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116th Congress     }                                          {    Report
                          HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES
 1st Session       }                                          {   116-131

======================================================================



 
    EXPANDING FINDINGS FOR FEDERAL OPIOID RESEARCH AND TREATMENT ACT

                                _______
                                

 June 27, 2019.--Committed to the Committee of the Whole House on the 
              State of the Union and ordered to be printed

                                _______
                                

    Ms. Johnson of Texas, from the Committee on Science, Space, and 
                  Technology, submitted the following

                              R E P O R T

                        [To accompany H.R. 3153]

      [Including cost estimate of the Congressional Budget Office]

    The Committee on Science, Space, and Technology, to whom 
was referred the bill (H.R. 3153) to direct the Director of the 
National Science Foundation to support research on opioid 
addiction, and for other purposes, having considered the same, 
reports favorably thereon without amendment and recommends that 
the bill do pass.

                                CONTENTS

                                                                   Page
   I. Purpose of the Bill.............................................2
  II. Background and Need for the Legislation.........................2
 III. Committee Hearings..............................................2
  IV. Committee Consideration and Votes...............................2
   V. Summary of Major Provisions of the Bill.........................3
  VI. Section-By-Section Analysis (By Title and Section)..............3
 VII. Committee Views.................................................3
VIII. Cost Estimate...................................................3
  IX. Congressional Budget Office Cost Estimate.......................4
   X. Compliance with Public Law 104-4 (Unfunded Mandates)............4
  XI. Committee Oversight Findings and Recommendations................4
 XII. Statement on General Performance Goals and Objectives...........5
XIII. Federal Advisory Committee Statement............................5
 XIV. Duplication of Federal Programs.................................5
  XV. Earmark Identification..........................................5
 XVI. Applicability to the Legislative Branch.........................5
XVII. Statement on Preemption of State, Local, or Tribal Law..........5
XVIII.Proceedings of Full Committee Markup............................5


                         I. PURPOSE OF THE BILL

    The purpose of H.R. 3153 is to direct the National Science 
Foundation (NSF) to support research related to opioid 
addiction.

              II. BACKGROUND AND NEED FOR THE LEGISLATION

    The opioid epidemic is a significant and ongoing problem 
for communities throughout the country with significant social, 
medical, and economic impacts. According to data from the 
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the number of 
prescription opioid involved deaths has been increasing since 
1999.\1\ In 2017, more than 47,000 Americans died from an 
opioid overdose and approximately 1.7 million Americans had a 
substance abuse disorder related to prescription opioids.\2\ 
This is an issue that affects every state in the country; 
between 2016 and 2017, 23 states had statistically significant 
increases in drug overdose rates.\3\
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    \1\Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. December 19, 2018. 
``Understanding the Epidemic.'' https://www.cdc.gov/drugoverdose/
epidemic/index.html.
    \2\National Institute on Drug Abuse. January 2019. ``Opioid 
Overdose Crisis.'' https://www.drugabuse.gov/drugs-abuse/opioids/
opioid-overdose-crisis.
    \3\Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. December 19, 2018. 
``Drug Overdose Deaths.'' https://www.cdc.gov/drugoverdose/data/
statedeaths.html.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    The opioid epidemic affects not only those addicted to 
opioids but their family members and communities as well. 
Babies born into addiction suffer from neonatal abstinence 
syndrome, or neonatal opioid withdrawal syndrome. There were 
five times as many babies born with neonatal abstinence 
syndrome in 2014 than in 2004.\4\ Research indicates that the 
misuse of prescription opioids alone costs 78.5 billion dollars 
per year.\5\ These costs include medical costs, productivity 
losses, and criminal justice costs.\6\
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    \4\National Institute on Drug Abuse. January 2019. ``Dramatic 
Increases in Material Opioid Use and Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome.'' 
https://www.drugabuse.gov/related-topics/trends-statistics/
infographics/dramatic-increases-in-maternal-opioid-use-neonatal-
abstinence-syndrome.
    \5\National Institute on Drug Abuse. January 2019. ``Opioid 
Overdose Crisis.'' https://www.drugabuse.gov/drugs-abuse/opioids/
opioid-overdose-crisis.
    \6\Ibid
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Ongoing research on opioid addiction conducted by the 
National Science Foundation (NSF) has focused on areas such as 
the role of illicit supply networks; the neuroscience of 
addiction; options for alternative, non-addictive therapies for 
pain; and the secondary effects of opioid addiction on families 
and communities. However, research gaps remain in a number of 
areas. Additionally, both the NSF and the National Institutes 
of Health (NIH) have recognized that research into opioid 
addiction would benefit from a multidisciplinary approach and 
collaboration. H.R. 3153 would take advantage of NSF's 
strengths in neuroscience and social and behavioral sciences in 
particular to address some of the basic research gaps in opioid 
addiction, including through partnership with NIH.

