strategy including supplier base 
capacity and need for trusted, radiation-hardened and anti-
tamper microelectronics, and also address how the onset of 5G 
technologies is changing the national security and commercial 
marketplace for trusted microelectronics.

Military rotorcraft safety

    The committee recognizes that military rotorcraft operate 
in hazardous conditions using special tactics, techniques, and 
procedures that can lead to increased risk for pilots and their 
crews. The committee is aware of the significant risk that 
uncharted wires and obstacles pose to military rotorcraft, 
especially those flown by special operations forces and combat 
search and rescue elements. The committee also notes that 
military rotorcraft face safety and readiness challenges 
stemming from excessive aircraft vibration. The committee 
further understands that current vibration mitigation efforts 
often seek to mask or absorb vibrations without resulting in an 
actual decrease in vibration. The committee is concerned that 
there is insufficient focus on developing and fielding 
effective technology for detecting uncharted wires and 
obstacles, as well as insufficient focus on developing materiel 
solutions to help mitigate excessive vibration in legacy 
rotorcraft platforms.
    The committee directs the Secretary of Defense, in 
coordination with the Secretaries of the Army, Navy, and Air 
Force, to provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed 
Services by February 1, 2020, on Department-wide efforts to 
identify, develop, and procure capabilities related to the 
detection and avoidance of uncharted wires and obstacles, as 
well as efforts to mitigate excessive vibration in rotorcraft. 
The briefing should include to the maximum extent practicable 
an evaluation of current commercially available systems for 
obstacle detection and analysis of any tools, processes, 
software, or methodologies currently being evaluated towards 
mitigating vibration levels.

Moving Target Defense

    The budget request contained $81.8 million in PE 603563N 
for Ship Concept Advanced Design.
    The committee supports the Department's efforts to explore 
alternatives to traditional cyber defense architectures and 
approaches to mitigate cyber vulnerabilities. The committee 
encourages the Secretary of Defense to continue to explore and 
invest in cyber technology that provides multi-tiered defensive 
capabilities, such as moving target defense.
    The committee recommends an increase of $5.0 million, in PE 
603563N, for Moving Target Defense technology.

National Academies Science, Technology, and Security Roundtable

    The budget request contained $16.9 million in PE 65798D8Z 
for Defense Technology Analysis.
    Intellectual property theft and counterintelligence threats 
pose significant challenges to maintaining a United States 
technological edge. To that end, the committee mandated the 
Department of Defense establish an initiative to support 
protection of national security academic researchers from undue 
influence and other security threats in section 1286 of the 
John S. McCain National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal 
Year 2019 (Public Law 115-232). The committee is aware that 
implementation of this initiative, specifically gathering 
information on persons performing Department of Defense 
research at universities and participants of foreign talent 
programs, has presented policy challenges relating to privacy 
and civil liberties, and sharing of data between federal 
agencies. The committee is also aware that sharing of threat 
information by the Federal Government to academia has not 
increased through this initiative and believes that efforts 
under this initiative would be more effectively executed with 
the inclusion of appropriate domestic law enforcement agencies 
and entities, such as the Federal Bureau of Investigation.
    Therefore, the committee supports the Secretary of Defense 
convening a National Science, Technology, and Security 
Roundtable through the National Academies of Science, 
Engineering and Medicine in order to facilitate dialogue and 
formulate solutions related to protecting U.S. critical 
technology and national security information while 
simultaneously preserving civil liberties and an open science 
and technology research environment. The committee believes 
that key stakeholders from the interagency and scientific and 
academic communities, as well as foreign partner and allies 
should be part of this roundtable.
    The committee therefore recommends $19.9 million, an 
increase of $3.0 million, in PE 65798D8Z for the Secretary to 
convene the National Science, Technology, and Security 
Roundtable through NASEM.

National Consortium for the Study of Terrorism and Responses to 
        Terrorism

    One of the key tenants specified in the 2018 National 
Defense Strategy (NDS) is reforming the Department of Defense 
for greater performance and affordability. In the NDS, the 
Department acknowledged that an increasingly complex security 
environment, coupled with the need to modernize and improve 
readiness, are among the factors that will require difficult 
and informed prioritization decisions. Machine learning and 
related concepts offer promise to deliver data driven decision 
making tools where the potential consequences and risk of 
selected actions can be evaluated in real time based on a wide 
variety of input sources and emerging conditions.
    The committee is aware the Department has been investing in 
the National Consortium for the Study of Terrorism and 
Responses to Terrorism (START) and is the largest consumer of 
data from this program. START is a university-based research 
and education center that provides an effective resource that 
has informed current counterterrorism policies and strategy. 
Aligning with the objectives specified in the National Defense 
Strategy, this funding has supported a robust and versatile 
decision matrix created by leading social scientists from more 
than 50 academic and research institutions across the country 
and around the globe.
    For example, one of the effective elements within START is 
the Leadership of the Extreme and Dangerous for Innovative 
Results Dataset and Collection, developed to assess and better 
understand the motivations and maneuvering of the leadership of 
current and emerging Violent Extremist Organizations, such as 
the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant. The research provides 
an analytical framework and risk based consequence management 
prediction capability that has been tested and proven effective 
on battlefields around the globe.
    The committee believes that because of the success and 
maturation of START's analytical framework, as well as its 
multi-disciplinary approach, there may be alignment with other 
Department funded priorities. The committee notes that there 
could be benefit in using the program as a prototype for other 
applications that require a mission focused capability that 
crosses functional domains and enhances warfighter lethality, 
technical superiority, adaptability, and resilience. Therefore, 
the committee encourages the Department to evaluate and fully 
fund a prototype using the START database foundation as a 
consequence management counterterrorism decision support 
application.

National Defense Education Program

    The budget request contained $92.1 million in PE 61120D8Z 
for the National Defense Education Program (NDEP).
    NDEP fosters and enhances the Department of Defense's 
ability to access high-quality science, technology, 
engineering, and mathematics personnel vital to national 
defense now and in the future. This is accomplished through 
initiatives such as the Science Mathematics and Research for 
Transformation program, a scholarship-for-service program, as 
well as the Military Child Pilot Program formally established 
by section 233 of the National Defense Authorization Act for 
Fiscal Year 2015 (Public Law 113-291). The committee believes 
that investments in science, technology, engineering, and 
mathematics education to develop a future technical workforce 
are critical to maintaining a technological edge.
    Therefore, the committee recommends $112.1 million, an 
increase of $20.0 million, in PE 61120D8Z for NDEP.

Optical fiber in next generation information infrastructure

    The committee is aware of the significant wired and 
wireless information infrastructure deployments that will be 
required to operate a robust, secure next generation 5G 
network. As the Department of Defense increases investments in 
next generation information technology research and 
development, it will be critical that the Department also 
understand the strategic industries that will be required to 
grow and sustain this technology modernization. One of these 
critical technologies is the optical fiber industry, which will 
form the backbone of the wired 5G infrastructure for national 
security applications. The committee encourages the Department 
of Defense to consider the security implications of foreign 
optical fiber on 5G modernization and the importance of 
maintaining a secure, domestic industrial base for optical 
fiber.

Pilot Program for Supply Chain Awareness and Cybersecurity in the 
        Defense Industrial Base

    The budget request contained $40.1 million in PE 64771D8Z, 
for the Joint Tactical Information Distribution System, which 
includes funds for cybersecurity support to the Defense 
Industrial Base.
    The committee recognizes the thoughtful approach that the 
Department of Defense has taken on its pilot program, Cyber 
Maturity Model Certification (CMMC). This program managed by 
the Under Secretary of Defense for Acquisition and Sustainment 
has brought together experts from academia and the private 
sector to create a framework for evaluating a defense 
contractor's cybersecurity posture. The program recognizes the 
challenges of robust cybersecurity programs for small and 
medium-sized businesses seeking opportunities with the 
Department of Defense, while ensuring that cyber risk to 
Department equities is managed appropriately. As this program 
continues to evolve in its development, the committee expects 
the Department to provide regular briefings on the program's 
status.
    The committee recommends $43.1 million, an increase of $3.0 
million, in PE 64771D8Z to support the Department's program.

Protecting Critical Technologies Task Force

    According to a memorandum issued by the Secretary of 
Defense on October 24, 2018, ``each year, it is estimated that 
American industry loses more than $600 billion to theft and 
expropriation. Far worse, the loss of classified and controlled 
unclassified information is putting the Department's 
investments at risk and eroding the lethality and survivability 
of our forces.'' Protection of classified and controlled 
unclassified information, and intellectual property, when 
appropriate, is necessary for the U.S. to maintain a 
warfighting advantage.
    The committee believes that effective protection of 
appropriately designated information requires a comprehensive, 
data-based understanding of theft and exportation and that 
impacted entities, such as academia and the Defense Industrial 
Base, must be part of the Department's efforts to develop 
solutions. The committee further believes that privacy and 
civil liberties, as well as an open research environment, must 
not be compromised by efforts to protect information.
    For example, the Department funds basic research that 
benefits greatly from the global science and technology 
ecosystem. National Security Decision Directive 189 on the 
National Policy on the Transfer of Scientific, Technical and 
Engineering Information from President Reagan's administration 
outlined that the products of ``fundamental research,'' defined 
as ``basic and applied research in science and engineering, the 
results of which ordinarily are published and shared broadly 
within the scientific community,'' should remain unrestricted.
    The committee is aware the Protecting Critical Technologies 
Task Force (PCTTF), established by former Secretary of Defense 
James Mattis, is one of the entities in the Department leading 
the effort to mitigate the loss of classified and controlled 
unclassified information. The committee supports the PCTTF and 
expects to be continually updated on its efforts. Additionally, 
the committee directs the Director of the PCTTF to provide a 
briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services not later 
than October 30, 2019, on efforts and progress to date.

Protection of National Security Research

    The committee believes that institutes of higher learning, 
laboratories, and other entities and organizations play 
critical roles in advancing national security within the U.S. 
science and technology ecosystem that is charged with 
delivering the best capabilities to the warfighter in the near, 
mid, and long-term. The committee understands that near-peer 
competitors such as China and Russia attempt to exploit and 
benefit from the open and collaborative global research 
environment created by the Reagan Administration's National 
Security Decision Directive 189 on the National Policy on the 
Transfer of Scientific, Technical and Engineering Information, 
which established that the products of ``fundamental 
research''--defined as ``basic and applied research in science 
and engineering, the results of which ordinarily are published 
and shared''--should remain unrestricted.
    The committee is also aware that academia is not always 
kept apprised by the interagency of a complete picture of 
potential activities and threats in the research community, 
such as improper technology transfer, intellectual property 
theft, and cyber-attacks directly affiliated with nation-state 
governments. Elsewhere in this bill and report, the committee 
includes measures to promote increased information sharing 
across the interagency and with academia.
    The Committee therefore directs the Secretary of Defense to 
provide to the Committees on Armed Services of the Senate and 
House of Representatives, not later than January 1, 2020, a 
report listing Chinese and Russian academic institutions that 
have a history of improper technology transfer, intellectual 
property theft, cyber espionage, or operate under the direction 
of their respective armed forces or intelligence agencies. The 
report should be in unclassified form, though it may contain a 
classified annex.

Provision of Analysis to U.S. Humanitarian Demining Organizations

    The committee recognizes the prevalence and growing use of 
improvised threats in war and the work being conducted by 
humanitarian demining organizations, with support from the U.S. 
government, to alleviate the lasting impacts of such threats on 
civilian populations. The committee also recognizes the 
expertise of the Defense Threat Reduction Agency, Joint 
Improvised-Threat Defeat Organization Directorate (JD), which 
has conducted extensive research on these improvised threats.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Director, JD, to 
submit a report to the House Committee on Armed Services not 
later than October 1, 2020 cataloguing previous JD research 
that could be released to U.S. humanitarian demining 
organizations to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of 
humanitarian demining efforts.

Radio frequency countermeasures for rotary wing aircraft

    The committee supports the Department's commitment to 
modernizing the vertical lift and rotary-wing capabilities 
across the services. The committee also notes with concern the 
rapid development and proliferation of advanced radio frequency 
threat systems that would possess the ability to engage rotary-
wing aircraft currently operated by the Army, Navy, Marine 
Corps and Air Force. Therefore, the committee directs the 
Secretary of Defense to provide a briefing to the House Armed 
Services Committee, no later than January 31, 2020, that 
includes: a near and long-term acquisition and development 
strategy to provide radio frequency countermeasure (RFCM) 
protection for current and future rotary wing aircraft for each 
of the military services. The briefing should also include all 
current rotary-wing RFCM production programs and address any 
additional applicable programs with mature technology readiness 
levels.

Report on Designation of a National Center of Excellence for Pathogen 
        and Microbiome Analysis

    The Committee is concerned that the Department has no 
central research center dedicated to dangerous pathogen and 
microbiome research; therapeutics and vaccine development; 
workforce education and training; and advanced computational 
analysis. The lack of a central laboratory that can handle and 
ship highly dangerous pathogens while employing the most 
advanced genomic, immunology, and computational analyses has 
resulted in a suboptimal effort to research, develop, test, and 
evaluate (RDT&E) some of the most lethal threats to the 
warfighter. The Committee believes that the lack of a central 
RDT&E Institute to coordinate nationwide efforts results in 
higher costs to the taxpayer.
    The Committee believes that it is critical that the next 
generation of pathogen and microbiome researchers are educated 
through university partnerships, as neither the Defense Threat 
Reduction Agency (DTRA) nor federal contractors have the tools 
for such training. Formally designating a university-housed 
Center of Excellence within DTRA would enable a central entity 
staffed with experts in different research disciplines to 
include immunology; vaccines; therapeutics; genomics; 
bioinformatics; disease models; and artificial intelligence to 
coordinate these many efforts without the need to create 
another entity within DTRA.
    The Committee therefore directs the Assistant Secretary of 
Defense for Nuclear, Chemical, and Biological Defense Programs, 
with support from the Director of DTRA, to submit a report by 
December 31, 2019 to the Committees on Armed Services of the 
Senate and House of Representatives on the benefits and 
feasibility of designating and funding an existing operational 
entity which has a proven record of zero violations for safety, 
shipping, and compliance as the National Institute for Pathogen 
and Microbiome Analysis under DTRA to coordinate, focus, and 
assist DTRA's RDT&E efforts to protect warfighters from 
biological threats.

Role of universities in rapid prototyping

    The committee recognizes that the ability to rapidly 
prototype services, technologies, and systems is critical to 
expanding warfighting capabilities by reducing time and cost to 
field systems. While the Department of Defense engages with the 
university community in support of basic research and workforce 
development, the committee believes universities can also 
contribute to rapidly integrating existing and new technologies 
into the Department's systems. The committee encourages the 
Department to explore the establishment of partnerships with 
academia under a university consortium, cooperative agreement, 
or multi-institution task order contract model, as authorized 
in section 217(e) of the National Defense Authorization Act for 
Fiscal Year 2018 (Public Law 115-91), to rapidly prototype 
services, technologies, and systems with national security 
applications into Department of Defense command, control, 
communications, computers, cyber, and intelligence systems and 
infrastructure.

Tactical data links

    The committee remains concerned with the lack of a 
Department of Defense-wide, comprehensive effort to achieve a 
resilient and survivable network for 5th and 4th generation 
systems data sharing in a highly contested operational 
environment. Section 234 of the National Defense Authorization 
Act for Fiscal Year 2018 (Public Law 115-91) directed the then-
Under Secretary of Defense for Acquisition, Technology, and 
Logistics to coordinate with the Secretary of the Navy and the 
Secretary of the Air Force to develop a competitive acquisition 
plan for low probability of detection/low probability of 
intercept (LPD/LPI) datalink network capability. The committee 
notes, however, that the Department's plan was not sufficient 
or comprehensive.
    The National Defense Strategy's shift to peer and near-peer 
threats requires joint force capabilities for operations in 
highly contested environments. The F-22 and the F-35 aircraft 
possess LPD/LPI datalinks, but their two systems, the Intra-
Flight Data Link and the Multifunction Advanced Data Link 
(MADL), cannot share information between aircraft. The 
Department identified F-35's MADL as the preferred airborne 
datalink to meet the requirement, but the associated form, fit, 
and function changes required rendered this unaffordable and 
the effort was cancelled. Additionally, the Air Force's concept 
for an Advanced Battle Management System (ABMS) for battle 
management and command and control (BMC2) also depends upon 
LPD/LPI datalinks to exchange intelligence, surveillance, and 
reconnaissance (ISR) and BMC2 information between current and 
future sensor network nodes.
    The committee believes LPD/LPI networked communications 
must be a priority, and therefore, directs the Under Secretary 
of Defense for Acquisition and Sustainment, in coordination 
with the Secretaries of the Air Force and Navy, to provide a 
report to the congressional defense committees by December 1, 
2019, on plans to ensure LPD/LPI communications among and 
between 5th and 4th generation airborne platforms as well as 
other network nodes for command, control, communications, and 
intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance. The report 
shall include:
    (1) all current and planned LPD/LPI data link developments, 
with requirements, technology specifications and readiness 
levels, and applicability to specific platforms and network-
enabled weapon systems;
    (2) a plan and schedule for flight testing the data links 
in operationally relevant environments; and,
    (3) estimated cost and schedule to implement each solution.

University and industry research centers

    The budget request contained $86.2 million in PE 61104A for 
University and Industry Research Centers.
    The committee is concerned that although many valuable 
innovations, such as combat gauze and tourniquets, have derived 
from lessons learned on the battlefield and are now 
commercially available, many more get lost in institutions, 
laboratories, and the ``Valley of Death''. Key components of 
accessing capital, sharing information on current military 
medical gaps and private-sector capabilities to address them, 
forming synergistic collaborations across academic 
institutions, businesses and government, and providing guidance 
to entrepreneurs and start-ups all remain essential to enable 
innovations to transition for Military Medical Innovations. 
Additionally, university and industry research centers of 
excellence conduct a wide range of research to advance 
technology in support of the Army's modernization priorities.
    The committee recommends $91.2 million, an increase of $5.0 
million, in PE 61104A for University and Industry Research 
Centers to help address the challenges to expand the 
entrepreneurial ecosystem to address unmet needs for the 
Department of Defense and produce dual-use innovations.

                         LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS


              Subtitle A--Authorization of Appropriations


              Section 201--Authorization of Appropriations

    This section would authorize appropriations for research, 
development, test, and evaluation at the levels identified in 
section 4201 of division D of this Act.

    Subtitle B--Program Requirements, Restrictions, and Limitations


  Section 211--Program on Enhancement of Preparation of Dependents of 
      Members of Armed Forces for Careers in Science, Technology, 
                      Engineering, and Mathematics

    This section would make section 233 of the Carl Levin and 
Howard P. ``Buck'' McKeon National Defense Authorization Act 
for Fiscal Year 2015 (Public Law 113-291) permanent. Section 
233 created a pilot program on enhancement of preparation of 
dependents of members of Armed Forces for careers in science, 
technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM). The program 
improves STEM learning and performance for children; helps 
retain service members; provides STEM education opportunities 
to children in lower socioeconomic communities from which the 
U.S. military recruits heavily; and is a national level 
curriculum that works well for families that move around the 
country.
    The committee expects the Secretary of Defense to continue 
to coordinate with other government organizations and 
departments as appropriate, to include the Secretary of 
Education, the National Science Foundation, and the heads of 
such other Federal, State, and local government and private 
sector organizations as the 0Secretary of Defense considers 
appropriate. Additionally, the committee expects the Secretary 
to continue, to the maximum extent practicable, to make use of 
the authorities under chapter 111 and sections 2601, 2605, and 
2374a of title 10, United States Code, section 219 of the 
Duncan Hunter National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal 
Year 2009 (10 U.S.C. 2358), and such other authorities as the 
Secretary of Defense considers appropriate.

   Section 212--Temporary Inclusion of Joint Artificial Intelligence 
 Center of the Department of Defense in Personnel Management Authority 
             to Attract Experts in Science and Engineering

    This section would extend personnel management authorities 
to the Director of the Joint Artificial Intelligence Center to 
facilitate recruitment of eminent experts in science or 
engineering through December 31, 2024.

            Section 213--Joint Hypersonics Transition Office

    This section would amend section 218 of the John Warner 
National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2007 (Public 
Law 109-364) by directing the Department of Defense to 
establish a coordinating office that standardizes the technical 
priorities across the Department and provides discretionary 
authorization of funding of new technologies for expeditious 
transition to the service weapons systems.

Section 214--Modification of Proof of Concept Commercialization Program

    This section would amend section 1603(g) of the National 
Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2014 (Public Law 113-
66) by extending the Proof of Concept Commercialization Pilot 
Program through 2024 and amending the title of the section 
heading by inserting ``of Dual-Use Technology'' after 
``Commercialization.''

      Section 215--Contract for National Security Research Studies

    This section would direct the Secretary of Defense, acting 
through the Under Secretary of Defense for Acquisition and 
Sustainment, to seek to enter into a contract to support the 
JASON scientific advisory group, and would require notification 
to the congressional defense committees 90 days before 
termination of such contract. The committee also expects the 
Department of Defense to provide notification to the 
congressional defense committees if the contract expires 
without renewal.

              Section 216--JASON Scientific Advisory Group

    This section would require the Secretary of Defense to seek 
to engage the members of the private scientific advisory group 
known as ``JASON'' as advisory personnel to provide advice, on 
an ongoing basis, on matters involving science, technology and 
national security.

  Section 217--Direct Air Capture and Blue Carbon Removal Technology 
                                Program

    This section would authorize a program for carbon capture 
from the sea to support energy security and increase the 
efficiency of forward deployed units.

   Section 218--Foreign Malign Influence Operations Research Program

    This section would require the Under Secretary of Defense 
for Research and Engineering to carry out a research program on 
foreign malign influence operations research as part of the 
university and other basic research programs of the Department 
of Defense, such as the Minerva Research Initiative.

   Section 219--Sensor Data Integration for Fifth Generation Aircraft

    This section would require the Secretary of Defense to 
ensure fifth generation aircraft such as the F-35, F-22, and B-
21 can share and disseminate data collected by on-board sensors 
with other joint service users and platforms. This section 
would further require the Comptroller General of the United 
States to assess and provide an interim briefing to the 
congressional defense committees within 180 days after the date 
of the enactment of this Act, the Department's doctrinal, 
organizational, and technological methods of managing sensor 
data collected by fifth generation aircraft and the ability of 
fifth generation aircraft to share information collected in 
real-time with other joint service users and platforms.

   Section 220--Documentation Relating to Advanced Battle Management 
                                 System

    This section would require the Secretary of the Air Force 
to provide program documentation for the Advanced Battle 
Management System (ABMS) family of systems.
    The fiscal year 2019 budget request for the Air Force 
cancelled the long-planned Joint Surveillance Target Attack 
Radar System recapitalization and included a small amount of 
funding in existing programs as a bridge to a new concept for 
comprehensive battle management command and control. The 
committee notes that this concept, the Advanced Battle 
Management System, envisions several existing airborne and 
ground intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance (ISR) and 
command and control systems connected by resilient, protected 
communications and data links.
    The budget request provided limited programmatic details on 
ABMS. The committee is concerned with the lack of discernible 
benchmarks to assess and measure progress. The committee 
understands that the ABMS Analysis of Alternatives (AOA) will 
conclude in 2019. At that time, the committee expects the Air 
Force to complete the documentation requested by this section 
and submit it to the congressional defense committees not later 
than 180 days after completion of the AOA.
    The committee also notes that Air Force modernization plans 
rely on introducing artificial intelligence and machine 
learning into a range of major weapon systems. Given the 
intended capability of ABMS, the committee believes the Air 
Force should consider prototyping and demonstrating the utility 
of artificial intelligence and automated sensor fusion as part 
of the ABMS concept.

     Section 221--Documentation Relating to B-52 Commercial Engine 
                          Replacement Program

    This section would limit funds for the B-52 commercial 
engine replacement program until the Secretary of the Air Force 
submits a capability development document and a signed test and 
evaluation master plan.

Section 222--Diversification of the Science, Technology, Research, and 
           Engineering Workforce of the Department of Defense

    This section would require the Secretary of Defense to 
assess critical skillsets required in the Department of 
Defense's science, technology, research, and engineering 
workforce to support emerging and future warfighter 
technologies, to include an analysis of the recruiting, 
retention and representation of minorities and women in the 
current workforce, and geographic diversity.
    Additionally, this section would require the Secretary of 
Defense to develop and implement a plan to diversify and 
strengthen the Department's science, technology, research, and 
engineering workforce using existing programs and authorities 
to include authorities granted in sections 2304d, 2371, and 
2358 of title 10, United States Code.
    Finally, this section would require the Secretary to submit 
a report to the congressional defense committees within 1 year 
from the date of the enactment of this Act with the plan to 
diversify the workforce.

 Section 223--Policy on the Talent Management of Digital Expertise and 
                         Software Professionals

    This section would create a Chief Digital Engineering 
Recruitment and Management Officer at the Department of Defense 
responsible for promoting and maintaining digital expertise and 
software development as core competencies for civilian and 
military employees at the Department of Defense.

  Section 224--Development and Implementation of Digital Engineering 
        Capability and Automated Software Testing and Evaluation

    This section would direct the Under Secretary of Defense 
for Research and Engineering and the Director, Operational Test 
and Evaluation, in consultation with Under Secretary of Defense 
for Acquisition and Sustainment, the military service 
acquisition executives, the service testing commands, and 
Defense Digital Service, to design, develop, and implement 
digital engineering capability and infrastructure to provide 
technically accurate digital models to the acquisition process 
that serve as the foundation for automated approaches to 
software testing and evaluation.
    Additionally, this section would direct the Under Secretary 
and Director to carry out pilot programs to demonstrate whether 
it is possible for automated testing to satisfy developmental 
and operational test requirements to enable the Department to 
find and prevent defects in software earlier and deliver new 
capability to the field faster and on an iterative basis. This 
section would also direct the Under Secretary and Director to 
implement policies and guidance for both efforts and would 
require an initial report be submitted to the congressional 
defense committees outlining details on the selected pilot 
programs.

     Section 225--Process to Align Policy Formulation and Emerging 
                         Technology Development

    This section would direct the Secretary of Defense to 
establish a process to ensure that the policies of the 
Department of Defense relating to emerging technology are 
formulated and updated continuously as such technology is 
developed by the Department not later than 180 days after the 
date of the enactment of this Act. This section would also 
require the Secretary to submit a report on the process to the 
congressional defense committees.
    The committee notes that technology development often 
outpaces policy formulation. For example, the Department is 
investing significantly in hypersonics, artificial 
intelligence, directed energy, and other cutting-edge 
technologies without a cohesive policy regarding development 
and employment of such capabilities, including the use of these 
technologies for offensive purposes. The committee believes the 
Department should better align policy formulation with 
technology development in order to promote responsible 
capability development and facilitate rapid and appropriate 
deployment to the warfighter.

Section 226--Limitation on Transition of Strategic Capabilities Office 
                      of the Department of Defense

    This section would limit the ability of the Secretary of 
Defense to transfer the functions of the Strategic Capabilities 
Office to another organization or element of the Department 
unless certain conditions are met.

                 Subtitle C--Reports and Other Matters


Section 231--Master Plan for Implementation of Authorities Relating to 
            Science and Technology Reinvention Laboratories

    This section would require the Secretary of Defense, acting 
through the Under Secretary of Defense for Research and 
Engineering (USD(R&E)), to provide a master plan to the 
congressional defense committees by October 30, 2020, on how 
the Department of Defense will use its current authorities and 
responsibilities granted in previous National Defense 
Authorization Acts to modernize the workforce and capabilities 
of its science and technology reinvention laboratories. 
Further, this provision would require an initial report from 
USD(R&E) to be submitted to the congressional defense 
committees within 180 days after the date of the enactment of 
this Act on the barriers that prevent each military service 
from fully implementing currently available authorities and 
responsibilities. This section would direct the USD(R&E) to 
create the plan and report in consultation with the Secretary 
of each military department, the Service Acquisition 
Executives, and the affected commanders of each military 
command with responsibilities relating to research and 
engineering.

    Section 232--Master Plan for Infrastructure Required to Support 
          Research, Development, Test, and Evaluation Missions

    This section would require the Secretary of Defense, in 
consultation with the Secretaries of the military departments, 
to develop and implement a master plan that addresses the 
research, development, test, and evaluation infrastructure and 
modernization requirements of the Department of Defense, to 
include the science and technology reinvention laboratories and 
the Major Range and Test Facility Bases. This section would 
require the master plan be provided to the congressional 
defense committees by October 30, 2020.
    The committee is aware that the laboratories and test 
facilities do not compete well across the military departments 
for military construction and other infrastructure funding and 
that authorities provided to promote and allow for 
infrastructure investment remain underutilized by the 
Department. The committee expects the Department to utilize 
authorities provided by Congress to ensure the in-house 
infrastructure of the Department remains viable in order to 
continue to support warfighter requirements.
    In developing the master plan, the committee expects the 
Secretary to enlist the expertise of the Under Secretary of 
Defense for Research and Engineering, the Under Secretary of 
Defense for Acquisition and Sustainment, and the Director of 
Operational Test and Evaluation. Finally, the committee expects 
the Secretaries of the military departments to enlist the 
expertise of their Service Acquisition Executives and civilian 
research leadership as well as the relevant commanders of each 
military command with responsibility for research and 
engineering.

  Section 233--Strategy and Implementation Plan for Fifth Generation 
              Information and Communications Technologies

    This section would require the Secretary of Defense to 
develop and implement a strategy for fifth generation 
information and communications technologies not later than 270 
days after the date of the enactment of this Act and to provide 
a briefing to the congressional defense committees not later 
than 180 days after the date of the enactment of this Act on 
progress in developing the strategy.

 Section 234--Department-Wide Software Science and Technology Strategy

    This section would require that the Secretary of Defense, 
acting through the Under Secretary of Defense for Research and 
Engineering, designate a senior official with principal 
responsibility for guiding the direction of research and 
development of next generation software and software intensive 
systems for the Department of Defense. Further, this section 
would require that the designated senior official develop a 
strategy for research and development of the next generation 
software and software intensive systems and submit the strategy 
to the congressional defense committees not later than 1 year 
after the date of the enactment of this Act.

        Section 235--Artificial Intelligence Education Strategy

    This section would require the Secretary of Defense to 
develop a strategy which identifies the key aspects, 
applications, and challenges associated with artificial 
intelligence that can be developed into an educational 
curriculum for military service members who utilize the 
technology in the execution of responsibilities. This section 
would also require the development of an implementation plan 
for the educational curriculum, and mandates that the 
Department of Defense provide the Artificial Intelligence 
Education Strategy and the associated implementation plan to 
the congressional defense committees not later than 270 days 
after the date of the enactment of this Act.

   Section 236--Biannual Report on the Joint Artificial Intelligence 
                                 Center

    This section would require a biannual report by the 
Secretary of Defense on the Joint Artificial Intelligence 
Center (JAIC) and its efforts to harmonize the Department's 
work on artificial intelligence (AI) issues. The report would 
require the Department to detail the status of the JAIC, its 
current staffing, hiring efforts, and investment priorities. 
The report would specify how the JAIC is working with the 
military services, academia, industry, and international 
partners to develop and operationalize AI.
    The committee supports the work of the Department of 
Defense on matters related to AI, as evident in section 238 of 
the John S. McCain National Defense Authorization Act for 
Fiscal Year 2019 (Public Law 115-232), which directed the 
establishment of a set of activities within the Department of 
Defense to coordinate the efforts of the Department to develop, 
mature, and transition artificial intelligence technologies 
into operational use. The committee will ensure that the 
Department approaches issues involving AI, such as workforce 
development and ethical use, in a substantive and comprehensive 
manner.

   Section 237--Quarterly Updates on the Optionally Manned Fighting 
                            Vehicle Program

    This section would require the Assistant Secretary of the 
Army for Acquisition, Logistics, and Technology to provide 
quarterly briefings, beginning October 1, 2019, to the 
congressional defense committees on the status and progress of 
the Optionally Manned Fighting Vehicle program.

           Section 238--Grants for Civics Education Programs

    This section would require that the Secretary of Defense 
carry out a program under which the Secretary makes grants to 
eligible entities, on a competitive basis, to support the 
development and evaluation of civics education programs.

        Section 239--Technology and National Security Fellowship

    This section would establish a Technology and National 
Security Fellowship program within the Department of Defense to 
increase national security professionals with science, 
technology, engineering, and math degrees.

   Section 240--National Security Commission on Defense Research at 
    Historically Black Colleges and Universities and Other Minority 
                              Institutions

    This section would establish an independent Federal 
commission to advance the research capability of Historically 
Black Colleges and Universities and other Minority 
Institutions.

                  TITLE III--OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE

                       ITEMS OF SPECIAL INTEREST


                             Energy Issues


    Energy Efficiency Improvements for Shelters and Hard Containers

    The committee notes that Department of Defense use of 
shelters, hard containers, and mobile units plays an integral 
role in overseas deployment. Many of these units are climate 
controlled in diverse and austere environments across the world 
in support of our Armed Services, often at great financial 
cost. The committee notes that use of shelters and hard 
containers requires cost avoidance, energy efficiency and 
sustainability.
    Accordingly, the committee directs the Secretary of Defense 
to submit a report to the House Committee on Armed Services by 
February 1, 2020, on the development of energy efficient 
shelters and hard containers. At a minimum, the report shall 
contain the following:
    (1) A discussion of the utility, viability, cost-
effectiveness, and environmental benefit of energy efficiency 
improvements for shelters;
    (2) The viability of including mobile insulation systems to 
standard Department of Defense shelters and hard containers 
with heating or cooling systems;
    (3) A discussion of other cost-saving, efficiency enhancing 
technologies;
    (4) The potential for cost savings through reduced 
environmental control system costs; and
    (5) Energy consumption and energy loss data from field 
tests of current shelters.

   Enhancing Installation Energy Resiliency through Renewable Energy

    The committee notes that the Department of Defense has a 
goal of 25 percent renewable energy for military facilities and 
institutions by 2025. The committee further notes that 
renewable energy can be an important element of ensuring energy 
resiliency and mission assurance at Department of Defense 
installations, and to that end some services have already 
exceeded the 25 percent goal in pursuit of enhanced energy 
resiliency. The committee encourages the Secretary of Defense 
to procure, construct, operate, maintain, test, and upgrade 
independent energy resilient systems for critical energy 
requirements on its military installations.
    Additionally, the committee directs the Secretary of 
Defense to provide a report to the Senate Committee on Armed 
Services and the House Committee on Armed Services by February 
1, 2020, on the following:
    (1) the Department's progress towards meeting the 25 
percent goal by military service, the feasibility of increasing 
this goal as a means of enhancing energy resiliency, and the 
resources that would be required to accomplish a higher goal;
    (2) the extent the services share best practices in 
achieving energy resiliency through renewable energy sources; 
and
    (3) the Department's plans for achieving 100 percent energy 
resilience for its critical energy loads and the feasibility of 
achieving this goal by fiscal year 2030. If 2030 is not 
attainable, the report shall include a projection for when this 
goal will be attainable.

        Fuel Resiliency Issues within the Department of Defense

    The committee notes that the Federal Aviation 
Administration and commercial aviation industry are assessing 
sustainable alternative fuel options as a means to address fuel 
cost and energy security challenges. The committee understands 
that a commercial airline achieved enhanced performance and 
lower fuel consumption through use of a sustainable fuel blend. 
If these results can be replicated, sustainable fuel usage will 
likely increase in commercial aviation. The committee further 
notes that as these fuel options come into commercial use, 
military aircraft may encounter them when using commercial 
airfields either in the course of normal operations or as an 
emergency divert location. An assessment of sustainable fuel 
blends for military aviation use will contribute to operational 
resiliency.
    Accordingly, the committee directs the Under Secretary of 
Defense for Acquisition and Sustainment, in coordination with 
the Director of the Defense Logistics Agency, to provide a 
report to the House Committee on Armed Services not later than 
December 1, 2019, on fuel resiliency and availability 
worldwide. The report shall include an assessment of the range 
of fuel formulations in use worldwide, particularly at divert 
locations where commercially available fuels may differ from 
military specifications; trends in the commercial aviation fuel 
market and how they may impact fuel resiliency; and what the 
Department is doing to ensure that it retains the maximum 
flexibility to refuel military aircraft worldwide.

            Geothermal Revenue Sharing Process Improvements

    The committee notes that section 313 of the John S. McCain 
National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2019 (Public 
Law 115-232) amended section 2916 of title 10, United States 
Code, to require that half of the revenue generated by sale of 
geothermal energy resources be set aside for the installation 
that is the source of the geothermal energy to use on local 
energy, water, or military construction projects.
    The committee is concerned that the process used by the 
Navy to distribute these funds to eligible installations is 
unwieldy and slow. Therefore, the committee directs the 
Secretary of the Navy to provide a report to the House 
Committee on Armed Services by December 1, 2019, describing the 
current process for distributing these funds, a plan to improve 
the process so that local commanders can rapidly address base-
level needs, and the timeline for implementing process 
improvements.

   Maintenance Availability for Destroyers for Hybrid Electric Drive 
                                Retrofit

    The committee understands that hybrid electric drive (HED) 
propulsion systems operate with greater efficiency and 
facilitate greater range and on-station time. Given these 
benefits, the committee believes the Navy should make maximum 
use of the HED technology currently in its inventory. 
Accordingly, the committee directs the Secretary of the Navy to 
provide a report to the House Committee on Armed Services by 
September 30, 2019, on the availability of Flight II Arleigh 
Burke-class destroyers for retrofit with previously procured 
hybrid electric drive systems. The report shall include a 
description of upcoming maintenance availability periods that 
would be of adequate duration to allow for installation of the 
HED, any additional barriers to installation, and any plans the 
Department of the Navy has for use of the remaining HED systems 
that would not involve installation on a naval vessel.

              Medium Power Mobile Transformer Substations

    The committee is aware of the Department of Defense's 
continuing interest in grid resiliency as it pertains to 
military installations. The committee is interested in 
understanding and determining the military installations with 
the greatest critical energy requirements and exhibiting the 
most significant energy resilience vulnerabilities. Therefore, 
the committee directs the Secretary of Defense to provide a 
briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services by February 
1, 2020, on the ten military installations with the greatest 
critical energy requirements and their top five installation 
critical energy vulnerabilities and appropriate mitigation 
strategies, strategies to ensure resilience, and mature 
technologies that enhance capabilities.

    Plug-in Hybrids and Electric Vehicles on Department of Defense 
                             Installations

    The committee believes that military installations could 
improve resiliency through a network of microgrids supporting 
hybrid or fully electric administrative vehicles. Further, the 
committee notes that the majority of government administrative 
vehicles do not transit large distances, and are therefore 
ideally suited for plug-in hybrid or fully electric technology. 
Accordingly, the committee directs the Under Secretary of 
Defense for Acquisition and Sustainment to provide a briefing 
to the House Committee on Armed Services not later than 
September 30, 2019, on the feasibility of requiring Department 
of Defense installations to procure plug-in hybrids or fully 
electric vehicles for the government vehicle fleet and install 
appropriate microgrids to support charging infrastructure to 
charge the vehicles.

    Report on Department of Defense and NATO Cooperation on Energy 
                             Infrastructure

    The committee recognizes that energy security in Europe is 
a critical enabler to United States military readiness in the 
region. The committee further appreciates that the United 
States has economic and national security interests in 
assisting Central and Eastern European countries in achieving 
energy security through diversification of energy sources and 
supply routes. To that end, the committee encourages the 
Secretary of Defense, in coordination with the Secretary of 
State, to work with our North Atlantic Treaty Organization 
(NATO) allies and partners to study vulnerabilities from energy 
instability in Europe and develop ways to mitigate these 
vulnerabilities. The committee directs the Secretary of Defense 
to provide a report to the House Committee on Armed Services by 
March 1, 2020, that provides the results of this study. The 
report shall include at least the following:
    (1) identify and list energy vulnerabilities that impact 
the military readiness of the United States and its allies in 
Central and Eastern Europe;
    (2) identify and list vulnerabilities to supply routes that 
impact the military readiness of the United States and its 
allies in Central and Eastern Europe;
    (3) assess the Department of Defense's current ability to 
mitigate and respond to these vulnerabilities;
    (4) identify ways in which the Department can enhance 
integration and mitigate these vulnerabilities in the future; 
and
    (5) results of coordination with the Department of State on 
ways in which diplomatic relationships can be leveraged to 
provide energy security.

             Review of Offshore Energy Development Projects

    The committee understands that the Department of Defense 
has streamlined its process for evaluating energy development 
projects to include both onshore and offshore energy 
development under the Military Aviation and Installation 
Assurance Siting Clearinghouse (Siting Clearinghouse). The 
committee applauds this consolidation and believes it will 
ensure a consistent process for evaluating energy development 
projects for their potential impacts to military activities. 
The committee directs the Under Secretary of Defense for 
Acquisition and Sustainment to provide a briefing to the House 
Committee on Armed Services not later than September 30, 2019, 
on the consolidation of these functions under the Siting 
Clearinghouse. The briefing should address how offshore 
projects will be evaluated under the Siting Clearinghouse 
process, how the Siting Clearinghouse will interact with the 
Department of Interior when evaluating offshore projects, and 
whether any legislative changes to section 183a of title 10, 
United States Code, are required in order to support the Siting 
Clearinghouse review of offshore projects.

              Siting Clearinghouse Process for Wind Energy

    The development of wind energy off the Central California 
coast would provide a reliable renewable energy resource that 
would enhance energy independence and grid stability. The 
committee notes that the Department of Defense has 
traditionally used the Siting Clearinghouse process to provide 
a timely, transparent, technical, mission-specific and science-
based analysis of potential impacts to military operations from 
proposed domestic energy development. Through this process, the 
Clearinghouse traditionally looks for impacts on military 
testing and training operations. However, given the 
proliferation of offshore wind turbines in the Indo-Pacific 
theater, wind energy development off the Central California 
coast could also provide an area to develop tactics, 
techniques, and procedures for military operations in the 
vicinity of offshore wind turbines. Therefore, the committee 
directs the Executive Director of the Department of Defense 
Siting Clearinghouse to provide an analysis to the House 
Committee on Armed Services, not later than September 1, 2019, 
which outlines how the Clearinghouse process will evaluate 
real-world environments in which the military may need to 
operate to determine whether offshore wind development is 
compatible with or may enhance military testing and training 
operations. The Executive Director shall provide the House 
Committee on Armed Services with a detailed briefing that 
includes analysis of the existing California call areas 
identified by the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM), a 
summary of Department concerns, alternatives being evaluated, 
and how real-world environments are being considered in the 
evaluations. In the interim, the Committee directs the 
Department not to communicate a final position of opposition to 
offshore wind leasing in any of the three California call areas 
identified by BOEM.

                    Logistics and Sustainment Issues


              B-52 Stratofortress power plant sustainment

    The Committee understands that technologies exist to 
achieve increased performance on aircraft engines using an 
advanced foam wash. Recent tests on military aircraft with the 
same or similar engines as B-52s using foam cleaning technology 
have demonstrated the ability to reduce engine temperatures, 
increase engine performance, reduce engine maintenance costs, 
increase visual inspection for maintainers, and save fuel. The 
Committee strongly encourages the Air Force to evaluate the 
benefits that can be achieved with advanced engine wash 
technologies. The Committee also directs the Secretary of the 
Air Force to provide a brief to the Committee outlining the 
interim B-52 power plant sustainment program while each 
aircraft awaits engine replacement.

                            C-17 Sustainment

    The committee recognizes the critical capability of the C-
17 Globemaster 111, which provides strategic and tactical 
airlift, medical evacuation and aerial deliveries in support of 
combat and humanitarian missions around the world. The 
committee further recognizes that the existing sustainment C-17 
Globemaster Ill strategy, which is a performance-based 
logistics contract, has resulted in consistent mission 
readiness rates that exceed 80% and fully conforms with the 
percentage limitations on performance of depot-level 
maintenance (50/50 requirements) of Section 2466 of Title 10, 
United States Code.
    The committee is aware that at a time when aviation 
readiness rates on other fleets have been lagging, the Air 
Force is considering changing the sustainment strategy for C-
17. The committee notes that Section 2337 of Title 10, United 
States Code, requires a periodic review product support 
arrangement to ensure the arrangements are consistent with the 
overall product support strategy. The committee understands 
that the Air Force contracted PricewaterhouseCoopers (PWC) to 
conduct an independent Product Support Business Case Analysis 
of the C-17 sustainment strategy and that analysis has been 
completed and delivered to the Air Force. The committee directs 
the Secretary of the Air Force to provide the PWC business case 
analysis on C-17 sustainment to the House Committee on Armed 
Services no later than June 30, 2019.
    The committee further directs the Secretary of the Air 
Force to provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed 
Services no later than July 31, 2019, detailing the Air Force's 
analysis and decision-making related to changes to C-17 
sustainment

        Commercial Best Practices for Maintenance and Logistics

    The committee notes that commercial industries, such as 
passenger and cargo airlines, maritime fleets, and retail 
merchants, must manage international maintenance and supply 
chain to stay competitive. As a result, private industry seeks 
to reduce sustainment costs and increase operational 
availability by implementing innovative solutions to areas such 
as supply chain management, inventory accountability, workload 
forecasting, and maintenance practices and procedures. The 
committee believes many of these industry best practices can 
and should be leveraged by the Department of Defense to reduce 
sustainment costs and increase readiness. Therefore, the 
committee directs the Assistant Secretary of Defense for 
Sustainment, in coordination with the Secretaries of the 
military departments, to provide a briefing to the House 
Committee on Armed Services not later than March 1, 2020, on 
initiatives to incorporate commercial best practices into 
weapon system maintenance, inventory accountability, workload 
forecasting, and supply chain management. The briefing should 
address specific examples of commercial partnerships or best 
practices that have been adopted by the Department of Defense, 
areas of focus the Department of Defense is looking to industry 
for lessons learned or best practices, and barriers to 
implementing commercial best practices in areas of maintenance, 
inventory management, workload forecasting, and supply chain 
management.

             Comptroller General Report on F-35 Sustainment

    The committee recognizes the importance of the F-35 
Lightning II program to U.S. national defense and cooperation 
with foreign allies and partners. The F-35 is replacing a 
variety of aircraft in the Air Force, Navy, and Marine Corps, 
representing the future of tactical air for the Department of 
Defense. The F-35 program is the most ambitious and expensive 
weapon system in the Department's history, with total life-
cycle costs estimated by the Department to be in excess of $1.0 
trillion. While the F-35 brings advanced, fifth-generation 
aviation capabilities to our military, the program faces 
sustainment challenges in areas including repair capacity, 
global spare parts availability and capability, mission 
capability, and functionality of its Autonomic Logistics 
Information System. In addition, affordability concerns have 
led the military services to identify a need to reduce total 
operation and support costs per aircraft by 43 percent for the 
Air Force, 24 percent for the Marine Corps, and 5 percent for 
the Navy.
    Given the significance of the F-35 program to the future of 
tactical air for the military, the Department's need to operate 
and deploy the F-35 on a widespread basis in the coming years, 
the involvement of international partners and foreign military 
sales customers, and the importance of maintaining 
affordability, the committee directs the Comptroller General of 
the United States to review the Department's sustainment 
efforts related to the F-35 to include issues such as:
    (1) the status of the F-35 Lightning II aircraft program 
sustainment strategy.
    (2) Department oversight and prime contractor management of 
key sustainment functions.
    (3) the Department's ability to reduce costs or maintain 
affordability for F-35 fleet sustainment.
    (4) other matters regarding F-35 sustainment and 
affordability that the Comptroller General determines of 
critical importance to the long-term viability of the program.
    The committee directs the Comptroller General to provide a 
briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services not later 
than March 1, 2020, with the preliminary findings of the 
Comptroller General's review, with successive reports to follow 
on March 1, 2021, and March 1, 2022, respectively.

    Comptroller General Report on Homeport of U.S. Aircraft Carriers

    The committee notes that the Navy's 2018 Strategic Laydown 
and Dispersal Plan reversed a previous Navy decision to return 
an aircraft carrier to Naval Station Everett in fiscal year 
2019. The Secretary of the Navy has stated the decision was 
made due to maintenance efficiencies and to minimize the impact 
to personnel. However, the committee is concerned that the Navy 
did not make this decision by fully considering operational 
impacts, installation capacity, or State and local plans that 
could mitigate impacts to the maintenance of, and personnel 
assigned to, the ship.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Comptroller General of 
the United States to submit a report to the House Committee on 
Armed Services on recent changes to the Navy's west coast 
aircraft carrier homeporting. The review should address the 
following:
    (1) a description of recent changes to west coast aircraft 
carrier homeporting plans and the process used to make those 
changes;
    (2) the extent to which the Navy considered fleet 
dispersal, access to deep water and dredging requirements, man-
made or natural restrictions to deployability, encroachment, 
installation capacity, and previous analyses of west coast 
aircraft carrier homeporting conducted pursuant to the National 
Environmental Policy Act (42 U.S.C. 4321);
    (3) the degree to which State and local governments were 
consulted about alterations to previous homeporting plans and 
potential cost-sharing arrangements; and
    (4) any other matter the Comptroller General determines 
appropriate.
    The committee further directs the Comptroller General to 
provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services not 
later than March 1, 2020, on the Comptroller General's 
preliminary findings and present final results in a format and 
timeframe agreed to at the time of the briefing.

   Comptroller General Report on Littoral Combat Ship Operations and 
                              Sustainment

    The committee notes that 16 of 33 planned littoral combat 
ships (LCS) have been delivered to the Navy, with at least 15 
more under construction or in the pre-production phase. The LCS 
comprises a growing proportion of the surface fleet, yet the 
ship has limited operational experience and its mission 
packages remain behind schedule. In response to program 
challenges with executing the ships' unique operational and 
sustainment concepts, the Navy conducted an LCS program review 
in 2016 and announced fundamental changes to the ships' 
crewing, maintenance, and other operational concepts. As the 
Navy implemented these changes, it canceled planned 2018 LCS 
deployments but has announced three planned LCS deployments for 
2019. These deployments will be another opportunity for the 
Navy to test the feasibility of revisions to its operational 
and sustainment concepts, even as more LCS enter the fleet.
    Given these issues and the vital importance of affordably 
operating and sustaining the LCS, the committee directs the 
Comptroller General of the United States to conduct a study of 
the following topics:
    (1) to what extent has the Navy implemented the LCS program 
changes announced in 2016;
    (2) to what extent has the Navy demonstrated that revised 
LCS operational concepts and sustainment plans are executable; 
and what, if any, challenges did the Navy have on its initial 
deployments using this revised concept;
    (3) how has the Navy prepared to support and maintain LCS 
while they are deployed overseas;
    (4) what have been the operating and sustainment costs of 
the LCS program to date, how have these deviated from cost 
estimates, and to what extent has the Navy updated the LCS cost 
estimate to include the new operation and support strategy;
    (5) what are LCS long-term contracting strategies for ship 
repair and maintenance and to what extent do they address 
challenges related to the cost of maintaining the vessels; and
    (6) any other related matters the Comptroller General 
considers appropriate.
    The committee further directs the Comptroller General to 
provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services not 
later than March 1, 2020, on preliminary findings of the 
Comptroller General's review, and to present final results in a 
format and timeframe agreed to at the time of briefing.

  Comptroller General Report on Ship Repair Capabilities and Capacity

    The committee notes the Navy will seek to increase from 289 
to 355 ships in order to meet the new National Defense 
Strategy. However, the committee is concerned that the current 
configuration and capacity of the U.S. industrial base, as well 
as maintenance capabilities overseas, may not be well-
positioned to support the ship repair capabilities necessary to 
support a peacetime 355-ship Navy or to be successful in a 
protracted near-peer naval conflict. Of note, the Navy has 
consistently struggled to execute regularly scheduled 
maintenance on time with the size of the fleet it operates 
today. For example, over two-thirds of all aircraft carrier, 
submarine, and surface ship maintenance availabilities were 
completed late in the past 7 years. The Navy has also faced 
challenges in responding to emergent, unplanned ship 
maintenance work due to capability and capacity issues. The 
Navy's Long-Range Plan for the Maintenance and Modernization of 
Naval Vessels for Fiscal Year 2020 states that maintaining a 
355-ship Navy will require a significant increase and upgrade 
of public and private industrial capability and capacity to 
meet the Navy's future ship repair needs.
    Given these issues, and the critical importance ship repair 
plays in sustaining Navy readiness during both peacetime and 
conflict, the committee directs the Comptroller General of the 
United States to submit a report to the congressional defense 
committees that addresses the following:
    (1) to what extent has the Navy identified the resources 
and investments necessary to maintain and modernize a 355-ship 
Navy and ensure sufficient ship repair capabilities and 
capacity during a near-peer conflict;
    (2) to what extent has the Navy identified or assessed 
challenges or risks in the U.S. ship repair industrial base 
and/or overseas Navy capacity as part of its planning to 
maintain a 355-ship Navy and respond to battle-damaged ships 
during a conflict;
    (3) to what extent has the Navy developed plans to mitigate 
or address those challenges to ensure effective and efficient 
ship maintenance of a larger fleet and during conflict with a 
near-peer; and
    (4) any other related matters the Comptroller General 
considers appropriate.
    The Comptroller General shall provide a briefing to the 
House Committee on Armed Services not later than March 1, 2020, 
on preliminary findings of the Comptroller General's review and 
shall present final results in a format and timeframe agreed to 
at the time of the briefing.

                   Conditions Based Maintenance Plus

    The committee is aware the Army, Marine Corps, Navy, and 
Air Force are each conducting, to differing degrees, pilot 
initiatives to assess the benefits of using a conditions based 
maintenance plus (CBM+) maintenance model on weapon systems. 
With CBM+, maintenance personnel can use algorithms that 
analyze data collected from onboard sensors or from historic 
data and maintenance trends to make informed decisions before a 
part fails. The committee believes that a CBM+ maintenance 
system can help reduce maintenance workloads, minimize the 
maintenance downtime of a weapon system, improve the management 
and response of the supply chain, reduce maintenance costs, and 
increase overall military readiness. The committee believes 
CBM+ has potential applications on both legacy weapon systems 
and new acquisition programs. Therefore, the committee directs 
the military service chiefs to each provide a briefing to the 
House Committee on Armed Services not later than November 1, 
2019, on the use of conditions based maintenance systems and 
processes. The briefings should address specific weapon systems 
that are currently utilizing CBM+ approaches, observations on 
the impact CBM+ practices have had on the readiness of these 
weapon systems, plans to expand CBM+ to additional weapon 
systems, and any barriers to the expansion of CBM+.

                  Contracted Aerial Refueling Aircraft

    The committee is aware that the Department of the Navy 
utilizes the contracted air services program to provide 
contractor-owned, contractor-operated aerial refueling in 
support of Navy pilot initial qualification, recurring pilot 
training, operational test and evaluation, and cross-country 
and overwater refueling services. The Commander of U.S. 
Transportation Command testified that the Air Force's aerial 
refueling fleet is ``the most stressed capability in terms of 
sufficiency.'' The committee is also aware that as many as 
30,000 hours of aerial refueling missions are not being 
supported annually. Given the current demands placed on the Air 
Force's aerial refueling fleet, as well as the readiness rates 
associated with those aircraft, the committee believes the 
options to complement the Air Force's current and planned 
organic aerial refueling fleet should be assessed.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of the Air 
Force, in coordination with the Commander of U.S. 
Transportation Command, to provide a report to the House 
Committee on Armed Services not later than March 1, 2020, 
assessing the feasibility, affordability, and advisability of 
expanding the use of contractor-operated aerial refueling 
aircraft to support Air Force receiver requirements. The 
assessment should consider the types of refueling missions that 
would be appropriate for support by a contractor-operated 
aircraft.

                    Corrosion Control and Prevention

    The committee recognizes that corrosion negatively affects 
military equipment and infrastructure, can lead to the reduced 
availability or capability of weapon systems, and creates 
safety hazards for military personnel. According to a study 
conducted for the Department of Defense, the estimated annual 
cost of the impact of corrosion is $20.6 billion on the 
Department of Defense. To help prevent corrosion, the military 
services have invested in the research and development of 
innovative coatings that can be applied to weapon systems to 
increase the durability and operational capability of the 
weapon system while reducing the cost and amount of time 
required to maintain these weapon systems. In addition to 
developing and utilizing innovative coatings, the committee 
believes the military services should ensure that sufficient 
training on the application of such coatings is available for 
military and civilian personnel involved in weapon systems 
sustainment at the installation and depot level. Therefore, the 
committee directs the Assistant Secretary of Defense for 
Sustainment to provide a report to the House Committee on Armed 
Services not later than November 1, 2019 that assesses the 
current capability and capacity of its workforce to perform 
corrosion prevention and control, to include the application of 
preventative coatings. The report should address any identified 
training shortfalls, to include whether there is a need to 
establish a center focused on training and research related to 
the development and application of paint and coatings.

                     Optimized Fleet Response Plan

    The committee notes that the Navy began a multi-year 
process of implementing the Optimized Fleet Response Plan 
(OFRP) in November 2014. The stated goal of OFRP was to 
maximize the availability of Navy ships for operations while 
ensuring adequate time for maintenance and training while 
providing an appropriate and predictable operational tempo for 
Navy personnel. As directed in the committee report 
accompanying the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal 
Year 2016 (H. Rept. 114-102), the Comptroller General reviewed 
matters related to OFRP and, while noting it was too early to 
assess the overall effectiveness, did note that there were 
signs of challenges with implementation and execution of OFRP. 
Since the Comptroller General's report in 2016, the committee 
notes the Navy has experienced delays in the schedule of ship 
maintenance availabilities, implemented a number of changes 
following the release of the Navy's Comprehensive Review of 
Surface Force Incidents and the Navy's Strategic Readiness 
Review, and is responding to the Dynamic Force Employment 
requirements of the 2018 National Defense Strategy. Therefore, 
the committee directs the Comptroller General of the United 
States to conduct an updated assessment of the Navy's Optimized 
Fleet Response Plan (OFRP), to include:
    (1) an analysis of the extent to which the Navy has been 
successful in achieving the goals it established under OFRP in 
terms of maintenance completion and timeliness, training 
certifications, personnel fit/fill rates, operational 
availability, and others;
    (2) the impact that the performance of OFRP on ship 
maintenance and training have had on the carrier air wings 
maintenance, training, and readiness;
    (3) how assumptions about operational availability and 
costs under OFRP are affecting the Navy's force structure 
assessment; and
    (4) any other matter the Comptroller General determines 
appropriate.
    The committee directs the Comptroller General to provide a 
briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services not later 
than March 1, 2020, with the preliminary findings of the 
Comptroller General's review, with the report to follow at a 
date to be determined at the time of the briefing.

          Planning, Programming, and Budgeting for Sustainment

    After several years of civilian and military leaders of the 
Department of Defense raising concerns about the readiness of 
the Armed Forces, the Congress passed a 2-year budget agreement 
that provided additional resources for the Department of 
Defense. Despite the readiness challenges raised, and 
additional resources provided, the committee is concerned that 
the Department failed to sufficiently plan, program, or budget 
for key readiness-enabling accounts that provide for the 
sustainment of weapon systems and equipment. For example, the 
budget request for fiscal year 2020 provides for only 82 
percent of the Marine Corps ground depot requirement, 92 
percent of the Navy ship depot maintenance requirement, and 90 
percent of the Air Force weapon systems sustainment 
requirement. The committee is concerned that the military 
departments frequently state the accounts are funded to their 
``maximum executable rate'' without being able to provide 
supporting analysis or describe what actions need to be taken 
to increase the execution rates. While the committee recognizes 
the need to invest in modernization and new weapon systems in 
support of long-term readiness, such investments must be 
appropriately balanced with the sustainment accounts that 
maintain and improve the materiel condition of today's weapon 
systems and equipment. Without sufficient investment in the 
sustainment accounts, the near-term readiness of the Department 
will continue to be challenged.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretaries of the 
military departments to each provide a report to the House 
Committee on Armed Services not later than February 1, 2020, 
that provides a detailed plan for the planning, programming, 
budgeting, and execution of funding that support the 
sustainment of weapon systems and equipment. The reports should 
describe how the military departments calculate their 
sustainment requirements, how the maximum executable 
sustainment funding level is calculated, barriers to increasing 
sustainment execution, and actions being taken to improve the 
planning, programming, budgeting, and execution of accounts 
that support the sustainment of weapon systems and equipment.

    Report on the National Guard's Equipment Reimbursement Policies

    In accordance with National Guard Regulations, State 
Adjutant General have the authority to use federal equipment 
during State Active Duty (SAD) missions, and the United States 
Property and Fiscal Officers have the responsibility to seek 
reimbursement for the use of that equipment. Comptrollers who 
have received these reimbursements from the states had been 
depositing them in three different ways: to current fiscal year 
operation and maintenance accounts of the National Guard, to 
the operation and maintenance accounts of the National Guard 
for the fiscal year during which the SAD mission took place, 
and to the General Fund of the U.S. Treasury. The committee is 
aware of a recent legal interpretation and updated policy 
guidance that requires all reimbursements to be deposited in 
the General Fund of the U.S. Treasury. The committee is 
concerned that this new policy may adversely impact maintenance 
and sustainment of equipment used for SAD missions.
    The committee understands that the Chief of the National 
Guard Bureau has been working with the State Adjutant Generals 
to identify potential legislative changes that may be necessary 
to allow reimbursements to be retained and utilized by the 
National Guard. Therefore, the committee directs the Chief of 
the National Guard Bureau to provide a report to the House 
Committee on Armed Services, not later than March 1, 2020. At 
minimum, the report should provide details on the amount of 
reimbursements for SAD missions deposited to the U.S. Treasury 
in fiscal year 2019 and, if required, a legislative proposal 
that would ensure reimbursed funds could be utilized for the 
maintenance and sustainment of equipment utilized in SAD 
missions.

                            Readiness Issues


          Allocation of Excess Property for Wildfire Fighting

    The Committee is supportive of Department of Defense 
programs that transfer surplus and excess military equipment to 
federal, state, and local agencies with responsibilities for 
combating wildfires and emergency services. As the threat of 
wildfires increases, the Firefighter Property Program (FFP) and 
the Federal Excess Personal Property Program (FEPP) provide 
first responders with critical firefighting and emergency 
service resources.
    Wildfire risks are not evenly distributed, and the 
Committee is supportive of ensuring that communities with the 
greatest need and threat of wildfire have equitable access to 
Department of Defense surplus property.
    Therefore, the Committee directs the Secretary of Defense, 
acting through the Director of the Defense Logistics Agency, in 
coordination with the Secretary of Agriculture, acting through 
the Chief of the United States Forest Service, to develop an 
assessment of FFP and FEPP implementation, training, best 
practices, and equipment distribution taking into account need 
and risk. Further, the Secretary of Defense acting through the 
Director of the Defense Logistics Agency, shall provide a 
report on its findings and any recommendations to more 
efficiently increase firefighting and emergency service 
capabilities to the Committees on Armed Services and 
Agriculture of the U.S. House of Representatives, no later than 
180 days after the date of enactment of this Act.

                          Army Urban Training

    The committee remains concerned that the Department of 
Defense is not prepared to operate in complex, densely 
populated urban cities which are the likely terrain of future 
major conflict. The committee supports the Department's ongoing 
efforts, but questions whether the Army has prioritized this 
challenge. Specifically, the committee believes the Army should 
establish two entities to address this gap. First, the Army 
should establish an Army urban warfare center dedicated to the 
study and research of urbanization, mega-cities, urban warfare, 
and military operations in dense urban environments.
    Second, the Army should construct an urban warfare training 
center that focuses on advanced skills to fight, survive, and 
win in urban operating environments at the brigade level and 
higher. This training facility would address the challenges 
associated with vertical, subterranean, and dense urban 
terrain, and the inclusion and integration of joint and 
interagency enablers.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of the Army 
to provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services 
not later than December 1, 2019, on the Army's plan to prepare 
and train for high-intensity conflicts in dense urban warfare. 
The briefing should include:
    (1) how the Army plans and prepares doctrine for urban 
warfare, including any plans to establish an urban warfare 
center;
    (2) an updated overview of a plan and timeline to construct 
an urban warfare training center for dense urban warfare at the 
brigade level and higher; and
    (3) an identification of costs associated with the 
construction of an urban warfare training center.

  Assessment of Air Combat Maneuvering Instrumentation and Collision 
                           Awareness Systems

    The committee understands that despite numerous safety 
procedures designed for safe, effective training--such as 
assignment of different block altitudes, low altitude training 
rules, and dive recovery rules--the majority of midair 
collisions and terrain crashes involving combat aircraft occur 
during training exercises, not combat operations. These mishaps 
have repeatedly and tragically resulted in losses of life and 
aircraft. To mitigate the current risk for midair collision and 
controlled flight into terrain during air combat training, the 
committee encourages the Air Force, Navy, and Marine Corps 
officials to consider a collision awareness system that can 
leverage existing infrastructure and systems that would allow 
range training officers and pilots to receive notifications in 
the event a potential midair or terrain crash is assessed.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretaries of the Air 
Force and Navy, not later than November 29, 2019, to provide to 
the congressional defense committees a report of the 
utilization of air combat maneuvering instrumentation systems 
for these purposes. This report shall include detailed analyses 
on the costs, benefits, and feasibility of building out this 
capability on air combat maneuver instrumentation equipment on 
all combat aircraft as the basis for a collision awareness 
system at all relevant training ranges.

     Cold Weather Organizational Clothing and Individual Equipment

    The committee commends the Army for taking necessary steps 
to improve and modernize cold weather organizational clothing 
and individual equipment (OCIE) such as glove systems and 
handwear to provide soldiers with a distinct combat advantage. 
The committee is concerned that current procurement timelines 
are too lengthy and will prevent cold weather units from 
receiving the most effective cold weather items in a timely 
manner. Such delay could negatively impact both the readiness 
and lethality of the Army's cold weather combat units. 
Therefore, the committee encourages the Secretary of the Army 
to review these acquisition timelines and take steps to make 
cold weather OCIE items, including handwear, available to all 
eligible soldiers as soon as possible through the programs of 
record. Further, the committee supports efforts by the services 
to support a strong domestic industrial base to ensure that 
innovative and cost-effective cold weather OCIE items are 
available now and in the future.

Comptroller General Assessment of Surface Fleet Manning, Workload, and 
                                Training

    The committee notes the Navy has taken steps to improve 
shipboard manning and decrease sailor fatigue and workload 
after the loss of life from ship collisions in 2017. The Navy 
has reevaluated shipboard and in-port workload, updated surface 
fleet manpower requirements, established minimum thresholds for 
filling billets with sailors (``fill'') possessing the 
appropriate skills (``fit''), and directed the implementation 
of watchbills and shipboard routines to combat fatigue. 
However, the committee is concerned that manning difficulties 
and cultural resistance may hinder full implementation of these 
initiatives. While the Navy is attempting to improve manning 
and fatigue management, it is simultaneously implementing the 
Ready Relevant Learning (RRL) initiative, meant to provide 
sailors with more timely and targeted training. The committee 
remains concerned about RRL's implementation across the fleet 
and its efficacy in preparing sailors to execute their 
workload, especially as the Navy grows the size of the surface 
fleet.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Comptroller General of 
the United States to submit a report to the House Committee on 
Armed Services not later than December 1, 2020, and to provide 
a briefing on preliminary findings not later than April 1, 
2020, addressing the following:
    (1) to what extent is the Navy meeting manning fit and fill 
goals for sea duty;
    (2) actions the Navy is taking to mitigate any manning fit 
and fill shortfalls and when shortfalls are projected to be 
addressed;
    (3) how manning guidance and implementation in the surface 
community differs from that of the aviation and submarine 
communities and from Federal guidelines for other professions;
    (4) whether the Navy is positioned for a significant 
manpower increase based on an increase to a 355-ship Navy and 
to what extent the Navy's training pipelines are being 
resourced to accommodate the increased demand;
    (5) to what extent circadian rhythm watchbills and 
shipboard routines have been implemented in the surface fleet, 
factors that impede full implementation, and actions the Navy 
has taken to mitigate these factors;
    (6) the measures of effectiveness for RRL training and the 
effect the RRL approach has on fleet readiness; and
    (7) how RRL is affecting the qualifications of sailors when 
they arrive at their first duty assignment as part of the 
Forward Deployed Naval Forces, and how ship manning affects the 
successful implementation of this training approach.

           Comptroller General Report on Army Rail Capability

    The committee notes that in 2012, the Army proposed a force 
design update that would provide the rail capabilities required 
for the contemporary operational environment. This force design 
was approved by the Army Training and Doctrine Command's Army 
Capabilities Integration Center and thereby created the Army 
Reserve Expeditionary Railway Center.
    The committee notes that the Expeditionary Railway Center's 
mission is to provide rail network capability and 
infrastructure assessments; perform rail mode feasibility 
studies; provide advice on the employment of rail capabilities; 
perform and track railway rolling stock capability assessments; 
and perform and assist with rail planning in support of 
military strategic and operational requirements.
    In order to determine whether these actions have resulted 
in an improvement to the Department of Defense's rail 
capabilities, the committee directs the Comptroller General of 
the United States to submit a report to the Committees on Armed 
Services of the Senate and the House of Representatives by 
December 1, 2020, explaining to what extent the Army, through 
the Expeditionary Railway Center, has assessed current rail 
capabilities and addressed any identified gaps; if the Army's 
2012 force design update and the Expeditionary Railway Center 
have been successful in meeting combatant command requirements; 
and how existing mechanisms inform Army and Department decision 
makers about the ability of the Department's rail system to 
meet combatant command needs.
    The committee further directs the Comptroller General to 
provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services by 
March 1, 2020, on the Comptroller General's preliminary 
findings.

  Comptroller General Report on Navy Collective Training for High-End 
                            Combat Missions

    The committee notes that the 2018 National Defense Strategy 
stated that, in order to prepare for long-term strategic 
competition, the U.S. military must train to ``high-end combat 
missions'' alongside allies in bilateral and multinational 
exercises. However, as the Government Accountability Office 
testified in 2018, the Navy has focused recent efforts on 
training up to existing standards and certifications in order 
to rebuild readiness. Meanwhile, foreign militaries have been 
improving the scope, complexity, and realism of their training. 
As a result, the committee recognizes that U.S. Navy training 
and exercises need sufficient realism in order to match our 
near-peer competitors and provide the readiness and 
capabilities needed to succeed in a high-end fight. 
Accordingly, the committee directs the Comptroller General of 
the United States to conduct a study addressing:
    (1) the extent to which the Navy's training standards have 
been updated or changed to portray realistic scenarios, as 
based on current intelligence;
    (2) the extent to which Navy training and exercises 
incorporate current and future threats, including cyber 
attacks, electronic warfare, new acoustic sensors, and unmanned 
underwater vehicles;
    (3) the extent to which current warfare certifications and 
training readiness data provide an accurate portrayal of the 
Navy's readiness to perform in high-end combat missions; and
    (4) any other related matters the Comptroller General 
considers appropriate.
    The committee further directs the Comptroller General to 
provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services not 
later than March 1, 2020, on preliminary findings of the 
Comptroller General's review, with the report to follow at a 
date to be determined at the time of the briefing.

Comptroller General's Report on the Army's Use of Global Combat Support 
                                 System

    The committee notes that logistics is a key combat support 
area and a critical enabler underpinning U.S. military power. 
The Army manages tactical logistics with the Global Combat 
Support System-Army (GCSS-Army), which replaces several 
separate legacy information systems used to manage logistics 
support activities at the Army tactical unit level. Once fully 
fielded, GCSS-Army will manage billions of dollars in assets on 
an annual basis and will have more than 150,000 users. In April 
2015, the Government Accountability Office reviewed the early 
implementation of GCSS-Army at selected units and found that it 
was generally meeting their logistics requirements. At that 
time, however, very few tactical units had the full system 
capability and the units were not deployed when using the 
system. The Army was expecting to fully field GCSS-Army to its 
tactical units by September 2017, but this did not occur.
    Given this limited field experience to date, the committee 
directs the Comptroller General of the United States to submit 
a report to the House Committee on Armed Services by June 1, 
2020, explaining the following:
    (1) how tactical units manage and track logistics support 
activities using GCSS-Army when deployed in a military 
operation,
    (2) to what extent the Army has tested and evaluated the 
use of GCSS-Army for logistics support during military 
operations, and
    (3) to what extent is GCSS-Army able to provide geographic 
combatant commanders and other military leaders a common 
operating picture of logistics support during military 
operations.
    The committee further directs the Comptroller General to 
provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services by 
March 1, 2020, on the Comptroller General's preliminary 
findings.

               Corrosion Mitigation for Tactical Aircraft

    While the U.S. military updated aircraft cleaning and 
corrosion control requirements to mitigate corrosion and 
maintain aircraft readiness, the committee understands that the 
U.S. Army may not be currently performing recommended rinsing 
procedures at certain locations due to lack of appropriate 
equipment at those locations. The committee also notes that 
lack of rinse equipment can present greater challenges in 
austere environments where sand, dirt, and salt can cause 
significant damage to aircraft and components and where the 
lack of infrastructure and water resources also poses 
challenges. Noting the significant costs associated with 
airframe corrosion, the committee believes the use of 
commercial, off-the-shelf (COTS) tactical rise systems may 
provide a quick return on investment.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of the Army 
to provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services 
no later than September 27, 2019, on the potential for wider 
fielding of COTS tactical rinse systems for taxi-through fixed 
and rotary wing aircraft. This briefing shall include a 
detailed description of evaluations of such rinse systems to 
date, a list of locations that currently lack such rinse 
systems, whether there is a plan for using fielding additional 
capabilities to address corrosion prevention and control for 
taxi-through aircraft, and the potential for a program of 
record for this capability.

      Department of Defense Fire and Emergency Services Reductions

    The committee commends the Office of the Assistant 
Secretary of Defense for Sustainment for its efforts to achieve 
cost savings and provide military installations with the 
necessary services in the event of an emergency. However, the 
committee is concerned that the planned reductions in fire and 
emergency services go too far in its reduction of appropriate 
response personnel. As the reductions in services proceed, the 
committee encourages the Office of the Assistant Secretary of 
Defense for Sustainment to ensure that there is an appropriate 
number of fire and emergency personnel to provide adequate 
response protection at military installations. Therefore, the 
committee directs the Secretary of Defense to submit a report 
to the House Committee on Armed Services by December 1, 2019 on 
the effects of currently planned reductions to fire and 
emergency services as it pertains to providing adequate fire 
and emergency response protection at military installations.

                      Hearing Protection Measures

    The committee notes that despite the widespread 
availability of ear protection equipment across the Department 
of Defense, service members continue to experience hearing loss 
attributed to their military service. The committee believes 
that the Department of Defense should adopt a more innovative 
approach to prevent hearing loss.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of Defense 
to submit a report to the House Committee on Armed Services by 
January 1, 2020, on current hearing protection measures in use 
during combat and training and the effectiveness of these 
devices for a range of combat, combat support, and 
administrative specialties. The report should also compare 
hearing for service members upon entry into the military 
services to the end of the first term of service and compare 
discharged members receiving service-connected benefits for 
hearing loss. This report should also include recommendations 
for innovative safe technologies that could be used to deter 
hearing loss or improve hearing through training and combat.

                Live, Virtual, and Constructive Training

    The committee continues to recognize the important role 
that Live, Virtual, and Constructive (LVC) and game-based (LVC-
G) systems can play to improve military capabilities and 
readiness for missions in contested environments. While the 
Army, Marine Corps, Navy, and Air Force each have various 
programs and initiatives to leverage LVC and LVC-G systems, the 
committee is concerned the services lack clear investment 
strategies or plans to scale the use of LVC and LVC-G systems 
to improve and sustain military readiness. Therefore, the 
committee directs the Secretaries of the military departments 
to provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services 
not later than November 1, 2019, on the military services' 
investment strategies and plans to scale the use of LVC and 
LVC-G systems. In addition, the briefing should address efforts 
to use LVC and LVC-G systems to enhance joint and multinational 
training and readiness and how LVC and LVC-G training will be 
assessed within the Defense Readiness Reporting System.

 Minimal-Notice Examinations of Naval Vessels and Associated Manpower 
                              Requirements

    The committee notes that naval vessel examinations are 
critical for assessing the material readiness of the U.S. Navy 
fleet. In order to provide a more accurate representation of 
the material condition of each vessel without the benefit of 
dedicated inspection preparation, section 322 of the John S. 
McCain National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2019 
(Public Law 115-232) required that examinations of naval 
vessels be conducted on a minimal-notice basis. The committee 
is aware that the Navy is undertaking a phased implementation 
of this requirement that aims to achieve 100 percent minimal 
notice by late 2019. The committee therefore directs the 
President of the Navy's Board of Inspection and Survey to 
provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services by 
March 1, 2020, on the results and lessons learned from its 
implementation of minimal-notice examinations. In addition, the 
committee is aware of a potential shortfall in the number of 
inspectors available to meet the Navy's new examination 
requirements and directs the President of the Board of 
Inspection and Survey to provide a briefing to the House 
Committee on Armed Services by March 1, 2020, on the results of 
its upcoming Shore Manpower Requirements Determination.

                  Mission Capability Rating Assessment

    On September 17, 2018, the Secretary of Defense issued a 
memorandum to the Secretaries of the military departments 
directing they achieve a minimum of 80 percent mission 
capability rates and reduce operating and sustainment costs for 
F-35, F-22, F-16, and F-18 aircraft by the end of fiscal year 
2019. In addition, the memorandum directed the military 
departments to ``set and pursue aggressive targets for other 
enduring fixed- and rotary-wing aviation assets.'' The 
committee supports the military departments' efforts to improve 
the mission capability rates of aviation assets and reduce the 
operating and sustainment costs of such assets. The committee 
seeks to understand the lessons learned from this initiative 
and how the improved readiness levels can be sustained and 
applied to other components of the Armed Forces.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretaries of the 
military departments to each provide a briefing to the House 
Committee on Armed Services, not later than November 1, 2019, 
on the results of their efforts to meet the directive outlined 
in the September 2018 memorandum. The briefing should address 
specific actions taken to meet the 80 percent mission 
capability objective for each of the aircraft identified, the 
framework for sustaining an appropriate mission capability 
rating for each of the aircraft going forward, and plans to 
expand the mission capability initiative to other weapons 
systems that operate in the air, land, and sea domains.

                    Navy Readiness Assessment Teams

    The committee is aware that the Navy leverages Engineering 
Readiness Assessment Teams (ERATs) and Combat Systems Readiness 
Assessment Teams (CSRATs) to provide periodic material 
condition assessments and training assistance to the Navy's 
surface forces in the Atlantic and Pacific Fleets. Conducting 
approximately 150 ship visits per year, ERATs help improve 
technical knowledge, operational understanding, and operational 
performance of the crews aboard Navy surface ships. The Navy 
has identified ERATs as an integral component of the Optimized 
Fleet Response Plan training cycle and the committee believes 
ERATs help enhance unit readiness.
    The committee is concerned about differences in the 
contracting process for the ERAT and CSRAT programs. Of 
particular concern is the lack of a uniform, standard, and 
consistent funding source and the lack of an integrated program 
management construct to unify the ERAT and CSRAT requirements, 
management, and execution across both the Atlantic and Pacific 
Fleets. This, coupled with the use of a non-Navy contract 
vehicle, has further contributed to decline in execution of 
both ERAT and CSRAT requirements. The committee believes the 
Navy should seek ways to improve the coordination, 
administration, and execution of these programs.
    The committee is aware that Navy Surface Forces Atlantic is 
in the process of adjusting its acquisition strategy for the 
delivery of ERAT services. As these adjustments are made, the 
committee will continue to closely monitor these changes, as 
well as the management and funding of the ERAT and CSRAT 
programs, to ensure the ERAT and CSRAT programs continue to 
efficiently and effectively support the readiness of the Navy's 
surface ships.

                    Northern Strike Exercise Funding

    The committee notes that the Northern Strike exercise is 
one of the largest Reserve Component exercises supported by the 
Department of Defense. This annual event develops full-spectrum 
combat readiness of National Guard, Active Component, and 
coalition partner units through realistic, joint live-fire 
training with an emphasis on joint and coalition force 
cooperation. The committee recognizes that the Northern Strike 
exercise has over 5,000 participants from all military services 
and military units from the United Kingdom, Germany, Poland, 
Hungary, Estonia, Lithuania, and Latvia. However, the committee 
is concerned that the Department of Defense has inconsistently 
programmed funding for this annual event. Accordingly, the 
committee directs the Chief, National Guard Bureau to submit a 
report to the Committees on Armed Services of the Senate and 
the House of Representatives by December 1, 2019, that provides 
the following:
    (1) the annual cost of the Northern Strike exercise broken 
out by account over the last 5 years;
    (2) the number and countries of foreign partner 
participants over the last 5 years;
    (3) the number of military personnel by service and 
component over 5 years broken out by service; and
    (4) the anticipated funding for future exercises in the 
Future Years Defense Program.

                Report on Security Clearance Processing

    The Committee is concerned with the persistent backlog of 
security clearance applications and the impact that has on our 
national security apparatus' ability to effectively recruit and 
retain high-quality professionals. In 2018, the Government 
Accountability Office added the government-wide personnel 
security clearance process to their High-Risk List, which 
identifies federal areas in need of urgent reforms to address 
significant challenges. Pursuant to Executive Order 13869, the 
responsibility for background investigations functions has been 
transferred to the DoD, which combines the Defense Security 
Service, the Consolidated Adjudication Facility, the National 
Background Investigative Bureau, and several other components 
under the newly renamed Defense Counterintelligence and 
Security Agency. Consistent with this transfer of authority, 
the committee directs the Secretary of Defense to submit a 
report to the congressional defense committees not later than 
180 days after the enactment of this Act detailing the scope of 
both the investigative and adjudicative backlog, how cases are 
disposed of (whether adjudicated or otherwise disposed of some 
other way), current staffing levels at DSCA, and what reforms 
are being put in place to reduce these backlogs while ensuring 
a high-quality security clearance process.

 Use of Funds Provided for the Defense Community Infrastructure Program

    The committee believes the Defense Community Infrastructure 
Pilot Program (DCIP) authorized by section 2861 of the John S. 
McCain National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2019 
(Public Law 115-232) can be a powerful tool for the long-term 
sustainment and resiliency of defense installations. However, 
the committee is concerned that the Department of Defense has 
yet to issue a policy, guidance, or other documents regarding 
the use of this new authority.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Under Secretary of 
Defense for Acquisition and Sustainment, in coordination with 
the Director of the Office of Economic Adjustment, to provide a 
report to the House Committee on Armed Services not later than 
February 1, 2020, on the Department's implementation of DCIP. 
The report should address how the DCIP program will be 
structured, policy guidance that has been issued for the 
management of the program, how projects will compete and be 
selected for funding, a description of projects that have been 
selected, and a timeline for the award and completion of such 
projects.

      Utilization of Recycled Products in Military Clothing Items

    The committee commends the Department of Defense on its 
most recent update to its internal instruction on the 
implementation of a sustainable procurement program for 
recycled content products. In line with the Department's 
internal instruction, and in the committee report accompanying 
the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2012 (S. 
Rept. 112-26), the Secretary of Defense was required to submit 
a report to the Committees on Armed Services of the Senate and 
the House of Representatives on the utilization of recycled 
products in military clothing items. That report cited four 
military clothing items made from recycled materials at the 
time, including the Protective Combat Uniform for the Special 
Forces, the Third Generation Extended Cold Weather Clothing 
System, Underwear, and the Army Fleece Jacket. Given the amount 
of clothing items in the Department of Defense and prevalence 
of recycled content products, the committee directs the 
Secretary of Defense to submit a report to the House Committee 
on Armed Services by March 1, 2020, on the feasibility of 
incorporating additional recycled content products into these 
clothing items and other environmental protection clothing 
items currently being utilized by service members.

            Value of Energy and Logistics Informed Exercises

    The committee notes that logistics play a critical role in 
the success of military operations. Unfortunately, logistics, 
specifically fuel and energy resource availability, are 
routinely ``assumed out'' of military exercises, diminishing 
the value of those opportunities to identify critical gaps in 
our logistics plan. Additionally, the Department of Defense can 
do more to protect logistics information from adversaries. 
Therefore the committee encourages the Department of Defense to 
conduct realistic war games and exercises that accurately 
reflect the potential threats and limitations of the joint 
logistics enterprise and encourages continued investment in its 
logistics enterprise as an enabler of power projection and 
sustainment operations against strategic competitors.

        Women, Peace and Security Strategy in Military Training

    The committee recognizes that the Women, Peace and Security 
Strategy Act of 2017 (Public Law 115-68) required that relevant 
personnel receive training, as appropriate, in conflict 
prevention, peace processes, mitigation, resolution, and 
security initiatives that specifically addresses the importance 
of meaningful participation by women, gender considerations and 
meaningful participation by women, and effective strategies and 
best practices for ensuring meaningful participation by women. 
Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of Defense to 
provide a report to the House Committee on Armed Services, not 
later than March 1, 2020, on how the Department is complying 
with the requirements of Public Law 115-68 and how the required 
training is incorporated into pre-deployment training for units 
and military personnel deploying overseas.

                             Other Matters


                       Aircraft Noise Mitigation

    The committee is concerned that decisions made by the 
military departments with respect to basing and operating 
military aircraft may have adverse noise impacts on the private 
property and municipal properties such as schools that are 
located in close proximity to military installations and 
auxiliary military airfields at which tactical aircraft are 
based and train. The committee is concerned that, while these 
impacts are considered during required environmental reviews 
and consultations, the military departments may not be taking 
sufficient action to mitigate the impacts identified during 
these reviews and consultations.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of Defense 
to provide a report to the House Committee on Armed Services 
not later than March 1, 2020, on the available programs and 
authorities to mitigate the effects of military aircraft noise 
on private residences, schools, and hospitals. The report 
should address specific programs and authorities that are 
available for such mitigations, the process used to provide for 
such mitigations, a list of military installations where such 
mitigations have been made to private residences or other 
entities outside the installation within the last 5 years, and 
a list of military installations where there are currently 
private residences or other entities being considered for such 
mitigations in the future.

                       Alternatives to Burn Pits

    The Committee notes the Department's efforts to phase out 
the use of open burn pits for disposal of waste in contingency 
locations, unless there is no feasible alternative, and the May 
31, 2019 report to Congress that indicated that ``no technology 
or equipment solution has been devised that could eliminate all 
waste burning requirements for every contingency location.'' 
The Committee encourages the Department to accelerate RDT&E for 
technology or equipment solutions to eliminate the need for 
open burn pits and to establish a safe, cost-effective, long 
term solution for toxic waste disposal that can be used in any 
contingency environment. The Committee directs the 
Undersecretary of Defense for Acquisition and Sustainment to 
provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services by 
February 1, 2020, on the Department's assessment of available 
alternatives to open burn pits, including any commercially 
available solutions, RDT&E efforts to develop a feasible 
alternative for use in contingency environments, any resource 
constraints for acquisition of a technology or equipment 
solution to eliminate the need for open burn pits, and a plan 
of action and timeline for the projected transition to a new 
technology or equipment solution.

                   Aqueous Film Forming Foam Training

    The committee notes that while there has been significant 
policy guidance issued from headquarters related to 
perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) and perfluorooctanoic acid 
(PFOA), it is unclear whether there is adequate training of 
individuals who are in regular contact with aqueous film 
forming foam (AFFF) about the potential dangers associated with 
PFOS and PFOA. The committee encourages the military services 
to ensure that service members are aware of the potential 
hazards related to AFFF and are aware of best practices for its 
use, maintenance, and disposal.

     Authorities Available to the Department of Defense for Tribal 
                               Mitigation

    The committee notes that there are many situations in which 
military training or construction activities impact tribal 
lands, cultural properties, or tribal treaty rights. The 
committee further observes that consultation between the 
service action proponent and the impacted tribe is required by 
law. While consultation on these impacts often occurs in 
parallel to environmental planning under the National 
Environmental Policy Act (Public Law 91-190), impacts to tribes 
and the potential mitigation of those impacts goes beyond the 
scope of environmental mitigation. The committee notes that 
environmental authorities and funding mechanisms such as the 
Sikes Act (Public Law 86-797) are one tool for addressing these 
impacts, but should not limit the Department of Defense from 
using other authorities or mechanism to mitigate impacts.
    The committee directs the Secretary of Defense to submit a 
report to the House Committee on Armed Services by January 31, 
2020, on the authorities available to the Department and 
military services to address tribal mitigation and funding 
mechanisms for those mitigations. The report shall include 
analysis on whether the existence of a treaty with the United 
States changes the authorities available, and if so describe 
the differences.

Best Practices for Cleanup and Disposal of PFOS- and PFOA-Contaminated 
  Groundwater, Soils, and Filters and Gaps That Require Further Study

    The committee notes that the class of man-made chemicals 
known as per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances have presented 
particular challenges with respect to cleanup and disposal. The 
committee further notes that as the Department of Defense 
transitions from cutting off exposure to perfluorooctanoic acid 
(PFOA) and perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) to cleanup actions 
under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, 
and Liability Act, the Department must conduct these actions in 
a manner that is effective in protecting human health and the 
environment.
    The committee understands that further research and study 
are required to develop disposal methodologies beyond high-heat 
incineration, which is the only known way to dispose of PFOS- 
and PFOA-contaminated materials. The committee notes that this 
method of disposal presents concerns about whether the 
chemicals are adequately broken down and about the production 
of hydrogen fluorine gas as a by-product of that incineration.
    Accordingly, the committee directs the Under Secretary of 
Defense for Acquisition and Sustainment to provide a briefing 
to the House Committee on Armed Services by November 1, 2019, 
on the Department's understanding of best practices for the 
cleanup and disposal of PFOS- and PFOA-contaminated soils, and 
disposal of spent filters and Aqueous Film Forming Foam. The 
briefing should include a discussion of current research on 
these chemicals being conducted by the Strategic Environmental 
Research and Development Program or Environmental Security 
Technology Certification Program and what areas require 
additional research.

        Chase Aircraft at NASA Armstrong Flight Research Center

    The Committee is increasingly concerned about the 
availability of chase aircraft at NASA Armstrong Flight 
Research Center, which provides total flight safety during 
developmental and operational tests of various experimental 
aircraft, to include the new generation of highly maneuverable 
Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV). As a regular provider of direct 
support to Air Force and Navy test missions, the Committee 
believes the Center is critical to helping the U.S. military 
maintain its technological superiority. The Committee 
understands the Navy is unable to provide F/A-18F models to the 
Center due to fleet requirements, but remains concerned that 
without replacement chase planes, the Center will lose all 
capability to support the high transonic and supersonic 
research required by the majority of current and projected 
Department of Defense projects dedicated to maintaining 
national security. Accordingly, the Committee directs the 
Secretary of the Navy to submit a report to the House Committee 
on Armed Services, not later than 90 days after enactment of 
this Act, on the feasibility of transferring two low-time 
serviceable F/A-18, either D, E, or F models, to the NASA 
Armstrong Flight Research Center that do not jeopardize the 
operational needs of the Navy, nor are reaching the end of 
their useful life based on logistics supportability criteria 
and flying hours. The report should include:
    (1) The feasibility of transferring two F/A-18 aircraft to 
NASA;
    (2) The proposed timeline for delivery;
    (3) The minimum number of remaining flight :hours of each 
aircraft to be transferred and their sustainability 
requirements; and,
    (4) The radar capabilities, centerline and wing station 
stores management system, and advanced targeting forward 
looking infrared equipment of such aircraft.