                        III. COMMITTEE HEARINGS

    The Committee has held no hearings on this legislation.

                 IV. COMMITTEE CONSIDERATION AND VOTES

    As noted in Section IV of this report, the Committee has 
held no hearings on this legislation.
    On June 6, 2019, Representative Jennifer Wexton, for 
herself and Representatives Baird of Indiana, Ms. Dean of 
Pennsylvania, Mr. Connolly of Virginia, Mr. Fitzpatrick of 
Pennsylvania, and Mr. Kilmer of Washington introduced H.R. 
3153, the Expanding Findings for Federal Opioid Research and 
Treatment Act or the EFFORT Act, to director the Director of 
the Nation Science Foundation to support research on opioid 
addiction, and for other purposes.
    On June 20, 2019, the Committee on Science, Space, and 
Technology met to consider H.R. 3153 and three other bills. 
There were no amendments offered to H.R. 3153.
    Ms. Johnson moved that the Committee favorably report the 
bill, H.R. 3153, to the House with the recommendation that the 
bill be approved. The motion was agreed to by a voice vote.

               V. SUMMARY OF MAJOR PROVISIONS OF THE BILL

    H.R. 3153 directs the Director of the National Science 
Foundation (NSF) to support merit-reviewed and competitively 
awarded research on the science of opioid addiction.

         VI. SECTION-BY-SECTION ANALYSIS (BY TITLE AND SECTION)

SECTION 1. SHORT TITLE; FINDINGS

    ``Expanding Findings for Federal Opioid Research and 
Treatment Act or EFFORT Act''
    This section also provides findings for the bill.

SECTION 2. NSF SUPPORT OF RESEARCH ON OPIOD ADDITION

    This section directs NSF to support merit-reviewed and 
competitively awarded research on the science of opioid 
addiction.

                          VII. COMMITTEE VIEWS

    Research conducted by NSF has significantly increased our 
understanding of the science of addiction, but gaps remain in 
areas of research that will enhance our ability to address the 
opioid epidemic. The Committee believes increased research into 
opioid addiction is an important tool to develop evidence-based 
policies to address the opioid epidemic. While NSF is not the 
only agency to fund research into opioid addiction, the 
Committee believes NSF is the appropriate agency to address and 
fund some of the basic research into the science of opioid 
addiction. The Committee encourages NSF to collaborate with NIH 
and other agencies when appropriate, and otherwise take steps 
to disseminate the results of NSF funded research to agencies 
and other end-users who can help translate the science into 
practice.

                          VIII. COST ESTIMATE

    Pursuant to clause 3(c)(2) of rule XIII of the Rules of the 
House of Representatives, the Committee adopts as its own the 
estimate of new budget authority, entitlement authority, or tax 
expenditures or revenues contained in the cost estimate 
prepared by the Director of the Congressional Budget Office 
pursuant to section 402 of the Congressional Budget Act of 
1974.

                IX. CONGRESSIONAL BUDGET OFFICE ESTIMATE

                                     U.S. Congress,
                               Congressional Budget Office,
                                     Washington, DC, June 25, 2019.
Hon. Eddie Bernice Johnson,
Chairwoman, Committee on Science, Space, and Technology,
House of Representatives, Washington, DC.
    Dear Madam Chairwoman: The Congressional Budget Office has 
prepared the enclosed cost estimate for H.R. 3153, the EFFORT 
Act.
    If you wish further details on this estimate, we will be 
pleased to provide them. The CBO staff contact is Janani 
Shankaran.
            Sincerely,
                                             Mark P. Hadley
                                           (For Phillip L. Swagel).
    Enclosure.
    