               Climate Impacts on Installation Resiliency

    The committee notes that section 335 of the National 
Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2018 (Public Law 115-
91) required the Department of Defense to report on the impacts 
of climate change to the Department. The committee notes that 
this report was spurred by multiple statements by senior 
Department of Defense officials characterizing climate as a 
national security issue that would increase instability around 
the world. The committee further notes that the report was 
focused on facilitating effective preparation and planning to 
enhance military installation climate resiliency. To that end, 
the Department was required to submit a report that included 
the following:
    (1) a list of the 10 most vulnerable military installations 
within each service based on the effects of sea-level rise, 
flooding, drought, desertification, wildfires, and thawing 
permafrost;
    (2) an overview of the mitigations that may be necessary to 
increase installation resiliency; and
    (3) an estimate of the cost of these mitigations.
    The committee notes that in January 2019, the Department 
submitted the report. While the committee commends the 
Department for unequivocally stating that the majority of its 
installations assessed in the report are vulnerable to climate 
and weather impacts, the committee is disappointed that the 
Department failed to adequately respond to the three 
requirements above. The deficiencies of this report are 
particularly acute in light of the extreme weather events that 
caused billions of dollars in damage to military installations 
in 2018. The committee notes that data suggests that new and 
renovated buildings that included extreme weather mitigation 
measures generally fared better during Hurricanes Florence and 
Michael, providing an unfortunate real-world illustration of 
the benefits of planning for military installation climate 
resiliency. These events have also provided data from which 
services can extrapolate an estimated cost for mitigation and 
create more accurate methodologies for setting facility 
standards.
    To that end, the committee directs the Secretaries of the 
military departments each to provide a report to the House 
Committee on Armed Services by December 1, 2020, that shall 
include the following:
    (1) the total plant replacement value of each installation 
in the service's inventory;
    (2) the plant replacement value of buildings in the 100-
year floodplain that have not been mitigated to address flood 
risk, by installation and State;
    (3) the plant replacement value of buildings with roofs 
that do not meet current building codes listed by installation 
and State;
    (4) the plant replacement value of buildings in coastal and 
hurricane-prone areas that are currently in a poor or failing 
condition, listed by installation and State;
    (5) a description of how the extreme weather events of 2018 
have impacted the decision to continue to defer facility 
sustainment projects;
    (6) if the service's methodology has changed, a description 
of how it has changed; and
    (7) any additional investment as a percentage of plant 
replacement value that would be required to adequately address 
climate resiliency. If the Department has failed to meet the 
industry standard for investment in facilities of 2 percent of 
plant replacement value, the calculation shall include both the 
investment to achieve the industry standard, and any additional 
that would be required to address climate resiliency.

                   Defense Personal Property Program

    The committee is aware that many military families have 
experienced poor service in the movement of their household 
goods during recent moving seasons. The movement of military 
families is a complex system, administered by U.S. 
Transportation Command (TRANSCOM) in coordination with the 
military services. The committee believes the Department of 
Defense's management of this system must improve and recognizes 
that TRANSCOM's proposed solution relies on the pending Global 
Household Goods Contract (GHC). Given the importance of the GHC 
and the large share of military moves in the domestic market, 
the committee believes that stakeholders must have adequate 
time to thoughtfully review and comment on the draft request 
for proposals (RFP). Accordingly, the committee encourages the 
commander of TRANSCOM to extend the comment period for the 
draft GHC RFP to allow at least 60 days for comments and delay 
the release of the final RFP until August 15, 2019. Finally, 
the committee directs the Secretaries of the military 
departments to provide a report to the House Committee on Armed 
Services by December 1, 2019, on the Secretaries' plans to 
improve installation-level relocation services to military 
families.

  Feasibility of Using Non-Fluorinated Fire Fighting Foam in Training

    The committee is aware of the adverse health impacts 
related to perfluorooctane sulfonate and perfluorooctanoic acid 
and believes the Department of Defense should minimize the use 
of these chemicals wherever possible. While the committee 
understands that certain emergency situations may still require 
use of these foams, the committee is concerned about the 
continued use of fluorinated firefighting foams for non-
emergency purposes such as training. The committee directs the 
Secretary of Defense to provide a report to the House Committee 
on Armed Services by February 1, 2020, on the feasibility of 
using non-fluorinated foam for firefighter training. The report 
shall include cost estimates related to instituting the use of 
fluorine-free foams for training.

  Health Impact to Service Members from Live-Fire Small Arms Training 
                                 Ranges

    The committee remains concerned that short- and long-term 
health impacts to service members are not adequately assessed 
when the Department of Defense considers technologies that 
would mitigate operational safety, environmental, and health 
concerns on live-fire small arms training ranges. These hazards 
include bullet ricochets, toxins from bullets and projectiles 
leeching into the natural water system, and hearing loss from 
excessive noise.
    The committee remains concerned that the Department of 
Defense focuses too heavily on initial investment costs, which 
fails to recognize the long-term health impact to service 
members. The committee urges the Secretary of Defense and the 
Secretaries of the military departments to consider the 
totality of human, environmental, and equipment costs when 
assessing the best technologies available to mitigate 
environmental impacts and health impacts generated at live-fire 
small arms training ranges.

                   Information Processing Efficiency

    The committee observes that the Department of Defense is 
inconsistent in application of modern web-based tools and urges 
all departmental organizations to migrate to more user-friendly 
systems. For that reason, the committee supports the Defense 
Logistics Agency (DLA) efforts to modernize its internal and 
external digital services. The committee believes the 
modernization effort with regard to forms and workflow will 
enable the DLA to improve its service and internal workflows. 
Therefore, the committee encourages the Department of Defense 
to expand this program, focusing on those requirements that 
have the most significant impact on mission enhancement and 
that most effectively modernize Department of Defense services. 
This effort should include modernizing forms, an overlooked 
ubiquitous inefficiency in information processing.

             Kirtland Air Force Base Fuel Spill Remediation

    The committee is aware of the efforts of the Air Force to 
clean up the extensive, years-long fuel spill at Kirtland Air 
Force Base, New Mexico, but the committee is concerned that the 
Air Force has not adequately engaged with local stakeholders on 
their plans and progress for remediation of the spill. 
Accordingly, the committee directs the Secretary of the Air 
Force to provide a report to the House Committee on Armed 
Services by December 1, 2019, on the environmental remediation 
of the fuel spill at Kirtland Air Force Base. The report shall 
contain a section on the progress made to remediate 
contaminated soil and groundwater, and detail the Air Force 
plans for fiscal year 2020 remediation actions. In addition, 
the report shall contain an engagement plan for coordination 
with the local water utility authority, applicable State 
environmental agencies, and surrounding communities on Air 
Force remediation activities.

               Military Munitions Response Program (MMRP)

    The committee notes that in 2014, DOD established goals to 
implement Interim Risk Management (IRM) at Formerly Used 
Defense Sites (FUDS) Military Munitions Response Program (MMRP) 
sites but the program has struggled to reach its goals. The 
committee further notes that the management challenges facing 
MMRP have been longstanding dating back to at least 2010, when 
the Government Accountability Office (GAO) issued a report 
which found that the Department had not established clear 
criteria for prioritizing its work or established clear 
performance goals for work done at FUDS. Most concerning, the 
GAO expressed concern about DOD recording sites as ``complete'' 
in cases where the Department took no action at the site, which 
could be misleading to the Committee and the public. Therefore, 
the committee directs the Comptroller General to conduct a 
review and provide a report to the House Armed Services 
Committee by June 1, 2020 that examines the following:
    (1) the management of the MMRP program including its 
staffing arid funding levels,
    (2) progress DOD has made in cleaning up munitions response 
sites,
    (3) resources allocation across MMRP sites in the last 5 
years;
    (4) program priorities for the next five years, and
    (5) MMRP protocols for communicating with stakeholders and 
the public.

             National Guard Unit Equipped Flying Squadrons

    The committee recognizes that the Air National Guard 
enterprise is based on established Capstone Principles that 
notionally set the foundational framework for mission 
allocation in the 54 states and territories. One of those 
Capstone Principles is to allocate at least one unit-equipped 
wing and flying squadron to each state. New Mexico is one of 
three states--New Mexico, Virginia, and Washington--that have 
an operational flying mission, but due to the classic associate 
construct they lack ownership of aircraft. The committee 
therefore directs the Secretary of the Air Force, in 
consultation with the Chief of the National Guard Bureau, to 
report back to the committee by December 15, 2019 to present 
additional options for achieving an operational flying mission 
in each state.

           Reducing Costs Associated with Single-use Plastics

    The Committee notes the growing costs associated with the 
recycling and disposal of single-use plastics, and particularly 
single-use plastic water bottles. The Committee directs the 
Assistant Secretary of Defense for Sustainment to provide a 
briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services by February 
1, 2020, on efforts and opportunities to reduce expenditures 
on, and waste from, single-use plastics, with a focus on 
single-use plastic water bottles. The briefing should address--
    (1) Costs associated with the procurement and disposal of 
single-use plastics;
    (2) Current and planned efforts to reduce procurement and 
disposal of single-use plastics, and estimated cost and waste 
savings from such efforts, to include any public information 
campaigns; and
    (3) Additional opportunities to avoid costs and waste from 
single-use plastics, and estimated cost and waste savings from 
such efforts.

             Removal of Unexploded Ordnance on Tribal Lands

    The committee is concerned that unexploded ordnance 
endangers Indian Reservations. There are millions of acres of 
land previously used by Department of Defense that still 
contain unexploded ordnance. In many cases, these lands are on 
current Indian Reservations. Accordingly, the committee directs 
the Secretary of Defense to provide a report to the House 
Committee on Armed Services by February 1, 2020, on the state 
of unexploded ordnance on Indian Reservations, including:
    (1) a catalogue of lands on Indian Reservations which 
contain unexploded ordnance,
    (2) historical and current efforts to remove unexploded 
ordnance from these lands,
    (3) the estimated cost of finishing the removal of 
unexploded ordnance from Indian Reservations, and
    (4) the feasibility of entering into agreements with non-
government entities through the Indian Incentive Program 
through the Department of Defense to remove unexploded ordnance 
on Indian Reservations.

    Report on Fiscal Impacts of Intergovernmental Service Agreements

    The committee is aware that many military instillations 
have entered into Intergovernmental Service Agreements (IGSA). 
These IGSAs allow the Department of Defense and State or Local 
Governments to provide, receive, or share installation support 
services. The committee is also aware that many of these ISGAs 
have resulted in millions of dollars in cost savings to DoD. 
The savings realized by these agreements are not returned to 
the installation that has used them to reduce costs. Therefore, 
the committee directs the Secretary of Defense to submit a 
report to the House Committee on Armed Service by December 31, 
2019, on the actual cost savings realized by IGSAs, the 
feasibility of returning a portion of the savings realized from 
IGSAs back to the installations, and the overall fiscal impact 
to the services of IGSAs.

      Report on Phytoremediation to Clear Heavy Metal Contaminants

    The committee directs the Secretary of Defense to submit a 
report to Congress before May 1, 2020 on the use of plants that 
have hyperaccumulatory and phytoremediation capabilities to 
clear contaminants from or related to heavy metal 
contamination, including but not limited to arsenic, lead, 
mercury, copper, chromium, and nickel, and other related toxic 
areas, including for contaminants in soil, water, and air.

Report on the Feasibility and Cost of Net-Zero Greenhouse Emissions and 
              Implementing H. Res. 109, the Green New Deal

    The Committee acknowledges that renewable energy sources 
only account for approximately 17 percent of domestic energy 
production, with wind accounting for less than 7 percent and 
solar accounting for less than 2 percent. The Committee also 
notes the Green New Deal, H. Res. 109 in 116th Congress, 
purports to require the United States to achieve net-zero 
greenhouse gas emissions through a ten-year national 
mobilization. Some who support this course of action, namely 
the Green Party, recommend achieving the goals of the Green New 
Deal by cutting the military budget in half, returning all 
members of the Armed Forces who are deployed or stationed 
overseas to the United States, and closing all of the more than 
800 United States military installations around the world. The 
Committee believes implementing the Green New Deal would be 
devastating to the military readiness of the United States and 
the ability of the Government of the United States to protect 
the homeland.
    The Committee affirms energy security and diversity are 
vital to national security, and that it is in the Nation's best 
interest for the Department of Defense to maximize the use of 
renewable energy sources, and that an effort to achieve net-
zero greenhouse gas emissions would have a negative effect on 
the preparedness of the Armed Forces.
    The Committee directs the Secretary of Defense to provide a 
report to the Committees on Armed Services of the Senate and 
the House of Representatives within 180 days after the date of 
the enactment of this Act which provides the following: an 
assessment of the technical feasibility of the Department of 
Defense achieving net-zero greenhouse emissions by the date 
that is ten years after the date of the enactment of this Act; 
the cost of the Department of Defense achieving net-zero 
greenhouse emissions by the date that is ten years after the 
date of the enactment of this Act; an assessment of the effects 
the effort to achieve net-zero greenhouse emissions by the date 
that is ten years after the date of the enactment of this Act 
would have on the requirements for major service acquisition 
programs an assessment of the ability of the Department to 
implement the national defense strategy if required to achieve 
net-zero greenhouse emissions by the date that is ten years 
after the date of the enactment of this Act; how the 
implementation of the proposed Green New Deal would affect 
military readiness; the cost of closing all of the more than 
800 overseas military installations; and how complying with the 
Green New Deal would affect the current threat environment and 
the ability of the Department of Defense to protect the 
homeland.

 Survey to Locate and Identify the Remains of Native American Children 
                      Buried at Carlisle Barracks

    The committee commends the Department of the Army for its 
work to identify, exhume, and return to their respective 
families the remains of Native American children buried at 
Carlisle Barracks, Pennsylvania. However, the committee notes 
that given the tragic legacy of Carlisle Indian Industrial 
School, more work is required. Accordingly, the committee 
directs the Secretary of the Army to provide a report to the 
House Committee on Armed Services by January 1, 2020, that 
provides a plan for conducting a comprehensive survey of the 
land at Carlisle Barracks for remains of Native American 
children and the repatriation of those children. The report 
shall include at a minimum information on how the Department 
can achieve the following:
    (1) conducting a comprehensive survey of the cemetery and 
surrounding land at Carlisle Barracks to identify the number of 
whole sets of remains; the number of partial sets of remains; 
the location of the remains, including how the sets of remains 
match with existing headstones; and groups of remains 
containing two or more individuals;
    (2) establishing a process to facilitate coordination with 
other relevant Federal agencies and tribes to ensure that the 
survey, exhumation, identification of remains and repatriation 
of remains, as appropriate and desired, to the family is 
handled in a culturally appropriate manner;
    (3) establishing a process to work with tribes to determine 
the appropriate measures to be taken for remains of children 
whose family or relatives have not been found, including 
options for repatriating those remains to the appropriate 
tribe;
    (4) establishing a process to work with tribes to determine 
what, if any, actions should be taken for remains that are 
unidentifiable; and
    (5) working with tribes and relevant Federal agencies to 
establish other actions that can be taken to recognize the 
tragic history of the Carlisle Indian Industrial School at 
Carlisle Barracks.

               Tijuana Sewage Runoff Impact to Readiness

    The committee notes that sewage runoff from Tijuana can 
cause unhealthy conditions off the coast of southern California 
whose waters are routinely used for military training. When 
scheduled training corresponds with sewage spills or 
discharges, military personnel may be exposed to untreated 
sewage with consequences to their health. Accordingly, the 
committee directs the Secretary of the Navy to provide a 
briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services by February 
1, 2020, on the readiness impacts of Tijuana sewage runoff in 
waters adjacent to military installations. The briefing shall 
address whether spills, discharges, and debris in the Tijuana 
River have any impact on the national security interests of the 
United States. The briefing must also address what steps should 
be taken to resolve or mitigate the impacts from these 
releases. Further, the Secretary of the Navy shall make every 
effort to coordinate the briefing with the Department of State, 
the Environmental Protection Agency, the Department of Homeland 
Security (to include U.S. Customs and Border Patrol and the 
U.S. Coast Guard), the International Boundary and Water 
Commission, the Department of the Interior, San Diego County, 
and the San Diego Association of Governments.

      Water Security under Sustainable Groundwater Management Act

    The committee notes that the State of California enacted 
the Sustainable Groundwater Management Act (SGMA) in 2014. This 
California law requires communities whose groundwater resources 
are challenged to prepare and provide a Groundwater 
Sustainability Plan (GSP) by January 2020, for basins defined 
as medium- or high-priority. Under the law, medium- and high-
priority basins must be managed consistently with their 
sustainable yield by 2040, though an extension is possible. The 
committee notes that three Navy installations are located in 
high-priority basins and that one Navy and three Air Force 
installations are located in medium-priority basins. These 
seven Department of Defense installations must work with their 
local communities in developing sustainable groundwater plans 
for their respective basins. The committee is concerned that 
the Department does not have a coordinated approach to meeting 
these new water sustainability requirements.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of Defense 
to provide a report to the House Committee on Armed Services by 
October 1, 2019, that provides the Department's plan to address 
its response to the requirements of SGMA; a description of how 
the Navy and Air Force bases in California are working with 
local communities to achieve compliance with this law in a 
manner that does not impact the installation missions; the 
Department of Defense, Navy, and Air Force offices responsible 
for ensuring compliance; and the estimated cost of complying 
with the SGMA.

                   Water Usage Related to Landscaping

    The committee understands that a significant percentage of 
the Department of Defense's water usage on installations goes 
to landscaping. Particularly in water constrained or arid 
environments, the Department should endeavor to mitigate its 
water use through practices such as use of non-potable or 
recycled water, use of native or drought-resistant plants, and 
ground cover substitutes. The committee further notes that 
sustainable landscaping practices can provide significant cost 
avoidance through diminished water consumption.
    Accordingly, the committee directs the Secretary of Defense 
to provide a report to the House Committee on Armed Services by 
March 1, 2020, on sustainable landscaping practices currently 
in use, practices that can be implemented to cut water 
consumption, a list of installations where 30 percent or more 
of water usage is for landscaping, and a plan for decreasing 
the percentage of water used for landscaping at these 
installations and other installations in water constrained 
geographical locations.

                         LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS


              Subtitle A--Authorization of Appropriations


              Section 301--Authorization of Appropriations

    This section would authorize appropriations for operation 
and maintenance activities at the levels identified in section 
4301 of division D of this Act.

                   Subtitle B--Energy and Environment


  Section 311--Timeline for Clearinghouse Review of Applications for 
Energy Projects That May Have an Adverse Impact on Military Operations 
                             and Readiness

    This section would amend section 183a of title 10, United 
States Code, to allow the Military Aviation and Installation 
Assurance Clearinghouse 90 days to conduct its preliminary 
review of applications for an energy project.

    Section 312--Authority to Make Final Finding on Designation of 
Geographic Area of Concern for Purposes of Energy Projects with Adverse 
              Impacts on Military Operations and Readiness

    This section would amend section 183a of title 10, United 
States Code, by changing the list of Department of Defense 
personnel who can make a final finding on the designation of a 
geographic area of concern.

Section 313--Authority to Accept Contributions of Funds from Applicants 
 for Energy Projects for Mitigation of Impacts on Military Operations 
                             and Readiness

    This section would amend section 183a of title 10, United 
States Code, to accept a voluntary contribution of funds from 
an applicant for an energy project.

 Section 314--Department of Defense Improvement of Previously Conveyed 
             Utility Systems Serving Military Installations

    This section would amend section 2688 of title 10, United 
States Code, by authorizing the use of military construction 
funding to support improvements to the reliability, resiliency, 
efficiency, physical security, or cybersecurity of the conveyed 
utility system.

   Section 315--Five-Year Authority for National Guard Environmental 
            Restoration Projects for Environmental Responses

    This section would amend section 2707 of title 10, United 
States Code, to allow the Chief of the National Guard Bureau to 
access Defense Environmental Remediation Account funds for the 
limited purpose of addressing perfluorooctanoic acid and 
perfluorooctane sulfonate exposure and contamination resulting 
from National Guard activities in and around National Guard 
bases. This authority would sunset 5 years after the date of 
the enactment of this Act.

Section 316--Sale of Electricity from Alternate Energy and Cogeneration 
                         Production Facilities

    This section would amend section 2916(b)(3) of title 10, 
United States Code, to narrow the scope of recipients of funds 
generated from a geothermal energy resource located on a 
military installation.

Section 317--Transfer Authority for Funding of Study and Assessment on 
      Health Implications of Per- and Polyfluoroalkyl Substances 
  Contamination in Drinking Water by Agency for Toxic Substances and 
                            Disease Registry

    This section would amend the National Defense Authorization 
Act for Fiscal Year 2018 (Public Law 115-91) by extending the 
transfer authority for funding the study and assessment on 
health implications of per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances 
contamination in drinking water by the Agency for Toxic 
Substances and Disease Registry.

Section 318--Replacement of Fluorinated Aqueous Film-Forming Foam with 
                   Fluorine-Free Fire-Fighting Agent

    This section would require the Secretary of the Navy to 
complete a military specification for a fluorine-free fire 
fighting agent to be used at all Department of Defense 
installations not later than January 2025. This provision would 
ban use of fluorinated foams on military installations by 
September 2029 or before such date, if possible.

Section 319--Prohibition of Uncontrolled Release of Fluorinated Aqueous 
              Film-Forming Foam at Military Installations

    This section would require the Secretary of Defense to 
prohibit uncontrolled release of fluorinated Aqueous Film 
Forming Foam (AFFF) at military installations except in cases 
of emergency response and limited non-emergency use for 
training or testing of equipment where complete containment, 
capture, and proper disposal mechanisms are in place to ensure 
no AFFF is released into the environment.

  Section 320--Prohibition on Use of Fluorinated Aqueous Film Forming 
                      Foam for Training Exercises

    This section would prohibit the use of fluorinated aqueous 
film forming foam for training exercises at military 
installations.

  Section 321--Real-Time Noise-Monitoring Study at Navy and Air Force 
         Installations where Tactical Fighter Aircraft Operate

    This section would require the Secretary of the Navy and 
Secretary of the Air Force to conduct real-time noise 
monitoring at no fewer than three installations per military 
department where tactical fighter aircraft operate regularly 
and noise contours have been developed through noise modeling. 
The purpose of this monitoring would be to assess the validity 
of the noise contours developed through virtual analysis and 
modeling at those installations. In addition, this section 
would require the Secretary of the Navy and the Secretary of 
the Air Force to submit a report to the House Committee on 
Armed Services on the results of the noise monitoring study.

 Section 322--Development of Climate Vulnerability and Risk Assessment 
                                  Tool

    This section would direct the Secretary of Defense to 
develop a climate vulnerability and risk assessment tool to 
assist in providing standardized risk calculations of climate-
related impacts to military facilities and capabilities.

Section 323--Provision of Uncontaminated Water for Agricultural Use on 
   Land Contaminated by PFOS and PFOA Used on Military Installations

    This section would authorize the Department of Defense to 
provide water or water treatment for perfluorooctanesulfonic 
acid (PFOS) or perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) contaminated 
agricultural water.

                 Subtitle C--Logistics and Sustainment


         Section 331--Material Readiness Metrics and Objectives

    This section would add a new section to chapter 2 of title 
10, United States Code, and would require the Secretary of 
Defense to develop material readiness metrics that would 
support the National Defense Strategy by requiring product 
support managers to develop product support strategies to meet 
material readiness objectives for major weapon systems.

   Section 332--Clarification of Authority regarding Use of Working 
  Capital Funds for Unspecified Minor Military Construction Projects 
 Related to Revitalization and Recapitalization of Defense Industrial 
                            Base Facilities

    This section would amend section 2208(u)(2) of title 10, 
United States Code, to clarify authority regarding use of 
working capital funds for unspecified minor military 
construction projects related to defense industrial base 
facilities.

           Section 333--F-35 Joint Strike Fighter Sustainment

    This section would require the Under Secretary of Defense 
for Acquisition and Sustainment to submit a report on steps 
being taken to improve the availability and accountability of 
F-35 parts within the supply chain. In addition, this section 
would limit funds available to the Under Secretary until such 
time as the report is delivered.

Section 334--Report on Strategic Policy for Prepositioned Materiel and 
                               Equipment

    This section would require the Assistant Secretary of 
Defense for Sustainment, in coordination with the Joint Staff, 
to submit a report to the Committees on Armed Services of the 
Senate and the House of Representatives by March 1, 2020, on 
the implementation plan for prepositioned materiel and 
equipment as required by section 321 of the National Defense 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2014 (Public Law 113-66).

Section 335--Limitation on Use of Funds for Implementation of Elements 
of Master Plan for Redevelopment of Former Ship Repair Facility in Guam

    This section would continue the limitations established by 
section 325 of the John S. McCain National Defense 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2019 (Public Law 115-232) on 
expending Department of the Navy funds to modify the Former 
Ship Repair Facility in Guam except in certain circumstances 
through fiscal year 2020.

                          Subtitle D--Reports


                    Section 341--Readiness Reporting

    This section would amend sections 117 and 482 of title 10, 
United States Code, to modify the delivery method, timeline, 
and required elements of the Quarterly Readiness Report to 
Congress and the Joint Forces Readiness Review.

Section 342--Extension of Deadline for Transition from Service-Specific 
                  Defense Readiness Reporting Systems

    This section would amend section 358 of the John S. McCain 
National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2019 (Public 
Law 115-232) to allow the military services to complete the 
transition to the Defense Readiness Reporting Systems-Strategic 
by October 1, 2020.

       Section 343--Report on Navy Ship Depot Maintenance Budget

    This section would require the Secretary of the Navy to 
submit reports for fiscal years 2021, 2022, and 2023 that 
provide additional information related to ship and submarine 
depot maintenance.

                   Section 344--Report on Runit Dome

    This section would require the Secretary of Energy, in 
coordination with the Administrator of the Environmental 
Protection Agency and Secretary of Defense, to submit a report 
on the status of the Runit Dome in the Marshall Islands.

                       Subtitle E--Other Matters


  Section 351--Inclusion of Over-the-Horizon Radars in Early Outreach 
                               Procedures

    This section would amend section 183a(c)(6) of title 10, 
United States Code, to include over-the-horizon radar in the 
coverage of early outreach procedures issues by the Military 
Aviation and Installation Assurance Siting Clearinghouse.

  Section 352--Extension of Authority for Secretary of Defense to Use 
 Department of Defense Reimbursement Rate for Transportation Services 
         Provided to Certain Non-Department of Defense Entities

    This section would amend section 2642 of title 10, United 
States Code, to extend the date that the Secretary of Defense 
may use the Department of Defense reimbursement rate for 
military transportation services provided to certain non-
Department of Defense entities until October 1, 2024.

    Section 353--Expanded Transfer and Adoption of Military Animals

    This section would amend section 2583 of title 10, United 
States Code, to allow for the transfer and adoption of 
Department of Defense-owned mules and donkeys and provide 
consistency for use of the word ``transfer.''

 Section 354--Extension of Authority of Secretary of Transportation to 
                  Issue Non-Premium Aviation Insurance

    This section would amend section 44310 of title 49, United 
States Code, to extend the authority of the Secretary of 
Transportation to issue non-premium aviation insurance until 
September 30, 2023.

             Section 355--Defense Personal Property Program

    This section would require the Commander of U.S. 
Transportation Command (TRANSCOM) to prepare a business case 
analysis for the proposed award of a Global Household Goods 
Contract (GHC) for the Defense Personal Property Program. In 
addition, this section would require that the Secretary of 
Defense establish an advisory council of outside stakeholders 
to provide feedback throughout contract execution and advice on 
recommended modifications to the contract, and would require 
the council to submit quarterly reports to the congressional 
defense committees on its activities. This section would also 
withhold funding for the single move manager contract until 30 
days after the Commander of TRANSCOM has provided a briefing to 
the congressional defense committees on the business case 
analysis and proposed advisory council.

  Section 356--Public Events about Red Hill Bulk Fuel Storage Facility

    This section would require the Department of the Navy to 
hold quarterly events open to the public which provide 
information and updates on the Red Hill Bulk Fuel Storage 
Facility.

Section 357--Sense of Congress regarding Innovative Readiness Training 
                                Program

    This section would express the sense of Congress on the 
importance of Innovative Readiness Training, particularly to 
non-contiguous States and territories.

Section 358--Pilot Program on Reduction of Effects of Military Aviation 
                      Noise on Private Residences

    This section would create a pilot program that allows the 
Secretary of Defense to provide funds for the purpose of 
installing noise insulation on private residences impacted by 
aviation noise from military installations.

              TITLE IV--MILITARY PERSONNEL AUTHORIZATIONS

                         LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS


                       Subtitle A--Active Forces


              Section 401--End Strengths for Active Forces

    This section would authorize the following end strengths 
for Active Duty personnel of the Armed Forces as of September 
30, 2020:

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                     FY 2020                   Change from
                                                FY 2019   ------------------------------------------------------
                   Service                     Authorized                  Committee      FY 2020      FY 2019
                                                             Request    Recommendation    Request     Authorized
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Army........................................      487,500      480,000        480,000             0       -7,500
Navy........................................      335,400      340,500        340,500             0        5,100
USMC........................................      186,100      186,200        186,200             0          100
Air Force...................................      329,100      332,800        332,800             0        3,700
                                             -------------------------------------------------------------------
  DOD Total.................................    1,338,100    1,339,500      1,339,500             0        1,400
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    The committee is aware the Army will not meet the Active 
end strength of 487,500 required by section 402 of the John S. 
McCain National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2019 
(Public Law 115-232) and is expected to attain an end strength 
of only 478,000, 9,500 less than required. The President's 
budget request for the Army Active end strength for fiscal year 
2020 is 480,000. This is 7,500 below the Public Law 115-232 
requirement. The committee notes that although the Army 
recently determined it could only increase the Active end 
strength by 2,000 per year, Army leadership has stated that, 
based on requirements, the Army intends to grow to 
approximately 500,000 soldiers.

 Section 402--Revisions in Permanent Active Duty End Strength Minimum 
                                 Levels

    This section would establish new minimum Active Duty end 
strengths for the Army, Navy, Marine Corps, and Air Force as of 
September 30, 2020. The committee recommends 480,000 as the 
minimum Active Duty end strength for the Army, 340,500 as the 
minimum Active Duty end strength for the Navy, 186,200 as the 
minimum Active Duty end strength for the Marine Corps, and 
332,800 as the minimum Active Duty end strength for the Air 
Force.

                       Subtitle B--Reserve Forces


            Section 411--End Strengths for Selected Reserve

    This section would authorize the following end strengths 
for Selected Reserve personnel, including the end strength for 
Reserves on Active Duty in support of the Reserves, as of 
September 30, 2020:

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                     FY 2020                   Change from
                                                FY 2019   ------------------------------------------------------
                   Service                     Authorized                  Committee      FY 2020      FY 2019
                                                             Request    Recommendation    Request     Authorized
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Army National Guard.........................      343,500      336,000        336,000             0       -7,500
Army Reserve................................      199,500      189,500        189,500             0      -10,000
Navy Reserve................................       59,100       59,000         59,000             0         -100
Marine Corps Reserve........................       38,500       38,500         38,500             0            0
Air National Guard..........................      107,100      107,700        107,700             0          600
Air Force Reserve...........................       70,000       70,100         70,100             0          100
                                             -------------------------------------------------------------------
  DOD Total.................................      817,700      800,800        800,800             0      -16,900
Coast Guard Reserve.........................        7,000        7,000          7,000             0            0
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

 Section 412--End Strengths for Reserves on Active Duty in Support of 
                              the Reserves

    This section would authorize the following end strengths 
for Reserves on Active Duty in support of the Reserves as of 
September 30, 2020:

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                     FY 2020                   Change from
                                                FY 2019   ------------------------------------------------------
                   Service                     Authorized                  Committee      FY 2020      FY 2019
                                                             Request    Recommendation    Request     Authorized
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Army National Guard.........................       30,595       30,595         30,595             0            0
Army Reserve................................       16,386       16,511         16,511             0          125
Navy Reserve................................       10,110       10,155         10,155             0           45
Marine Corps Reserve........................        2,261        2,386          2,386             0          125
Air National Guard..........................       19,861       22,637         22,637             0        2,776
Air Force Reserve...........................        3,849        4,431          4,431             0          582
                                             -------------------------------------------------------------------
  DOD Total.................................       83,062       86,715         86,715             0        3,653
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

   Section 413--End Strengths for Military Technicians (Dual Status)

    This section would authorize the following end strengths 
for military technicians (dual status) as of September 30, 
2020:

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                     FY 2020                   Change from
                                                FY 2019   ------------------------------------------------------
                   Service                     Authorized                  Committee      FY 2020      FY 2019
                                                             Request    Recommendation    Request     Authorized
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Army National Guard.........................       22,294       22,294         22,294             0            0
Army Reserve................................        6,492        6,492          6,492             0            0
Air National Guard..........................       15,861       13,573         13,573             0       -2,288
Air Force Reserve...........................        8,880        8,848          8,848             0          -32
                                             -------------------------------------------------------------------
  DOD Total.................................       53,527       51,207         51,207             0       -2,320
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

 Section 414--Maximum Number of Reserve Personnel Authorized To Be on 
                  Active Duty for Operational Support

    This section would authorize, as required by section 115(b) 
of title 10, United States Code, the maximum number of Reserve 
Component personnel who may be on Active Duty or full-time 
National Guard duty during fiscal year 2020 to provide 
operational support. The personnel authorized here do not count 
against the end strengths authorized by section 401 or section 
412 of this Act unless the duration on Active Duty exceeds the 
limitations in section 115(b)(2) of title 10, United States 
Code.

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                     FY 2020                   Change from
                                                FY 2019   ------------------------------------------------------
                   Service                     Authorized                  Committee      FY 2020      FY 2019
                                                             Request    Recommendation    Request     Authorized
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Army National Guard.........................       17,000       17,000         17,000             0            0
Army Reserve................................       13,000       13,000         13,000             0            0
Navy Reserve................................        6,200        6,200          6,200             0            0
Marine Corps Reserve........................        3,000        3,000          3,000             0            0
Air National Guard..........................       16,000       16,000         16,000             0            0
Air Force Reserve...........................       14,000       14,000         14,000             0            0
                                             -------------------------------------------------------------------
  DOD Total.................................       69,200       69,200         69,200             0            0
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

              Subtitle C--Authorization of Appropriations


                    Section 421--Military Personnel

    This section would authorize appropriations for military 
personnel at the levels identified in the funding table in 
section 4401 of division D of this Act.

                   TITLE V--MILITARY PERSONNEL POLICY

                       ITEMS OF SPECIAL INTEREST


           Appointment of Guardian ad Litem for Minor Victims

    The committee is concerned for the welfare of minor, 
military dependents who are victims of an alleged sex-related 
offense. The committee acknowledges the Department of Defense's 
continued efforts to implement services in support of service 
members who are victims of sexual assault and further, to 
expand some of these services to dependents who are victims. 
However, the committee remains concerned that there is not an 
adequate mechanism within the military court-martial process to 
represent the best interests of minor victims following an 
alleged sex-related offense.
    Therefore, not later than 180 days after the date of the 
enactment of this Act, the Defense Advisory Committee on 
Investigation, Prosecution, and Defense of Sexual Assault in 
the Armed Forces shall submit to the Committees on the Armed 
Services of the Senate and the House of Representatives a 
report that evaluates the need for, and the feasibility of, 
establishing a process under which a guardian ad litem may be 
appointed to represent the interests of a victim of an alleged 
sex-related offense (as that term is defined in section 
1044e(g) of title 10, United States Code) who has not attained 
the age of 18 years.

                 Army Special Forces Officer Education

    The committee notes the that Army Special Forces Officers 
may have different Professional Military Education (PME) 
requirements than the conventional force officer, particularly 
with respect to irregular warfare. The committee is concerned 
that any reduction in opportunities to attend PME that can 
tailor the curriculum to irregular warfare could hinder the 
future development of these officers. Therefore the committee 
encourages the Secretary of the Army to continue to fund Army 
Special Forces officer attendance at the Naval Post Graduate 
School.

    Briefing on Bystander Intervention in Cases of Sexual Misconduct

    The committee acknowledges that the Department of Defense's 
annual reports on sexual assault in the military have 
consistently reported that sexual assaults are more likely to 
occur in units that have a command climate that tolerates 
sexual harassment. Further, the committee notes that 
servicemembers are less likely to intervene in situations where 
they are a bystander to sexual misconduct than in other 
situations where servicemembers are bystanders to dangerous 
behavior, including situations related to suicide and alcohol 
abuse. A 2018 National Institutes of Health (NIH) study, titled 
``Prevalence of Bystander Intervention Opportunities and 
Behaviors Among U.S. Army Soldiers,'' found that 87.9 percent 
of soldiers who witnessed an event relating to suicide and 74.4 
percent of soldiers who witnessed an event relating to alcohol 
misuse reported consistently intervening, while 49.2 percent of 
soldiers who witnessed events relating to sexual harassment or 
assault reported consistently intervening.
    The committee believes that servicemembers should be 
empowered to intervene when they witness sexual misconduct or 
retaliation for reporting this conduct. Further, the committee 
is concerned that the available data indicates that bystander 
intervention education efforts may not be effective in 
increasing the likelihood of intervention in incidents of 
sexual misconduct versus other dangerous scenarios. 
Accordingly, the committee directs the Secretary of Defense to 
provide a briefing to the Committees on Armed Services of the 
Senate and of the House of Representatives not later than 
January 1, 2020 on the feasibility of establishing any legal 
requirements for bystanders that witness sexual misconduct. The 
briefing should include an analysis on the likelihood of a 
servicemember to intervene in a situation where they are a 
bystander to sexual misconduct based on age, gender, rank, 
command climate, understanding of what constitutes sexual 
misconduct, understanding of their rights, as well as the 
victim's rights, and obligations, and correlation metrics based 
on the indicators listed here.

    Briefing on Department of Defense Student Loan Repayment Program

    The committee directs the Secretary of Defense to provide a 
briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services not later 
than 180 days after the date of the enactment of this Act, on 
the use of the DoD College Loan Repayment Program (10 USC 
2171). The briefing shall include the following elements:
    (1) The number of Service members who are eligible to 
receive this benefit, by Service;
    (2) The number of Service members who have received or are 
currently receiving this benefit, by Service, over the past 5 
years;
    (3) The average length of service required in order to 
receive the benefit;
    (4) The cost to the Department of Defense, by service, of 
providing this benefit for the past 5 years;
    (5) The overall impact the benefit has on recruitment and 
retention of highly qualified individuals.

                Cell Phone Use in Correction Facilities

    The committee is aware of the potential use of contraband 
cellular phones and devices in corrections facilities, 
including in military corrections institutions. The committee 
directs the Secretary of Defense to provide a briefing to the 
House Committee on Armed Services no later than January 1, 2020 
on the use of contraband cellular devices in military prisons, 
an evaluation of the use of managed access technology to detect 
and prevent such use, and the military facilities which would 
benefit from the deployment of such technology.

            Comptroller General Report on Domestic Violence

    The committee is concerned about the Department of Defense 
and military services' domestic violence response and 
prevention programs. The committee notes that Department of 
Defense Instruction 6400.06 ``Domestic Abuse Involving DoD 
Military and Certain Affiliated Personnel'' clearly establishes 
detailed procedures for responding to domestic violence and 
directs the military departments to establish policies and 
programs to implement the instruction. The committee 
understands there are variances in response and prevention 
programs based on military service guidance and local 
jurisdictions, but is concerned by the April 19, 2019, 
Department of Defense Inspector General Report ``Evaluation of 
Military Services Law Enforcement Responses to Domestic 
Violence'' findings that military service law enforcement 
organizations did not consistently comply with Department of 
Defense policies.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Comptroller General of 
the United States to provide preliminary observations to the 
Committees on Armed Services of the Senate and the House of 
Representatives by February 1, 2020, with a report to follow by 
an agreed upon time, on the military services' efforts to 
prevent and respond to domestic violence. The report should 
address the following elements:
    (1) the extent to which each military service policy 
conforms to the Department of Defense Instruction;
    (2) the actions service secretaries took to address the 
Department of Defense Inspector General recommendations;
    (3) the extent to which the military services are meeting 
training requirements listed in Department of Defense 
Instruction 6400.06, the objectives of those training 
requirements, and whether the training is effective to meet 
those objectives;
    (4) the extent to which each military service has 
established memorandums of understanding with local law 
enforcement and jurisdictions to enhance the coordinated 
community response to domestic violence;
    (5) the extent to which commanders have played a role in 
the coordinated community response to domestic abuse consistent 
with Department of Defense Instruction 6400.06;
    (6) an assessment of how the military services respond to 
domestic violence from initial reports to military law 
enforcement through final adjudication, to include victim 
assistance and early intervention; and
    (7) any recommendations the Comptroller General may have 
with respect to implementation of the military services' 
domestic violence prevention and response programs.

                  Comptroller General Report on Hazing

    The committee is concerned about the results of the 
Department of Defense 2018 Annual Summary Report on Hazing 
Prevention and Response in the Armed Forces. The committee 
notes the disparity in the number of incidents and reports 
between the services. Of the 291 reported complaints of hazing, 
256 complaints were from the Marine Corps. This disparity in 
the number of complaints was similar to the results of the 2017 
report with a total of 415 complaints, 314 of those from the 
Marine Corps. The committee is aware the Department issued 
Department of Defense Instruction 1020.03, Harassment 
Prevention and Response in the Armed Forces, on February 8, 
2018, and the military services are updating their policies to 
align with the Department's changes. However, the committee is 
concerned there is not a consistent emphasis across the 
services with respect to hazing. Further, the committee notes 
that in the Government Accountability Office (GAO) report ``DOD 
and Coast Guard: Actions Needed to Increase Oversight and 
Management Information on Hazing Incidents Involving Service 
members'' (GAO-16-226), GAO found that the Department had not 
conducted oversight through regular monitoring of policy 
implementation and recommended that the Department of Defense 
do so.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Comptroller General of 
the United States to provide preliminary observations to the 
Committees on Armed Services of the Senate and the House of 
Representatives by February 1, 2020, on the status of the 
military services' efforts to prevent and respond to hazing 
with a report to follow on an agreed upon date. The report 
should address the following elements:
    (1) the extent to which each military service's policy and 
definition of hazing conforms to the Department of Defense 
Instruction;
    (2) the extent to which each military service provides 
harassment prevention and response training using best 
practices with a targeted approach to the demographics the 
report indicates are involved with hazing;
    (3) the extent to which the military services are meeting 
the standardized data reporting requirements;
    (4) the extent to which each military service's specific 
implementation meets the requirements of Department of Defense 
Instruction 1020.03; and
    (5) any recommendations the Comptroller General may have 
with respect to implementation of the military services' hazing 
prevention and response programs.

   Comptroller General Study on Military Adoptive and Foster Families

    The committee directs the Comptroller General of the United 
States to conduct a study on the challenges faced by military 
adoptive and foster families and the support services available 
to help address these challenges and promote permanency. The 
Comptroller General shall submit a report on the study not 
later than 18 months from the date of enactment to the 
Congressional defense committees. The study shall include the 
following elements:
    (1) Describe what is known about the number of military 
foster and adoptive families and permanency of placements;
    (2) Describe challenges faced by military families related 
to fostering and adopting, including any effects these 
challenges have on the youth and families;
    (3) Describe mental health and other support services 
available to military foster and adoptive families, including 
services provided by Military and Family Support Centers and 
Military and Family Life Counselors, and whether such services 
and providers are foster- and adoption-competent; and
    (4) Identify any actions federal agencies can take to 
better prepare and support military foster and adoptive 
families, promote the permanency of placements, and reduce 
barriers, such as improving pre- and post-foster and adoption 
mental health and other support services for youth and 
families.

                     Cultural Sensitivity Training

    The committee recognizes the Department of Defense and the 
military services have multiple cultural sensitivity training 
programs for military personnel. The committee also believes in 
the importance of protecting servicemembers' rights regarding 
religious exercise and ethnic heritage. As such, the committee 
supports efforts to identify resource and personnel gaps that 
may exist in the Office of Diversity Management and Equal 
Opportunity of the Department of Defense as well as efforts to 
identify existing gaps in protections for new and prospective 
servicemembers.

      Implementation of the Women, Peace and Security Act of 2017

    The committee directs the Secretary of Defense, through 
implementation of the Women, Peace, and Security Act of 2017 
(Public Law 115-68), to ensure gender advisor support, building 
partner capacity activities, and research on gender 
considerations across the conflict spectrum is addressed in 
professional military education.

            Inspector General Whistleblower Improvement Plan

    The committee remains concerned about the ability of the 
Department of Defense and the military service Inspectors 
General (IG) to meet timeliness goals for handling 
whistleblower complaints. Responding promptly and thoroughly is 
essential to instilling trust and confidence in the system. The 
Government Accountability Office (GAO) report ``Whistleblower 
Protection, Analysis of DOD's Actions to Improve Case 
Timeliness and Safeguard Confidentiality'' (GAO-19-198) found 
that Department of Defense and military service Inspectors 
General met some, but not all, of the timelines and quality 
goals. The GAO made 12 recommendations to the Department of 
Defense Inspector General and the military service IGs with 
concurrence by all organizations for all recommendations. 
Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of Defense to 
provide a report to the Committees on Armed Services of the 
Senate and the House of Representatives by December 2, 2019, 
detailing the implementation of the 12 GAO recommendations. The 
Secretary's report shall also include actions taken by the 
Secretary to improve the timeliness of completing whistleblower 
complaints, as well as efforts to protect the confidentiality 
of the complainant.

           Marine Corps Integration of Recruit Basic Training

    The committee notes the United States Marine Corps 
graduated its first-ever mixed-gender company from recruit 
training at Parris Island, South Carolina, in March 2019. 
Although the Marine Corps has combined over 90 percent of 
training, they have not fully integrated basic recruit 
training. The report required by the committee report 
accompanying the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal 
Year 2018 (H. Rept. 115-200) clearly identified the steps 
needed to fully integrate basic training, including identifying 
military construction costs associated with additional 
barracks. The report also emphasized the platoon as the 
building block for transforming recruits into the United States 
Marine Corps. Therefore, the committee encourages the 
Commandant of the Marine Corps to develop a plan to achieve 
fully integrated basic recruit training at the platoon level 
within 5 years.

                     Measure Officer Accountability

    The committee acknowledges the Department of Defense's 
efforts to address low and stagnant reporting rates for sexual 
assault and sexual harassment in the U.S. military. The 
committee also acknowledges commanders' responsibilities to 
cultivate positive and safe command climates and maintain trust 
from junior and mid-level service members. The committee is 
aware that fear of retaliation is consistently cited as a 
contributing factor to the underreporting of sexual assault and 
sexual harassment crimes across military installations. The 
committee is also aware that measures are currently in place to 
enable victims of sexual assault and sexual harassment to 
formally report perceived instances of retaliation to their 
respective commanders, law enforcement, special victims' 
counsel, and Sexual Assault Response Coordinators. The 
committee is concerned that, despite the aforementioned 
safeguards, perceived instances of retaliation remain high.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Department of Defense 
Inspector General to submit a report to the Committees on Armed 
Services of the Senate and the House of Representatives not 
later than March 1, 2020, containing data from fiscal year 2018 
on the following:
    (1) the total number of substantiated cases of ostracism;
    (2) the total number of substantiated cases of 
maltreatment;
    (3) the total number of substantiated cases of retaliation 
that would meet the elements of Article 132 of the Uniform Code 
of Military Justice;
    (4) the total number of commanders, across military 
services, who have been formally accused of mishandling reports 
of sexual harassment and sexual assault;
    (5) the total number of commanders, across military 
services, who have been formally reprimanded for mishandling 
reports of sexual harassment and sexual assault and what, if 
any, related disciplinary action was taken;
    (6) the total number of commanders, across military 
services, who have been formally accused of mishandling reports 
of victim retaliation related to sexual harassment and sexual 
assault;
    (7) the total number of commanders, across military 
services, who have been formally reprimanded for mishandling 
reports of victim retaliation related to sexual harassment and 
sexual assault and what, if any, related disciplinary action 
was taken; and
    (8) the total number of commanders, across military 
services, who have received negative command climate reports 
related to sexual harassment, sexual assault, and gender 
discrimination.

 Prioritization of Sexual Assault and Sexual Harassment Prevention and 
                           Response Resources

    The committee acknowledges the Department of Defense's 
continued efforts to adequately respond to and prevent 
instances of sexual assault and sexual harassment in the United 
States military. However, the committee remains concerned about 
the growing rates and underreporting of sexual assault and 
sexual harassment across all military services. The committee 
is aware that in 2014, the Sexual Assault Prevention and 
Response Office, in the Office of the Secretary of Defense, 
selected the RAND Corporation to conduct an independent study 
evaluating sexual assault, sexual harassment, and gender 
discrimination across the United States military. The committee 
is also aware that the study focused on the prevalence of 
sexual assault and sexual harassment at specific U.S. military 
installations and commands, for the purpose of identifying 
additional resources, educating leaders on command climate 
issues, and gaining a better understanding of environmental and 
organizational risk factors. Based on the results of the study, 
military installations were labeled ``high-risk'' and ``low-
risk'' according to the number of individuals who were sexually 
assaulted or sexually harassed at the respective facilities.
    Therefore, the committee encourages the Secretary of 
Defense and the military service secretaries to prioritize 
funding for sexual assault and sexual harassment response and 
prevention programs and training to military installations that 
have been identified as ``high-risk,'' based on the results of 
the 2014 RAND Corporation study. The committee recommends the 
Secretary of Defense and the service secretaries conduct 
further analysis to identify the environmental and 
organizational features of ``high-risk'' installations in order 
to effectively tailor response and prevention efforts.

      Report on Access to Court Filings and Materials for Victims

    The committee remains concerned that, under the current 
military justice procedure, prosecutors and military courts 
apply different and inconsistent approaches with respect to 
military sexual assault victims' access to court filings and 
nonprivileged information derived directly from and pertaining 
directly to the victim. The committee is also concerned that 
recent changes in military law addressing access to court 
filings and investigation information have not resulted in 
timely, consistent and widespread access to relevant 
information for victims. The committee recognizes that victims 
benefit from access to pre-trial investigation materials that 
directly relate to them because it allows them and their 
counsel to prepare for trial. Therefore, the committee directs 
the Secretary of Defense to submit a report to the Committee on 
Armed Services of the House of Representatives by March 1, 
2020, addressing the following questions with regards to 
establishing a clear standard through law for victims and 
victims' counsel to have access to all nonprivileged court 
filings and related materials derived directly from and 
pertaining directly to the victim:
    (1) Does such a standard impact victims' privacy and make 
it harder to gain a conviction? If so, how, and what mitigating 
measures can be put into place?
    (2) Does such a standard impact the ability to execute and 
conclude a fair trial? If so, how, and what mitigating measures 
can be put into place?
    (3) What types of filings and materials would be covered 
under such a standard?
    (4) How does access to all nonprivileged court filings and 
related materials derived directly from and pertaining directly 
to the victim impact the case for the prosecution and defense?
    (5) Can the victim receive adequate legal representation 
and protection of his or her rights without access to all 
nonprivileged court filings and related materials derived 
directly from and pertaining directly to the victim?

              Report on Air National Guard Control Grades

    The committee recognizes the challenges the Air National 
Guard (ANG) faces in recruiting and retaining qualified airmen 
for full-time positions due to the statutory control grade cap. 
To alleviate this limitation, the John S. McCain National 
Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2019 (Public Law 115-
232) increased the control grade cap for O-4 through O-6, E-8s, 
and E-9s. While units across the country felt the positive 
impact of this cap increase, they continue to face personnel 
challenges. With the current numbers and distribution, there 
are fewer control grades than the unit manning document 
positions. Therefore, organizations are unable to place service 
members of the correct rank into the corresponding positions. 
The committee directs the Director of the Air National Guard to 
perform a by-unit audit to determine the true number of control 
grade deficiencies and necessary increases and provide a report 
to the House Committee on Armed Services not later than June 1, 
2020, with audit results.

    Report on Army Active Component Support of the Reserve Component

    The Committee notes that efforts to achieve Army active and 
reserve component integration have made significant progress. 
However, both Congressionally mandated and Department of 
Defense-led efforts to provide active component support for 
Army reserve components have failed. Uniformed full-time 
personnel assigned to Army reserve component units should bring 
relevant, operational experience from the active component and 
return to the active force with a greater understanding of the 
reserve component. The current Army Active Guard and Reserve 
(AGR) program does not integrate components at the unit level 
and does not capitalize on the potential benefits of personnel 
exchange. Therefore, the Committee directs the Secretary of the 
Army to report to the House Armed Services Committee no later 
than January 1, 2020 on the current force structure of AGR 
personnel, the impact of increased active component support to 
the reserve component, ways to incentivize active service in 
the reserve components, and any recommended changes to the 
Active Guard and Reserve (AGR) program.

    Report on Cyber Education Integration in Professional Military 
                               Education

    The committee remains concerned about the Department of 
Defense's ongoing efforts to integrate cyber domain education 
into officer, warrant officer, and non-commissioned officer 
professional military education. Therefore, the committee 
directs the Secretary of Defense to provide a briefing to the 
Committee on Armed Services of the House of Representatives, 
not later than March 1, 2020, on the Department's efforts to 
integrate cyber domain education in professional military 
education courses to further the understanding of the cyber 
domain among senior leaders. The briefing will also include an 
assessment of efforts to recruit and develop career tracks with 
promotion potential for cyber professionals.

   Report on Implementation of Transition Assistance Program Content

    The committee remains interested in the effective and 
efficient transition of service members to civilian life and 
the programs in place to assist in this transition. Section 552 
of the John S. McCain National Defense Authorization Act for 
Fiscal Year 2019 (Public Law 115-232) required a comprehensive 
reform of the Department of Defense Transition Assistance 
Program. The committee therefore directs the Secretary of 
Defense to submit a report to the Committee on Armed Services 
of the House of Representatives, not later than April 1, 2020, 
containing the plan for implementation of reforms to the 
Transition Assistance Program directed by section 552 of Public 
Law 115-232. The report shall also include:
    (1) an analysis of how many service members each year, 
since the beginning of fiscal year 2015, have met the Career 
Readiness Standards (CRS) at least 90 days before separation.
    (2) how many required additional assistance because the 
service member did not meet the CRS standards and/or does not 
have a viable transition plan, and how many service members 
affirmatively received this assistance.
    (3) what steps the Department will take to increase the 
number of service members that will meet CRS standards at least 
90 days before separation.
    (4) what organizations are receiving the service members in 
a ``warm handover'' and how many are handed over to each.
    (5) a status update on the establishment of the pathways 
for individualized counseling, including a description of each 
of the pathways and their objective.

     Report on Integration of Women into Previously Closed Special 
      Operations Forces Career Fields and the 75th Ranger Regiment

    On January 13, 2016, U.S. Special Operations Command 
(SOCOM) Commander Joseph Votel issued a memo entitled ``US 
Special Operations Command Implementation Plan for the 
Integration of Women.'' This memo detailed SOCOM's plan for the 
integration of women into the 75th Ranger Regiment and the 
eight special operations career fields previously closed to 
women, in accordance with former Secretary of Defense Ash 
Carter's decision to fully integrate women in the Armed Forces. 
The committee understands that the four lines of effort 
outlined in the SOCOM implementation plan, including Accession, 
Talent Management, Communication, and the Longitudinal 
Implementation Plan Assessment, remain in effect. However, the 
committee has yet to receive substantive information regarding 
the efforts relating to and progress towards integration of 
women into previously closed special operations career fields 
and the 75th Ranger Regiment.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Commander of SOCOM to 
submit a report to the congressional defense committees not 
later than January 31, 2020, detailing efforts relating to and 
progress towards integration of women into the eight previously 
closed special operations career fields and the 75th Ranger 
Regiment since the issuance of the memorandum. The report shall 
include, but not be limited to, a description of efforts by 
SOCOM and its service component commands to recruit qualified 
female candidates; the number of qualified female candidates, 
by component command, that were selected to participate in 
initial selection, assessment, and qualification programs since 
2016; the number of female candidates, by component command, 
that qualified for subsequent phases of training; the number of 
females in operational units; a description of the status of 
the four lines of effort; and any other matters the Commander 
of SOCOM deems relevant.

  Report on Junior Reserve Officers' Training Corps Community Service

    The committee notes that the purpose of the Junior Reserve 
Officers' Training Corps (JROTC) program is to instill in 
students in U.S. secondary educational institutions the values 
of citizenship, service to the United States, personal 
responsibility, and a sense of accomplishment. The committee 
believes that community service of all types supports and 
enhances this purpose. Therefore, the committee directs the 
Secretary of Defense to submit a report to the Committee on 
Armed Services of the House of Representatives by March 1, 
2020, on the feasibility and advisability of a community 
service requirement as part of the JROTC program in order for a 
unit to earn an ``Honor Unit with Distinction'' designation.

           Report on Passport Guidance for Emergency Contacts

    The committee notes that families of service members 
deployed outside the continental United States often may not 
have a valid passport for overseas travel in the event the 
service member has a medical emergency and a family member's 
presence is needed. While the services have policies in place 
for obtaining short-notice passports, the committee is 
concerned that information on these procedures is not being 
adequately disseminated to unit commanders and service casualty 
offices. Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of 
Defense to provide a report not later than April 1, 2020, 
addressing the following questions:
    (1) what information is provided to service members' 
families prior to deployment regarding family travel policies?
    (2) how are the instructions for obtaining a short-notice 
passport relayed to unit commanders and the service casualty 
office?
    (3) what improvements can be made to the passport process?
    (4) how can the Department of Defense and the services 
improve their dissemination of information related to emergency 
travel procedures for families of overseas service members?

   Report on Program on Enhancement of Preparation of Dependents of 
      Members of Armed Forces for Careers in Science, Technology, 
                      Engineering, and Mathematics

    The committee recognizes that military base communities are 
often underserved by STEM education outreach efforts and that 
Congress created the National Defense Education Program to 
improve the effectiveness of education in STEM fields and 
maintain the United States' role as the world leader in 
technological development. As such, the committee also directs 
the Secretary of Defense to provide a report no later than 180 
days from the enactment of this act to the House Committee on 
Armed Services on how the Department may carry out a program 
under which the Secretary makes grants, on a competitive basis, 
to eligible entities to carry out STEM educational events for 
military communities across the United States.

              Report on Senior Officer Outside Employment

    The committee is interested in senior officer outside 
employment while still on Active Duty. Therefore, the committee 
directs the Secretary of Defense to submit a report to the 
Committee on Armed Services of the House of Representatives not 
later than May 1, 2020, on requests from senior officers for 
approval of outside employment. The report period will be 
inclusive of the fiscal years from 2017 through 2019 and cover 
Active Duty officers in the grade of O-6 or above. The elements 
of the report shall include:
    (1) the number of such requests made in each fiscal year;
    (2) the number of such requests approved in each fiscal 
year;
    (3) the types of positions for which senior personnel made 
such requests;
    (4) the range and average of the time commitment for such 
positions; and
    (5) any ethical lapses or abuses by senior personnel in the 
course of employment pursuant to approved requests.

        Report on the Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery

    The committee notes that according to the Department of 
Defense 71 percent of Americans ages 17 to 24 are not eligible 
for military service. Approximately 24 percent of this same 
population who take the Armed Services Vocational Aptitude 
Battery (ASVAB) do not receive a score that qualifies them for 
enlistment in the Armed Forces without a waiver. The committee 
believes the Department of Defense's data on the ASVAB could be 
useful in identifying the kinds of test takers who struggle to 
meet the minimum educational standards for enlistment and 
identifying the educational needs of local education agencies. 
Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of Defense to 
provide the Committees on Armed Services of the Senate and the 
House of Representatives, not later than March 1, 2020, a 
report on those deemed ineligible for service due to inadequate 
test scores on the ASVAB and the impact this population has on 
recruitment and military readiness. The report shall include:
    (1) Detailed information on the most recent 10 years of 
data available for all candidates who took the ASVAB by mean 
and median Armed Forces Qualification Test (AFQT) score, 
including a breakdown by section of the test and category the 
test takers' overall scores falls into, for: (a) ethnicity; (b) 
race; (c) gender; (d) age at time of test; (e) state of 
residency at time of test; (f) county of residency at time of 
test; (g) zip code at time of test; (h) highest level of 
education attained at time of test; and (i) if available: (a) 
type of secondary educational institution attended; (b) school 
and/or school district enrolled in at time of test; (c) 
percentage of students in school district attended qualifying 
for free and reduced-priced lunch at time of test, (d) National 
Center for Education Statistics school identification number 
for secondary educational institution; (e) free and reduced-
price lunch status at time of test; (f) Individual Education 
Plan or 504 Plan status; and (g) English Language Learner 
status;
    (2) Correlation metrics between ASVAB scores and 
demographic indicators;
    (3) A list of the counties and school districts scoring in 
the bottom five percent on the ASVAB nationally over the past 
10 years;
    (4) Number of test takers deemed ineligible for service 
based on their Category V ASVAB score each year over the past 
10 years;
    (5) Number of test takers who were granted a waiver for 
enlistment who received a Category IV score each year over the 
past 10 years; and
    (6) The feasibility of sharing the information required in 
the report with the Secretary of Education to assist in 
improving the education of young American.

   Report to the Defense Committees on the National Guard's Role in 
                   Current and Future Space Strategy

    The committee recognizes that National Guardsmen and women 
across the country provide a unique skillset that accommodates 
the role of space in modern defense, and the needs of the 
overall force in the years ahead. While the National Guard has 
served and will continue to serve a role in space operations, 
the Department has yet to adequately define the role of the 
National Guard in future DoD space strategy. Therefore, the 
committee directs the Chief of the National Guard Bureau, in 
consultation with the Secretary of Defense to provide a 
detailed report to the Defense Congressional Committees on the 
Guard's role in space, and the departments intentions for the 
guard in future space planning.

                  Reserve Component Duty Status Reform

    The committee notes that the Office of the Secretary of 
Defense continues to refine and coordinate legislative language 
to fulfill the requirement of section 513 of the National 
Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2018 (Public Law 115-
91) to reduce the number of statutory authorities by which 
members of the Reserve Component of the Armed Forces may be 
ordered to Active Duty. The committee continues to support the 
completion of the required legislative provision and encourages 
the Secretary of Defense to continue the necessary coordination 
with all stakeholders, to include the States' Adjutants 
General, to complete this legislative proposal for inclusion in 
the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2021.

            Special Education Services for Military Families

    The Committee notes the purpose of the Exceptional Family 
Member Program (EFMP) is to provide comprehensive and 
coordinated community support, housing, educational, medical, 
and personnel services worldwide to U.S. military families with 
children with special needs. The Committee is concerned that 
many families participating in the EFMP program are not 
provided with consistent educational opportunities throughout 
each Permanent Change of Station (PCS) move. The Committee is 
concerned that each PCS is disruptive to the educational plans 
for the child, as the services provided to special needs 
children can vastly differ between states and school systems, 
and that each PCS is disproportionately more difficult for EFMP 
families, who may need more time to make better educational 
choices. The Committee is also concerned the Department of 
Defense and Services lack the common performance measures and 
metrics to assess assignment coordination and family support.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of Defense 
to submit a report to the Committee on Armed Services of the 
House of Representatives not later than February 1, 2020 
describing the needs of military families with children with 
special education needs and evaluating options to enhance the 
benefits available to such families and children under the 
Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (20 U.S.C. 1400 et 
seq.) in meeting such needs. The report should include 
assessing the feasibility of establishing an expedited process 
for resolution of complaints by military parents with a child 
with special education needs about a lack of access to 
education and related services otherwise specified in the 
individualized education program of the child; as well as 
assess the feasibility of allowing the Department of Defense to 
contact the State to which a military family with a child with 
special education needs will relocate pursuant to a permanent 
change of station with the orders for such change of station 
are issued, but before the family takes residence in such 
State, for the purpose of commencing preparation for education 
and related services specified in the individualized education 
program of the child.

   Standardizing Training for Sexual Assault Prevention and Response 
                             Practitioners

    The committee acknowledges the Department of Defense's 
continued efforts to ensure that sexual assault prevention and 
response training remains effective, adequate, and up-to-date. 
In response to the committee report accompanying the National 
Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2019 (H. Rept. 115-
676), the Department submitted a report to the House Committee 
on Armed Services on the feasibility of developing and 
incorporating standardized best practices for sexual assault 
prevention and response training across services. The report 
suggests that standardized implementation is essential to 
achieving decreases in rates of sexual assault.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of Defense, 
in consultation with the Secretaries of the Army, Navy, and Air 
Force, to provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed 
Services not later than November 1, 2019, on the Department's 
efforts to standardize sexual assault prevention training, 
across services, and to ensure that such training incorporates 
innovative training methodologies based on identified 
competencies for prevention and response practitioners.

                         LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS


                  Subtitle A--Officer Personnel Policy


     Section 501--Management Policies for Joint Qualified Officers

    This section would amend section 661 of title 10, United 
States Code, to allow the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff 
to delegate the approval authority for non-Joint Qualified 
Officers to fill critical joint duty assignments, thus allowing 
the Chairman's designee to approve or disapprove waivers.

    Section 502--Grade of Chief of the Veterinary Corps of the Army

    This section would require that the grade of the Chief of 
the Veterinary Corps of the Army be a brigadier general.

 Section 503--Authority of Promotion Boards to Recommend that Officers 
         of Particular Merit Be Placed Higher on Promotion List

    This section would amend sections 14108, 14109, and 14308 
of title 10, United States Code, to allow for Reserve Component 
promotion selection boards to recommend placing an officer on 
the reserve active-status list higher on a promotion list based 
on particular merit, if at least a majority of the promotion 
selection board members so recommend.

Section 504--Availability on the Internet of Certain Information about 
           Officers Serving in General or Flag Officer Grades

    This section would require the Secretary of each military 
department to publish general and flag officer biographies and 
assignment information on a publicly available website on the 
internet.

                Subtitle B--Reserve Component Management


       Section 511--Grade of Certain Chiefs of Reserve Components

    This section would ensure grade parity among the Chiefs of 
the Reserve Components.

   Section 512--Authority to Defer Mandatory Separation at Age 68 of 
       Officers in Medical Specialties in the Reserve Components

    This section would amend section 14703 of title 10, United 
States Code, to authorize the Secretary concerned to retain 
Reserve Component medical specialty officers beyond the age of 
68.

 Section 513--Repeal of Requirement for Review of Certain Army Reserve 
Officer Unit Vacancy Promotions by Commanders of Associated Active Duty 
                                 Units

    This section would repeal section 1113 of the Army National 
Guard Combat Readiness Reform Act of 1992 (10 U.S.C. 10105 
note) to repeal the requirement for the commander of an Active 
Duty unit associated with an Army Selected Reserve unit to 
review promotion recommendations for unit vacancy promotions.

   Section 514--Guidance for Use of Unmanned Aircraft Systems by the 
                             National Guard

    This section would require the Secretary of Defense to 
issue new guidance, within 90 days after the date of the 
enactment of this Act, regarding the use of unmanned aircraft 
systems that is comparable to other aircraft for certain 
activities.

          Section 515--Junior Reserve Officers' Training Corps

    This section would amend section 2031 of title 10, United 
States Code, to add science, technology, engineering, and 
mathematics to Junior Reserve Officers' Training Corps 
curriculum.

     Section 516--JROTC Computer Science and Cybersecurity Program

    This section would direct the Secretary of Defense to carry 
out a program to enhance the preparation of students in Junior 
Reserve Officers' Training Corps for careers in computer 
science and cybersecurity.

  Section 517--Programs of Scholarships for Members of Junior Reserve 
    Officers' Training Corps Units toward Obtaining Private Pilot's 
                              Certificates

    This section would authorize the Department of Defense to 
create a program to award scholarships to qualified members of 
Junior Reserve Officers' Training Corps units to pursue a 
private pilot's certification.

   Section 518--Sense of Congress regarding Junior Reserve Officers' 
                             Training Corps

    This section would express the sense of Congress regarding 
support for 3,700 Junior Reserve Officers' Training Corps units 
nationwide.

   Section 519--Sense of Congress regarding the National Guard Youth 
                           Challenge Program

    This section would express the sense of Congress that the 
National Guard Youth Challenge Program provides a vital service 
to at-risk youth and would encourage the Secretary of Defense 
to use the authority provided in section 519 of the John S. 
McCain National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2019 
(Public Law 115-232) to use equipment and facilities of the 
Department of Defense in this program.

  Subtitle C--General Service Authorities and Correction of Military 
                                Records


    Section 521--Establishment of Board of Appeals regarding Denied 
            Requests for Upgraded Discharges and Dismissals

    This section would require the Secretary of Defense to 
establish a board of discharge appeals to hear appeals of 
request for upgraded discharges and dismissals that are denied 
by the service review agencies. This section would also require 
the Secretary to submit a report not later than April 1, 2021, 
on data based on the appeals heard by the board, and to publish 
the information online annually beginning on October 1, 2022.

   Section 522--Prohibition on Reduction in the Number of Personnel 
             Assigned to Duty with a Service Review Agency

    This section would amend section 1559(a) of title 10, 
United States Code, by extending the date on prohibition on 
reducing the number of personnel assigned to duty with a 
service review agency from December 31, 2019, to December 31, 
2025. This section would also require a report by each 
Secretary of each military department that details a plan to 
reduce the backlog of applications and maintain resources 
required to meet timelines under section 1557 of title 10, 
United States Code.

  Section 523--Advisory Committee on Record and Service Review Boards

    This section would establish a Defense Advisory Committee 
on Record and Upgrade Review Boards to advise the Secretary of 
Defense on the best structure, practice, and procedures to 
ensure consistency of the boards for correction of military 
records and service review boards.

 Section 524--Time Requirements for Certification of Honorable Service

    This section would require the Secretary of a military 
department or a designated commissioned officer serving in the 
pay grade of O-6 or higher to, upon submission of a completed 
United States Citizenship and Immigration Services Form N-426 
in the case of a member of the Armed Forces who has served 
honorably on active duty, provide certification not later than 
5 days, and in the case of a member of the Armed Forces who has 
served honorably in the Reserve Component provide certification 
not later than 3 weeks.

    Section 525--Prohibition on Implementation of Military Service 
    Suitability Determinations for Foreign Nationals Who Are Lawful 
                          Permanent Residents

    This section would prohibit the Secretary of Defense from 
taking any action to implement the memorandum titled ``Military 
Service Suitability Determinations for Foreign Nationals Who 
Are Lawful Permanent Residents'' until the Secretary submits a 
report on the justification for the policy changes.

        Section 526--Strategic Plan for Diversity and Inclusion

    This section would require the Secretary of Defense to 
update and implement the Department of Defense Diversity and 
Inclusion Strategic Plan. The plan will cover a 5-year period 
beginning January 1, 2020.

  Section 527--Independent Study on Barriers to Entry into the Armed 
                      Forces for English Learners

    This section would require the Secretary of Defense to seek 
to enter into a contract with a federally funded research and 
development center to study barriers to entry into the Armed 
Forces for English learners.

Section 528--Reenlistment Waivers for Persons Separated from the Armed 
           Forces Who Commit One Misdemeanor Cannabis Offense

    This section would require the Secretary of Defense to 
prescribe regulations that permit any Secretary of a military 
department to grant a reenlistment waiver to a covered person 
who has separated from the Armed Forces and has admitted to or 
been convicted by a court of competent jurisdiction of a single 
violation relating to the use or possession of cannabis.

      Section 529--Sense of Congress regarding Accession Physicals

    This section would express the sense of Congress that the 
Secretary of Defense should explore alternatives to centralized 
accession physicals at United States Military Entrance 
Processing Command stations, including conducting physicals in 
the local community, in order to reduce transportation costs 
and improve efficiency in processing times and free up 
recruiters to allow them to focus on their core recruiting 
mission.

                      Subtitle D--Military Justice


                     Section 531--Command Influence

    This section would amend section 837 of title 10, United 
States Code (article 37 of the Uniform Code of Military 
Justice), to prohibit convening authorities and commanding 
officers from interfering with access and influencing 
witnesses, and would expressly allow convening authorities and 
commanding officers to engage in communications with 
subordinates that do not jeopardize the fairness of military 
judicial proceedings.

        Section 532--Statute of Limitations for Certain Offenses

    This section would amend section 843 of title 10, United 
States Code (article 43 of the Uniform Code of Military 
Justice), to eliminate the statute of limitations for the 
offenses of maiming and kidnapping of a child.

 Section 533--Guidelines on Sentences for Offenses Committed under the 
                    Uniform Code of Military Justice

    This section would require the Secretary of Defense to 
establish non-binding sentencing guidelines for offenses under 
the Uniform Code of Military Justice, taking into account 
sentencing data collected by the Military Justice Review Panel.

Section 534--Expansion of Responsibilities of Commanders for Victims of 
     Sexual Assault Committed by Another Member of the Armed Forces

    This section would require commanders to notify an alleged 
victim of sexual assault of significant events in the military 
justice process in connection with the investigation, 
prosecution, and confinement of the accused, when the accused 
is a member of the Armed Forces, and to document such 
notification. This section would also require commanders to 
create and maintain documentation of an alleged sexual assault 
victim's expressed preference for prosecution jurisdiction.

  Section 535--Increase in Investigative Personnel and Victim Witness 
                      Assistance Program Liaisons

    This section would require military service secretaries to 
ensure personnel authorizations for criminal investigators 
allow for the completion of investigations of sex-related 
offenses in no more than 6 months, to the extent practicable. 
This section would require service secretaries to issue 
guidance requiring criminal investigators to submit a status 
report to their direct supervisor in the event an investigation 
exceeds 90 days. This section would also require military 
service secretaries to increase the number of personnel serving 
as Victim Witness Assistance Program liaisons to address 
personnel shortages.

 Section 536--Increase in Number of Digital Forensic Examiners for the 
             Military Criminal Investigation Organizations

    This section would increase the number of digital forensic 
examiners in each military criminal investigation organization 
by not fewer than 10 from the authorized number as of September 
30, 2019, and would require that funding for additional digital 
forensic examiners be derived from amounts authorized to be 
appropriated for fiscal year 2020 for the Armed Force concerned 
for operation and maintenance.

 Section 537--Pilot Programs on Defense Investigators in the Military 
                             Justice System

    This section would require the Secretary of Defense to 
implement a pilot program on defense investigators within the 
military justice system.

 Section 538--Pilot Program on Prosecution of Special Victim Offenses 
          Committed by Attendees of Military Service Academies

    This section would require the Secretary of Defense to 
create and carry out a pilot program establishing an 
independent authority to review certain special victim offenses 
and determine whether such offenses shall be referred to trial 
by court-martial convening authority. This section would also 
require the Secretary of Defense to establish an Office of the 
Chief Prosecutor within the Office of the Secretary of Defense, 
as part of the pilot program.

Section 539--Timely Disposition of Nonprosecutable Sex-Related Offenses

    This section would require the Secretary of Defense to 
develop and implement a policy to ensure the timely disposition 
of nonprosecutable sex-related offenses.

     Section 540--Training for Sexual Assault Initial Disposition 
Authorities on Exercise of Disposition Authority for Sexual Assault and 
                          Collateral Offenses

    This section would require specified training for sexual 
assault initial disposition authorities on the exercise of 
disposition authority for sexual assault and collateral 
offenses.

                    Subtitle E--Other Legal Matters


  Section 541--Standard of Evidence Applicable to Investigations and 
  Reviews Related to Protected Communications of Members of the Armed 
               Forces and Prohibited Retaliatory Actions

    This section would amend section 1034 of title 10, United 
States Code, to allow a finding or other determination made 
under subsections (c), (d), (g), or (h) to be based on the 
standards of evidence specified in section 1221(e) of title 5.

 Section 542--Expansion of Special Victims' Counsel for Victims of Sex-
                 Related or Domestic Violence Offenses

    This section would expand the Special Victims' Counsel 
program to cover eligible domestic violence victims and 
designate Special Victims' Counsel Paralegals. This section 
would also require expansion of the Special Victims' Counsel 
program not later than 2 years post-enactment and would require 
a report, due not later than December 1, 2022, on how the 
military services are meeting Special Victims' Counsel program 
requirements.

 Section 543--Notification of Issuance of Military Protective Order to 
                        Civilian Law Enforcement

    This section would amend section 1567a of title 10, United 
States Code, to require unit commanders to notify civilian 
authorities of the issuance of a military protective order 
against a member of the Armed Forces, and would require unit 
commanders to notify a receiving unit of the issuance of a 
military protective order in the event a member is transferred 
to another unit. This section would also require the Secretary 
of Defense, not later than March 1, 2020, and each year 
thereafter through 2024, to submit a report to the 
congressional defense committees identifying the number of 
military protective orders issued and the number of military 
protective orders reported to the appropriate civilian 
authorities in the preceding calendar year in which the report 
was submitted.

     Section 544--Clarifications regarding Scope of Employment and 
        Reemployment Rights of Members of the Uniformed Services

    This section would amend section 4303 of title 38, United 
States Code, to protect service members from forced arbitration 
in Uniformed Services Employment and Reemployment Rights Act 
cases.

    Section 545--Military Orders Required for Termination of Leases 
            Pursuant to the Servicemembers Civil Relief Act

    This section would amend section 3955 of title 50, United 
States Code, to clarify that, in the context of terminating 
residential or motor vehicle leases, military orders for a 
permanent change of station include separation or retirement 
orders.

Section 546--Consultation regarding Victim's Preference in Prosecution 
                              Jurisdiction

    This section would require the Secretary of Defense, acting 
through the Under Secretary of Defense for Personnel and 
Readiness, to issue guidance to ensure that sexual assault 
victims' preference for prosecution jurisdiction is recorded.

 Section 547--Extension and Expansion of Defense Advisory Committee on 
Investigation, Prosecution, and Defense of Sexual Assault in the Armed 
                                 Forces

    This section would extend the Defense Advisory Committee on 
Investigation, Prosecution, and Defense of Sexual Assault (DAC-
IPAD) for an additional 5 years past its original expiration 
date. This section would also expand DAC-IPAD's scope of review 
to cover restorative justice models and interpretation of the 
Rules for Courts-Martial 1001(c).

 Section 548--Defense Advisory Committee for the Prevention of Sexual 
                               Misconduct

    This section would require the Secretary of Defense to 
establish an advisory committee, known as the Defense Advisory 
Committee for the Prevention of Sexual Misconduct, which shall 
advise the Secretary on the prevention of sexual assault and on 
the policies, programs, and practices of each military 
department, Armed Force, and military service academy for the 
prevention of sexual assault.

 Section 549--Safe to Report Policy Applicable across the Armed Forces

    This section would require the Secretary of Defense, in 
consultation with the service secretaries and the Secretary of 
Homeland Security, to prescribe regulations for a safe to 
report policy that would allow alleged victims of sexual 
assault, who may have committed minor collateral misconduct, to 
report sexual assault without fear or receipt of discipline for 
such collateral misconduct.

   Section 550--Availability of Special Victims' Counsel and Special 
              Victim Prosecutors at Military Installations

    This section would ensure Special Victims' Counsel or 
Special Victim Prosecutors are available to requesting 
individuals not later than 48 hours after a request is made. 
This section would also require a report to the Committees on 
Armed Services of the Senate and the House of Representatives 
which sets forth the feasibility and advisability of 
maintaining civilian positions that would provide support to 
Special Victims' Counsel and ensure continuity and preservation 
of knowledge during transition between service of Special 
Victims' Counsels.

 Section 550a--Notice to Victims of Alleged Sexual Assault of Pendency 
of Further Administrative Action Following a Determination Not to Refer 
                       to Trial by Court-Martial

    This section would require the Secretary of Defense to 
establish regulations requiring a commander who decides not to 
refer a case of alleged sexual assault to court-martial to 
periodically notify the victim of further action on such case.

    Section 550b--Training for Special Victims' Counsel on Civilian 
Criminal Justice Matters in the States of the Military Installations to 
                             Which Assigned

    This section would require Special Victims' Counsel and 
Victim Legal Counsel to receive training on the law and 
policies, for certain criminal justice matters, of the State or 
States in which the military installation is located in order 
to provide victims of alleged sex-related offenses with 
information to make informed decisions regarding preference for 
prosecution jurisdiction.

                      Subtitle F--Member Education


 Section 551--Authority for Detail of Certain Enlisted Members of the 
                Armed Forces as Students at Law Schools

    This section would require service secretaries to detail 
enlisted members of the Armed Forces as students at accredited 
law schools leading to the degree of bachelor of law or juris 
doctor.

    Section 552--Education of Members of the Armed Forces on Career 
                 Readiness and Professional Development

    This section would require the Secretary of Defense to 
carry out a program to provide education on career readiness 
and professional development to members of the Armed Forces.

    Section 553--Defense Language Institute Foreign Language Center

    This section would amend section 2168 of title 10, United 
States Code, to permit the Defense Language Institute to confer 
Bachelor degrees, in addition to Associate degrees, to 
graduates that meet the appropriate requirements for that 
degree.

    Section 554--Expansion of Department of Defense Starbase Program

    This section would amend section 2193b of title 10, United 
States Code, by inserting science, technology, engineering, art 
and design, and mathematics.

Section 555--Degree Granting Authority for United States Army Armament 
                            Graduate School

    This section would amend chapter 751 of title 10, United 
States Code, to authorize the United States Army Armament 
Graduate School to confer appropriate degrees upon graduates 
who meet the degree requirements.

  Section 556--Congressional Nominations for Senior Reserve Officers' 
                      Training Corps Scholarships

    This section would allow the Secretary of the Army to 
consider any candidate nominated but not selected for 
appointment to the United States Military Academy by Members of 
Congress or officials from U.S. Territories to be considered 
for appointment as a Senior Reserve Officers' Training Corps 
cadet under section 2107 of title 10, United States Code.

Section 557--Consideration of Application for Transfer for a Student of 
  a Military Service Academy Who Is the Victim of a Sexual Assault or 
                            Related Offense

    This section would amend sections 7461, 8480, and 9461 of 
title 10 United States Code, and would direct the military 
service secretaries to establish regulations, based on 
guidelines provided by the Secretary of Defense, for the timely 
consideration of an application for transfer of a military 
service academy student who is the victim of a sexual assault 
or related offense.

 Section 558--Redesignation of the Commandant of the United States Air 
 Force Institute of Technology as the Director and Chancellor of Such 
                               Institute

    This section would amend section 9414b of title 10, United 
States Code, to redesignate the Commandant of the United States 
Air Force Institute of Technology (AFIT) as the Director and 
Chancellor of AFIT.

 Section 559--Eligibility of Additional Enlisted Members for Associate 
       Degree Programs of the Community College of the Air Force

    This section would amend section 9415 of title 10, United 
States Code, to authorize the Community College of the Air 
Force (CCAF) to award associate degrees to enlisted members of 
services other than the Air Force who are participating in CCAF 
affiliated joint-service training and education courses.

   Section 560--Safe-to-Report Policy Applicable to Military Service 
                               Academies

    This section would require the Secretary of Defense to 
prescribe regulations for the implementation of a safe-to-
report policy which would allow alleged sexual assault victims 
at the United States Military Academy, United States Naval 
Academy, United States Air Force Academy, and the United States 
Coast Guard Academy, who may have committed minor collateral 
misconduct, an opportunity to report an occurrence of sexual 
assault without fear of discipline.

Section 560a--Recoupment of Funds from Cadets and Midshipmen Separated 
                        for Criminal Misconduct

    This section would direct each Secretary of a military 
department to develop regulations that would require monetary 
recoupment from a service academy cadet or midshipman convicted 
of criminal misconduct, regardless of academic year.

               Subtitle G--Member Training and Transition


Section 561--Prohibition on Gender-Segregated Training at Marine Corps 
                             Recruit Depots

    This section would prohibit the Commandant of the Marine 
Corps from segregating training at the Marine Corps Recruit 
Depot, Parris Island, South Carolina, not later than 5 years 
after the date of the enactment of this Act and at Marine Corps 
Recruit Depot, San Diego, California, not later than 8 years 
after the date of the enactment of this Act.

     Section 562--Medical Personnel at Marine Corps Recruit Depots

    This section would require the Secretary of the Navy to 
assign the appropriate medical personnel to Marine Corps 
Recruit Depots.

Section 563--Assessment of Deaths of Recruits under the Jurisdiction of 
                       the Secretary of the Navy

    This section would require the Department of Defense 
Inspector General to conduct an assessment of the deaths of 
recruits and medical protocols at recruit training facilities 
under the jurisdiction of the Secretary of the Navy.

 Section 564--Inclusion of Specific Email Address Block on Certificate 
         of Release or Discharge from Active Duty (DD Form 214)

    This section would modify the certificate of release or 
discharge from Active Duty (DD Form 214) by adding an email 
address block.

  Section 565--Machine Readability and Electronic Transferability of 
   Certificate of Release or Discharge from Active Duty (DD Form 214)

    This section would require the Secretary of Defense to 
modify the DD Form 214 to make it machine readable and 
electronically transferable.

              Section 566--Records of Service for Reserves

    This section would require the Secretary of Defense to 
establish and implement a standard record of service for 
members of the Reserve Component that summarizes the record of 
service of the service member including dates of Active Duty 
service.

    Subtitle H--Military Family Readiness and Dependents' Education


Section 571--Authorizing Members to Take Leave for a Birth or Adoption 
                       in More Than One Increment

    This section would amend section 701 of title 10, United 
States Code, removing the statutory requirement that parental 
leave be taken in one increment.

      Section 572--Deferred Deployment for Members Who Give Birth

    This section would amend section 701 of title 10, United 
States Code, to standardize new mother deployment deferral 
policy across the military services, to include the Coast 
Guard.

Section 573--Authority of the Secretary Concerned to Transport Remains 
of a Covered Decedent to No More Than Two Places Selected by the Person 
            Designated to Direct Disposition of the Remains

    This section would amend section 1482 of title 10, United 
States Code, to authorize the Department of Defense to 
reimburse surviving family members of service members killed in 
action for costs associated with transporting their remains to 
a national cemetery.

     Section 574--Clarification regarding Eligibility to Transfer 
       Entitlement under Post-9/11 Educational Assistance Program

    This section would amend section 3319 of title 38, United 
States Code, to prevent the Secretary of Defense from imposing 
a limit on transferability of Post-9/11 GI Bill benefits based 
on maximum number of years of service.

             Section 575--Absentee Ballot Tracking Program

    This section would amend section 20302 of title 52, United 
States Code, to require State election officials to establish 
and operate an absentee ballot tracking program for absentee 
uniformed voters and overseas citizen voters.

                 Section 576--Annual State Report Card

    This section would amend section 1111 of the Elementary and 
Secondary Education Act of 1965 to include children with a 
parent(s) in the National Guard or Reserve Component in the 
Military Student Identifier definition of the Every Student 
Succeeds Act.

 Section 577--Transportation of Remains of Casualties; Travel Expenses 
                            for Next of Kin

    This section would authorize transportation expenses to 
Dover Air Force Base, Delaware, for next of kin of service 
members killed overseas.

 Section 578--Meetings of Officials of the Department of Defense with 
           Survivors of Deceased Members of the Armed Forces

    This section would direct the Secretary of Defense to 
establish procedures to ensure that each of the military 
departments identify surviving family members of fallen service 
members to meet periodically with their respective military 
service chiefs to provide feedback on surviving family member 
issues and concerns. In addition, the Under Secretary of 
Defense for Personnel and Readiness shall meet periodically 
with surviving family members to help inform Department of 
Defense casualty and Gold Star Family policy. This section 
would also require the Under Secretary of Defense for Personnel 
and Readiness to provide a briefing to the Committee on Armed 
Services of the House of Representatives not later than April 
1, 2020, on procedures established and the results of the 
meetings with the family members.

    Section 579--Direct Employment Pilot Program for Members of the 
National Guard and Reserve, Veterans, Their Spouses and Dependents, and 
                     Members of Gold Star Families

    This section would enable the Secretary of Defense to 
create a pilot program that would allow States to establish or 
expand job placement programs, and related employment services, 
for unemployed guardsmen, reservists, military spouses, and 
veterans.

 Section 580--Continued Assistance to Schools with Significant Numbers 
                     of Military Dependent Students

    This section would authorize $40.0 million for the purpose 
of providing assistance to local educational agencies with 
military dependent students, and $10.0 million for local 
educational agencies eligible to receive a payment for children 
with severe disabilities.

                   Subtitle I--Decorations and Awards


    Section 581--Expansion of Gold Star Lapel Button Eligibility to 
                     Stepsiblings; Free Replacement

    This section would amend section 1126 of title 10, United 
States Code, to extend the authority for the Secretary of 
Defense to provide a gold star lapel button to stepsiblings of 
deceased military service members. Additionally, it would allow 
the Department of Defense to replace the lapel button upon 
application and without cost to an eligible family member.

    Section 582--Establishment of the Atomic Veterans Service Medal

    This section would authorize the creation of the Atomic 
Veterans Service Medal, to be awarded to radiation-exposed 
veterans.

            Section 583--Review of World War I Valor Medals

    This section would direct the Department of Defense to 
review the service records of certain African American, Asian 
American, Hispanic American, Jewish American, and Native 
American war veterans to ensure that minority service members 
are appropriately recognized for their valorous service.

          Subtitle J--Miscellaneous Reports and Other Matters


        Section 591--Repeal of Quarterly Report on End Strengths

    This section would repeal paragraph (3) of section 115(e) 
of title 10, United States Code, to remove the requirement for 
the Secretary of Defense to notify the Committee on Armed 
Services of the Senate and the Committee on Armed Services of 
the House of Representatives whenever the Secretary establishes 
an end-of-quarter strength level pursuant to section 
115(e)(2)(A) or modifies a strength level pursuant to section 
115(e)(2)(B).

    Section 592--Revision of Workplace and Gender Relations Surveys

    This section would amend section 481 of title 10, United 
States Code, to update the Armed Forces Workplace and Gender 
Relations Surveys and the Department of Defense Civilian 
Employee Workplace and Gender Relations Survey to require 
solicitation of information of the types and frequency of 
unwanted sexual contact that have occurred during the preceding 
year.

   Section 593--Modification of Elements of Reports on the Improved 
                     Transition Assistance Program

    This section would modify the required reports to Congress 
concerning the improved Transition Assistance Program.

  Section 594--Questions in Workplace Surveys regarding Supremacist, 
                     Extremist, and Racist Activity

    This section would require the Secretary of Defense to 
include in the workplace and equal opportunity, command 
climate, and workplace and gender relations surveys whether 
respondents have ever experienced supremacist activity, 
extremist activity, or racism.

 Section 595--Command Matters in Connection with Transition Assistance 
                                Programs

    This section would require the inclusion of commander 
support for transition assistance programs as a criteria in 
command climate assessments.

 Section 596--Expressing Support for the Designation of a ``Gold Star 
                       Families Remembrance Day''

    This section would express the Congress's support for 
``Gold Star Families Remembrance Day.''

          TITLE VI--COMPENSATION AND OTHER PERSONNEL BENEFITS

                       ITEMS OF SPECIAL INTEREST


                     Commissaries during Shutdowns

    The committee notes that service members rely on the 
commissary for their daily need for groceries, and service 
member surveys consistently rate commissaries as one of their 
most valued benefits. If commissaries are closed during 
government shutdown, there will be an immediate pressure on in-
store inventory and the working capital funds as products begin 
to spoil and reach their expiration dates. It is important that 
the commissary remain open during government shutdowns to meet 
the needs of service members. The committee therefore urges the 
Department of Defense and the Defense Commissary Agency to keep 
the commissaries open during any government shutdown because of 
the vital need of military men and women for groceries on a 
daily basis.

  Department of Defense SkillBridge Program Applicability to Service 
                             Member Spouses

    The committee commends the Department of Defense for its 
development of the Department of Defense SkillBridge program, 
which offers training programs in the form of internships and 
apprenticeships through participating private companies for 
service members transitioning to civilian life. The committee 
remains concerned by the persistent issue of unemployment and 
underemployment of military spouses. Therefore, the committee 
directs the Secretary of Defense to provide a report to the 
Committee on Armed Services of the House of Representatives not 
later than April 1, 2020, on the feasibility and advisability 
of providing a similar program for service member spouses that 
would apply at any time during a spouse's career. The report 
shall include:
    (1) the extent to which private companies currently 
participating in SkillBridge are interested in extending 
internships and apprenticeships to service member spouses;
    (2) the extent to which the potential expansion of the 
program would affect the ability to effectively administer the 
current SkillBridge program;
    (3) the costs to the Department of Defense of administering 
such a program;
    (4) any other issues the Secretary of Defense deems 
relevant.

        Educational Opportunities for Service Member Dependents

    The committee recognizes that the quality and availability 
of educational resources at and around military installations 
can vary greatly, causing challenges for service members with 
school-aged children. Children of service members are often 
subject to local educational conditions and frequent moves can 
pose additional stresses on the continuity of learning 
standards. These challenges may impact recruitment and 
retention. The committee recognizes providing quality 
educational options is necessary for ensuring our national 
security. Therefore, the committee encourages the Department of 
Defense to fully consider the quality of education available on 
and off military installations and whether additional 
educational options should be made available at certain 
geographically isolated installations.

    Maternity Leave Parity for National Guard and Reserve Components

    The committee notes that the Department of Defense 
established policies for maternity leave in 2016, authorizing 
12 weeks fully paid maternity leave after normal pregnancy and 
childbirth. The committee further notes that such paid leave is 
not given to female services members in inactive duty status 
within the National Guard and reserve components, and that 
these service members are still required to attend unit 
training assemblies to receive military service pay and 
retirement points. Therefore, the committee directs the 
Secretary of Defense to provide a report to the House Committee 
on Armed Services by May 1, 2020, on the barriers, benefits, 
and feasibility of providing compensation and credit for 
retired pay to members of the National Guard and reserve 
components in inactive duty status.

 Report Assessing the Advisability of Permitting Military Personnel to 
   use Education Benefits for Nontraditional Cyber-Related Education 
                                Programs

    The committee understands that new and innovative 
educational opportunities exist for service members through 
non-traditional forms of schooling such as technology boot 
camps or massive online open courses (MOOC's). Such courses are 
particularly useful for service members in geographically 
remote areas who are hoping to continue their education. While 
the committee understands and appreciates the need for 
verification and certification of educational programs prior to 
approving government funds, such as tuition assistance, to pay 
for such programs, the committee believes that such standards 
should be mindful of the rapidly evolving nature of modern 
educational services.
    Therefore, the Secretary of Defense shall provide a 
briefing to the Committee on Armed Services of the House of 
Representatives no later than February 1, 2020, outlining the 
Department of Defense's procedures for determining the 
educational institutions and resources eligible for tuition 
assistance. The report should include:
    (1) Standards the educational resource or institution must 
meet for military personnel to receive assistance from DoD.
    (2) A description of the steps taken to ensure a broad 
variety of STEM-focused programs are eligible for tuition 
assistance, including non-traditional cyber-related learning 
alternatives.
    (3) Steps that have been taken to account for the changes 
in modern learning platforms.
    (4) Recommendations for expanding the educational 
opportunities available to military personnel.

 Report on Feasibility of Loan or Grant Program to Offset the Cost of 
Child Care Center Accreditation in Areas with Long Waitlists to Access 
                   On-Base Child Development Centers

    The committee notes that there is a shortage of available 
and affordable child care on military installations and that 
many military families utilize private child care options due 
to this shortage. Further, the committee notes that in order to 
use the child care stipend made available to servicemembers 
whose children have been on a wait list for on-base child care 
for an extended period of time, the private child care center 
must be accredited. Data suggests that approximately half of 
the United States has too few licensed child care options. The 
committee directs the Secretary of Defense to submit a report 
to the Committees on Armed Services of the Senate and the House 
of Representatives not later than June 1, 2020 regarding the 
feasibility of the creation of a grant or loan program to 
defray the initial cost of meeting state licensure requirements 
for child care facilities in areas where there is a shortage of 
licensed child care options for military families. The report 
shall include:
    (1) An assessment of areas with the longest waitlists for 
on-base Child Development Centers;
    (2) An assessment of the availability of licensed, off-base 
child care facilities in those areas;
    (3) The feasibility of creating a grant or loan program to 
defray up to half the cost of meeting state licensure 
requirements;
    (4) Recommendations for legislative or administrative 
action as the Secretary considers appropriate in light of the 
report, including recommendations for a pilot grant or loan 
program.

                Report on TSP Default Contribution Rate

    The committee is concerned that the Department of Defense's 
default contribution rate of 3% to the Thrift Savings Plan 
(TSP) will have long term negative impacts on service 
members'--specifically junior enlisted service members''--
financial readiness and wellbeing. Civilian studies show that 
the average default automatic enrollment for civilian employer 
matching has increased in recent years to 4.6%, and that a 
contribution of at least 4% is required to achieve the same 
undiscounted lifetime income under the BRS as under the current 
system.
    The committee directs the Secretary of Defense to submit a 
report to the Committee on Armed Services of the House of 
Representatives not later than March 1, 2020, on the potential 
effects of automatically enrolling new service members into the 
Thrift Savings Plan (TSP) at the maximum government matching 
rate of 5% of the service member's base pay compared to the 
existing automatic enrollment of 3% of the servicemember's base 
pay. The elements of the report shall include:
    (1) The analysis and rationale for the current 3% default 
enrollment contribution.
    (2) A comparison of the estimated undiscounted lifetime 
income of an enlisted service member under the Blended 
Retirement System with a 3% matching contribution, a 5% 
matching contribution and the legacy retirement system. The 
comparison shall include analysis of different amounts of time 
in service as well as differentials between the active and 
reserve component.
    (3) A comparison of the estimated undiscounted lifetime 
income of an officer under the Blended Retirement System with a 
3% matching contribution, a 5% matching contribution and the 
legacy retirement system. The comparison shall include analysis 
of different amounts of time in service as well as 
differentials between the active and reserve component.
    (4) Analysis on enrollees who changed their contribution 
allocation from the default percentage and their rationale to 
do so.
    (5) The average TSP contribution percentage among 
servicemembers who elect to change from their default 
contribution once enrolled in the blended retirement system.
    (6) What programs or initiatives have been shown to be 
effective in increasing the percentage of servicemembers opting 
for the full 5% contribution?
    (7) Recommendations to enhance the future earnings and 
retirement savings of servicemembers.

       Review and Assessment of Transitional Compensation Program

    The committee notes the importance of all members of the 
Armed Forces and their families to feel safe and secure. The 
committee acknowledges the Department of Defense's continuous 
efforts to provide resources and programs, such as the Family 
Advocacy Program, to benefit the safety and quality of life for 
members of the Armed Forces and their families. In instances of 
domestic violence or abuse, victims should feel empowered and 
resourced to seek assistance. The committee is concerned that 
reports of domestic violence, intimate partner violence and 
sexual assault, or child abuse may go unreported by family 
members out of fear for losing access to military pay and 
allowances and benefits. The committee directs the Under 
Secretary of Defense for Personnel and Readiness to provide a 
briefing to the House Armed Services Committee not later than 
March 1, 2020, on a comprehensive review and assessment of the 
Transitional Compensation program. The report shall include the 
following:
    (1) a review of requests for Transitional Compensation;
    (2) a review of approved requests for Transitional 
Compensation;
    (3) an analysis of the discrepancies between (1) and (2);
    (4) an assessment of current Transitional Compensation as 
written in statute in Section 1059, title 10, United States 
Code, and its alignment with other legal definitions of 
domestic violence, intimate partner violence or sexual assault, 
or child abuse; and
    (5) any recommendations for modifying Transitional 
Compensation to improve supportive outcomes for victims.

              Service Member Separation Survey Methodology

    The committee is concerned that valuable military personnel 
data currently collected by the Department of Defense is not 
being effectively organized, analyzed, and applied to better 
understand service members' motivations for staying in or 
leaving the military. Data on service members' reasons for 
separation from service, that could be used to adjust 
recruiting and retention policies of the armed services and the 
Department of Defense, is not being collected in an effective 
or timely manner. The committee notes that the requirement for 
individual exit surveys and interviews with separating or 
retiring service members has not been uniformly established 
across the Department of Defense. In addition, the committee is 
concerned that the exit surveys may not be valid survey 
instruments.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of Defense, 
in coordination with the Department of Defense Office of People 
Analytics, to determine the best methodology and timing to 
conduct and require exit interviews or surveys with individuals 
leaving Active Duty to establish, at a minimum:
    (1) what personal or professional factors are causing the 
service member to leave the military service.
    (2) what specific opportunities, programs, or benefits 
could have influenced their retention decisions.
    (3) service member satisfaction with benefits, 
compensation, and service leadership.
    (4) service member suggestions for improving benefits, 
career management, or work-life balance.
    Furthermore, the Secretary, in coordination with the Office 
of People Analytics, shall review currently existing military 
personnel databases that may be used to assist the services in 
further establishing service member behaviors regarding 
accession and retention in the military.
    The committee directs the Secretary to provide a briefing 
to the Committee on Armed Services of the House of 
Representatives not later than April 1, 2020, on the efforts to 
establish enhanced military personnel data analytics and an 
effective exit survey program as described above.

                  Servicemember Statement of Benefits

    Section 522 of the John S. McCain National Defense 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2019 (Public Law 115-232) 
amended chapter 58 of title 10, United States Code, by adding a 
new ``Statement of Benefits'', that would provide 
servicemembers, with a current and individualized statement of 
benefits that provides a comprehensive and complete listing of 
all benefits to the servicemember is entitled. To date, the 
Department of Defense has not yet complied with section 522. 
The committee reaffirms that Active Duty servicemembers and 
members of a Reserve Component shall be provided with an 
individualized, comprehensive, and complete statement of 
benefits listing all benefits to which they are entitled. It is 
imperative that those who have served in our Nation's Armed 
Forces be afforded with clear guidance as to the benefits to 
which they are entitled after serving their country to assist 
them with a successful transition to civilian life. Provision 
of such a statement of benefits individualized to each 
servicemember, including an authoritative estimate of benefits 
provided by other departments, will assist in that member's 
awareness of and ability to access services to which that 
member is entitled.

                       Spouse Employment Programs

    The committee is aware of the extensive network of 
resources that the Department of Defense has established to 
assist spouses of members of the Armed Forces in seeking 
employment. The committee understands the need to provide both 
online and in-person career counseling and employment 
information to ensure the unique needs of military spouses are 
met. However, the committee remains concerned that some of the 
resources available may not adequately target the professions 
most sought-after by spouses. Therefore, the committee directs 
the Comptroller General of the United States to provide a 
briefing to the Committee on Armed Services of the House of 
Representatives not later than April 1, 2020, with a report to 
follow at a later date, containing the following components:
    (1) an analysis of whether military spouses with certain 
professional certifications or licenses have higher rates of 
unemployment and underemployment than other military spouses;
    (2) an analysis of whether military spouses with certain 
professional certifications or licenses have higher rates of 
unemployment and underemployment when compared to their 
civilian counterparts;
    (3) an analysis of whether military spouses married to 
service members of certain ranks have higher rates of 
unemployment and underemployment than other military spouses;
    (4) an analysis of whether the Department of Defense has a 
system of measurement for evaluating the effectiveness of 
States' laws in easing licensing burdens on military spouses 
and whether occupational licensing requirements are considered 
when evaluating service member assignment decisions; and
    (5) marketing efforts by the Department of Defense to 
ensure military spouses are aware of the available resources.

                         LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS


                     Subtitle A--Pay and Allowances


       Section 601--Clarification of Continuation of Pays During 
 Hospitalization and Rehabilitation Resulting From Wounds, Injury, or 
Illness Incurred while on Duty in a Hostile Fire Area or Exposed to an 
             Event of Hostile Fire or Other Hostile Action

    This section would amend section 372 of title 37, United 
States Code, to authorize, in the case of a member under the 
jurisdiction of a Secretary of a military department, the 
continuation of special pays until the date on which the member 
is determined fit for duty.

   Section 602--Basic Needs Allowance for Low-Income Regular Members

    This section would amend section 402 of title 37, United 
States Code, to authorize the Secretary of Defense to pay a 
basic needs allowance to a qualified service member.

Section 603--Temporary Increase of Rates of Basic Allowance for Housing 
Following Determination That Local Civilian Housing Costs Significantly 
                           Exceed Such Rates

    This section would amend section 403(b) of title 37, United 
States Code, to authorize the Secretary of Defense to prescribe 
a temporary adjustment of the basic allowance for housing rates 
for a housing area where the actual costs of adequate housing 
differ from the calculated rates of housing for that area as 
determined by the Secretary.

     Section 604--Basic Allowance for Housing for a Member Without 
  Dependents When Relocation Would Financially Disadvantage the Member

    This section would allow the Secretaries of the military 
departments discretionary authority to authorize a housing 
allowance based on the old homeport or permanent duty station 
for single members disadvantaged as a result of a unit's change 
of homeport or permanent duty station, as long as the member 
had orders returning to the previous homeport or duty station.

               Section 605--Partial Dislocation Allowance

    This section would amend sections 452 and 477 of title 37, 
United States Code, to allow service members to receive a 
partial dislocation allowance if they are ordered to vacate 
dormitories.

             Subtitle B--Bonuses and Special Incentive Pays


 Section 611--One-Year Extension of Certain Expiring Bonus and Special 
                            Pay Authorities

    This section would extend, through December 31, 2020, 
income replacement payments for Reserve Component members 
experiencing extended and frequent mobilization for Active Duty 
service; would extend two critical recruitment and retention 
incentive programs for Reserve Component health care 
professionals; would extend accession and retention incentives 
for nuclear-qualified officers; and would extend the 
consolidated special and incentive pay authorities.

                Subtitle C--Family and Survivor Benefits


     Section 621--Payment of Transitional Compensation for Certain 
                               Dependents

    This section would amend section 1059 of title 10, United 
States Code, to close an inequitable gap that delays 
commencement of transitional compensation to a small subset of 
dependents or former dependents who request the Secretary 
concerned to authorize exceptional eligibility for transitional 
compensation.

             Section 622--Death Gratuity for ROTC Graduates

    This section would amend section 1475 of title 10, United 
States Code, to authorize a death gratuity to the family of a 
graduate of the Reserve Officers' Training Corps who dies 
before receiving a first duty assignment.

     Section 623--Continued Eligibility for Education and Training 
             Opportunities for Spouses of Promoted Members

    This section would extend the eligibility for any spouse 
who is eligible for the My Career Advancement Account program 
and begins a course of study leading toward a qualifying 
degree, license, or certification, and would ensure they will 
not be subsequently made ineligible to complete their studies 
solely because the sponsoring service member has been promoted 
to a higher grade.

Section 624--Occupational Improvements for Relocated Spouses of Members 
                       of the Uniformed Services

    This section would amend section 1784 of title 10, United 
States Code, to provide occupational support to military 
spouses by improving the portability of occupational licenses 
through interstate compacts and amending residency laws 
pertaining to registering a business.

Section 625--Expansion of Authority To Provide Financial Assistance to 
Civilian Providers of Child Care Services or Youth Program Services Who 
 Provide Such Services to Survivors of Members of the Armed Forces Who 
                          Die in Line of Duty

    This section would amend section 1798 of title 10, United 
States Code, to authorize financial assistance to civilian 
providers of child care services or youth program services to 
survivors of members of the Armed Forces who die in the line of 
duty.

 Section 626--Space-Available Travel on Military Aircraft for Children 
and Surviving Spouses of Members Who Die of Hostile Action or Training 
                                  Duty

    This section would amend section 2641 of title 10, United 
States Code, to allow children meeting certain requirements and 
surviving spouses of members of the Armed Forces who die as a 
result of hostile action or training duty to use Space-
Available (Space-A) travel.

 Section 627--Consideration of Service on Active Duty To Reduce Age of 
          Eligibility for Retired Pay for Non-Regular Service

    This section would amend section 12731(f)(2)(B)(i) of title 
10, United States Code, to authorize credit for a service 
member who as a member of the Ready Reserve serves on Active 
Duty or performs Active service under section 12304(b) of title 
10, United States Code. The eligibility age will be reduced 
below 60 years of age by 3 months for each aggregate of 90 days 
on which such person serves on such Active Duty or performs 
such Active service in any fiscal year after January 28, 2008, 
or in any two consecutive fiscal years after September 30, 
2014.

Section 628--Modification to Authority To Reimburse for State Licensure 
and Certification Costs of a Spouse of a Member Arising From Relocation

    This section would require the Secretary concerned to 
increase the maximum reimbursement amount to $1,000 and to do 
an analysis to determine if the maximum reimbursement amount 
for State licensure and certifications of a spouse is 
sufficient to cover the average costs of relicensing.

Section 629--Improvements to Child Care for Members of the Armed Forces

    This section would amend section 1798(a) of title 10, 
United States Code, to authorize financial assistance to 
civilian child care providers who care for the children of 
survivors of members who die in the line of duty and to expand 
direct hiring authority for child care providers. Additionally, 
this section would direct the Secretary of Defense to assess 
and report on:
    (1) the financial assistance provided service members for 
child care,
    (2) the child care capacity on military installations to 
ensure access of service members, and
    (3) the accessibility of Department of Defense websites 
related to child care and spousal employment.
    The Secretary of Defense shall also ensure the portability 
to another Department of Defense facility of background 
investigations and training certifications for childcare 
providers.

    Section 630--Casualty Assistance for Survivors of Deceased ROTC 
                               Graduates

    This section would provide a casualty assistance officer to 
the family of Reserve Officers' Training Corps cadets who have 
taken the oath but have not yet reported to their first duty 
station, in the event of their death.

                   Subtitle D--Defense Resale Matters


      Section 631--GAO Review of Defense Resale Optimization Study

    This section would require the Comptroller General of the 
United States to conduct a review and submit a report to the 
Committees on Armed Services of the Senate and the House of 
Representatives regarding the business case analysis performed 
as part of the defense resale optimization report titled 
``Study to Determine the Feasibility of Consolidation of the 
Defense Resale Entities,'' dated December 4, 2018. The 
consolidation of defense resale entities would be delayed until 
the report is received and accepted.

                   TITLE VII--HEALTH CARE PROVISIONS

                       ITEMS OF SPECIAL INTEREST


                    Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy

    The committee commends the research and work being 
conducted by the Department of Defense on traumatic brain 
injury (TBI). However, the committee is seeking to understand 
the proportion of TBI research being dedicated to chronic 
traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). Therefore, the committee 
directs the Secretary of Defense to provide a report to the 
Committee on Armed Services of the House of Representatives not 
later than March 1, 2020, on the following:
    (1) the proportion and amount of the Department of Defense 
medical research budget being dedicated to CTE;
    (2) the projected number of service members potentially 
afflicted with CTE;
    (3) the plan and methodologies used for the detection of 
CTE in service members and covered beneficiaries;
    (4) the number of Department of Defense Graduate Medical 
Education programs that incorporate CTE into curricula;
    (5) the therapeutics being developed for covered 
beneficiaries afflicted with CTE; and
    (6) potential gaps in CTE research and detection 
methodologies.

                       Civilian Astronaut TRICARE

    The committee is aware of the sacrifices and risks 
associated with serving as an astronaut or payload specialist 
with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. This 
select population is exposed to hazardous environments that can 
result in injury and death. Currently, two-thirds of the 
currently living former astronauts were members of the military 
who are covered by TRICARE. The remaining one-third, however, 
are not eligible for this valuable benefit after years of 
dangerous and important service to their Nation. Therefore, the 
Secretary of Defense shall provide a briefing to the Committee 
on Armed Services of the House of Representatives no later than 
July 1, 2020, on the advisability and feasibility of providing 
TRICARE coverage to former astronauts and payload specialists.

Co-Location of Department of Defense and Department of Veterans Affairs 
                           Medical Facilities

    The committee is concerned that the Department of Defense 
and Department of Veterans Affairs have not fully considered 
the potential benefits of co-locating military treatment 
facilities in geographic locations in close proximity to 
Department of Veterans Affairs medical facilities in areas like 
William Beaumont Army Medical Center, Naval Medical Center San 
Diego, Travis Air Force Base, and other similar locations. 
Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of Defense to 
submit a report to the Committee on Armed Services of the House 
of Representatives by February 1, 2020, on the following:
    (1) a list of facilities where co-location may be possible;
    (2) a cost-benefit analysis that highlights efficiencies 
that could be gained by shared services, personal services 
contracts, equipment, and other resources; and
    (3) a list of facilities that could benefit from a joint 
planning, design, and construction process for Department of 
Defense and Department of Veterans Affairs medical facilities.

            Defense Health Command Organizational Structure

    The committee recognizes the Department of Defense is 
undertaking the most significant reform in the history of the 
Military Health System (MHS). Congressional action over the 
last 3 years has sought to ensure the MHS standardizes business 
process, reduces unnecessary duplication of organizational 
structures while enhancing the readiness of service members, 
and ensures a robust TRICARE health benefit. However, it 
remains unclear whether the Defense Health Agency is the 
transformational organizational structure needed to move the 
MHS into the future. Section 711 of the John S. McCain National 
Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2019 (Public Law 115-
232) required the Department of Defense to study potential 
Defense Health Command organizational structures, but that 
report has not yet been completed. The committee encourages the 
Department of Defense to consider the most efficient structure 
that meets the congressional requirements to transform the 
Military Health System as it determines the feasibility of 
developing a Defense Health Command organization structure.

      Food Allergies in the Peer Reviewed Medical Research Program

    The committee recognizes the critical contribution that the 
Department of Defense research and development portfolio makes 
in protecting service members and their families from chronic, 
life-threatening conditions. The committee recognizes the need 
to sustain and support these efforts by fully funding research 
and development programs that carry out this work within the 
Department of Defense Health Program and the Peer Reviewed 
Medical Research Program. A recent study in the Journal of the 
American Medical Association indicated that more than 10 
percent of the civilian population of the United States suffers 
from food allergies. If these figures were adjusted to the 
TRICARE population, it may translate into at least 400,000 
beneficiaries that could be affected. Also important is that 
more than two-thirds of young adults do not qualify for 
military service due to poor physical fitness or other issues 
where the diagnosis of food allergy may adversely affect 
military recruiting and retention. The committee recognizes 
that the rapidly increasing rate of food allergy prevalence 
over the past two decades can have detrimental effects on 
readiness and can increase defense-related health care costs. 
The committee encourages investment in research on the causes, 
treatments, and cures for food allergies.

 Government Accountability Office Review on Health Care Quality in the 
                         Military Health System

    The committee understands the Military Health System 
strives to offer quality health care to service members and 
covered beneficiaries. However, the committee is concerned 
there may be some gaps in different quality metrics that assess 
the provision of health care services. Therefore, the committee 
directs the Comptroller General of the United States to conduct 
a review and submit a report to the Committee on Armed Services 
of the House of Representatives not later than February 1, 
2020, that includes the following:
    (1) the timeliness of urgent health care referrals to be 
appropriately referred in both the direct care system and 
purchased care system;
    (2) an assessment of whether patients in the Military 
Health System are receiving the right amount of care when 
needed;
    (3) an assessment of whether the Department of Defense is 
utilizing work conducted by the Agency for Healthcare Research 
and Quality and the Institute of Medicine in developing 
standardized health care quality metrics;
    (4) an assessment on how many medical providers in the 
direct care system and purchased care system lost eligibility 
for malpractice insurance prior to working for the Department 
of Defense or would not be eligible for insurance were they not 
working for the Department of Defense; and
    (5) any changes in patient safety metrics related to the 
implementation of the Genesis electronic health record.

 Implementation Plan To Address the Impacts of Obesity on the Defense 
                               Enterprise

    The committee remains concerned that persistent high rates 
of excessive weight and body fat pose long-term risks for 
national security to the extent they prevent the Department of 
Defense from its mission to recruit, retain and sustain an 
effective joint force. The committee recognizes the efforts of 
the Department of Defense in acknowledging these mission 
readiness challenges and observes the findings of numerous 
studies on excessive weight and body fat in the military 
population. The committee notes that the Department of the 
Defense is the largest public healthcare provider in the United 
States and is aware of estimates that the Department spends 
more than $1 billion annually in treating obesity-related 
illnesses for servicemembers and dependents. The committee also 
observes that despite multiple studies acknowledging the costs 
and systemic readiness challenges of obesity-induced illnesses 
in the military community, actions taken to date have been 
fragmented, uncoordinated, and generally ineffective in 
reversing the detrimental impacts this condition has on 
readiness and rising health care costs. The committee believes 
the Department must urgently address the challenges that 
obesity poses to mission readiness and the military healthcare 
system's capacity to provide care to servicemembers, dependents 
and retirees.
    The committee therefore directs that the Undersecretary for 
Personnel and Readiness provide a briefing to the congressional 
defense committees by January 15, 2020 on the Department's 
implementation plan to address weight and obesity impacts on 
military servicemembers and dependents in the active and 
reserve component. This plan will include a
    (1) a description of the Department's goals, and how it 
will measure progress toward these goals;
    (2) how it will incorporate cross-functional strategies to 
align efforts across the services, commands, agencies, and the 
broader defense health enterprise;
    (3) how it will expand access to healthy food and fitness 
facilities in military communities;
    (4) how it will implement nutritional standards for food 
offered in military dining facilities, defense resale entities, 
and contract vendors; and
    (5) how it will use existing acquisition authorities to 
catalyze innovative partnerships to rapidly prototype scalable 
technology-enabled solutions that improve health and wellness 
for servicemembers and dependents across their daily lives.

    Innovative Traumatic Brain Injuries Preventative Device Research

    The committee commends the Department for its ongoing 
efforts to combat Traumatic Brain Injuries (TEI). With over 
380,000 TBIs documented within the services since 2000, the 
committee remains concerned about service members sustaining 
TBIs in training and in combat, particularly within the US 
Army.
    The committee understands that to date there has been 
limited focus and funding aimed at research for preventative 
solutions (other than helmets and training) to mitigate the 
severity of, or prevent entirely, TBI events despite the fact 
that such solutions are currently being developed in the 
commercial sector. For example, the committee is aware of 
collar-based technology that when worn around the neck has been 
shown to reduce the frequency and severity of TBIs. The 
committee believes it would be prudent for the Army to 
prioritize and initiate active research on protective devices 
such as these to determine their benefit and applicability to 
the force.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of the Army 
to provide a briefing to the Committees on Armed Services of 
the Senate and House of Representatives, not later than January 
1, 2020, on the Army's efforts in the area of TBI mitigation. 
The briefing shall include a description of the Army's current 
and past research on TBI preventative devices, the Army's plan 
to incorporate new innovate TEI preventative devices into their 
research efforts, and possible paths for the rapid fielding of 
such devices.

                Malaria and Malaria Vaccine Development

    The committee recognizes the critical contribution that the 
Department of Defense research and development portfolio makes 
in protecting service members from infectious diseases they may 
encounter on missions around the world. The committee 
recognizes the need to sustain and support this work by fully 
funding research and development programs that carry out these 
activities within the Department of Defense Health Program and 
Department of the Army and Department of the Navy Research, 
Development, Test and Evaluation budgets, including the 
Military Infectious Diseases Research Program, the Walter Reed 
Army Institute of Research, and the Navy Medical Research and 
Development Center. The committee in particular commends the 
research on malaria and malaria vaccines conducted by the 
Walter Reed Army Institute of Research and the Navy Medical 
Research and Development Center and encourages sustained 
investment in these areas.

                Military Wellness Information Synthesis

    The committee is concerned that gaps between disparate 
health databases may pose a risk to the readiness of service 
members in the Armed Forces. The committee also understands the 
need to harness the power of data and transform it into 
meaningful information, requires tools like algorithms, 
artificial intelligence and agile information system 
architecture. Therefore, the committee encourages the 
Department of Defense to continue seeking ways to partner with 
industry and develop internal processes that can leverage big 
data for strategic decision making that also has the power to 
make important contributions to individual service member 
readiness.

   Naval Medical Research Unit Dayton Disorientation Research Device

    The committee notes the importance of the work being 
conducted on spatial disorientation at the Naval Aerospace 
Medical Research Lab at Naval Medical Research Unit-Dayton on 
Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio. Spatial disorientation 
represents one of the most significant non-combat causes of 
aviation mishaps. A new Navy research tool, the Disorientation 
Research Device, known as the ``Kraken,'' has the ability to 
provide unprecedented research capability to address the 
persistent threat of spatial disorientation. The committee 
encourages the Secretary of Defense to make effective use of 
this valuable research capability to reduce the risk of spatial 
disorientation and to evaluate human factors like operational 
effectiveness, performance, and safety in range of moving 
vehicles.

              Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder Drug Therapy

    The committee is encouraged by recent medical advancements 
in the treatment of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). This 
emphasis on treatment is essential given that the Veterans 
Administration estimates that between 11 and 20 percent of 
Operation Iraqi Freedom and Operation Enduring Freedom veterans 
have PTSD in a given year. As a part of these advances, both 
the Department of Defense and private companies have worked to 
develop new drug therapy, some of which are in the Phase 3 
clinical trial stage. The committee encourages the Department 
to continue partnerships with private drug developers and to 
fund Phase 3 clinical trials for PTSD drugs when appropriate. 
However, there are concerns that additional emphasis should be 
placed on the advanced development of pharmaceuticals that show 
increasing effectiveness throughout clinical trials. Therefore, 
the committee directs the Secretary of Defense to provide a 
briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services by January 1, 
2020, on the current efforts underway to develop effective PTSD 
drug therapy, along with a description of existing partnerships 
with private drug developers, and the amount of Federal funding 
they receive.

Report on Access to Health Care Services for Reserve and National Guard 
                      Who Disclose Sexual Assault

    The Committee is concerned that if a Reserve Component (RC) 
service member is sexually assaulted while not in an active 
status, they are ineligible for DoD medical care (to include 
psychological health care) to treat symptoms from the trauma. 
Sexual assault, regardless when it occurs, is likely to impact 
duty performance and degrade mission effectiveness, and RC 
service members often execute military missions alongside their 
active duty counterparts. Medical treatment, to include 
psychological health treatment, can assist in recovery and 
enhance mission effectiveness and should be available 
regardless of service member's duty status. The Committee 
directs the Secretary of Defense to report to the House 
Committee on Armed Services by January 1, 2020 on the 
feasibility of providing medical care, to include psychological 
care, to members of the RC who are sexually assaulted while not 
in an active status.

 Report on Expanding TRICARE Benefits To Include Coverage To Allow for 
 Medical Treatment for Sexual Dysfunction Related to Sexual Assault or 
                               Harassment

    The Committee is concerned that service members who have 
been sexually assaulted or harassed do not have access to 
treatment for sexual dysfunction related to sexual assault or 
harassment through TRICARE. Service members who experience 
sexual assault or sexual harassment often struggle with 
subsequent sexual dysfunction, and may benefit from mental 
health treatment by an expert provider who treats sexual 
dysfunction, either as a stand-alone treatment, or in 
combination with medication. The Committee directs the 
Secretary of Defense to brief the House Committee on Armed 
Services no later than January 1, 2020 on the feasibility of 
providing treatment for sexual dysfunction related to sexual 
assault or harassment.

         Report on Pre-Hospital Tactical Combat Trauma Training

    The committee is interested in the continued development of 
tactical combat casualty care and notes the pivotal role it has 
played in saving the lives of wounded service members. However, 
the committee is concerned about the wide variation and lack of 
a standardized teaching methodology for pre-hospital tactical 
combat casualty care that could result in adverse casualty 
outcomes in the operational environment. Therefore, the 
committee directs the Secretary of Defense to submit a report 
to the Committee on Armed Services of the House of 
Representatives not later than May 1, 2020, on the development 
of a comprehensive strategy that addresses the standardization 
of pre-hospital tactical combat casualty care, as well as 
hospital and pre-hospital partnerships that include the 
American College of Surgeons, the National Association of 
Emergency Medical Technicians, and other organizations that may 
provide vital training, standards, and best practices that help 
improve the continuum of battlefield care. The report shall 
also include analysis of preventative medicine partnership 
programs, such as orthopedic surgery, that contribute to the 
medical readiness of military medical providers as they relate 
to tactical combat casualty care.

 Report on Service Member Discharges Related to Human Immunodeficiency 
                          Virus or Hepatitis B

    The committee remains concerned about the implementation of 
the Department of Defense Retention Policy for Non-Deployable 
Service Members as it relates to service members with Human 
Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) or Hepatitis B. Therefore, the 
committee directs the Secretary of Defense to submit a report 
to the Committee on Armed Services of the House of 
Representatives not later than February 1, 2020, that includes:
    (1) the number of service members discharged over the 
previous year as part of the Department of Defense Retention 
Policy for Non-Deployable Service Members;
    (2) the number of service members discharged because of 
non-deployability associated with HIV;
    (3) the number of service members discharged because of 
non-deployability associated with Hepatitis B; and
    (4) an explanation of any updates to personnel policies 
made by the Department of Defense for individuals living with 
HIV or Hepatitis B, or other diseases who are, as a result of 
their disease, impacted by this policy.

             Research to Reduce Deaths Due to Hemorrhaging

    The committee remains concerned that a platelet shortage 
for hemorrhage control continues to impact battlefield 
casualties. With challenges in logistics and limitations on 
current platelet products, the committee believes further 
research of freeze-dried blood products would reduce the loss 
of life. The committee encourages the Department of Defense to 
rapidly advance the research and development of freeze-dried 
hemostatic products, especially platelet-derived products, 
beyond their current stage. Therefore, the committee recommends 
that freeze-dried platelet derived hemostatic agents be 
included in the Army's top medical priorities and directs the 
Assistant Secretary of Defense for Health Affairs to instruct 
the Defense Health Agency to further investigate the value of a 
freeze-dried, platelet-derived hemostatic agent. The committee 
further directs that the Secretary of the Army shall 
investigate the potential long-term use as a component in 
support of any incident that occurs under the Emergency Use 
Authorization Act.

                   Service Member Diet and Nutrition

    The committee notes that between 2001 and 2011, almost a 
million service members or former service members were 
diagnosed with at least one psychological disorder either 
during or after deployment. A 2009 Department of Defense and 
National Institutes of Health conference (``Nutritional Armor 
for the Warfighter'') identified that excessive Omega-6 and 
inadequate Omega-3 in the food military personnel eat has a 
negative effect on physical and mental health. In October 2013, 
the Defense Science Board reported that ``restoring Omega-3 
fatty acids, magnesium, vitamin-D or other nutrients to optimal 
levels may not only improve performance, but may restore 
impaired personnel to healthy and fit status . . . These and 
similar strategies are designed to provide the warfighter with 
a range of benefits to maintain peak physical and cognitive 
abilities both during the mission and over the long term.'' The 
Department's Combat Feeding Program is designed to optimize 
rations for performance fueling of the warfighter, conducting 
multiple studies on ration enhancements, including rebalancing 
Omega-6/Omega-3 fatty acids ratio. Moreover, service member 
diet and nutrition is a critical preventive component of 
military readiness. The committee encourages the Secretary of 
Defense to complete efforts to develop a holistic program 
integrating effective dietary strategies to sustain health and 
performance by fiscal year 2020 and move rapidly to implement a 
long-term enterprise-wide nutrition policy that considers a 
science-based approach to service member diets geared toward 
enhancing service member performance and maximizing combat 
effectiveness.

        Translational Application of Mental Health Evidence Base

    The committee is concerned by the pace of translating 
research on post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), pain 
management, major depressive disorders (MDDs), and substance 
abuse into practical application that can be disseminated into 
clinical practice guidelines across the Department of Defense. 
Building on the committee report accompanying the National 
Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2019 (H. Rept. 115-
676), the committee directs the Secretary of Defense to provide 
a briefing to the Committee on Armed Services of the House of 
Representatives not later than February 1, 2020, on the 
following:
    (1) the tracking of patients who receive their care in 
primary care clinics (which frequently occurs, particularly for 
depression), those seen by embedded providers on operational 
platforms, and those who use purchased care for some or all of 
their care;
    (2) the process that ensures a formalized methodology for 
translating and tracking evidence-based research and treatments 
for PTSD, MDD, pain management, and substance abuse across the 
Department of Defense; and
    (3) the mechanism for the Defense Health Agency to track 
and assess substance abuse programs that may reside in the 
military departments.

                      TRICARE Reserve Select Study

    The committee remains concerned about Reserve Component 
service members using limited training time to address required 
health evaluations. The consumption of training time for 
purposes like medical preparedness that is not directly related 
to military readiness training may inhibit unit lethality. The 
lack of a TRICARE Reserve Select option for dual-status 
technicians impacts Reserve Component recruiting and retention 
efforts. The committee therefore directs the Secretary of 
Defense to submit a report to the Committee on Armed Services 
of the House of Representatives not later than April 1, 2020, 
that includes the following:
    (1) administrative, policy, statutory, and technical 
changes that could reduce the administrative burden on the 
military;
    (2) the program cost associated with providing TRICARE 
Reserve Select for medical, dental, and vision care to dual-
status technicians;
    (3) the out-of-pocket costs involved with providing TRICARE 
Reserve Select for medical, dental, and vision care to dual-
status technicians compared to the Federal Employees Health 
Benefits Program;
    (4) the amount of funding currently budgeted for Reserve 
Component health care;
    (5) the readiness and quality of life impacts associated 
with providing Reserve Component service members with TRICARE 
Reserve Select; and
    (6) an economic analysis of whether the cost of providing 
TRICARE Reserve Select for dual-status technicians is feasible 
when considering the readiness and time constraints of Reserve 
Component service members.

              TRICARE Specialty Drug Network Accessibility

    The Committee is concerned that the Pharmacy Benefits 
Manager (PBM) acting on behalf of TRICARE under the Office of 
Defense Health Affairs is restricting access for additional 
accredited pharmacies to the TRICARE specialty drug network 
without consideration or evaluation. The Committee is concerned 
that these actions by the PBM limits the maximum pricing 
competition possible, as well as reduces the widest degree of 
beneficiary access to drug therapies within TRICARE's specialty 
drug network.
    The Committee directs the Secretary of Defense to submit a 
report to the defense authorization committees by February 1, 
2020 that: evaluates TRICARE's pharmacy benefits management 
responsibilities and requirements; outlines the clear process 
for consideration, evaluation, and admission of additional and 
new accredited pharmacies to the TRICARE specialty drug 
network; and provides a cost analysis for adding new entrants 
into the specialty drug network.

                      Unhealthy Alcohol Use Report

    The committee is concerned that harmful alcohol use 
persists among Active Duty personnel and that trends have 
remained unchanged for years based on the 2015 Department of 
Defense Health Related Behaviors Survey results published in 
2018. In the report, one-third of service members reported 
binge drinking in the past 30 days and 35 percent engaged in 
hazardous or disordered drinking. High levels of alcohol misuse 
have translated into significant increases in mental health and 
health care utilization within the military. Finally, alcohol 
abuse is also associated with increased rates of suicide, 
alcohol-related misconduct, family problems, and increased 
medical costs. Taken together, these factors can significantly 
impair and diminish force readiness among Active Duty 
personnel.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of Defense 
to submit a report to the Committee on Armed Services of the 
House of Representatives by January 1, 2020, that contains the 
following:
    (1) the current Department-wide and service efforts to 
decrease the deleterious effects of alcohol on Active Duty 
personnel;
    (2) the implementation of current, effective, evidence- and 
population-based interventions to curb harmful alcohol use;
    (3) the incidence rate of sexual assaults and domestic 
violence involving alcohol-related events;
    (4) the feasibility of efforts taken to streamline the 
effective evidence-based alcohol abuse prevention programs 
employed by the services so that common elements are more 
standardized and jointly managed; and
    (5) the feasibility of adapting a National Institute of 
Alcohol and Alcohol Abuse-endorsed, effective web-based 
intervention developed by academia for the collegiate 
population to prevent and reduce harmful alcohol consumption, 
for a similarly aged military cohort pilot study.

                 University Affiliated Research Center

    The committee notes the important relationship between the 
Department of Defense and the Department-sponsored University 
Affiliated Research Center (UARC) laboratories in providing 
critical science, technology, and engineering research that 
support the warfighter. The committee encourages the Assistant 
Secretary of Defense for Health Affairs to establish a UARC to 
focus on the unique challenges wounded servicemembers 
experience. Emphasis should be placed on research that reduces 
dependency on opioids, develops novel pain management and 
mental health strategies, and leverages partnerships with 
industry and medical device manufacturers to advance promising 
technologies for wounded servicemembers.

                  Wounded Warrior Service Dog Program

    The committee is aware that Congress has appropriated funds 
for a competitive grants program to qualified non-profit 
organizations to provide assistance dogs to service members 
and/or veterans with disabilities across diverse geographic 
regions and population demographics. The program has received 
appropriations under the authority of the Defense Health 
Program, Operation and Maintenance, ``therapeutic service dog 
training program.'' The Uniformed Services University of the 
Health Sciences has solicited grant applications from non-
profit institutions committed to connecting trained service 
dogs with service members and veterans. The committee 
encourages the Secretary of Defense to fund this program and 
continue efforts to research the effectiveness of these 
treatments in support of service members recovering from post-
traumatic stress disorder and other post-deployment mental 
health conditions.

                         LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS


           Subtitle A--Tricare and Other Health Care Benefits


  Section 701--Contraception Coverage Parity under the TRICARE Program

    This section would amend section 1074d of title 10, United 
States Code, to allow members and former members of the 
uniformed services access to care related to the prevention of 
pregnancy with no cost sharing.

   Section 702--Pregnancy Prevention Assistance at Military Medical 
           Treatment Facilities for Sexual Assault Survivors

    This section would amend section 1074 of title 10, United 
States Code, to provide information and assistance to sexual 
assault survivors at military medical treatment facilities.

Section 703--Modification of Eligibility for TRICARE Reserve Select for 
                Certain Members of the Selected Reserve

    This section would amend section 1076 of title 10, United 
States Code, by removing the restriction of Federal employees 
who are National Guard or Reserve Component service members 
from purchasing TRICARE Reserve Select beginning in the year 
2030.

      Section 704--Lead Level Screenings and Testings for Children

    This section would amend section 1077 of title 10, United 
States Code, by including lead level testing in the TRICARE 
program for children meeting specific criteria, and would 
require the Secretary of Defense to submit a report to the 
congressional defense committees not later than January 1, 
2021, detailing de-identified information regarding lead level 
screening in children. This section would also require the 
Comptroller General of the United States to submit a report to 
the congressional defense committees by January 1, 2022, on the 
effectiveness of the Department of Defense lead screening 
program for children.

Section 705--Exposure to Open Burn Pits and Toxic Airborne Chemicals or 
Other Airborne Contaminants as Part of Periodic Health Assessments and 
                      Other Physical Examinations

    This section would ensure periodic health assessments and 
physical examinations provided by the Department of Defense 
include specific information related to exposure to burn pits, 
toxic airborne chemicals, and other airborne contaminants. This 
information would also be shared between the Department of 
Defense and the Department of Veteran Affairs.

 Section 706--Enhancement of Recordkeeping and Postdeployment Medical 
   Assessment Requirements Related to Occupational and Environmental 
                   Hazard Exposure during Deployment

    This section would amend section 1074 of title 10, United 
States Code, by requiring the Secretary of Defense to record 
occupational and environmental health risks for service members 
and ensure the electronic health record is updated with 
information from the Department of Veterans Affairs Airborne 
Hazards and Open Burn Pit Registry.

Section 707--Modifications to Post-Deployment Mental Health Assessments 
 for Members of the Armed Forces Deployed in Support of a Contingency 
                               Operation

    This section would amend section 1074 of title 10, United 
States Code, by requiring a mental health assessment for 
members of the Armed Forces within 14 days after redeployment 
from a contingency operation.

Section 708--Provision of Blood Testing for Firefighters of Department 
of Defense to Determine Exposure to Perfluoroalkyl and Polyfluoroalkyl 
                               Substances

    This section would require the Secretary of Defense to 
provide blood testing for each Department of Defense 
firefighter during the annual physical exam to determine and 
document potential exposure to perfluoroalkyl and 
polyfluoroalkyl substances.

                 Subtitle B--Health Care Administration


     Section 711--Requirements for Certain Prescription Drug Labels

    This section would amend section 1074g of title 10, United 
States Code, to clarify that drugs made available through 
military treatment facilities include labels that are printed 
with specific directions for the purposes for which the drug is 
intended.

     Section 712--Officers Authorized to Command Army Dental Units

    This section would amend section 7081(d) of title 10, 
United States Code, to remove the requirement of having a 
Dental Corps Officer command dental units.

 Section 713--Improvements to Leadership of Interagency Program Office 
  of the Department of Defense and the Department of Veterans Affairs

    This section would amend section 1071 of title 10, United 
States Code, by revising the personnel qualifications and 
appointment requirements for the Director and Deputy Director 
of the Joint Department of Defense and Department of Veterans 
Affairs Interagency Program Office.

Section 714--Inclusion of Blast Exposure History in Medical Records of 
                      Members of the Armed Forces

    This section would require the Secretary of Defense, in 
coordination with the Secretaries of the military departments, 
to ensure blast pressure exposure history is included in the 
military medical records of members of the Armed Forces, and 
submit to the Committees on Armed Services of the Senate and 
House of Representatives a report on the data requirements 
regarding blast pressure exposure information included in the 
military medical records of members of the Armed Forces.

 Section 715--Comprehensive Policy for Provision of Mental Health Care 
                     to Members of the Armed Forces

    This section would require the Secretary of Defense, acting 
through the Under Secretary of Defense for Personnel and 
Readiness, to develop and implement a comprehensive policy for 
the provision of mental health care to members of the Armed 
Forces. This section would also require the Secretary of 
Defense to submit a report to the Committees on Armed Services 
of the Senate and the House of Representatives not later than 
18 months after the date of the enactment of this Act on 
implementation of the policy.

  Section 716--Limitation on the Realignment or Reduction of Military 
                      Medical Manning End Strength

    This section would prohibit the Secretary of Defense and 
the Secretaries of the military departments from realigning or 
reducing military medical end strength until the Secretary of 
Defense submits a report to the Committees on Armed Services of 
the Senate and the House of Representatives on whether specific 
conditions and analyses related to the provision of health care 
services have been completed.

  Section 717--Strategy to Recruit and Retain Mental Health Providers

    This section would require the Secretary of Defense to 
submit a report on the shortage of mental health providers in 
the Department of Defense and develop a strategy to recruit 
mental health professionals.

   Section 718--Monitoring Medication Prescribing Practices for the 
              Treatment of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder

    This section would require the Secretary of Defense to 
submit a report to the Committees on Armed Services of the 
Senate and the House of Representatives on post-traumatic 
stress disorder medication prescribing practices and establish 
a monitoring program for the Armed Forces.

                 Subtitle C--Reports and Other Matters


     Section 721--Establishment of Military Dental Research Program

    This section would amend section 2116 of title 10, United 
States Code, by authorizing the creation of a TriService Dental 
Research Program at the Uniformed Services University of the 
Health Sciences.

       Section 722--Pilot Program on Cryopreservation and Storage

    This section would require the Secretary of Defense to 
establish a pilot program on cryopreservation and storage for 
not more than 1000 members of the Armed Forces serving on 
Active Duty and deploying to a combat zone.

     Section 723--Encouragement of Participation in Women's Health 
                   Transition Training Pilot Program

    This section would require the Secretaries of the military 
departments to encourage participation in the Women's Health 
Transition Training pilot program administered by the 
Department of Veterans Affairs, and would require the Secretary 
of Defense to submit a report to the Committees on Armed 
Services of the Senate and the House of Representatives by 
September 30, 2020, assessing the pilot program.

      Section 724--National Guard Suicide Prevention Pilot Program

    This section would authorize the Chief of the National 
Guard Bureau to carry out a pilot program to expand suicide 
prevention and intervention efforts at the community level 
through the utilization of smartphone and other handheld 
applications to provide in-the-moment support to service 
members.

   Section 725--Reports on Suicide among Members of the Armed Forces

    This section would require the Secretary of Defense to 
conduct a review and submit a report to the Committees on Armed 
Services of the Senate and the House of Representatives on 
suicide among members of the Armed Forces and provide specific 
metrics related to the effectiveness of suicide prevention 
initiatives.

  Section 726--Study on Military-Civilian Integrated Health Delivery 
                                Systems

    This section would require the Secretary of Defense to 
conduct a study on the use of local military-civilian 
integrated health delivery systems in specific geographic areas 
where military medical treatment facilities have existing 
contractual relationships with local civilian health care 
networks.

  Section 727--Study on Case Management at Military Medical Treatment 
                               Facilities

    This section would require the Secretary of Defense to 
conduct a study on the effectiveness of case management 
practices at military medical treatment facilities and to 
provide a report to the Committees on Armed Services of the 
Senate and the House of Representatives.

  Section 728--Study on Infertility among Members of the Armed Forces

    This section would require the Secretary of Defense to 
conduct a study on infertility among service members of the 
Armed Forces and provide a report on the study to the 
Committees on Armed Services of the Senate and the House of 
Representatives.

  TITLE VIII--ACQUISITION POLICY, ACQUISITION MANAGEMENT, AND RELATED 
                                MATTERS

                       ITEMS OF SPECIAL INTEREST


              Assessment of Defense Sustainment Enterprise

    The committee directs the Under Secretary of Defense for 
Acquisition and Sustainment to provide a comprehensive report 
to the House Committee on Armed Services not later than 
December 31, 2019, assessing the defense sustainment enterprise 
in order to identify the capability of that enterprise to 
support the National Defense Strategy and alternatives to 
improve the effectiveness, efficiency, and affordability of the 
overall defense sustainment enterprise. The report shall 
include:
    (1) the appropriate balance of leadership attention to 
acquisition and sustainment;
    (2) organizational structures;
    (3) the national industrial base (including both 
organizations organic to the Department of Defense and 
commercial organizations), including the right size and 
composition of the industrial base regarding organic and 
commercial technology to take best advantage of all 
capabilities in view of the National Defense Strategy, and 
depot determinations within the industrial base (organic and 
commercial), focused on warfighting requirements;
    (4) accountability of the Defense Materiel Enterprise for 
outcomes tied to readiness requirements;
    (5) such other matters as are needed to provide a full and 
accurate assessment of the defense sustainment enterprise; and
    (6) the Secretary's plan for any steps to be taken to 
address the cases identified above within the Department of 
Defense and such recommendations for legislative action as the 
Secretary considers appropriate as a result of the review.
    The committee notes that sustainment currently lacks equal 
footing with development and procurement during the acquisition 
phase of a program. The committee further notes that while the 
Department of Defense must be able to immediately counter 
multipronged, prolonged threats, the current logistics and 
sustainment system lacks the agility needed to do so. The 
committee agrees with the acquisition advisory panel 
established under section 809 of the National Defense 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2016 (Public Law 114-92), 
which highlighted in its final report, dated January 15, 2019, 
a number of concerns related to lack of product support and 
sustainment management which has led to degraded weapon system 
readiness, rising sustainment costs, and insufficient supply 
support.

      Assessment of Program Management Structure and Improvements

    The committee directs the Secretary of Defense to provide a 
report to the House Committee on Armed Services not later than 
December 31, 2019, assessing the acquisition training of 
program managers. The report shall include a comprehensive plan 
to improve program management capacity and workforce 
competency, to include:
    (1) appropriate subject matter experience, education, years 
of experience, certifications, and other qualifications set 
forth separately for current Department of Defense employees 
and personnel in program management positions;
    (2) a plan for career training, including training in 
leadership, program management, engineering, finance and 
budgeting, market research, business management, contracting, 
supplier management, requirement setting and tradeoffs, 
intellectual property matters, and software;
    (3) a description of benefits using existing human capital 
flexibility to retain qualified employees, such as student loan 
repayments, bonuses, or pay banding;
    (4) a description of use of the Defense Acquisition 
Workforce Development Fund (DAWDF) established under section 
1705 of title 10, United States Code, to train personnel in 
program management positions; and
    (5) a description of how the program will be administered 
and overseen by the Secretaries of each military department, 
acting through the service acquisition executive for the 
department concerned and integrated with existing program 
manager development efforts.
    The committee notes that this review and plan should 
facilitate implementation of the portfolio management structure 
the Department has already undertaken. As the Department works 
to streamline and improve the defense acquisition system, 
American National Standards Institute (ANSI)-accredited 
standards should be a main source for policy updates and 
guidance around program management. The committee encourages 
working toward closing any gaps between current Department 
policy and the ANSI-accredited standards to streamline 
disparate delivery methods into a common delivery platform that 
drives consistent performance across the Department and its 
industrial base while ensuring compliance with Office of 
Management and Budget Circulars A-11 and A-119 and Public Law 
114-264. The committee also notes that DAWDF is a primary 
funding source for program and project manager training and 
development, but inconsistent access across the Department that 
prevents many professionals from accessing this support should 
be addressed.

                   Assessment of the Use of Tantalum

    The committee directs the Under Secretary of Defense for 
Acquisition and Sustainment to provide a report to the House 
Committee on Armed Services not later than December 31, 2019, 
assessing the current use of the critical material tantalum in 
Department of Defense acquisition programs. The report shall 
include an assessment of the current levels of tantalum in the 
National Defense Stockpile and the source countries involved in 
the purchase of the raw material. The report shall also include 
information on domestic and foreign sources for both procuring 
and processing tantalum that the Department has identified. The 
report submitted shall be classified at levels appropriate to 
and sufficient for access to data necessary for a comprehensive 
review of the subject and related information but must include 
an unclassified summary of findings and recommendations. The 
Under Secretary may submit comments, if any, to accompany the 
report's classified or unclassified findings and 
recommendations.

  Assessment of Training Needs for Non-Acquisition Workforce Personnel

    The committee recognizes the importance of non-acquisition 
workforce personnel who work on acquisitions at the Department 
of Defense, especially personnel who play a significant role in 
defining requirements, conducting market research, 
participating in source selection and contract negotiation 
efforts, and overseeing contract performance. However, the 
committee is concerned that the Department has limited 
visibility into the non-acquisition workforce, including 
personnel who may not be receiving acquisition training that 
would enhance their contributions.
    The committee directs the Secretary of Defense to provide a 
report to the House Committee on Armed Services by February 1, 
2020, that assesses the unmet demand for courses and modules 
offered by the Defense Acquisition University. The report shall 
include an assessment of the fiscal year 2019 courses and 
modules offered by Defense Acquisition University, the extent 
that non-acquisition workforce are taking acquisition training, 
and the courses and modules that have wait lists by the start 
of the course or module. The report shall also address the 
number of courses and modules with wait lists as well as the 
number and type of non-acquisition personnel on the wait lists, 
including staff who support foreign military sales processes.
    Further, the report should include plans for how the 
Department will meet the training needs for non-acquisition 
workforce personnel. The report should address how the 
Department will identify and track non-acquisition workforce 
personnel who play a significant role in the acquisition 
process. Lastly, the report should also address the extent to 
which additional acquisition training is needed for non-
acquisition workforce personnel, including the types of 
training needed, the positions that need the training, and any 
challenges to delivering necessary additional training.

 Briefing on Sustainment Plan for Maintaining Access to MIL-PRF-19500 
                                 Parts

    The committee recognizes the important role that military 
specification semiconductor devices perform in a broad array of 
space, satellite, and strategic defense applications. These 
components form the backbone of critical defense and space 
designs by providing power and control to satellite, aircraft, 
and missiles and must be able to withstand environmental stress 
such as extreme temperature, radiation, shock, and vibration. 
The committee is aware of possible disruptions to the supply of 
over three thousand critical components that meet MIL-PRF-19500 
specifications as production ceases or domestic fabrication is 
relocated outside of the United States. Therefore, the 
committee directs the Under Secretary of Defense for 
Acquisition and Sustainment to provide a briefing to the House 
Committee on Armed Services by January 15, 2020, on the status 
of the domestic supply chain for MIL-PRF-19500 qualified 
discrete parts and the sustainment plan for maintaining access 
to these qualified parts.

                   Communication with the Marketplace

    The committee notes that despite attempts to increase 
industry interaction by government-wide and Department of 
Defense acquisition leaders since Congress enacted the Federal 
Acquisition Streamlining Act of 1994 (Public Law 103-355), 
Department of Defense acquisition personnel and individuals in 
the marketplace have expressed concern about communicating with 
each other openly and frequently, believing it is either 
prohibited or fraught with risk, fearing possible legal 
violations or being challenged by oversight functions in 
government and through the protest processes. The committee 
further notes, however, that this fear is not rooted in law; 
there are very few restrictions that apply to communications 
with the marketplace.
    The committee recognizes that communications with the 
marketplace on an ongoing basis are essential to acquiring 
intelligence in terms of what the marketplace has to offer and 
acquiring and maintaining technological superiority that might 
be employed by Department of Defense to counter threats. More 
importantly, such communications would allow the Department to 
get inside the turn of near-peer competitors and non-state 
actors in terms of delivering lethality to our warfighter in a 
timely and cost-efficient manner.
    The committee wants to make it clear that, with very 
limited exceptions, communication is not only encouraged and 
authorized, but essential when engaged in an acquisition 
function.

 Comptroller General Report on Procurement Technical Assistance Centers

    The committee notes that little is known about the 
effectiveness of the Procurement Technical Assistance Program 
and its centers, known as Procurement Technical Assistance 
Centers (PTAC), in helping businesses pursue and perform under 
contracts with the Department of Defense, other Federal 
agencies, State and local governments, and government prime 
contractors. The committee is concerned that these centers have 
not been utilized to their fullest capacity to expand the 
number of businesses capable of participating in government 
contracts and whether they duplicate services available 
elsewhere.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Comptroller General of 
the United States to assess the services that PTACs provide to 
businesses seeking participation in Federal procurement. The 
review shall address:
    (1) the number of PTACs and their geographic distribution;
    (2) what is known about the number of businesses that are 
assisted annually by PTACs;
    (3) how businesses obtain access to PTAC services, 
including through procurement events sponsored by other 
agencies (for example, matchmaking events), classroom 
instruction, and counseling;
    (4) training requirements and their implementation for PTAC 
staff members providing services to businesses;
    (5) the mechanism used to determine PTAC funding;
    (6) what statistics are collected to measure the 
performance and effectiveness of PTACs; and
    (7) any other matters deemed important by the Comptroller 
General.
    The committee further directs the Comptroller General to 
provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services not 
later than March 2, 2020, on the Comptroller General's 
preliminary findings, and to submit a final report to the 
congressional defense committees on a date agreed to at the 
time of the briefing.

 Comptroller General Report on the Joint Capabilities Integration and 
                      Development System Timelines

    The committee notes that there have been longstanding 
concerns about the effectiveness and efficiency of the Joint 
Capabilities Integration and Development System (JCIDS) 
process. In 2008, the Government Accountability Office (GAO) 
found that most of the capability proposals that had gone 
through the process were approved, and that the process was not 
effective in identifying and prioritizing warfighting needs 
from a joint, department-wide perspective at the Department of 
Defense (DOD). Since that time, GAO has made numerous 
recommendations to improve DOD's ability to prioritize joint 
capability needs.
    The National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2017 
(Public Law 114-328) modified the responsibilities of the Joint 
Requirements Oversight Council (JROC), which oversees the JCIDS 
process, to focus on critical joint military capabilities. The 
Act also generally designated non-joint performance 
requirements as the responsibility of the Chief of Staff of the 
military service concerned and stated that these performance 
requirements were not required to be validated by the JROC. The 
committee is aware that the Joint Staff began implementing 
revised procedures for the JCIDS process effective in November 
2018 to address these modifications.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Comptroller General of 
the United States to assess the effects of the recent revisions 
to the JCIDS process. At a minimum, the review shall address:
    (1) how the JCIDS process has been revised to address the 
modifications to the requirements process subsequent to the 
National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2017;
    (2) the extent to which joint performance requirements have 
been established and validated by the JROC since revised 
procedures were implemented and the timeframes associated with 
validating those requirements;
    (3) the extent to which the recent revisions to the process 
met anticipated goals and created challenges; and
    (4) the extent to which the military services have assessed 
whether they have effective processes and sufficient qualified 
workforces to perform their requirements development and 
validation responsibilities.
    The committee further directs the Comptroller General to 
provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services not 
later than December 1, 2020, on the Comptroller General's 
preliminary findings, and to submit a final report to the 
congressional defense committees on a date agreed to at the 
time of the briefing.

    Comptroller General Report on the Use of Fixed-Price Incentive 
                               Contracts

    The committee notes that the Department of Defense has 
increasingly favored the use of fixed-price incentive (FPI) 
type contracts, particularly for the development and initial 
production of major defense acquisition programs (MDAPs). In 
response to guidance issued by the Department, the military 
services have generally incorporated FPI type contracts into 
requests for proposals for both the development and early 
production of their major weapons systems.
    The committee is concerned by the lack of information on 
the relative benefits and costs associated with the 
Department's increased reliance on FPI contracts, including for 
Foreign Military Sales (FMS). Therefore, the committee directs 
the Comptroller General of the United States to submit a report 
to the congressional defense committees not later than July 31, 
2020, on the use of FPI type contracts for major systems within 
the Department since 2010. The report shall address, but not be 
limited to, the following elements:
    (1) the number of FPI and firm-fixed-price (FFP) contracts 
awarded by the Department since 2010;
    (2) a comparison of the average length of time for the 
Department to negotiate FPI and FFP contracts;
    (3) a comparison of the average length of time for the 
Department to close out FPI and FFP contracts;
    (4) a comparison of the average costs to the Department and 
contractor to close out FPI and FFP contracts; and
    (5) the number of times the Department has transitioned to 
FFP contracts when actual costs on prior related contracts were 
within 3-4 percent of negotiated costs.
    The report shall also address certain elements unique to 
contracting in support of FMS cases, including:
    (1) the number of times the Department used a waiver or 
exception to use a contract type other than FFP to award an FMS 
contract;
    (2) the number of FMS contracts or contracts with FMS-
specific contract line item numbers (CLINs) issued by the 
Department on an FPI versus FFP basis;
    (3) the number of the above FMS FPI contracts and CLINs 
that have been closed out;
    (4) the procedure for closing out the above FMS FPI 
contracts and CLINs; and
    (5) how the Department addresses cost underruns or overruns 
on FMS FPI and FFP contracts and CLINs.
    The committee further directs the Comptroller General to 
provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services not 
later than February 3, 2020, on the Comptroller General's 
preliminary findings.

                Defense Production Act Title III Funding

    The committee directs the Under Secretary of Defense for 
Acquisition and Sustainment to submit a report to the House 
Committee on Armed Services not later than December 31, 2019, 
on any legal or resource barriers to the expeditious investment 
of appropriated Defense Production Act (DPA) Title III funds, 
including the requirement for a non-delegable Presidential 
determination. The report shall identify methods to invest in 
new technologies consistent with Department of Defense 
modernization priorities. The committee recognizes the value of 
the DPA Title III program in investing in domestic production 
capabilities critical to our national defense and urges the DPA 
Title III office to explore investment in innovative 
technologies consistent with the military services' 
modernization priorities, including for operating in contested 
environments.

   Expansion of the GSA Pilot Authorized under FY18 NDAA Section 846

    The committee notes the value of the online procurement 
models being piloted by the GSA's Online Marketplace, and 
appreciates the benefits of the Defense Department's ability to 
utilize e-commerce acquisitions processes for certain 
commercial items.
    However, numerous constituents have brought to light 
significant concerns with respect to data protections under the 
current pilot system. The committee notes that participating 
small businesses are particularly vulnerable to harms resulting 
from the revelation of pricing or other sensitive business 
information if a sufficient data protection regime is not in 
place. The committee is concerned that entities with both 
online marketplace portal administrator access and seller 
access may reap an unfair advantage over entities who are only 
sellers.
    Therefore the committee directs the Administrator of the 
General Services Administration to conduct a pilot on all three 
models to include the e-commerce model, the e-marketplace 
model, and the e-procurement model. The Administrator of the 
General Services Administration is directed to provide the 
appropriate congressional committees a report on the plan and 
schedule of the pilot programs by December 15, 2019.

   Innovative Construction Materials and Design Process for Military 
                      Engineering in Cold Regions

    The committee is aware that the Arctic region presents 
significant economic, defense, homeland security, and 
diplomatic challenges and opportunities for the United States. 
In order to meet the nation's strategic goals, the Department 
of Defense is well positioned to develop a combination of 
infrastructure and remote sensing strategies to monitor 
changing conditions and increasing international activities in 
the Arctic, maintain the region's general atmosphere of peace 
and stability, execute search and rescue missions, preserve 
unique ecosystems, and ensure economic and homeland 
sovereignty.
    Related to these strategic goals, the committee is 
concerned that the Department of Defense may face challenges 
when operating in the Arctic, sub-Arctic, and other extreme 
cold environments. The committee is aware that the Department 
of Defense has developed an implementation plan for the 
National Strategy for the Arctic Region. The committee notes 
that implementation of the plan entails engineering challenges 
such as the ability to construct, maintain, and retrofit 
horizontal and vertical infrastructure in cold regions.
    The committee directs the Secretary of Defense to require 
an assessment based on both laboratory and full-scale 
accelerated testing of advanced construction techniques and 
materials needed to address the challenges of changing physical 
environments, that will enable the Department of Defense to 
rapidly project force and maintain position in austere cold 
regions. The committee directs the Secretary of Defense to 
provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services by 
March 1, 2020, on its plans for performing lab and full-scale 
tests of advanced construction techniques and materials for 
extreme cold environments. The committee further directs the 
Secretary of Defense to provide a report to the House Committee 
on Armed Services by March 1, 2021, on the results of this 
assessment and the requirements for adaptive construction 
techniques and innovative materials for extreme cold 
environments.

  Insight regarding Use of Lowest Price Technically Acceptable Source 
                           Selection Criteria

    The committee recognizes that there is a continued need for 
insight and transparency regarding the extent to which lowest 
price technically acceptable (LPTA) source selection criteria 
are used by executive agencies. The committee also notes that 
the Department of Defense has not revised the Defense Federal 
Acquisition Regulations Supplement (DFARS) nor has the Office 
of Federal Procurement Policy (OFPP) revised the Federal 
Acquisition Regulation (FAR) to reflect the revised LPTA source 
selection criteria specified in the National Defense 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2017 (Public Law 114-328) and 
John S. McCain National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal 
Year 2019 (Public Law 115-232), respectively. The committee 
remains interested in the Department's and the OFPP's efforts 
to verify that the use of LPTA source selection criteria is 
appropriate.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of Defense 
to provide a briefing to the congressional defense committees 
by March 1, 2020, on the status of Department efforts to revise 
the DFARS, issue related guidance to implement the statutory 
criteria, and ensure that its contracting officers are 
considering these criteria.
    The committee also directs the Administrator of the U.S. 
General Services Administration (GSA) to provide a briefing to 
the congressional defense committees, the House Committee on 
Oversight Reform, and the Senate Committee on Homeland Security 
and Governmental Affairs by March 1, 2020, on the status of 
efforts to update the Federal Procurement Data System, or any 
successor systems, to collect data on source selection 
procedures used in awarding contracts. In addition, the 
committee directs the Administrator of GSA to provide a 
briefing to these committees by June 30, 2020, on the status of 
its efforts to revise the FAR and ensure that contracting 
officers in civilian agencies are considering the statutory 
criteria applicable to them.

                   Maintain Commercial Supply Stores

    The committee expects the Department of Defense to compete 
through fair and open competition all requirements for the 
operation of civil engineering and industrial supply stores and 
not sole- or direct-source any such requirements unless allowed 
under the Small Business Act (Public Law 85-536).
    The committee notes that several private companies have 
operated supply stores on military installations with the 
purpose of providing commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) parts and 
supplies, much like commercial hardware stores, to military 
customers. In fact, because these storefronts serve a function 
that is not inherently governmental, Congress recognized the 
private sector's preferred role in managing and operating them, 
in the committee report accompanying the National Defense 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 1998 (H. Rept. 105-132).
    The committee expects the Department to reverse a trend 
which has seen the Department enter into agreements with the 
General Services Administration (GSA) to replace existing 
competitively awarded supply stores on military bases with 
stores administered through GSA's fourth-party logistics 
program. This trend runs counter to the Competition in 
Contracting Act of 1984 (41 U.S.C. 253) as it has been 
conducted without the competition that underpins Federal 
procurement policy, and results in less small business 
participation in government contracting. Therefore, the 
committee urges the Department to restore competitive 
acquisition practices and afford small business prime 
contractor opportunities through the award of contracts to 
administer these important stores at the nation's military 
facilities.

                Modernizing Department of Defense Forms

    The committee notes the changing ways in which 
organizations, members of the Armed Forces and their families, 
and federal agencies communicate using digital technology. The 
committee is concerned that current websites and key Department 
of Defense forms are not accessible on all digital and mobile 
devices. The committee commends the Department on its efforts 
to modernize forms and workflow processes to an extent of 
compliance with the 21st Century IDEA Act (PL 115-336).
    The committee supports the Defense Logistics Agency's 
effort to modernize its internal and external digital services 
consistent with the Department policies. The committee believes 
the modernization effort with regard to forms and workflow will 
enable the Defense Logistics Agency to improve service delivery 
military personnel and internal workflows. Therefore, the 
committee directs the Department of Defense Chief Information 
Officer, in consultation with military departments and 
agencies, to provide a briefing to the House Armed Services 
Committee not later than September 30, 2020, on the feasibility 
and requirements for modernizing Department forms and 
workflows. The briefing shall include two parts, at minimum:
    (1) analysis of feasibility, associated costs, and timeline 
required to modernize critical personnel forms, such as the 
Department of Defense Form 214 Certificate of Release or 
Discharge from Active Duty; and
    (2) analysis of feasibility, associated costs, and timeline 
required to modernize service processes and forms used by the 
Defense Logistics Agency.

                  Pacific Telecommunications Security

    The committee notes the strong interest in securing U.S. 
telecommunications from foreign interference, especially in 
Asia and the Pacific. Therefore, the committee directs the 
Secretary of Defense to submit a report to the committee not 
later than December 31, 2019 on the Department's effort to--(1) 
Identify any joint ventures, technology-sharing agreements, 
interconnection agreements, and other agreements with Huawei 
and Subsidiaries, ZTE and subsidiaries, and other Chinese-owned 
companies and subsidiaries operating on U.S. territories in the 
Pacific; and (2) ensure that telecommunications services and 
telecommunications infrastructure contacts do not compromise 
operational security of U.S. military operations or 
telecommunications security on military installations.

      Procurement Technical Assistance Centers Training Standards

    The committee supports the efforts of the Department of 
Defense to provide individualized, tailored training to meet 
the needs of Procurement Technical Assistance Centers 
nationwide. The committee is aware of and encourages the 
Defense Logistics Agency's work in consultation with the 
Association of Procurement Technical Assistance Centers and its 
members to support and enable effective training for the 
Procurement Technical Assistance Centers, but believes that 
formal, regularly updated standards would further advance these 
efforts.

      Procurement Technical Assistance Centers Training Standards

    The committee directs the Director of the Defense Logistics 
Agency to provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed 
Services by December 1, 2019, on training standards required 
for staff who work at Procurement Technical Assistance Centers, 
including training offered by the Defense Acquisition 
University. The briefing should identify the training 
curriculum to meet those standards, training curriculum that 
needs to be developed, and the plan to deliver the training. 
Finally, the briefing should include the Defense Logistics 
Agency method to track training completion for the Procurement 
Technical Assistance Center staff.

           Report on Domestic Nonavailability Waiver Process

    The committee directs the Assistant Secretary of Defense 
for Sustainment to provide a briefing to the House Committee on 
Armed Services not later than December 31, 2019, on the 
domestic nonavailability waiver process currently used by the 
Department of Defense. Such a briefing shall include:
    (1) the Department's process to inform existing suppliers 
about the waiver process and guide applicants through the 
process;
    (2) the Department's process to find domestic suppliers 
after a waiver has been requested;
    (3) the Department's process to review previously granted 
waivers to determine if domestic options not previously 
available for supply are now available;
    (4) the Department's efforts to get feedback from private 
industry on the waiver process, both from suppliers submitting 
an application for a waiver and from domestic suppliers who 
believe that they can provide an item deemed domestically 
nonavailable; and
    (5) a list of all domestic nonavailability determinations 
and national security waivers granted under sections 2533a and 
2533b of title 10, United States Code, since January 1, 2014.

   Report on Ownership or Trading of Stocks in Certain Companies by 
              Department of Defense Officers and Employees

    The committee directs the Secretary of Defense to submit a 
report to the House Committee on Armed Services no later than 
June 1, 2020 detailing how many senior officials own or trade 
publicly-traded stock of a company that during the preceding 
calendar year received more than $1.0 billion in revenue from 
the Department of Defense, including through one or more 
contracts with the Department. The report shall include what 
publicly-traded companies qualify for the $1.0 billion 
threshold and the number of Department senior officials who 
have reported owning such stock through financial disclosure. 
The report shall not consider widely-held investment funds as 
described in section 102(f)(8) of the Ethics in Government Act 
of 1978 (5 U.S.C. App.) as qualifying publicly-traded stock.

 Report on Plan to Expand and Strengthen the Military Radar Industrial 
                                  Base

    The Committee recognizes the critical defense need for 
competitive radar development and production in an open and 
modular architecture to meet current and future military 
requirements and to increase the capability of the defense 
industrial base to support a low cost and modular radar 
components and prototype. This is best accomplished by 
expansion of traditional and nontraditional U.S. based 
suppliers via open competition at the module level. With this 
in mind, the committee directs the Under Secretary of Defense 
for Acquisition and Sustainment to provide a report to the 
Committees on Armed Services of the Senate and the House of 
Representatives within 120 days on a plan to strengthen the 
defense radar industrial base leveraging authorities already 
granted in the Industrial Base Analysis and Sustainment program 
and the Manufacturing Technology Program.

Report on the Department's Market Research Practices for IT Acquisition

    The committee is concerned that the Department of Defense 
continues to struggle with implementation of effective market 
research practices as part of the acquisition cycle for 
information technology goods and services. Effective 
implementation of information technology is particularly 
dependent on high quality market research. Unless the 
Department improves capabilities in this area, it will continue 
to lag the private sector in deploying innovative technologies. 
The committee is also concerned that the Department has yet to 
issue regulations clarifying that market research may be 
acquired from commercial companies as well as conducted by 
government personnel in accordance with section 882 of the 
National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2019 (Public 
Law No: 115-232).
    Therefore, the committee directs the Chief Management 
Officer of the Department of Defense to deliver a briefing to 
the Committees on Armed Services of the House and Senate on the 
Department's efforts to improve its market research practices, 
and compliance with 10 U.S.C. 2377, with respect to information 
technology goods and services by December 15, 2019. At a 
minimum, the briefing shall include the following elements:
    (1) a discussion of current Department of Defense market 
research guidelines compared to private sector best practices
    (2) any challenges faced by the Department in accessing 
independent, third-party market research, particularly in the 
source selection process, due to incorrect perceptions that 
such research is an Inherently Governmental Function
    (3) any concerns of the Department related to potential 
conflict of interest or bias found in vendor-provided data, 
particularly as it relates to Requests for Information or 
Sources Sought Notices; and
    (4) an update on the status of regulations related to the 
use of independent, third-party market research and its status 
as a non-inherently government function.

       Report on the Procurement of Military Free Fall Parachutes

    The committee is concerned that the Army and Marine Corps 
have converted firm fixed price contracts for procurement of 
military free fall parachutes into technology development 
contracts. The committee notes that the advantages of procuring 
a parachute system, such as the Army's Advanced Ram-Air 
Parachute System (RA-1) and the Marine Corps' Enhanced Multi-
Mission Parachute System (E-MMPS) as a commercial item or at a 
firm fixed price may be undermined if the selected parachutes 
undergo significant redesign and technological changes, 
possibly incurring additional cost, post contract award.
    The committee directs the Comptroller General of the United 
States to provide a report, no later than February 1, 2020, 
examining the Army and Marine Corps' parachute research, 
development, and acquisition strategies. The report shall 
include observations and assessments on:
    (1) The development and execution of current parachute 
acquisition strategies including, but not limited to: (a) 
performance and adequacy related to production and fielding 
schedules; (b) cost growth on a per unit or contract basis and 
explanation for such growth; (c) costs associated with the 
design and testing of parachute systems; (d) funding obligated 
or budgeted for development or product improvements to the 
systems, as well as the source of the funds used for such 
development or improvements; and (e) a review of the plans and 
results of tests and evaluations associated with such systems.
    (2) Whether contracts are being executed consistent with 
the report provided by the Secretary of the Navy pursuant to 
Section 128 of the National Defense Authorization Act for 
Fiscal Year 2018 (Public Law 115-91; 131 Stat. 1313);
    (3) Whether the Army and Marine Corps parachute acquisition 
strategies support a competitive parachute manufacturer 
industrial base;
    (4) Whether the Army and Marine Corps have considered 
interoperability with joint, allied, and coalition forces in 
the parachute requirements development process to include 
addressing the glide ratios of the various fielded systems;
    (5) Whether there are any intellectual property or 
technology risks associated with such parachute procurements;
    (6) An assessment of the service life of such parachute 
systems; and
    (7) Any other items or issues the Comptroller General 
determines are relevant or useful to this report.

   Review of Conflicts of Interest in Organizational Analysis of the 
                         Department of Defense

    The committee recognizes the importance of assessing the 
effectiveness of organizations across the Department of Defense 
to validate their missions and functions, identify metrics to 
measure performance, and determine areas for improvement. The 
committee notes that any assessments should examine the risks 
and legal and ethical considerations associated with combining 
functions or using commercial providers to carry out certain 
functions. The committee is also aware that the Secretary of 
Defense is required to conduct joint reviews and submit reports 
regarding the Defense Contract Audit Agency, Defense Contract 
Management Agency, and Defense Finance and Accounting Service 
pursuant sections 925 and 926 of the John S. McCain National 
Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2019 (Public Law 115-
232).
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of Defense, 
acting through the Chief Management Officer of the Department 
of Defense, to submit risk assessments to the congressional 
defense committees not later than March 1, 2020, to supplement 
the reports required by sections 925 and 926 of Public Law 115-
232. The risk assessments should reflect the Department's 
analysis of potential combination of functions with each other 
or the use of commercial providers, as applicable. The risk 
assessments should include analysis of the legal and ethical 
implications of:
    (1) conflict of interest considerations;
    (2) the risks posed to governmental interests and the 
public when ``closely associated with inherently governmental'' 
functions as defined in section 2383 of title 10, United States 
Code, are performed by commercial providers;
    (3) the risks to mission failure when ``critical'' 
functions as defined in section 2461 of title 10, United States 
Code, are performed by commercial providers;
    (4) the risks of creating an ``employer-employee 
relationship'' through the use of ``personal services 
contracts,'' whether authorized by statutory exception (e.g., 
section 129b of title 10, United States Code) or otherwise 
prohibited; and
    (5) the application of each of the general ethical 
principles in 5 Code of Federal Regulation section 2635.101(b).

      Security of Department of Defense Telecommunication Services

    In awarding contracts for telecommunication services or 
installation of telecommunication infrastructure on military 
installations located in the United States or its territories, 
the committee urges the Secretary of Defense to give preference 
to American-owned and -operated companies.

    Small Business Procurement Specialists at Military Installations

    The committee recognizes the vital service that small 
business procurement specialists provide to small businesses 
seeking to do business with the Department of Defense. Further, 
the committee notes that small business procurement specialists 
located on installations are best equipped to understand the 
products and services that local communities can provide to the 
U.S. Government. However, the committee is concerned that the 
Department of the Army is considering the realignment and 
potential consolidation of small business procurement resources 
without assessing and articulating the tradeoffs, such as the 
impact on minority-owned small businesses.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of the Army 
to submit a report to the House Committee on Armed Services by 
February 1, 2020, on the Army's strategy for managing and 
allocating its small business procurement specialists. The 
report shall:
    (1) reflect alternate staffing models that the Army is 
considering or implementing, such as regional or national plans 
to centralize resources at a single site instead of maintaining 
the on-installation specialist model;
    (2) explain, where applicable, how the Army serves or plans 
to serve communities where there is no local small business 
procurement specialist; and
    (3) specify the metrics used to measure the Army's 
effectiveness in reaching small businesses, including in areas 
where there is no local small business procurement specialist.

          Sourcing of Domestic Components for U.S. Navy Ships

    The committee is concerned with the sourcing of non-
domestic components on U.S. Navy ships. The committee directs 
the Secretary of the Navy to provide a report to the 
congressional defense committees by December 1, 2019, on the 
feasibility of sourcing domestic components such as: auxiliary 
equipment, including pumps; propulsion system components, 
including engines, reduction gears, and propellers; shipboard 
cranes and spreaders for shipboard cranes; and other components 
on all Navy ships.

                         LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS


             Subtitle A--Acquisition Policy and Management


    Section 801--Establishment of Acquisition Pathways for Software 
                   Applications and Software Upgrades

    This section would direct the Secretary of Defense to 
establish a new software acquisition pathway to procure, 
develop, deploy, and continuously improve software for 
applications in the Department of Defense. It would utilize 
innovation ecosystems already in existence inside the 
Department. This section would require a report on the 
implementation not later than 180 days after the date of the 
enactment of this Act.
    The committee notes that the security of the United States 
increasingly relies on software to execute missions, integrate 
and collaborate with allies, and manage the defense enterprise. 
The ability to develop, procure, assure, deploy, and 
continuously improve software is thus central to national 
defense. Software should enable a more effective joint force, 
strengthen our ability to work with allies, and improve the 
business processes of the Department enterprise.

Section 802--Software Development and Software Acquisition Training and 
                          Management Programs

    This section would direct the Secretary of Defense to 
implement software development and acquisition training and 
management programs for all software acquisition professionals, 
developers, and associated functions to provide software 
practitioners access to modern engagement and collaboration 
platforms to connect, share their skills and knowledge, and 
develop solutions leveraging the full defense enterprise.
    The committee recognizes that the Department of Defense 
requires a workforce capable of acquiring, building, and 
delivering software and technology in real time. As threats and 
demands emerge, providing a strong training and management 
program ensures the Department has talented and skilled leaders 
at the helm. The committee is aware there is no comprehensive 
training or development program that prepares the software 
acquisition and technical workforce managers to adequately 
support and lead teams to deploy modern development tools and 
methodologies for continuous capability development and 
deployment within the Department's dynamic environments. The 
committee encourages the Secretary of Defense to partner with 
institutions of higher education or private sector 
organizations, to the extent practicable, to incorporate 
existing training and management programs that are helpful in 
the software realm.

    Section 803--Modifications to Cost or Pricing Data for Certain 
                              Procurements

    This section would modify section 2306a(b)(4) of title 10, 
United States Code, and allow the head of contracting activity 
to obtain cost or pricing data for commercial items that may be 
procured under sole source authority based on market research.

 Section 804--Modifications to Cost or Pricing Data on Below-Threshold 
                               Contracts

    This section would modify section 2306a(c) of title 10, 
United States Code, and section 3504 of title 41, United States 
Code, to allow contracting officers to request certified cost 
or pricing data when necessary to determine price 
reasonableness and removes the commercial item exception.

    Section 805--Comptroller General Report on Price Reasonableness

    This section would require the Comptroller General of the 
United States to submit a report by March 31, 2021, to the 
congressional defense committees, the House Committee on 
Oversight and Reform, and the Committee on Homeland Security 
and Governmental Affairs regarding the efforts of the 
Department of Defense to obtain cost and pricing data for sole 
source contracts for spare parts.

 Section 806--Requirement That Certain Ship Components Be Manufactured 
             in the National Technology and Industrial Base

    This section would amend section 2534 of title 10, United 
States Code, and would require certain auxiliary ship 
components to be procured from a manufacturer in the national 
technology and industrial base.

 Section 807--Acquisition and Disposal of Certain Rare Earth Materials

    This section would require the Department of Defense to 
promulgate guidance on streamlined acquisition of items with 
rare earth materials and allows exceptions to the Joint 
Capabilities Integration and Development System Manual and 
Department of Defense Directive 5000.01. This section would 
require a report on such guidance and the efforts of the 
Secretary of Defense to create and maintain secure supply 
chains for these materials within the United States and covered 
foreign sources 180 days after the date of the enactment of 
this Act. This section also would provide authority for the 
disposal of tungsten ores and concentrates contained in the 
National Defense Stockpile and acquisition of other critical 
materials. This section would amend section 2533b of title 10, 
United States Code, by prohibiting acquisition of tantalum from 
non-allied foreign nations. This section would amend section 
2533c(a)(2) of title 10, United States Code, by striking 
``covered'' before ``material''.

  Section 808--Prohibition on Acquisition of Tantalum from Non-Allied 
                            Foreign Nations

    This section would amend section 2533c of title 10, United 
States Code, by prohibiting acquisition of tantalum from non-
allied foreign nations.

Section 809--Application of Miscellaneous Technology Base Policies and 
            Programs to the Columbia-Class Submarine Program

    This section would amend the application of miscellaneous 
technology base policies and programs to the Columbia-class 
submarine program.

 Section 810--Application of Limitation on Procurement of Goods other 
          than United States Goods to the FFG-Frigate Program

    This section would allow funds authorized for the FFG-
Frigate program to be used to award a contract that does not 
domestically source propulsion or certain auxiliary equipment.

   Section 811--Consideration of Price in Procurement of the FFG(X) 
                                Frigate

    This section would require the Secretary of the Navy to 
ensure cost is a critical factor in the procurement of the 
FFG(X) Frigate.

  Section 812--Repeal of Continuation of Data Rights during Challenges

    This section would repeal section 866 of the John S. McCain 
National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2019 (Public 
Law 115-232). Section 866 provided authority, in addition to 
existing authority, for the government to use non-commercial 
technical data during a period of challenge in an agency Board 
of Contract Appeals or the U.S. Court of Federal Claims under 
certain circumstances.

 Section 813--Repeal of Authority to Waive Acquisition Laws to Acquire 
                  Vital National Security Capabilities

    This section would repeal section 806 of the National 
Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2016 (Public Law 114-
92), which allowed the Secretary of Defense to waive any 
provision of acquisition law or regulation in certain 
circumstances.

 Section 814--Repeal of Transfer of Funds Related to Cost Overruns and 
                             Cost Underruns

    This section would repeal an annual requirement for the 
Secretary of each military department to pay a penalty for cost 
overruns on covered major defense acquisition programs of the 
military department. Under the requirement, the Secretary of 
each military department was required to reduce research, 
development, test and evaluation, or procurement accounts up to 
$50.0 million at each military department every fiscal year. 
The funds were then credited to the Rapid Prototyping Fund 
established pursuant to section 804 of the National Defense 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2016 (Public Law 114-92).

Subtitle B--Amendments to General Contracting Authorities, Procedures, 
                            and Limitations


 Section 821--Modifications to the Middle Tier of Acquisition Programs

    This section would amend section 804 of the National 
Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2016 (Public Law 114-
92) by directing the Secretary of Defense to develop a process 
to provide the Director of Operational Test and Evaluation, the 
Director of Cost Assessment and Program Evaluation, and the 
Under Secretary of Defense for Research and Engineering access 
to all technical data, records, and information necessary to 
evaluate the technical maturity of acquisitions carried out 
under the rapid prototyping and rapid fielding authority. This 
section would also clarify that no program under this authority 
shall be the same size or exceed the dollar value of a major 
defense acquisition program, unless a waiver is granted from 
the Secretary of Defense.

 Section 822--Briefing Relating to the ``Middle Tier'' of Acquisition 
                                Programs

    This section would modify section 804 of the National 
Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2016 (10 U.S.C. 2302 
note) to direct the Secretary of Defense to provide a briefing 
to the committee on the lessons learned and best practices 
identified through the use of the ``middle tier'' of 
acquisition programs.

 Section 823--Rates for Progress Payments or Performance-Based Payments

    This section would require the Secretary of Defense to 
provide congressional defense committees with a notice of 
determination and to notify the public through the Federal 
Register before initiating changes to contract finance rates 
for progress payments or performance-based payments. This 
section would also require that the Secretary of Defense not 
use rates that are lower than the rates provided by the 
Secretaries of the Federal agencies listed in section 2302 of 
title 10, United States Code.

Section 824--Additional Requirements for Negotiations for Noncommercial 
                           Computer Software

    This section would amend section 2322a of title 10, United 
States Code, and codify existing Defense Federal Acquisition 
Regulations on noncommercial software rights as well as 
mandate, to the maximum extent practicable, that specially 
negotiated licenses be used for weapon systems noncommercial 
software.

    Section 825--Responsibility for Data Analysis and Requirements 
                   Validation for Services Contracts

    This section would amend section 2329 of title 10, United 
States Code, to specify that the Secretary of Defense act 
through the Under Secretary of Defense (Comptroller) and 
Director of Cost Assessment and Program Evaluation to collect 
data and information annually on the amount contracted for 
services procured by the Department of Defense, which would be 
included in the Future Years Defense Program submitted to 
Congress.

Section 826--Annual Reports on Authority to Carry Out Certain Prototype 
                                Projects

    This section would amend section 2371b of title 10, United 
States Code, by adding a new section requiring the Secretary of 
Defense to annually submit a report to the congressional 
defense committees on the activity carried out under the 
authority to use other transaction authorities for prototype 
projects and any deviations from implementing guidance.

Section 827--Competition Requirements for Purchases from Federal Prison 
                               Industries

    This section would amend section 2410n of title 10, United 
States Code, by removing ``for which Federal Prison Industries 
does not have a significant market share''.
    This section would create a requirement for conducting 
market research before purchasing a product listed in the 
Federal Prison Industries (FPI) catalog. This section would 
require the Department of Defense to:
    (1) conduct market research to determine if the product is 
comparable to products in the private sector and meets the 
Department's needs (price, quality, or time of delivery) prior 
to purchasing a product from FPI.
    (2) use competitive procedures or purchase under a multiple 
award contract if the product is not comparable and does not 
meet the Department's needs.

           Section 828--Enhanced Post-Award Debriefing Rights

    This section would amend section 818 of the National 
Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2018 (Public Law 115-
91), which required post-award debriefings of the Department of 
Defense rating for each evaluation criteria and overall award 
decision, by reducing the award threshold for comprehensive 
debriefings from $100.0 million to $50.0 million.

  Section 829--Standardizing Data Collection and Reporting on Use of 
            Source Selection Procedures by Federal Agencies

    This section would repeal portions of section 2305 note of 
title 10, United States Code, and section 3701 note of title 
41, United States Code, which required the Government 
Accountability Office (GAO) to provide an annual report on the 
use of lowest price technically acceptable (LPTA) source 
selection procedures by the Department of Defense and civilian 
agencies, respectively. These provisions presumed that the 
Department and the Office of Federal Procurement Policy (OFPP) 
would revise the Defense Federal Acquisition Regulations 
Supplement or the Federal Acquisition Regulation within the 
timeframes established in the enabling legislation. GAO has 
twice reported that the Department has not yet implemented the 
source selection criteria provided by Congress. The committee 
also understands that the OFPP is just beginning the process to 
draft implementing regulations for civilian agencies despite 
the mandate to do so within 120 days of the enactment of the 
John S. McCain National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal 
Year 2019 (Public Law 115-232). The committee notes that until 
the Department and OFPP issue implementing regulations, GAO 
will not have new information regarding agencies' use of LPTA 
and whether contracting officers are using LPTA appropriately.
    This section would also require revisions to the Federal 
Procurement Data System (FPDS), or any successor systems, to 
facilitate the collection of data on source selection 
procedures used in awarding contracts and other relevant 
contract actions, such as task and delivery orders issued under 
indefinite delivery-indefinite quantity contracts. Under this 
section, the Administrator of General Services, in coordination 
with the OFPP would determine appropriate revisions to the FPDS 
within the 180 days provided for under this section. The 
committee notes that this revision should be feasible, as the 
FPDS already collects information on whether contracts were 
awarded using the sealed bidding process, which accounts for a 
relatively small percentage of the total contracts awarded each 
year. The committee expects that the new information to be 
collected would include, at a minimum, whether the contract 
awarded or order issued was made using LPTA or best value 
contracting methods, or some other procedure.

Section 830--Modification of Justification and Approval Requirement for 
                Certain Department of Defense Contracts

    This section would modify the justification and approval 
threshold to $100.0 million for Department of Defense sole 
source contracts awarded to certain Native communities. The 
threshold was established in section 811 of the National 
Defense Authorization Act of Fiscal Year 2010.

        Subtitle C--Provisions Relating to Acquisition Workforce


Section 841--Defense Acquisition Workforce Certification and Education 
                              Requirements

    This section would amend section 1701a of title 10, United 
States Code. The committee notes that the Department of Defense 
could better prepare its acquisition workforce by modernizing 
its certification process to emphasize professional skills that 
are transferable across the workforce and industry. The 
Secretary of Defense is authorized to implement the program 
based on third-party accredited, nationally or internationally 
recognized standards, where they exist, or through entities 
outside the Department, if the Secretary determines that to be 
the best approach.
    This section also would amend section 1724 of title 10, 
United States Code, and strike the requirement for contracting 
officers to have completed at least 24 semester credit hours 
(or the equivalent) of study from an accredited institution of 
higher education, and make conforming amendments to section 
1732 of title 10, United States Code. The committee notes that 
the Department has raised the professionalism of its 
acquisition workforce since enactment of the Defense 
Acquisition Workforce Improvement Act in 1990 and the 
amendments would allow the Department the flexibility to 
establish the specific educational requirements that should be 
applied to a particular workforce career field.
    This section would also amend title 10, United States Code, 
by modifying several sections of chapter 87 to institutionalize 
career paths for all acquisition workforce career fields, and 
by inserting a new section 1765 to develop competencies for 
every acquisition career field. The committee is aware that 
while chapter 87 had general career path requirements, none 
specifically applied to all acquisition career fields or 
mandated recommended attributes, such as key work experience. 
Section 1721, as amended would be a key factor in the success 
of this implementation and would require the Department to 
identify which specific career fields represent the acquisition 
workforce in order to better institutionalize career paths 
throughout all acquisition career fields. The committee 
recognizes the scope of the new section 1765 is designed to 
establish proficiency standards throughout the acquisition 
workforce in an effort to qualify and assess the technical and 
nontechnical competencies for all acquisition career fields.
    Lastly, this section would amend section 1721 of title 10, 
United States Code, to include foreign military sales personnel 
as part of the acquisition workforce.

   Section 842--Public-Private Exchange Program for the Acquisition 
                               Workforce

    This section would create a two-way exchange program 
between the Department of Defense acquisition workforce and 
private sector companies. The committee recognizes that 
exchange programs between the public sector and the private 
sector could benefit the Federal Government and private sector 
companies alike, as evinced by the creation of a public-private 
talent exchange in the National Defense Authorization Act for 
Fiscal Year 2017 (Public Law 114-328). The committee recognizes 
that the Department's willingness to support those employees 
who participate in the exchange program and promote the further 
development of their careers would be essential to the success 
of the program.
    The committee is aware that the Department's previous 
efforts to implement such exchange programs were undermined by 
structural disincentives for key stakeholders. The committee 
notes that the new statute would eliminate these disincentives, 
thereby paving the way for greater participation among the 
acquisition workforce. In particular, the committee notes that 
the new statute would preclude the use of a private sector 
employee's participation in the exchange program, in and of 
itself, as the basis of an organizational conflict-of-interest 
complaint.
    This section would make conforming amendments to section 
1705 of title 10, United States Code, to permit the use of the 
Defense Acquisition Workforce Development Fund for the exchange 
program, and to section 1599g of title 10, United States Code, 
to exclude members of the acquisition workforce from the 
Department-wide talent exchange.

   Section 843--Incentives and Consideration for Qualified Training 
                                Programs

    This section would amend chapter 141 of title 10, United 
States Code, by adding a new section to incentivize contractors 
to invest in workforce development programs to address the 
workforce needs of the Department of Defense, as determined by 
the Secretary. This section would also require the Secretary of 
Defense to include an evaluation of contractor workforce 
development programs in the contract past performance system.

    Section 844--Certification by Prospective Military Construction 
   Contractors of Good Faith Effort to Utilize Qualified Apprentices

    This section would require the Secretary of Defense to 
revise the Defense Supplement to the Federal Acquisition 
Regulation to require a system be used to monitor or record 
contractor past performance of the contractor making a good 
faith effort to meet or exceed the apprenticeship employment 
goal of 20 percent. This section would also require the 
Secretary of Defense to develop an apprenticeship workforce 
incentive program to encourage contractors to meet the 20 
percent goal of employing certified and skilled workers who 
have completed State-mandated, federally funded programs in the 
relative career fields and certify to good faith effort to 
achieve the goal. This section would also require the Secretary 
of Defense to include an evaluation of whether the contractor 
meets this goal in the contractor past performance rating 
system.

        Subtitle D--Provisions Relating to Acquisition Security


 Section 851--Supply Chain Security of Certain Telecommunications and 
                Video Surveillance Services or Equipment

    This section would require the Secretary of Defense to 
conduct a comprehensive assessment of Department of Defense 
policies relating to telecommunications and video surveillance 
services and equipment from foreign contractors and 
subcontractors, and identify means to mitigate threats through 
the debarment and suspension process. This section would also 
require the Secretary of Defense to write regulations and 
internal Department policies and expectations for contractor 
cooperation based on findings of the assessment, not later than 
180 days after the date of the enactment of this Act. This 
section would strengthen the detection, avoidance, 
notification, and remediation of suspect covered equipment and 
services in the Department's supply chain.

   Section 852--Assured Security against Intrusion on United States 
                           Military Networks

    This section would prohibit the Secretary of Defense from 
awarding contracts for the procurement of telecommunications 
services or installations of telecommunications infrastructure 
on national security installations located on territories of 
the United States in the Pacific Ocean unless the contractor is 
American-owned or American-operated. This section includes an 
exception for contracts for telecommunications services or 
telecommunications infrastructure that do not process or carry 
information concerning the national security of the United 
States. The Secretary of Defense may waive this prohibition 
upon written determination that such a waiver is in the 
national security interest of the United States.

    Section 853--Revised Authorities to Defeat Adversary Efforts to 
             Compromise United States Defense Capabilities

    This section would strengthen defense supply chains by 
including security as a primary purpose for Department of 
Defense acquisition.

 Section 854--Prohibition on Operation or Procurement of Foreign-Made 
                       Unmanned Aircraft Systems

    This section would prohibit the Secretary of Defense from 
operating or entering into a contract for the procurement of 
certain unmanned aircraft systems.

 Section 855--Supply Chain Risk Mitigation Policies to Be Implemented 
                through Requirements Generation Process

    This section would amend section 807 of the National 
Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2018 (Public Law 115-
91) to require the Secretary of Defense to develop tools for 
supply chain risk mitigation policies during the requirements 
generation process.
    The committee notes that supply chain risk issues have 
grown in importance as the U.S. defense acquisition supply base 
has become increasingly global. The committee further 
recognizes that supply chain risk mitigation is requirements-
specific and should be addressed early in the acquisition 
process to allow for tailoring where appropriate.

       Subtitle E--Provisions Relating to the Acquisition System


      Section 861--Modifications to the Defense Acquisition System

    This section would enforce acquisition reforms already 
enacted by Congress, enact new policy on the recommendations of 
congressionally chartered panels, and lay the foundation for a 
continued culture of reform in acquisition.

                  Subtitle F--Industrial Base Matters


 Section 871--Consideration of Subcontracting to Minority Institutions

    This section would require the Department of Defense to 
ensure that the system used by the Federal Government to 
monitor or record contractor past performance for a grant or 
contract awarded to an institution of higher education includes 
incentives for the award of a sub-grant or subcontract to 
minority institutions.

  Section 872--Size Standard Calculations for Certain Small Business 
                                Concerns

    This section would clarify that section 3(a)(2)(C) of the 
Small Business Act undoubtedly applies to the Small Business 
Administration (SBA). The section would align the size 
standards based on data to the Small Business Runway Extension 
Act of 2018 (Public Law 115-324) by changing the calculation 
from 3 years to 5 years. This section also would require the 
SBA to develop a transition plan for small businesses and 
Federal agencies to help them successfully navigate the 
transition from the previous 3-year calculation to the new 5-
year calculation as mandated and would require that the System 
for Award Management be updated accordingly.

      Section 873--Modifications to Small Business Subcontracting

    This section would ensure greater accountability for prime 
contractors electing to receive subcontracting credit for 
subcontracting with small businesses at lower tiers, and would 
provide small businesses with an alternative avenue for 
nonpayment issues with the prime contractor. This section would 
clarify that large prime contractors have the ability to 
receive subcontracting credit for small businesses at lower 
tiers; would strengthen the agency's ability to collect and 
review data regarding prime contractors' achievement of their 
subcontracting plans; would require the prime contractor to 
keep and maintain records to demonstrate subcontracting credit 
claimed; and would implement a new dispute process allowing 
small subcontractors to bring nonpayment issues to the agency 
small business advocate.

 Section 874--Inclusion of Best in Class Designations in Annual Report 
                        on Small Business Goals

    This section would allow Congress to obtain critical 
information regarding the participation of small businesses in 
specially designated multiple award contracts known as ``best 
in class'' contracts. It would require the Small Business 
Administration (SBA) to report Federal spending made through 
designated ``best in class'' vehicles, and to report on the 
dollars awarded through these vehicles to small businesses. 
Additionally, this section would require the SBA to report the 
dollar amount of contracts awarded to HUBZone, women-owned, 
service-disabled veteran-owned, and socially and economically 
disadvantaged (also known as 8(a)) small businesses. This 
section would become effective on the date on which this 
information becomes available on the appropriate government-run 
procurement tracking system.

    Section 875--Small Business Administration Cybersecurity Reports

    This section would require the Small Business 
Administration to issue reports that assess its cybersecurity 
infrastructure, including determining the country of origin of 
its information technology components, and report cyber 
threats, breaches, and cyber attacks.

  Section 876--Cyber Counseling Certification Program for Lead Small 
                      Business Development Centers

    This section would amend section 21(a) of the Small 
Business Act by adding Cyber Strategy Training for Small 
Business Development Centers (SBDCs) and require the Small 
Business Administrator to establish, or certify, an existing 
cyber counseling certification program to certify employees at 
small business development centers (that have directly received 
a grant from the Administration) to provide assistance to small 
businesses for planning cybersecurity practices and strategies 
to respond to cyber attacks. The Small Business Administration 
would be authorized to reimburse SBDCs for employee 
certification costs up to $350,000 per fiscal year.

Section 877--Exemption of Certain Contracts from the Periodic Inflation 
        Adjustments to the Acquisition-Related Dollar Threshold

    This section would amend subparagraph (B) of section 
1908(b)(2) of title 41, United States Code, to exempt certain 
contracts from the periodic inflation adjustments to the 
acquisition-related dollar threshold.

    Section 878--Improvements to Certain Defense Innovation Programs

    This section would create a pilot program within the 
Department of Defense to encourage engagement with commercial 
technology companies through the Small Business Innovation 
Research Program and the Small Business Technology Transfer 
Program, and would modify other elements of the innovation 
architecture within the Department.

   Section 879--Pilot Program for Development of Technology-Enhanced 
              Capabilities with Partnership Intermediaries

    This section would authorize the Commander of U.S. Special 
Operations Command to use not more than 5 percent of funds 
required to be expended by the Department of Defense relating 
to small businesses for a pilot program to increase 
participation by small business concerns in the development of 
technology-enhanced capabilities for special operations forces. 
The authority would terminate on September 30, 2021.

Section 880--Authorized Official to Carry Out the Procurement Technical 
                Assistance Cooperative Agreement Program

    This section would move the management and oversight of the 
Procurement Technical Assistance Cooperative (PTAC) Agreement 
Program from the Defense Logistics Agency to the Office of the 
Under Secretary of Defense for Acquisition and Sustainment. The 
committee recognizes that PTACs are a critical part of efforts 
at the Department of Defense to reach new businesses and expand 
the defense industrial base. As such, the PTAC program should 
be placed in the Department's Office of Industrial Policy 
(formerly known as the Office of Manufacturing and Industrial 
Base Policy), where it would align with their activities.

 Section 881--Permanent Authorization and Improvement of Department of 
                     Defense Mentor-Protege Program

    This section would make the Department of Defense Mentor-
Protege pilot program permanent. This section also would add 
additional reporting requirements to better track the 
businesses that are benefiting both as mentors and proteges.

                       Subtitle G--Other Matters


Section 891--Requirement to Use Models of Commercial E-Commerce Portal 
                                Program

    This section would amend section 846 of the National 
Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2018 (41 U.S.C. 1901 
note) to require the Administrator of the General Services 
Administration to establish a 5-year program to pilot three 
models for commercial e-commerce portals to include an e-
commerce model, an e-marketplace model, and an e-procurement 
model as identified in section 4.1 of ``Procurement Through 
Commercial E-Commerce Portals Phase II Report: Market Research 
and Consultation'' issued by the Administrator in April 2019.

 Section 892--Report and Database on Items Manufactured in the United 
             States for Major Defense Acquisition Programs

    This section would amend chapter 144 of title 10, United 
States Code, by inserting a new section requiring the Secretary 
of Defense to submit a report to the congressional defense 
committees assessing the domestic source content of 
procurements carried out in connection with major defense 
acquisition programs. This section would also require the 
Secretary of Defense to establish an information repository for 
the collection of domestic source content information to be 
used for continuous data analysis and program management 
activities. The section would express the sense of Congress 
that any entity of the Department of Defense should purchase 
only American-made equipment and products where possible.
    The committee is interested in ensuring the Department's 
acquisition processes are in line with, at a minimum, the 
standards of the Buy American Act of 1933 (Public Law 72-428) 
and believes the Department should be setting a goal to acquire 
and procure purely American-made equipment and products to 
ensure a strong national industrial base to support our 
warfighters in time of need.

   Section 893--Requirements Relating to Selected Acquisition Reports

    This section would reestablish the requirement for Selected 
Acquisition Reports, which summarize key cost and schedule 
information for major defense acquisition programs (MDAPs) at 
the Department of Defense.
    This section would require the Secretary of Defense to 
submit a proposal for an alternative reporting methodology for 
MDAPs with the budget request for fiscal year 2021. The 
proposal shall also include other programs, such as rapid 
prototyping or rapid fielding programs, carried out under the 
authority of section 804 of the National Defense Authorization 
Act for Fiscal Year 2016 (Public Law 114-92) and how the 
Department plans to report cybersecurity and software 
development metrics.

  Section 894--Contractor Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math 
                                Programs

    This section would amend section 862 of the National 
Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2012 (Public Law 112-
81) by requiring that activities conducted under the authority 
provided in section 862 be considered as allowable community 
service activities for the purposes of determining allowability 
of cost on a government contract. The committee is aware that 
current cost accounting practices provide that the costs 
associated with certain community service activities be 
considered as allowable costs on a government contract. The 
Federal Acquisition Regulation specifically lists blood drives, 
savings bond drives, and disaster assistance as examples of 
such allowable community service activities. The committee 
believes that contractor investments in the science, 
technology, engineering, and math (STEM) programs covered under 
section 862 are of service to our communities, increase the 
health of the defense industrial base, and develop the STEM 
workforce of the Department of Defense. This section would also 
make technical corrections and conform the provision to the 
current organizational structure of the Department of Defense.

   Section 895--Extension of Sunset Relating to Federal Data Center 
                        Consolidation Initiative

    This section would extend the sunset date of the Federal 
Data Center Consolidation Initiative established in section 834 
of the Carl Levin and Howard P. ``Buck'' McKeon National 
Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2015 (Public Law 113-
291) from October 1, 2020, to October 1, 2022.

   Section 896--Requirements Relating to Certain Rail Rolling Stock 
                      Procurements and Operations

    This section would prevent financial assistance, 
specifically Federal transit dollars, from being used to award 
a contract or subcontract for the procurement of passenger 
railcars to priority foreign state-owned, -controlled, or -
subsidized enterprises (as identified by the Trade Act of 
1974). This section would create a certification process for 
transit agencies to ensure their funds are not being used to 
purchase rolling stock from a covered manufacturer, with a 
narrow exception for transportation agencies with a preexisting 
contract or subcontract with a covered rail rolling stock 
manufacturer executed prior to the date of the enactment of 
this Act.
    This section also would require that any rail transit 
service operator develop and execute a plan for identifying and 
reducing cybersecurity risks. Recipients of Federal transit 
assistance would be required to review best practices and 
identify any hardware and software components of new rolling 
stock assets that should undergo third-party testing.

Section 897--Prohibition on Contracting with Persons That Have Business 
                   Operations with the Maduro Regime

    This section would prohibit the Department of Defense from 
entering into a contract for the procurement of goods or 
services with any person that has business operations with an 
authority of the Government of Venezuela that is not recognized 
by the United States as the legitimate Government of Venezuela.

      TITLE IX--DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE ORGANIZATION AND MANAGEMENT


                         LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS


   Subtitle A--Office of the Secretary of Defense and Related Matters


    Section 901--Update of Authorities Relating to Nuclear Command, 
                      Control, and Communications

    This section would realign authorities related to nuclear 
command and control from the Chief Information Officer to the 
Under Secretary of Defense for Acquisition and Sustainment.

  Subtitle B--Other Department of Defense Organization and Management 
                                Matters


  Section 911--Codification of Assistant Secretaries for Environment, 
       Installations, and Energy of the Army, Navy and Air Force

    This section would amend sections 7016, 8016, and 9016 of 
title 10, United States Code, to require an Assistant Secretary 
with cognizance over environment, installations, and energy for 
each military department.

 Section 912--Limitation on Availability of Funds for Consolidation of 
                         Defense Media Activity

    This section would prohibit funds authorized or 
appropriated for the Department of Defense may be used to 
consolidate the Defense Media Activity until 180 days after the 
date of the enactment of this Act.

        Section 913--Modernization of Certain Forms and Surveys

    This section would require the Secretary of Defense to 
conduct a study to identify each form and survey that contains 
a term or classification that the Secretary determines may be 
considered racially or ethnically insensitive and provide a 
plan to modernize the forms.

                       Subtitle C--Space Matters


                   Part I--United States Space Corps


    Section 921--Establishment of United States Space Corps in the 
                      Department of the Air Force

    This section would amend title 10, United States Code, to 
establish the United States Space Corps within the Department 
of the Air Force.

Section 922--Transfer of Personnel, Functions, and Assets to the Space 
                                 Corps

    This section would provide for the transfer of personnel, 
functions, assets, and obligations from the space elements of 
the Air Force to the Space Corps over a specified transition 
period.

                  Section 923--Reports on Space Corps

    This section would require the Secretary of Defense to 
submit to the congressional defense committees a series of 
reports on the organizational structure of the Space Corps, the 
military personnel requirements of the Space Corps, the 
civilian personnel requirements of the Space Corps, and the 
transfer of assets to the Space Corps.

                   Section 924--Space National Guard

    This section would prohibit the Secretary of Defense from 
transferring any personnel or resources from any reserve 
components, including the National Guard, to the United States 
Space Corps until the date on which a Space National Guard of 
the United States has been established by law.

             Section 925--Effects on Military Installations

    This section would clarify that nothing in this part shall 
be construed to authorize or require the relocation of any 
facility, infrastructure, or military installation in the Air 
Force.

                      Part II--Other Space Matters


                Section 931--United States Space Command

    This section would repeal section 169 of title 10, United 
States Code, that mandated a sub-unified command for space.

                      TITLE X--GENERAL PROVISIONS

                       ITEMS OF SPECIAL INTEREST


                             Other Matters


            Assessment of Special Operations Force Structure

    U.S. Special Operations Command (SOCOM) has seen 
considerable growth since 2001, doubling its civilian and 
military manpower, more than tripling its budget, and 
quadrupling its overseas deployments. Despite increases in 
funding and growth over time, maintaining the readiness of 
special operations forces (SOF) continues to be a challenge due 
to a high operational tempo and global demand for forces.
    The committee recognizes the unique capabilities SOF offer 
to combatant commanders to achieve objectives in their assigned 
area of operations and acknowledges the value of SOF in 
carrying out missions which the general purpose forces (GPF) 
are not trained or equipped to meet. However, the committee 
notes that SOF are increasingly assigned to missions more 
appropriate for GPF, such as security cooperation in permissive 
environments, and that the theater special operations commands 
continue to self-generate requirements without limitation or 
validation.
    The committee remains concerned that the ever-increasing 
demand for SOF and continued over-employment may further 
degrade the readiness of the force for current and future 
contingencies, result in decreased proficiency in SOF 
activities, and negatively impact the well-being of the SOF 
enterprise.
    The committee also notes that SOF have been oriented to 
counterterrorism and counterinsurgency operations and 
contingencies for almost two decades and that alignment to the 
National Defense Strategy (NDS) will require SOF proficiency in 
different languages, cultures, and skill sets. Further, the 
committee believes that alignment to the NDS requires SOCOM to 
take advantage of emerging technologies to equip SOF operators 
and enablers to operate in new and challenging environments and 
that current organizational constructs may need to be modified 
to meet the objectives of the National Military Strategy.
    Finally, the committee recognizes that all military 
operational units are pressed to meet current demands and 
maintain readiness, but believes SOF should be preserved for 
SOF specific missions as an elite, highly specialized, and 
small force.
    Therefore, elsewhere in this title, the committee includes 
a provision that would require the Secretary of Defense to 
enter into an agreement with a federally funded research and 
development center for the conduct of an independent assessment 
of the force structure and roles and responsibilities of 
special operations forces and submit the assessment to the 
congressional defense committees not later than July 1, 2020.

                  Audit Leadership and Accountability

    The committee believes that clear leadership and 
accountability across the Department of Defense is a central 
factor enabling progress on audit readiness and remediation. 
The committee is encouraged by the steps taken by the 
Department to ensure that senior leaders are responsible for 
leading the transformations of business processes and financial 
systems that are required in order to achieve an unmodified 
audit opinion. The committee continues to encourage the 
Department to pursue this policy across the Department, 
agencies, and services.

    Briefing on Improving Ground Combat Vehicle Assured Mobility in 
                            Northern Regions

    The committee continues to have concerns regarding the cold 
weather capabilities and readiness of the military services. 
Specifically, the committee has concerns regarding the training 
and equipment limitations that may exist that could effectively 
limit operations and ground combat maneuver against peer 
competitors in northern and arctic regions. The committee also 
notes that near-peer and peer competitors such as North Korea, 
Russia, and China have well-known ground mobility capabilities 
in northern and arctic regions. The committee encourages the 
Army to consider the advisability and feasibility of 
implementing a task force to assess the current status of 
assured mobility in northern regions utilizing Army and 
civilian subject matter experts in northern military ground 
maneuver operations to assist in identifying science and 
technology gaps, as well as inform any modeling and simulation 
efforts required for the improvements to legacy and next 
generation ground combat vehicles.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Chairman of the Joint 
Chiefs of Staff, in consultation with the Chiefs of Staffs of 
the military services to provide a briefing to the House 
Committee on Armed Services by March 1, 2020 that includes 
current plans and potential opportunities to improve ground 
combat vehicle assured mobility in extreme cold weather 
conditions and regions.
    The briefing should also include:
    (1) A description and evaluation of current joint force 
requirements and capabilities for ground mobility to support 
military operations in extreme cold climates;
    (2) A description and evaluation of requirements for 
extreme cold weather ground mobility in the Arctic, Northeast 
Asia, and Northern and Eastern Europe;
    (3) A description and evaluation of the current joint force 
ground mobility readiness and training, and any equipment, 
infrastructure, personnel, or resource limitations or gaps that 
may exist;
    (4) An analysis of opportunities to expand tactical ground 
mobility development and testing for extreme cold weather and 
the resources or infrastructure required for such expansion; 
and
    (5) A description and evaluation of manned and unmanned 
ground systems for operations in extreme cold weather 
environments.

Briefing on National Guard Readiness and Ability To Meet Modern Threats 
          From Area Disasters and Weapons of Mass Destruction

    The Committee is aware that since the 1998 report on the 
National Guard's ability to respond to threats from Weapons of 
Mass Destruction (WMDs) there has been a significant evolution 
of threats emanating from technological revolutions, asymmetric 
threats, new chemical and biological threats, cyber threats, 
electromagnetic pulse (EMP) threats, UAV and drone technology, 
and security at the border and at ports of entry.
    Further, as the Committee observed in response to 
Hurricanes Maria, Harvey, and Michael, the recent California 
wildfires, and other wide-area natural disasters, synchronizing 
the flow of forces and resources in disaster response and 
recovery operations requires seamless planning and operations 
on behalf of U.S. Northern Command (NORTHCOM) and the National 
Guard, including all six phases of shaping, anticipating, 
responding, operating, stabilizing, and transitioning afflicted 
areas and populations.
    In light of these evolving threats, it is appropriate to 
re-examine the National Guard Homeland Defense and Security 
enterprise. The Committee believes it is important that each 
State and Territory be given the opportunity to develop 
detailed plans relating to their own special circumstances, 
under the guidance of the National Guard Bureau.
    The Committee directs the Chief of the National Guard 
Bureau, and the Commander of NORTHCOM, to provide a briefing to 
the House Committee on Armed Services, no later than April 15, 
2020, detailing the following:
    (1) a clarification of the roles and missions, structure, 
capabilities, and training of the National Guard and NORTHCOM 
and identification of emerging gaps and shortfalls in light of 
current homeland security threats to our country;
    (2) an overview of the resources that each State and 
Territory National Guard has at its disposal that are available 
to respond to a homeland defense or security incident;
    (3) the readiness and resourcing status of the resources 
listed in (2);
    (4) the current strengths and areas of improvement in 
working with State and Federal interagency partners;
    (5) the current assessments in place that address Guard 
readiness and resourcing of NORTHCOM Title 10 forces postured 
to respond to homeland defense and security incidents, and;
    (6) a roadmap that addresses readiness across the spectrum 
of long-range emerging threats facing the United States.

    Briefing on Support to Civil Authorities in Support of Natural 
   Disasters and Law Enforcement with Aerial Platforms and Satellites

    The committee recognizes that the Department of Defense 
provides resources at the request of States, territories, and 
other Federal agencies in support of natural disasters and 
matters of law enforcement. Some of this support comes in the 
form of unmanned and manned aerial systems supporting search 
and rescue operations, natural disasters (to include preemptive 
measures), and through collaboration between the Department and 
other Federal agencies. The committee also recognizes that the 
Department utilizes some of its space-based resources to assist 
in wildfire support (to include detection) and other natural 
disasters. The committee is concerned that there is a lack of 
understanding of the policy, procedures, and overall 
availability of Department resources.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of Defense, 
in coordination with the Chief of the National Guard Bureau and 
the Director of the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency, to 
provide an unclassified briefing to the House Committee on 
Armed Services and, as appropriate, the Committee on Homeland 
Security, not later than September 30, 2019, on the 
availability of Department resources, focusing on aerial and 
satellite platforms in support of natural disasters and law 
enforcement, the assets that are currently available, and how 
States, territories, and Federal agencies request or access 
these resources.
    The briefing should provide:
    (1) an explanation of Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS), 
piloted platforms, and satellite support the Department 
provides or can provide to States and other Federal agencies, 
including examples of support provided, length of time to 
approve requests, whether any requests were disapproved and the 
reason that such requests were disapproved, during calendar 
year 2018.
    (2) an overview of programs, including satellite systems, 
that provide wildfire support to States and Federal agencies, 
including how long such programs have been in operation, the 
processes by which States access such programs, and whether 
such programs provide detection and early warning as well as 
support during wildfires. The overview shall include examples 
of the support the Department provided in calendar year 2018 to 
wildfire suppression and wildfire detection.
    (3) an overview of current policies regarding the use of 
such systems and platforms by States and Federal agencies and 
the procedures a State or Federal agency must follow to obtain 
Department support for natural disasters and search and rescue 
operations, including whether UAS require additional approvals, 
and the amount of time to obtain additional approvals. Further, 
a discussion of whether such procedures can be streamlined, and 
whether different authorities exist when requesting use of 
unmanned systems versus manned systems.
    (4) a description of the different categories of the 
Department's UAS, how the different categories are managed, and 
if certain UAS categories affect the Department's ability to 
provide support to a State or Federal agency.
    (5) a description of how the Department shares imagery 
collected by manned aircraft and UAS with Federal, State, and 
local disaster responders, including whether such imagery is 
shared in real time.
    (6) an explanation of any restrictions on the use of UAS 
under the ``Guidance for the Domestic Use of Unmanned Aircraft 
Systems in U.S. National Airspace,'' August 18, 2018, and 
Department of Defense Instruction (DODI) 3025.18 ``Defense 
Support to Civil Authorities,'' or other relevant Department of 
Defense guidance.
    (7) a description of how the Department (Active Duty, 
National Guard, and the Reserves) supports other Federal 
agencies with UAS assets, specifically the Department of 
Homeland Security (DHS) and Custom and Border Protection (CBP), 
including examples of requests that were supported or not 
supported and an explanation for such determinations.
    (8) a description of policies and laws that facilitate or 
restrict Department support to DHS or CBP, and a description of 
any systems in place that enable long-range planning to support 
DHS and CBP support requests.
    (9) an analysis of how the Department of Defense can 
improve access and knowledge of resources to States, 
territories, and other Federal agencies and whether there are 
plans to make more assets available in the future.
    (10) any other matters the Secretary determines 
appropriate.

    Chemical, Biological, Radiological, Nuclear Response Enterprise

    The committee recognizes that a robust Chemical, 
Biological, Radiological, and Nuclear (CBRN) Response 
Enterprise is critical to the Nation's security. U.S. Northern 
Command plays an integral role in domestic CBRN response, and 
the committee applauds the role of the National Guard in the 
planning and response. The committee also notes the importance 
of coordinated combined training and operations between the 
Department of Defense and civilian first responders and 
agencies, including the Department of Homeland Security and the 
Department of Health and Human Services. To further enhance 
this collaboration, the committee believes the Department of 
Defense and other Federal and State agencies that sponsor first 
responder training should coordinate CBRN training 
opportunities to maximize the effectiveness of such events. As 
the Department of Defense continues to execute unit-level and 
enterprise-wide training events, including exercises in major 
metropolitan cities, the Department of Defense should consider 
including State and local first responders on a space-available 
basis. As noted in the Blue Ribbon Study Panel on Biodefense 
report released in October 2018, this would better integrate 
the Department of Defense response to a CBRN event with the 
overall Federal response. The committee encourages the 
Department of Defense, in coordination with Department of 
Homeland Security and Department of Health and Human Services, 
to increase engagement with State and local emergency first 
responders related to training and expert advice on CBRN 
emergency response activities, technology, and exercises.

             Commercial Technology Support to Audit Efforts

    The committee notes the rapid progress of commercial 
digital technologies such as robotic process automation, 
cognitive computing, and artificial intelligence, and 
encourages the Department of Defense to leverage such 
advancements in order to improve the quality and richness of 
financial data, reduce or eliminate manual processes and 
complex financial reconciliations, and accelerate the 
Department's achievement of an unmodified audit opinion. The 
committee directs the Under Secretary of Defense (Comptroller), 
in coordination with the Chief Management Officer, to provide a 
briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services not later 
than February 1, 2020, on the initiatives the Department has 
undertaken to incorporate commercial digital technologies into 
the Department's business processes.

                     Designation of Gender Advisors

    The committee notes the importance of gender perspectives 
and meaningful participation by women in peace and security 
processes. The committee directs the Secretary of Defense to 
designate a gender advisor for each of the geographic and 
functional combatant commands, the Office of the Secretary of 
Defense, the Defense Security Cooperation Agency, and the Joint 
Staff.

   DOD Efforts to Improve Friendly Force Identification in Close Air 
                                Support

    The committee notes that the tragic loss of military 
personnel to friendly-fire is a historical and unfortunate 
reality of military operations. While the Department of Defense 
has applied lesson learned and made marked progress in 
coordination processes between friendly forces, and has 
developed technologies to mitigate risk for distinguishing 
friendly and adversary forces, incidents of friendly-fire have 
not been eliminated.
    The committee recognizes that tactical air controllers 
employ a variety of friendly force identification systems in 
close air support operations and that the Department continues 
to seek improvements in its ability to identify friendly forces 
during military operations. However, the committee is concerned 
that ongoing efforts to upgrade critical identification 
capabilities are no sufficiently coordinated or synchronized 
within the Department to ensure expeditious integration and 
interoperability of advanced technologies as systems are 
developed, tested, and fielded.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Comptroller General of 
the United States to provide a report not later than September 
30, 2020, that assesses the following issues:
    (1) What actions has the Department taken to ensure a 
common understanding of requirements and challenges related to 
friendly force identification by close air support aircraft, 
including visibility of ongoing efforts to meet requirements;
    (2) What efforts does the Department have underway to 
enhance friendly force identification capabilities, to include 
efforts to identity, evaluate, and incorporate new technologies 
in rapid and effective manner;
    (3) To what extent does the Department coordinate and 
communicate friendly force identification requirements and 
evaluations across the Department to ensure that military 
services are developing complimentary requirements and 
interoperable technologies for ground combat personnel and 
aircraft platforms;
    (4) To what extent the Department has reviewed close air 
support training curriculum to determine sufficiency and 
effectiveness for those forces assigned to provide close air 
support capabilities; and,
    (5) Any other issues the Comptroller General determines 
appropriate with respect to efforts improve the Department's 
ability to identity friendly forces and minimize friendly fire 
incidents.

Evaluation of Integration of a Geographic Combatant Command and Theater 
                       Special Operations Command

    Theater Special Operations Commands (TSOCs) are subunified 
commands of U.S. Special Operations Command (SOCOM) that are 
operationally controlled by geographic combatant commanders 
(GCC). The TSOC plans and conducts campaigns in support of the 
GCC across the spectrum of military operations.
    The committee is concerned that GCC and TSOC organizational 
structures may not be optimal for managing, integrating, and 
synchronizing special operations forces (SOF) operations across 
an area of responsibility (AOR). For example, GCC and TSOC 
mission, planning, and operational control misalignment was 
highlighted in the investigation of the October 2017 incident 
in Niger in which four U.S. service members were killed. 
Additionally, U.S. Africa Command recently completed an effort 
directed by the Secretary of Defense to review the SOF 
footprint in the AOR referred to as ``optimization.'' The 
committee understands this effort was to decrease the reliance 
on SOF and more appropriately align SOF activities with GCC 
objectives. However, the committee believes that 
synchronization and alignment of SOF activities and operations 
to clear and concise GCC missions, goals, and objectives should 
be an ongoing priority for all GCCs, not directed by the 
Secretary of Defense.
    Furthermore, according to recent work conducted by the 
Government Accountability Office (GAO) regarding SOF readiness, 
the operational tempo for SOF continues to be high due to an 
ever-increasing demand for forces by GCCs. A significant 
percentage of the demand is generated directly by the TSOCs, 
which set forth requirements for SOF in a relatively 
unconstrained manner. The committee notes this demand impacts 
the sustainability of current missions and SOF preparedness for 
future crises and conflicts.
    The committee understands that as the Department of Defense 
focuses on near-peer competition, SOF will play a key role in 
such efforts, including in the U.S. European Command (EUCOM) 
AOR to address Russian malign influence. The committee notes 
that the percentage of SOF personnel deployed to Europe has 
grown significantly over the last several years and believes 
that the alignment of the GCC and TSOC is imperative for 
effective operations as well as to managing geopolitical and 
force protection risk related to any operations.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Comptroller General of 
the United States to submit a report to the congressional 
defense committees by March 1, 2020, containing an assessment 
of the following: the sufficiency of EUCOM and U.S. Special 
Operations Command-Europe command structures to manage, 
integrate, and synchronize SOF operations in Europe; EUCOM's 
defined missions, goals, and objectives for SOF units operating 
in Europe and what challenges, if any, do units face measuring 
progress against those goals and objectives; SOCOM's ability to 
provide SOF required to support EUCOM and what impact, if any, 
has such resourcing had on the ability of SOF to carry out 
other ongoing or future operations; and any other issues the 
Comptroller General determines appropriate with respect to SOF 
operations in Europe.

  Feasibility of Providing Dedicated Security Contingency Support for 
                     Non-Governmental Organizations

    The committee notes that development is a critical 
component to address the root causes of violent extremism and 
non-governmental organizations (NGOs) provide essential support 
to relevant agencies. The committee seeks to evaluate the 
challenges and benefits associated with Department of Defense 
support to U.S. development programs designed to prevent and 
address the underlying causes of violent extremism in fragile 
states that require personnel to operate in environments with 
poor security conditions.
    Therefore, not later than March 31, 2020, the committee 
directs the Secretary of Defense to provide a briefing on the 
feasibility of providing dedicated security contingency support 
from the Department of Defense for NGOs meeting specified 
criteria in the case of a security incident in a fragile state, 
including medical evacuation, quick reaction force support, and 
personnel recovery. The report should include:
    (1) An assessment of the potential legal implications of 
providing such support;
    (2) An assessment of implications to U.S. policy regarding 
providing such support, including locations where direct 
engagement with foreign forces is expected;
    (3) Implementation steps required for such support;
    (4) Identification of any potential limitations due to 
geographic location of such security incident;
    (5) Identification of any potential limitations due to the 
security situation at such geographic location;
    (6) An assessment of resources required to perform such 
support functions;
    (7) An assessment of prioritization of such support in 
relation to other military missions;
    (8) An assessment of risk to military operations;
    (9) An assessment of operational risk to members of the 
military that may be involved in providing such support;
    (10) Authorities, capabilities, and resources currently 
available, including capacity and assets available to 
geographic combatant commands;
    (11) Whether such ground force commanders currently have 
the authority to provide such assistance;
    (12) Identification of potential criteria that would be 
necessary for a security incident to necessitate support;
    (13) Identification of potential criteria that may be 
required for NGOs to receive such support; and
    (14) Any other matters the Secretary determines 
appropriate.

    Incorporation of Cleared U.S.-Flag Commercial Ship Operators in 
                         Wargames and Exercises

    Given the critical role that U.S.-flag commercial ship 
operators play in the combat logistics force and in strategic 
sealift, as well as the increasing threat environment outlined 
in the National Defense Strategy, the committee is concerned 
about vulnerabilities arising from potential capacity 
shortfalls and attrition. The committee therefore directs the 
Secretary of the Navy to brief the House Committee on Armed 
Services no later than October 1, 2019, on any plans to include 
cleared U.S.-flag commercial ship operators in wargames and 
exercises, including but not limited to Large Scale Exercise 
2020.

   Independent Study on Detainee Medical Care at United States Naval 
                     Station, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba

    The committee notes the important value of an independent 
assessment of detainee medical care at United States Naval 
Station, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. Therefore, the committee directs 
the Comptroller General of the United States to provide a 
report to the congressional defense committees not later than 
September 1, 2020, on the quality of medical care provided to 
detainees at United States Naval Station, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. 
The report shall include the following:
    (1) a review of the medical care, including specialty care, 
provided to detainees at Guantanamo after January 10, 2002;
    (2) an assessment of the health care requirements of the 
detainees at Guantanamo;
    (3) an assessment of relevant standards of care for 
comparison to the quality of medical care provided for 
detainees at Guantanamo;
    (4) whether there are specific professional or training 
requirements for providers at Guantanamo, and how this may 
affect the provision of medical care for detainees;
    (5) whether there are specific challenges to providing 
health care, including specialty care, to detainees at 
Guantanamo, such as policy, practice, and organizational 
factors; access to detainee medical records; and security 
clearance policy and the need for security clearances; and
    (6) an assessment of policies at Guantanamo related to 
detainee medical records and their interaction with the 
Military Commissions process, including any impacts on medical 
care.
    As appropriate, the report shall provide recommendations 
for policy changes, including any recommendations that would 
require legislative action. The report shall be unclassified 
without dissemination control, but may include a classified 
annex.

              Management of the Ammunition Industrial Base

    The committee recognizes the critically important 
responsibility and authority of the Joint Program Executive 
Office for Armaments and Ammunition (JPEO A&A) for 
comprehensive life-cycle assessment, planning, and management 
of our ammunition industrial base ensuring that our warfighters 
are appropriately equipped and supplied to meet ammunition 
readiness and mission requirements.
    The committee is concerned, however, that potential changes 
to the existing distribution of responsibility and authority 
for the life-cycle management of our ammunition enterprise, 
including the government-owned and contractor-operated 
industrial base, risks unnecessarily undermining unity of 
command and effort, complicating command and support 
relationships, contributing to inefficiency, and increasing 
cost.
    The committee is aware that the recent report, ``DoD 
Ammunition Enterprise Organizational Assessment'' dated March 
7, 2019, evaluated various options for realignment of 
responsibility and authority for management of the ammunition 
industrial base. Included in that report was a recommendation 
for a ``thorough legal review'' of statutory and regulatory 
changes that could impact readiness responsibilities for all 
agencies considered.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of the Army, 
prior to deciding on any changes currently under consideration, 
to conduct an audit of all laws, policies and procedures 
related to proposed changes and, if needed, identify 
legislative or regulatory changes required to implement such 
management changes. The committee further directs the Secretary 
of the Army to provide to the House Committee on Armed Services 
a briefing on the results of this audit, as well as plans to 
mitigate risk to the industrial base, risk to unity of command 
and effort, complications between command and support 
relationships, inefficiencies, or increased costs, not less 
than 60 days prior to implementing any changes to the 
distribution of authority or responsibility for the management 
of the ammunition industrial base.

                      Navy Cost Savings Initiative

    The committee is aware of the significant time and effort 
invested in audit readiness and remediation on the part of 
individual units and commands, and notes in particular the 
efforts of Commander, U.S. Pacific Fleet to enhance internal 
controls over the obligation management process. These efforts 
have to date resulted in sufficient freed purchasing power to 
enable the reinvestment of $4.4 million into ship repair costs 
for the USS Paul Hamilton (DDG-60). The committee directs the 
Secretary of the Navy to brief the committee by December 1, 
2019 on lessons learned from this initiative that can be 
applied across the broader Navy enterprise, as well as what the 
Navy plans to do to incentivize similar efficiencies, while 
enabling mission success, in the future.

     Office of the Chief Management Officer Human Capital Analysis

    The committee notes that the Office of the Chief Management 
Officer (CMO), which establishes policy and guidance for 
business system investments, has not demonstrated that it has 
conducted a human capital analysis, as recommended by the 
Government Accountability Office (GAO) in May 2013. The 
committee is concerned that without the insights provided by 
such an analysis, the Office of the CMO will be limited in its 
ability to plan strategically to address skill gaps, likewise 
limiting its ability to lead improvement initiatives across the 
Department of Defense. Given the importance of defense business 
system investments to key Department initiatives such as 
Financial Improvement and Audit Remediation, the committee 
believes it important that the CMO perform such an analysis at 
the earliest possible date. Accordingly, the committee directs 
the Chief Management Officer to provide an interim briefing to 
the House Committee on Armed Services not later than September 
30, 2019, outlining a plan to conduct a human capital analysis 
pursuant to the GAO recommendation, as well as a report to the 
congressional defense committees not later than January 15, 
2020, detailing the results of the human capital analysis.

           Operational Use of Publicly Available Information

    Violent extremist organizations and state-actors continue 
to conduct influence, command and control, and other overt 
operations in the information environment (IE), including on 
social media platforms, to achieve objectives that undermine 
U.S. national security. As such, the demand for the operational 
use of Publicly Available Information (PAI) for traditional 
military activities such as military information support 
operations, battlespace awareness, and force protection 
continues to increase. In fact, the 2016 Department of Defense 
Strategy for Operations in the IE correlates information 
operations and cyberspace operations with the operational use 
of PAI.
    The committee is aware that the collection, exploitation, 
understanding, and use of PAI may serve operational or 
intelligence operations or activities of the Department. The 
committee acknowledges that obtaining, understanding, and 
utilizing PAI for operational purposes presents significant and 
unique policy challenges. For example, the committee believes 
that protection of privacy and civil liberties of U.S. persons 
must remain a priority when setting forth guidance on 
accessing, acquiring, requesting, storing, analyzing, or 
otherwise using PAI for operational means, and that operational 
use of PAI should not serve as a replacement for Open Source 
Intelligence or other intelligence sources and tradecraft, or 
operational methods, for verifying military targets.
    The committee notes that the Department has not yet 
established, but is formulating, a policy and governance 
structure for PAI. The committee is concerned that the lack of 
policy and governance structure is hindering the Department 
from maintaining an edge in and outside of the IE. The 
committee also notes that cover requirements and resources for 
administering cover may not be conducive to responsible and 
expedient operational use of PAI.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Under Secretary of 
Defense for Policy, in coordination with the Under Secretary of 
Defense for Intelligence, to provide a briefing to the House 
Committee on Armed Services not later than October 1, 2019, on 
the operational use of PAI. The briefing shall include a 
description of the traditional military activities that may be 
enabled or enhanced using PAI, an update on policy formulation 
and considerations, frameworks for oversight and governance, 
cover requirements and guidance, and protection of U.S. persons 
privacy and civil liberties.

        Report on Egypt's Counterterrorism Campaign in the Sinai

    The Committee is concerned with the lack of verifiable 
access to the Egyptian Sinai to monitor compliance with end-use 
monitoring requirements. Therefore, the committee directs the 
Secretary of Defense, in consultation with the Secretary of 
State, to provide a report to the House Armed Services 
Committee, the House Foreign Affairs Committee, the Senate 
Armed Services Committee, and the Senate Foreign Relations 
Committee not later than November 1, 2019 detailing whether the 
Government of Egypt is readily providing information to the 
Government of the United States to facilitate a comprehensive 
vetting process; a detailed description of the internal 
protocol, evidentiary standards, and decision making process 
followed by the Department of Defense and the Department of 
State in investigating reports of human rights violations 
committed by Egyptian security forces; and an assessment of 
whether the Egyptian security forces are adequately complying 
with obligations under the ``Golden Sentry'' and ``Blue 
Lantern'' programs. The Committee directs the report to be 
provided in unclassified form, including a classified annex if 
necessary.

Report on Supporting Requirements for the Air Force's Proposed Increase 
                           in Force Structure

    The committee is concerned that the current size and 
structure of the Air Force does not support the National 
Defense Strategy. The committee acknowledges the Air Force's 
recent force structure assessment, called ``The Air Force We 
Need'', which provides a case and framework that would, if 
adopted and resourced, grow the Air Force from 312 to 386 
operational squadrons. While the committee understands the 
assessment's analysis and conclusions and the case it makes to 
grow the size of the Air Force, it also notes the limitations 
associated with an analysis of operational squadrons only. 
Further, the committee is concerned that the requirement for 
386 operational squadrons as illustrated in the assessment will 
only be realized through the alignment of resources to these 
requirements through future Air Force budgets and encourages 
the Air Force to develop a more comprehensive analysis that 
would fully integrate planning for 386 operational squadrons 
into future budgets.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of the Air 
Force, in consultation with the Secretary of Defense, Chairman 
of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, and the secretaries of the other 
military departments to provide a report to the congressional 
defense committees not later than March 1, 2020, that builds on 
the analysis completed in the ``Air Force We Need'' assessment, 
and details the supporting resources and support personnel 
requirements necessary to execute a force sized at 386 
operational squadrons. This analysis and report should include 
associated, realigned, or additional infrastructure 
requirements, maintenance and other supporting personnel 
requirements, depot production, industrial base support, and 
additional details the Secretary feels necessary to fully 
identify, evaluate, and estimate the costs of the changes 
required within the larger Air Force enterprise to meet the 
requirements of the National Defense Strategy.

  Report on the Process for Repatriation of Individuals Who Have Been 
  Cleared for Transfer out of United States Naval Station, Guantanamo 
                               Bay, Cuba

    The committee is concerned that the process for 
transferring individuals detained at U.S. Naval Station, 
Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, to third countries once they have been 
cleared for transfer by a periodic review board or the 
Guantanamo Review Task Force has ceased to make headway. A 
number of individuals detained at U.S. Naval Station, 
Guantanamo Bay, have been cleared for transfer to third 
countries, yet no such cleared individual has been transferred 
since January 20, 2017.
    In addition, an envoy in charge of detainee repatriation 
has not been appointed, and although periodic review boards 
(PRBs) continue to operate, the status and the future of the 
transfer process is unclear.
    In light of these concerns, the committee directs the 
Secretary of Defense to submit a report to the congressional 
defense committees not later than September 30, 2019, on the 
state of the repatriation process. The report shall be 
unclassified without dissemination control, but may include a 
classified annex. At a minimum, the report should address the 
following issues:
    (1) the status of and current plans for the repatriation 
process;
    (2) an explanation of the reasons why there has not been a 
transfer of an individual who has been cleared for transfer by 
a periodic review board or the Guantanamo Review Task Force 
since January 20, 2017, including any policy reviews or changes 
that have occurred to the PRB process;
    (3) the current state of each individual's case who has 
been cleared for transfer, but has not been transferred, 
including any actions taken to facilitate their transfer, any 
obstacles to their transfer, the current state of any planning 
for transfer;
    (4) an explanation of the reasons why a repatriation envoy 
for the Department of Defense has not been appointed, the 
impact that the lack of a repatriation envoy has on the 
repatriation process, whether there have been any efforts in 
the absence of a repatriation envoy, and an assessment of those 
efforts if applicable;
    (5) an assessment of who in the administration is currently 
in charge of arranging transfers for cleared detainees, 
monitoring former detainees' safety after repatriation or 
resettlement, and monitoring country compliance with transfer 
agreements;
    (6) the status of and current plans for the periodic review 
board process; and
    (7) an assessment of any collateral impacts to the 
detention process and proceedings at Guantanamo that have 
occurred as a result of the lack of transfers.

          Special Operations Forces Professionalism and Ethics

    In the committee report accompanying the National Defense 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2018 (H. Rept. 115-200), the 
committee required the Department of Defense to provide a 
briefing containing an assessment of the culture and 
accountability of special operations forces (SOF) due to 
allegations of serious misconduct. Further, section 1066 of the 
John S. McCain National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal 
Year 2019 (Public Law 115-232) required the Assistant Secretary 
of Defense for Special Operations and Low Intensity Conflict to 
conduct a review of ethics and professionalism programs 
available to SOF. This report was provided to the congressional 
defense committees on February 26, 2019, and reiterated the 
finding of a ``disordered value system'' that was identified by 
the Commander of U.S. Special Operations Command (SOCOM) after 
an internal survey of allegations of serious misconduct across 
the SOF enterprise in December 2018.
    As a result of the survey findings, the former Commander of 
U.S. Special Operations Command, General Tony Thomas, outlined 
steps SOCOM would take over 90 days. This included a review of 
command climate surveys, reviewing programs of instruction, 
conducting research between trauma and behavioral health, and 
command level engagement with the force, to address the 
``disordered value system'' focused on the individual and team 
rather than a commitment to serve.
    The committee recognizes the efforts of senior SOF 
leadership to maintain and strengthen SOF ethos and urges the 
Commander of U.S. Special Operations Command and the Assistant 
Secretary of Defense for Special Operations and Low Intensity 
Conflict to continue such efforts. However, the committee has 
not been briefed on the results or continuing effort of the 90-
day review and expects to be continually updated. Therefore, 
the committee directs the Commander of U.S. Special Operations 
Command, in coordination with the Assistant Secretary of 
Defense for Special Operations and Low Intensity Conflict, to 
provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services not 
later than July 9, 2019, on the 90-day review and provide an 
update on other efforts relating to professionalism and ethics 
of the force.

         Strategy for Operations in the Information Environment

    Operations in the information environment (IE) by state and 
non-state actors, such as Russian cyber intrusions to undermine 
democratic institutions, ISIS's recruitment through 
dissemination of propaganda, or exfiltration of controlled 
unclassified information from the defense industrial base by 
cyber actors affiliated with the People's Republic of China, 
pose a dynamic challenge to U.S. national security. The 
Department of Defense, when appropriate and in concert with the 
interagency, must be prepared to address, defend, and respond 
to actions in the IE that undermine national security across 
the spectrum of warfare and in all types of conflict.
    In June 2016 the Department of Defense issued a strategy 
for operations in the IE to align Departmental actions and 
ensure effective integration of actions across all information 
domains. Section 1637 of the National Defense Authorization Act 
for Fiscal Year 2018 (Public Law 115-91) directed the 
Department to develop an implementation plan to support the 
2016 Department of Defense Strategy for Operations in the 
Information Environment and establish processes and procedures 
to better integrate strategic information operations and cyber-
enabled information operations across the relevant elements of 
the Department, including those responsible for military 
deception, public affairs, electronic warfare, and cyber 
operations. Section 1637 of Public Law 115-91 also directed the 
Department of Defense to coordinate regional information 
strategies and interagency coordination plans of the combatant 
commands with the appropriate Department of State officials and 
the Global Engagement Center. Further, this section required 
periodic status reports to the congressional defense committees 
every 90 days on the date the implementation plan required was 
submitted.
    The committee recognizes the efforts of the Assistant 
Secretary of Defense for Special Operations and Low Intensity 
Conflict as well as the Department's Information Operations 
Steering Group, charted in August 2016, relating to the 
requirements of section 1637 of Public Law 115-91 and 
acknowledges the periodic status updates provided to the 
congressional defense committees to date. The committee 
understands the Information Operations Steering Group has 
recommended the 2016 Strategy for Operations in the IE be 
updated and that the Department will issue the new strategy 
sometime this year. The committee expects to be apprised of the 
new strategy and expects the Department to apply the direction 
and requirements of section 1637 of the NDAA for FY 2018 to the 
new strategy. Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of 
Defense to brief the House Committee on Armed Services not 
later than September 1, 2019, on the status of the existing 
Strategy for Operations in the IE, status of the implementation 
plan and other elements of section 1637 of Public Law 115-91, 
plan for continuing to provide the congressional defense 
committees continuous periodic updates relating to operations 
in the IE, and provide detailed information on existing 
authorities, policies, and doctrine relating to operations in 
the IE.

             Trafficking of Wildlife and Wildlife Products

    The committee is concerned about the financing of terrorism 
and empowerment of transnational organized crime organizations 
through illicit trafficking. One potential source of financing 
includes trafficking in wildlife and wildlife products. The 
illegal trade of endangered and threatened wildlife and their 
parts generates billions of dollars annually. The committee 
notes that profits from the illegal wildlife trade have been 
reported to finance groups such as the Lord's Resistance Army, 
Janjaweed militias, and Boko Haram. The committee, therefore, 
directs the Secretary of Defense, in consultation with the 
Secretary of Homeland Security and Secretary of State, to 
provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services no 
later than March 1, 2020, on the Department's support to United 
States' efforts to combat illicit trafficking that includes 
wildlife and wildlife products.

                         LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS


                     Subtitle A--Financial Matters


                Section 1001--General Transfer Authority

    This section would allow the Secretary of Defense, with 
certain limitations, to make transfers between amounts 
authorized for fiscal year 2020 in division A of this Act. This 
section would limit the total amount transferred under this 
authority to $1.0 billion. This section would also require 
prompt notification to Congress of each transfer made.

Section 1002--Additional Requirements for Annual Report and Briefing on 
            Financial Improvement and Audit Remediation Plan

    This section would amend the annual reporting and 
semiannual briefing requirements contained in section 240b of 
title 10, United States Code, to include a current accounting 
of the defense business systems of the Department of Defense 
that will be introduced, replaced, updated, modified, or 
retired in connection with the audit of the full financial 
statements of the Department, including a comprehensive roadmap 
displaying in-service, retirement, and other pertinent dates 
for affected defense business systems, as well as current cost-
to-complete estimates for each effort.

     Section 1003--Financial Improvement and Audit Remediation Plan

    This section would amend section 240b of title 10, United 
States Code, by updating the elements of annual reports, 
semiannual briefs, and audit remediation services of financial 
improvements and audit remediation plans.

Section 1004--Reporting Requirements Relating to Department of Defense 
                                 Audits

    This section would require an annual report ranking each of 
the military departments and Defense Agencies in order of how 
advanced they are in achieving auditable financial statements 
as required by law. This report would include, for the bottom 
quartile of departments and agencies ranked in the report, an 
additional report describing the material weaknesses of the 
reporting entity, underlying causes of the material weaknesses, 
and a plan for remediation. This section would also require a 
report presenting a plan for achieving an unmodified audit 
opinion on the Department of Defense-wide consolidated audit 
within 5 years.

 Section 1005--Annual Budget Justification Display for Service-Common 
  and Other Support and Enabling Capabilities for Special Operations 
                                 Forces

    This section would require the Secretary of Defense to 
provide a consolidated budget display to Congress annually as 
part of the President's budget request showing service-common 
and other support and enabling capabilities for special 
operations forces (SOF) requested by a military service or 
defense agency.
    The committee appreciates the level of fidelity provided in 
the budget request for Major Force Program (MFP)-11 
administered by U.S. Special Operations Command for SOF-
peculiar and command-specific programs, activities, and 
services. The budget request contained $13.8 billion in MFP-11 
which accounts for 2 percent of the total budget request for 
the Department. According to the Department, service-common 
support and enabling capabilities requested by the military 
departments for SOF contained in the budget request is 
approximately $8.0 billion, bringing the total amount requested 
for SOF to more than $21.0 billion. However, the committee is 
aware that other elements of the Department, such as the 
Defense Threat Reduction Agency, Combating Terrorism and 
Technical Support Office, and Defense Innovation Unit also 
request and expend funds to support SOF that may not be 
reflected in the service-common total. Therefore, the committee 
requires a better understanding of the total amounts requested 
for SOF across the Department and greater consolidated detail 
on such service-common and other enabling capabilities and 
support requested each fiscal year.

            Section 1006--Determination of Budgetary Effects

    This section would state the budgetary effects of this Act 
for the purpose of complying with the Statutory Pay-As-You-Go 
Act of 2010.

Section 1007--Independent Public Accountant Audit of Financial Systems 
                      of the Department of Defense

    This section would direct the Secretary of Defense to 
ensure financial systems of the Department of Defense are 
reviewed by an independent public accountant to validate the 
financial system will meet applicable Federal requirements.

                   Subtitle B--Counterdrug Activities


  Section 1011--Modification of Authority to Provide Support to Other 
     Agencies for Counterdrug Activities and Activities to Counter 
                     Transnational Organized Crime

    This section would modify the authority to provide support 
to other agencies for counterdrug activities and activities to 
counter transnational organized crime and clarify notification 
requirements for support provided under subsection (b).

     Section 1012--Technical Correction and Extension of Reporting 
     Requirement regarding Enhancement of Information Sharing and 
   Coordination of Military Training between Department of Homeland 
                   Security and Department of Defense

    This section would provide a technical correction and 
extend until December 31, 2022, to a report required by section 
1014 of the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 
2017 (Public Law 114-328).

 Section 1013--Repeal of Secretary of Defense Review of Curricula and 
        Program Structures of National Guard Counterdrug Schools

    This section would repeal the Secretary of Defense's review 
of National Guard counterdrug school curricula and program 
structures.

                Subtitle C--Naval Vessels and Shipyards


 Section 1021--Transportation by Sea of Supplies for the Armed Forces 
                          and Defense Agencies

    This section would modify section 2631 of title 10, United 
States Code, to expand application of cargo transported by the 
Department of Defense to include defense agencies. 
Additionally, this section would require additional latitude in 
the transportation of fuel products to better expand 
opportunities for U.S. flagged resources.

 Section 1022--Use of National Defense Sealift Fund for Procurement of 
                            Two Used Vessels

    This section would require the Secretary of the Navy to 
seek to enter into a contract for two used vessels for 
mobilization purposes.

Section 1023--Formal Schoolhouse Training for Shipboard System Programs 
                               of Record

    This section would require the Secretary of the Navy to 
ensure there is a formal schoolhouse for all shipboard systems 
that are current programs of record in the fleet.

Section 1024--Report on Shipbuilder Training and the Defense Industrial 
                                  Base

    This section would require the Secretary of the Navy to 
submit a report on how the Navy plans to manage the need to 
grow the shipbuilding workforce as it builds to a 355-ship 
Navy.

                      Subtitle D--Counterterrorism


 Section 1031--Extension of Authority for Joint Task Forces to Provide 
   Support to Law Enforcement Agencies Conducting Counter-Terrorism 
                               Activities

    This section would extend section 1022 of the National 
Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2004 (Public Law 108-
136) from fiscal year 2020 to fiscal year 2022, and make 
technical corrections.

 Section 1032--Prohibition on Use of Funds for Transfer or Release of 
 Individuals Detained at United States Naval Station, Guantanamo Bay, 
                       Cuba, to Certain Countries

    This section would prohibit the use of funding authorized 
to be appropriated or otherwise made available for the 
Department of Defense during the period beginning on the date 
of the enactment of this Act and ending on December 31, 2020, 
to transfer, release, or assist in the transfer or release of 
any individual detained at U.S. Naval Station, Guantanamo Bay, 
Cuba, to Libya, Somalia, Syria, Yemen, Cuba, Iran, Russia, 
North Korea, Mexico, Guatemala, Honduras, El Salvador, and 
Venezuela.

Section 1033--Prohibition on Use of Funds for Transfer to and Detention 
of Additional Individuals, Including United States Citizens, at United 
               States Naval Station, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba

    This section would prohibit the use of funding authorized 
to be appropriated or otherwise made available for the 
Department of Defense during the period beginning on the date 
of the enactment of this Act and ending on December 31, 2020, 
to detain any additional individuals, including United States 
citizens, at the detention facility at the United States Naval 
Station, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba.
    This section would prohibit detention of additional 
individuals under the law of war or pursuant to a military 
commission proceeding, and defines additional individuals as 
individuals to be detained at Guantanamo following the most 
recent release of a detainee, pursuant to a plea agreement, in 
May 2018.
    This section would also require a plan identifying a 
disposition other than continued law of war detention at United 
States Naval Station, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, for each individual 
currently detained at Guantanamo.

Section 1034--Sense of Congress regarding the Provision of Medical Care 
to Individuals Detained at United States Naval Station, Guantanamo Bay, 
                                  Cuba

    This section would express the sense of Congress that the 
increasing age of detainees at the U.S. Naval Station, 
Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, poses challenges for the provision of 
medical care and that the United States has an ongoing 
obligation to provide medical care to detainees at Guantanamo 
that meets appropriate standards of care.
    This section would also express the sense of Congress that 
the Secretary of Defense should take into account the standards 
of care provided at other relevant facilities, including those 
administered by the Federal Bureau of Prisons, when determining 
the policies regarding medical care for detainees at 
Guantanamo.

 Section 1035--Independent Assessment on Gender and Countering Violent 
                               Extremism

    This section would require the Secretary of Defense to 
enter into a contract with a nonprofit entity or a federally 
funded research and development center independent of the 
Department of Defense to conduct research and analysis on the 
intersection of gender and violent extremism and terrorism and 
provide a report to the congressional defense committees on the 
result of the research not later than 2 years after the date of 
the enactment of this Act.

         Subtitle E--MIscellaneous Authorities and Limitations


 Section 1041--Scheduling of Department of Defense Executive Aircraft 
           Controlled by Secretaries of Military Departments

    This section would require the Secretary of Defense to 
ensure there is a common scheduler for the scheduling and 
prioritization of executive airlift across the entire 
Department of Defense.

       Section 1042--Explosive Ordnance Defense Disposal Program

    This section would amend section 2284 of title 10, United 
States Code, to make technical changes regarding the 
responsibilities of the executive agent for the explosive 
ordnance disposal training and technology program. This section 
would also eliminate the requirement to designate a combat 
support agency to manage a defense-wide program element for 
certain explosive ordnance disposal activities.

   Section 1043--Notification on the Provision of Defense Sensitive 
                                Support

    This section would modify section 1055 of the National 
Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2017 (Public Law 114-
328) to provide additional Defense Sensitive Support reporting 
requirements.

 Section 1044--Modification and Technical Correction of Authority for 
 Deployment of Members of the Armed Forces to the Southern Land Border 
                          of the United States

    This section would modify the authority under section 1059 
of the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2016 
(Public Law 114-92) to require the Secretary of Defense to 
fully consider readiness, mission and task alignment to 
requested support, and ensure that support requirements are 
inherently governmental when determining the Department of 
Defense's ability to provide assistance to secure the U.S. 
southern land border. Additionally, this section would add 
reporting requirements.

 Section 1045--Limitation on Use of Funds for the Inactivation of Army 
                            Watercraft Units

    This section would prohibit the use of any funds for fiscal 
year 2020 for the inactivation of an Army watercraft unit until 
the Secretary of Defense has completed a review and the 
findings have been validated by a federally funded research and 
development corporation.

 Section 1046--Prohibition on Use of Funds for Construction of a Wall, 
   Fence, or Other Physical Barrier along the Southern Border of the 
                             United States

    This section would prohibit the obligation, expense, or use 
of funds, that have been authorized to be appropriated for 
national defense in fiscal years 2015 through 2020, to design 
or carry out a project to construct, replace, or modify a wall, 
fence or other physical barrier along the international border 
between the United States and Mexico.

     Section 1047--Expenditure of Funds for Department of Defense 
            Intelligence and Counterintelligence Activities

    This section would authorize the expenditure of no more 
than 5 percent of Military Intelligence Program funds for 
Department of Defense recurring or anticipated intelligence and 
counterintelligence activities for each of the fiscal years 
2020 through 2025. Further, this section would require the 
Secretary of Defense to provide a report of the expenditures 
covered by this authorization for each of the fiscal years 2020 
through 2025.
    This section would provide additional authorization in 
response to section 1041 of the National Defense Authorization 
Act for Fiscal Year 2018 (Public Law 115-91), which required 
the Secretary of Defense to clarify use of emergency and 
extraordinary expenses (EEE) for intelligence and 
counterintelligence (CI) activities that were determined not to 
be of an emergent or extraordinary nature. This modification of 
section 423 of title 10, United States Code, attempts to 
normalize limited, controlled spending for the Department's 
intelligence and CI activities while preserving the EEE 
construct for those intelligence and CI expenses that are truly 
emergent and extraordinary, and cannot be classified with an 
established Department of Defense funding program.

 Section 1048--Limitation on Use of Funds to House Children Separated 
                              from Parents

    This section would prohibit amounts made available to the 
Department of Defense for fiscal year 2020 from being used to 
house children separated from their parent or legal guardian by 
Customs and Border Protection near a port of entry or within 
100 miles of the border of the United States.

  Section 1049--Limitation on Use of Funds for Providing Housing for 
                      Unaccompanied Alien Children

    This section would require the Department of Defense to 
submit a congressional certification that any housing provided 
to unaccompanied alien children meets the standards of the 
Department of Health and Human Services, including those 
provided in the Flores settlement agreement, any waivers or 
exceptions to those standards, and identifies any environmental 
hazards and actions to mitigate those hazards.

          Subtitle F--National Defense Strategy Implementation


                       Section 1051--Short Title

    This section would establish that this subtitle may be 
cited as ``the National Defense Strategy Implementation Act''.

   Section 1052--Report on Operational Concepts and Plans Regarding 
                         Strategic Competitors

    This section would require the Secretary of Defense to 
provide to the congressional defense committees, not later than 
February 1, 2020, and biannually thereafter, a report on 
Department of Defense operational concepts and plans regarding 
strategic competitors.

           Section 1053--Actions to Increase Analytic Support

    This section would require the Secretary of Defense to 
direct the Under Secretary of Defense for Policy, the Director 
of the Joint Staff, and the Director of Cost Assessment and 
Program Evaluation, in consultation with the head of each 
military service, to jointly develop and implement a plan to 
strengthen necessary analytic capabilities, expertise, and 
processes for meeting the National Defense Strategy.

                       Section 1054--Definitions

    This section would define the terms ``operational 
challenges'' and ``strategic competitors'' for the purposes of 
this subtitle.

                    Subtitle G--Studies and Reports


 Section 1061--Report on Transfers of Equipment to Prohibited Entities

    This section would require the Secretary of Defense, in 
coordination with the Secretary of State, to submit an annual 
report on the transfer of defense articles to any unit 
committing a gross violation of human rights or any group or 
organization prohibited from receiving assistance from the 
United States during the preceding year. This section would 
also require a one time report on transfers during the period 
beginning on January, 1, 2015 and ending on the date of 
enactment of this Act.

Section 1062--Elimination of Requirement to Submit Reports to Congress 
                            in Paper Format

    This section would enable the Department of Defense to 
provide reports required by the Congress in an electronic 
format rather than a paper format. By eliminating the 
requirement of the delivery of congressional reports in paper 
format, the Department of Defense would be able to streamline 
the reporting process both within the Department and in 
delivery of its reports to the Congress.

 Section 1063--Modification of Annual Report on Civilian Casualties in 
           Connection with United States Military Operations

    This section would modify section 1057 of the National 
Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2018 (Public Law 115-
91), as most recently amended by section 1062 of the John S. 
McCain National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2019 
(Public Law 115-232), by adding additional elements and 
extending the reporting requirement.

    Section 1064--Inclusion of Certain Individuals Investigated by 
              Inspectors General in the Semiannual Report

    This section would require the Inspector General of the 
Department of Defense to include the already-public names of 
senior officials who commit misconduct in quarterly reports.

   Section 1065--Annual Report on Joint Military Information Support 
                    Operations Web Operations Center

    This section would require the Commander of U.S. Special 
Operations Command (SOCOM) to provide an annual report to the 
congressional defense committees not later than December 1 of 
each year on the Joint Military Information Support Operations 
(MISO) Web Operations Center (JMWC). The report shall include a 
description of MISO activities hosted by the JMWC, activities 
conducted to achieve initial operating capability and full 
operational capability, measures of effectiveness, 
infrastructure, leveraging lessons learned across the platform, 
number of personnel, and synchronization of efforts across the 
interagency and with international partners, as appropriate.
    The committee supports efforts to improve the effectiveness 
and efficiency of MISO programs. However, the committee is 
concerned the current plan for establishment of the JMWC is 
focused on consolidation rather than efficiencies and lacks 
focus on efforts to leverage lessons learned and implement 
measures of effectiveness across the geographic combatant 
commands.

          Section 1066--Mobility Capability Requirement Study

    This section would require the Commander, U.S. 
Transportation Command to submit a report and a briefing to the 
House Committee on Armed Services by January 1, 2021, with an 
interim update by June 1, 2020, assessing the operational risk 
for meeting the mobility requirements of the geographic 
combatant commanders.

     Section 1067--Assessment of Special Operations Force Structure

    This section would require the Secretary of Defense to 
enter into an agreement with a federally funded research and 
development center for the conduct of an independent assessment 
of the force structure and roles and responsibilities of 
special operations forces and to submit the assessment to the 
congressional defense committees not later than July 1, 2020.

  Section 1068--Army Aviation Strategic Plan and Modernization Roadmap

    This section would require the Secretary of the Army to 
provide a comprehensive strategy to the congressional defense 
committees by March 30, 2020, for Army aviation to ensure 
alignment between requirements, future Army budget submissions, 
and authorization of appropriations. The required strategy 
would cover both current and future multi-domain operations for 
Army aviation.
    The fiscal year 2020 budget request for the Army included 
several significant changes to aviation modernization programs. 
While these changes may align with the long-term Army aviation 
strategy, the committee is concerned with the absence of such a 
strategy that incorporates both current and future 
capabilities.

 Section 1069--Report on Ground-Based Long-Range Artillery to Counter 
                       Land and Maritime Threats

    This section would require the Secretary of Defense to 
provide a report to the congressional defense committees not 
later than March 1, 2020, on the integration of emerging long 
range ground-based fires to counter land and maritime threats, 
particularly those in the U.S. Indo-Pacific Command and U.S. 
European Command areas of responsibility.

Section 1070--Independent Review of Transportation Working-Capital Fund

    This section would require the Secretary of Defense, in 
coordination with the Secretaries of the military departments, 
to contract with an independent federally funded research and 
development center to conduct a review of the Transportation 
Working Capital-Fund (TWCF) of the U.S. Transportation Command.
    The committee is disappointed to learn that U.S. 
Transportation Command has delayed the implementation of the 
changes that were mandated by the National Defense 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2018 (Public Law 115-91) as 
it pertains to the management of the channel system. The 
channel system was designed to be a revenue generator for the 
TWCF but has consistently failed to meet this objective. The 
U.S. Transportation Command has done a poor job of projecting 
overhead costs and cargo as it relates to the channel system 
which has resulted in the military services budgeting 
incorrectly for the costs associated with using the channel 
system. The committee believes that rather than having the 
military services budget for the cost of using the channel 
system which then flow to the TWCF, U.S. Transportation Command 
should improve their cost projections and budget directly for 
them. The committee is also concerned that there has not been 
adequate oversight of where excess TWCF funds have been 
allocated. The committee expects U.S. Transportation Command to 
better disclose where excess TWCF funds are being allocated in 
the future.

  Section 1071--Geographic Command Risk Assessment of Proposed Use of 
                     Certain Aircraft Capabilities

    This section would require selected commanders of 
geographic combatant commands to provide a report to the 
congressional defense committees not later than March 31, 2020, 
that assesses the level of operational risk posed by the plans 
of the Department of the Air Force and the Department of the 
Navy to provide a mix of fifth generation and advanced fourth 
generation tactical aircraft capabilities to meet each 
commanders' contingency and steady-state operational 
requirements.

Section 1072--Annual Report on Strikes Undertaken by the United States 
     Against Terrorist Targets Outside Areas of Active Hostilities

    This section would require an annual report to Congress not 
later than May 1 of each year on the number of strikes 
undertaken by the United States against terrorist targets 
outside areas of active hostilities during the preceding 
calendar year, as well as assessments of combatant and non-
combatant deaths resulting from those strikes.

 Section 1073--Termination of Requirement for Submittal to Congress of 
                       Certain Recurring Reports

    This section would terminate certain recurring reports 
effective December 30, 2021.

                       Subtitle H--Other Matters


      Section 1081--Technical, Conforming, and Clerical Amendments

    This section would make a number of technical, conforming, 
and clerical amendments of a non-substantive nature to existing 
law.

 Section 1082--Submission to Congress of Department of Defense Execute 
                                 Orders

    This section would add a new section in chapter 2 of title 
10, United States Code, that would require the Secretary of 
Defense to provide to the chairman and ranking member of each 
of the congressional defense committees, and their designated 
staff with the appropriate security clearance, copies of each 
execute order issued by the Secretary or by a commander of a 
combatant command before the date of the enactment of this Act, 
and within 30 days of issuing an execute order after the date 
of the enactment of this Act.

 Section 1083--Extension of National Security Commission on Artificial 
                              Intelligence

    This section would modify reporting requirements for the 
National Security Commission on Artificial Intelligence, as 
established in section 1051 of the John S. McCain National 
Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2019 (Public Law 115-
232) by 180 days and extend the termination date to March 1, 
2021.

     Section 1084--National Commission on Military Aviation Safety

    This section would amend section 1087 of the John S. McCain 
National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2019 (Public 
Law 115-232) to extend the deadline to December 1, 2020, for 
the National Commission on Military Aviation Safety to submit 
its final report. In addition, this section would require the 
Secretary of Defense, in coordination with the Secretaries of 
the military departments, to provide a report that assesses the 
commission's findings and conclusions, as well as details any 
plans for implementing recommendations made by the commission 
and any other actions being taken to improve military aviation 
safety. Finally, this section would authorize $3.0 million in 
fiscal year 2020 for the commission's operations.

  Section 1085--Extension of Postage Stamp for Breast Cancer Research

    This section would amend section 414 of title 39, United 
States Code, by authorizing the extension of the postage stamp 
for breast cancer research until 2027.

  Section 1086--Processes and Procedures for Notifications regarding 
                       Special Operations Forces

    This section would mandate the Secretary of Defense 
establish and submit processes and procedures for providing 
notifications to the congressional defense committees regarding 
members of special operations forces. This section would also 
mandate that the processes and procedures include clarification 
of the roles and responsibilities of the Secretaries of the 
military departments, the Assistant Secretary of Defense for 
Special Operations and Low Intensity Conflict, and the 
Commander of U.S. Special Operations Command in providing such 
notifications to Congress.
    The Secretaries of the military departments provide 
notification to the congressional defense committees regarding 
members of the Armed Forces who receive awards of valor, 
demonstrate acts of heroism, are killed or wounded in action or 
while on duty, are alleged to have committed serious offenses 
punishable under the Uniform Code of Military Justice, are 
involved in high-profile incidents, and for other matters of 
interest.
    However, the committee notes that ambiguity regarding the 
roles and responsibilities of the Secretaries of the military 
departments, the Commander of U.S. Special Operations Command, 
and the Assistant Secretary of Defense for Special Operations 
and Low Intensity Conflict relating to notifications involving 
special operations forces have resulted in inconsistent, or 
lack of, notifications. For example, the congressional defense 
committees were not provided notifications of reprimands issued 
as a result of the investigation into the incident in Niger in 
2017.
    The committee expects processes and procedures established 
under this provision to be consistent with the processes for 
notifications involving the conventional forces and to account 
for the privacy of members of the Armed Forces.

   Section 1087--Assessment of Standards, Processes, Procedures, and 
                 Policy Relating to Civilian Casualties

    This section would require the Secretary of Defense to 
enter into an agreement with a federally funded research and 
development center for conduct of an independent assessment of 
the sufficiency of Department of Defense standards, processes, 
procedures, and policy relating to civilian casualties 
resulting from United States military operations.

                Section 1088--Disposal of IPv4 Addresses

    This section would require the Department of Defense to 
sell certain IPv4 addresses at fair market value. This section 
would also require the Secretary of Defense to submit a report 
to the congressional defense committees not later than 180 days 
after the date of the enactment of this Act on the disposal of 
certain IPv4 addresses, an accounting of the total number of 
IPv4 address holdings of the Department of Defense, and the 
plan of the Secretary to transition all Department addresses to 
IPv6. Finally, this section would limit the obligation or 
expenditure of funds for fiscal year 2020 to 70 percent of 
funds for the Office of the Secretary of Defense for travel 
until the Secretary submits this report.

         Section 1089--Securing American Science and Technology

    This section would establish an interagency working group 
to coordinate activities for the protection of federally funded 
research and development from foreign interference while 
accounting for an exchange of ideas and for the international 
talent required for scientific progress and American leadership 
in science.

  Section 1090--Standardized Policy Guidance for Calculating Aircraft 
                    Operation and Sustainment Costs

    This section would require the Under Secretary of Defense 
for Acquisition and Sustainment to develop and implement 
standardized policy guidance for calculating aircraft operation 
and sustainment costs for the Department of Defense.

    Section 1091--Special Federal Aviation Regulation Working Group

    This section would require the Secretary of Defense, the 
Secretary of Transportation, and the Secretary of State to 
establish a Special Federal Aviation Regulation interagency 
working group to review the current options for the Department 
of Defense to use contracted U.S. civil aviation to provide 
support for Department of Defense missions in areas where a 
Federal Aviation Administration Special Federal Aviation 
Regulation is in effect.

                  TITLE XI--CIVILIAN PERSONNEL MATTERS

                       ITEMS OF SPECIAL INTEREST


                     Civilian Sexual Assault Study

    The committee is concerned about sexual harassment and 
assault prevention and response procedures within the civilian 
workforce of the Department of Defense. The committee notes 
that civilian employees report harassment and assault at higher 
rates than their uniformed counterparts, and in some instances 
express dissatisfaction with their management's handling of 
these complaints.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Comptroller General of 
the United States to submit a report to the congressional 
defense committees by March 1, 2020, on the Department of 
Defense sexual assault and harassment prevention and response 
system for civilian employees. This report shall include, but 
is not limited to, the following elements:
    (1) the utilization rate of the sexual assault services by 
civilian employees;
    (2) an assessment of the quality and timing of preventive 
training;
    (3) the staffing level of the prevention and response 
systems, Department of Defense counselors, victim advocates, 
and special victims counsels for civilian employee sexual 
assault victims; and
    (4) a comparison of the resources to those available for 
military personnel.

           Department of Defense Report on Reduction in Force

    The committee notes that section 1101 of the National 
Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2016 (Public Law 114-
92) required the Secretary of Defense to establish procedures 
to require that any reduction in force for civilian positions 
for the competitive service or the excepted service be 
conducted primarily on the basis of performance under any 
applicable performance management system. The committee also 
notes that the ``New Beginnings'' performance management and 
workforce incentive system was authorized by section 1113 of 
the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2010 
(Public Law 111-84) in conjunction with the repeal of the 
National Security Personnel System.
    The committee believes the impacts of these significant 
changes to civilian workforce policy in the Department of 
Defense should be identified and reviewed for any necessary 
modification. Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of 
Defense to submit a report to the congressional defense 
committees by March 1, 2020, concerning all involuntary 
civilian reductions in force conducted on or after January 1, 
2016, broken out by Department of Defense component. The report 
should illustrate the number of employees separated, the number 
of employees separated because of less favorable performance 
evaluations, and the demographics of each group.

   Direct Hire Authority Clarification for Support Defense Activities

    The committee notes that Subsection (a) of section 1125 of 
the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2017 
granted temporary direct hire authority for domestic defense 
industrial base facilities and major range and test facilities 
bases. Furthermore, section 1101 of the National Defense 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2019, implemented direct hire 
authority across the Department. These changes have sped up 
hiring, brought employees on faster, and increased productivity 
at Air Force Depots.
    The committee notes that these changes to section 1125 and 
1101 intended to cover positions that work on and support 
defense activities for the defense industrial base or the major 
range and test facilities bases. Positions that support the 
Depots themselves, for example, plumbers, electricians, 
exterior maintenance, finance, etc., are currently not covered 
by the changes in section 1125 and section 1101. These types of 
employees, although not doing direct depot work, directly 
support and enable the operation of the depot.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of Defense 
to submit a report on the effects of the current interpretation 
of section 1125, specifically the challenges faced by the Air 
Force due to inadequate direct hire authority for positions 
that support defense activities for the defense industrial base 
or the major range and test facilities bases.

                   Optimizing Total Force Management

    The Department of Defense's Fiscal Year 2020 budget request 
explains that the size and composition of its civilian 
workforce is shaped to reflect changes commensurate with the 
Department's military force structure and its civilian 
workforce is key to warfighter readiness. However, when the 
committee examined the workforce projections of the Department 
of Defense, it found the civilian workforce increases by 0.7 
percent from fiscal year 2019 to 2020, while Active Component 
End Strength increases by 6.2 percent and Reserve Component End 
Strength by 1.5 percent.
    Therefore, given these workforce mix decisions, the 
committee directs the Secretary of Defense to contract with a 
federal funded research and development center to review the 
Department's force structure decision-making processes in the 
Office of Secretary of Defense, Joint Staff and in each of the 
Military Departments to verify the Department is planning, 
programing and budgeting for a force structure that optimizes 
lethality by using military for warfighting functions and 
ensures that planned operational capabilities are fully 
executable and sustainable.
    This review should include recommendations, and, as a 
minimum, include:
    (1) an identification of best practices as well as 
impediments to the optimum sizing of each component of the 
Total Force of active military, reserve component military, 
civilian workforce, host nation support, and contract support;
    (2) recommendations on how to leverage the Military 
Department's modeling efforts in order to achieve a more 
balanced Total Force mix, and;
    (3) the effects of Full Time Equivalent (FTE) caps and 
associated business processes resulting from either legislation 
or Departmental policy or practice that would impede the use of 
more holistic analytical tools for linking the enabling 
civilian to supported force structure.
    The report should be provided and briefed to the Armed 
Services Committees not later than February 1, 2021.

                Readiness and Borrowed Military Manpower

    The committee notes that the Report of the Defense Science 
Board Task Force on Readiness concluded that in order to 
achieve and sustain readiness it was essential to consider, not 
just the amount of hardware but key manpower issues such as the 
active-reserve mix, retention, training, and the sufficiency of 
supporting government civilians. The task force also concluded 
borrowed military manpower results in a loss of unit 
cohesiveness, reduced training efficiency, and lowered 
readiness.
    The committee questions whether the Department of Defense 
continues to divert service members from their unit assignments 
to perform nonmilitary functions which could be performed by 
civilian employees.
    Therefore, the committee directs the United States 
Comptroller General to submit a report to the congressional 
defense committees by April 1st, 2020 assessing the level and 
impacts of borrowed military manpower.
    This report should include the following elements:
    (1) An analysis of the diversions of Soldiers, Sailors, 
Airmen or Marines from their unit assignments and or their 
military occupational specialties, to perform non-military 
essential functions which could be performed by civilian 
employees.
    (2) A review the Department's tracking of borrowed military 
manpower in its readiness reporting systems and an assessment 
of the impact this is having on both the Department's ability 
to manage the Total Force, and the readiness effects of 
``missing'', but unreported manpower.

     The Department of Defense's Use of Term and Temporary Hiring 
                              Authorities

    The Committee questions if the Department of Defense's 
Congressionally appropriated overseas contingency operations 
funds, exempt from The Budget Control Act of 2011 (P.L. 112-
25), are funding enduring missions in support of the National 
Defense Strategy which is resulting in inappropriate use of 
term and temporary hiring authorities for enduring missions.
    Furthermore, the Committee questions whether there are 
cases where term and temporary hiring authorities are being 
misused in cases when the funding for the program directly 
supports the National Defense Strategy and is funded over the 
Future Year Defense Program with an enduring funding line.
    Lastly, the Committee is concerned that this creates a 
scenario for the Department of Defense to inappropriately 
circumvent title 5 due process and whistleblower protections 
and extend probationary periods.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Comptroller General of 
the United States to submit a report to the congressional 
defense committees by March 1st, 2020 reviewing the 
Department's use of term and temporary hiring authorities for 
enduring missions and analyzing the degree to which this is 
resulting from the misuse of overseas contingency operations 
funding or efforts to inappropriately extend probationary 
periods.

                         LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS


   Section 1101--Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency Personnel 
                          Management Authority

    This section would amend section 1599(h) of title 10, 
United States Code, to allow the Director of the Defense 
Advanced Research Projects Agency to appoint additional 
employees to the agency using the personnel management 
authority codified in section 1599(h) of title 10, United 
States Code.

     Section 1102--Modification of Probationary Period for Certain 
                    Department of Defense Employees

    This section would amend section 1599e of title 10, United 
States Code, to change the probationary period for Department 
of Defense civilian employees from 2 years to 1 year.

              Section 1103--Civilian Personnel Management

    This section would amend section 129 of title 10, United 
States Code, to clarify that civilian personnel of the 
Department of Defense may not be managed on the basis of man-
years, end strength, or full-time equivalent positions, or 
maximum number of employees, and instead will be managed based 
on the total force management policies and procedures 
established under section 129a of title 10, United States Code, 
the workload required to carry out the functions and activities 
of the Department, and the funds made available to the 
Department for each fiscal year.

   Section 1104--One-Year Extension of Temporary Authority to Grant 
Allowances, Benefits, and Gratuities to Civilian Personnel on Official 
                         Duty in a Combat Zone

    This section would amend section 1115 of the John S. McCain 
National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2019 (Public 
Law 115-232) by extending until 2021 the temporary authority 
granting allowances, benefits, and gratuities to civilian 
personnel on official duty in a combat zone.

     Section 1105--One-Year Extension of Authority to Waive Annual 
 Limitation on Premium Pay and Aggregate Limitation on Pay for Federal 
                  Civilian Employees Working Overseas

    This section would amend section 1101 of the Duncan Hunter 
National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2009 (Public 
Law 110-417) by extending premium pay for Federal civilian 
employees working overseas until the end of 2020.

 Section 1106--Performance of Civilian Functions by Military Personnel

    This section would amend section 129a of title 10, United 
States Code, to ensure that before the Secretary of a military 
department directs military personnel to perform the functions 
of civilian personnel, the military department concerned is in 
compliance with section 129 of title 10, United States Code.

     Section 1107--Extension of Direct Hire Authority for Domestic 
  Industrial Base Facilities and Major Range and Test Facilities Base

    This section would amend section 1125 of the National 
Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2017 (Public Law 114-
328) to extend the authority of the Secretary of Defense to use 
direct hire procedures for civilian personnel at domestic 
defense industrial base facilities and the Major Range and Test 
Facilities Base until 2025.

 Section 1108--Authority to Provide Additional Allowances and Benefits 
           for Certain Defense Clandestine Service Employees

    This section would authorize the provision of additional 
allowances and benefits for certain Defense Intelligence 
Agency, Defense Clandestine Service employees located in the 
United States, limited to 125 covered employees per year for 
locations with living costs determined by the Secretary of 
Defense to be equal to or higher than the District of Columbia. 
Further, the provision stipulates that the authorization is 
contingent upon the Secretary of Defense submitting required 
reports to the appropriate congressional committees, to include 
a 5-year future-year defense program strategy and an 
implementation plan. This section also requires an annual 
report detailing the extent to which the authority was utilized 
and efficacy of such authority in enabling the execution of the 
objectives of the Defense Intelligence Agency.

              Section 1109--Prohibited Personnel Practices

    This provision would amend section 2302 of title 5, United 
States Code, to extend the rights delineated in that section to 
all the interns in the United States Federal Government.

Section 1110--Enhancement of Antidiscrimination Protections for Federal 
                               Employees

    This section would amend section 2301 of title 5, United 
States Code, to strengthen the management of Federal equal 
employment opportunity programs by requiring that they operate 
independently of agencies' human resources and general counsel 
offices. This section would also strengthen the accountability 
mechanisms that are central to the effectiveness of the equal 
employment opportunity process.

     Section 1111--Modification of Direct Hire Authorities for the 
                         Department of Defense

    This section would amend section 9905 of title 5, United 
States Code, by consolidating direct hiring authorities for the 
following positions:
    (1) scientific, technical, engineering, mathematics 
positions within the defense acquisition workforce
    (2) scientific, technical, engineering, mathematics 
positions working outside a scientific and technology 
reinvention laboratory
    (3) medical or health professional positions
    (4) childcare services positions
    (5) financial management, accounting, auditing, actuarial, 
cost estimation, operational research, or business or business 
administration positions
    (6) Department of Defense business transformation and 
management innovation positions.
    The consolidation of these direct hiring authorities would 
sunset on September 30, 2025. In addition, this section would 
require the Secretary of Defense, in coordination with the 
Director of the Office of Personnel Management, to contract 
with a federally funded research and development center and 
submit a report to Congress by February 1, 2021, on improving 
competitive hiring at the Department of Defense.

         Section 1112--Permitted Disclosures by Whistleblowers

    This section would amend section 2302(b)(8)(B) of title 5, 
United States Code, to provide additional protections for 
whistleblowers who report waste, fraud, or abuse to their 
supervisors at a government agency.

             TITLE XII--MATTERS RELATING TO FOREIGN NATIONS

                       ITEMS OF SPECIAL INTEREST


            Assessment, Monitoring, and Evaluation Resources

    The committee is concerned that the amount identified in 
the fiscal year 2020 budget request for assessment, monitoring, 
and evaluation (AM&E) of security cooperation programs is 
insufficient to meet congressional intent. The committee 
believes that the Department of Defense's prioritization and 
resourcing of AM&E of security cooperation programs has been 
vastly inadequate in recent years and has not kept pace with 
the significant growth of and emphasis on security cooperation 
capacity building programs and associated funding. The 
committee expects the Department's AM&E program to be rigorous 
and comprehensive, and to be incorporated into security 
cooperation programs from inception to completion to measure 
outcomes against defined objectives. Further, the committee 
expects that an effective AM&E program will include independent 
evaluations and capture lessons learned, which are critical to 
improving the effectiveness and efficiency of subsequent 
security cooperation efforts. The committee expects independent 
evaluations to be conducted by individuals who are not also 
conducting monitoring of security cooperation capacity building 
programs. The committee further expects the Department to 
allocate sufficient resources to accomplish these objectives in 
future budget requests.

                 Briefing on Afghanistan Reconciliation

    The committee is aware that reconciliation talks have begun 
between the United States and the Taliban regarding a 
negotiated peace in Afghanistan. The committee supports the 
objectives of the South Asia strategy to create the conditions 
to support a political settlement in Afghanistan, and the 
efforts of the Special Representative for Afghanistan 
Reconciliation, the Secretary of State, and the Commander, 
Resolute Support Mission, to engage in reconciliation talks. 
Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of Defense, in 
coordination with the Secretary of State and the Director of 
National Intelligence, to provide a briefing to the House 
Committee on Armed Services by October 1, 2019, on the status 
of the U.S reconciliation negotiations with the Taliban and 
progress toward an intra-Afghan dialogue between the Afghan 
Government and the Taliban, as well as any potential shifts in 
the posture of the U.S. Armed Forces in Afghanistan as a result 
of successful negotiations. Such briefing shall also include 
the following elements with respect to the extent to which 
Taliban leaders present at the reconciliation talks:
    (1) maintain active association with terrorist 
organizations inside and outside of Afghanistan;
    (2) support the legitimacy of the Government of 
Afghanistan;
    (3) commit to maintaining societal gains advanced in the 
past 18 years including: protecting the rights of women and 
girls to access public healthcare, hold property, access 
education, and have freedom of movement;
    (4) commit to stop receiving funds and military support 
from non-Afghan governments or organizations;
    (5) will assist and be an active participant with the 
Government of Afghanistan in future counterterrorism 
operations; and
    (6) any other matter the Secretary of Defense considers 
appropriate.

   Briefing on Defense Department Plans for the European Deterrence 
                               Initiative

    The committee continues to support the European Deterrence 
Initiative (EDI) and seeks to ensure a sustained U.S. 
commitment to deterrence in Europe at levels appropriate to the 
challenges at hand. Therefore, the committee directs the 
Secretary of Defense, in coordination with the Commander, U.S. 
European Command, to provide a briefing to the House Committee 
on Armed Services not later than October 30, 2019. The briefing 
shall include the following:
    (1) a thorough explanation of the plans and assumptions 
underlying the future years plan for EDI that was submitted to 
Congress pursuant to section 1237(a) of the National Defense 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2018 (Public Law 115-91);
    (2) a thorough explanation of the current plans and 
assumptions for EDI over the next 5 years, based on the 
planning that informed the fiscal year 2020 budget request for 
EDI;
    (3) a comparison identifying and explaining the differences 
and similarities between the plans and assumptions identified 
in (1) and (2);
    (4) a detailed explanation of the rationale and 
implications of any changes in the plans and assumptions 
identified in (1) and (2); and
    (5) any other matters the Secretary considers appropriate.

  Comptroller General Review of Posture to Counter Russian Aggression

    The National Defense Strategy highlights challenges to the 
sovereignty and integrity of North Atlantic Treaty Organization 
(NATO) members posed by Russian aggression across all 
warfighting domains. NATO remains the foundation of trans-
Atlantic security, and the committee supports U.S. engagement 
with our NATO allies. Since 2014, Congress has funded the 
European Deterrence Initiative (EDI) to strengthen our 
partnerships and deter Russian aggression by increasing the 
presence of U.S. forces and prepositioned equipment in Europe, 
improving infrastructure, supporting NATO enhanced forward 
presence deployments, and sponsoring multinational training and 
exercises. In testimony before the committee, the Commander of 
U.S. European Command stated these efforts have imp