[GRAPHIC(S) NOT AVAILABLE IN TIFF FORMAT]
    

    H.R. 3153 would direct the National Science Foundation 
(NSF), in consultation with the National Institutes of Health, 
to support research on the science of opioid addiction. CBO 
estimates that implementing H.R. 3153 would have no effect on 
the federal budget because the NSF already awards grants to 
institutions of higher education and nonprofit organizations to 
study opioid addiction. In recent years, the agency has awarded 
several million dollars such research.
    The CBO staff contact for this estimate is Janani 
Shankaran. The estimate was reviewed by H. Samuel Papenfuss, 
Deputy Assistant Director for Budget Analysis.

                     X. FEDERAL MANDATES STATEMENT

    H.R. 3153 contains no unfunded mandates.

          XI. COMMITTEE OVERSIGHT FINDINGS AND RECOMMENDATIONS

    The Committee's oversight findings and recommendations are 
reflected in the body of this report.

       XII. STATEMENT OF GENERAL PERFORMANCE GOALS AND OBJECTIVES

    The goal of H.R. 3153 is to support research on opioid 
addiction consistent with NSF's current statutory mission to 
help strengthen the nation's response to the opioid epidemic. 
This bill has no reporting requirements.

               XIII. FEDERAL ADVISORY COMMITTEE STATEMENT

    H.R. 3153 does not create any advisory committees.

                  XIV. DUPLICATION OF FEDERAL PROGRAMS

    Pursuant to clause 3(c)(5) of rule XIII of the Rules of the 
House of Representatives, the Committee finds that no provision 
of H.R. 3153 establishes or reauthorizes a program of the 
federal government known to be duplicative of another federal 
program, including any program that was included in a report to 
Congress pursuant to section 21 of Public Law 111-139 or the 
most recent Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance.

                       XV. EARMARK IDENTIFICATION

    Pursuant to clause 9(e), 9(f), and 9(g) of rule XXI, the 
Committee finds that H.R. 3153 contains no earmarks, limited 
tax benefits, or limited tariff benefits.

              XVI. APPLICABILITY TO THE LEGISLATIVE BRANCH

    The Committee finds that H.R. 3153 does not relate to the 
terms and conditions of employment or access to public services 
or accommodations within the meaning of section 102(b)(3) of 
the Congressional Accountability Act (Public Law 104-1).

      XVII. STATEMENT ON PREEMPTION OF STATE, LOCAL, OR TRIBAL LAW

    This bill is not intended to preempt any state, local, or 
tribal law.

            XVIII. PROCEEDINGS OF THE FULL COMMITTEE MARKUP
                                 ______

2019

                        MARKUPS: H.R. 2528, STEM
                       Opportunities Act of 2019;
                  H.R. 36, Combating Sexual Harassment
                        in Science Act of 2019;
                 H.R. 3196, Vera Rubin Survey Telescope
                          Designation Act; and
            H.R. 3153, Expanding Findings for Federal Opioid
                       Research and Treatment Act

=======================================================================

                                 MARKUP

                               BEFORE THE

              COMMITTEE ON SCIENCE, SPACE, AND TECHNOLOGY
                        HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES

                     ONE HUNDRED SIXTEENTH CONGRESS

                             FIRST SESSION

                               __________

                             JUNE 20, 2019

                               __________

                          Serial No. CP 116-4

                               __________

 Printed for the use of the Committee on Science, Space, and Technology


       Available via the World Wide Web: http://science.house.gov
              COMMITTEE ON SCIENCE, SPACE, AND TECHNOLOGY

             HON. EDDIE BERNICE JOHNSON, Texas, Chairwoman
ZOE LOFGREN, California              FRANK D. LUCAS, Oklahoma,
DANIEL LIPINSKI, Illinois              Ranking Member
SUZANNE BONAMICI, Oregon             MO BROOKS, Alabama
AMI BERA, California,                BILL POSEY, Florida
  Vice Chair                         RANDY WEBER, Texas
CONOR LAMB, Pennsylvania             BRIAN BABIN, Texas
LIZZIE FLETCHER, Texas               ANDY BIGGS, Arizona
HALEY STEVENS, Michigan              ROGER MARSHALL, Kansas
KENDRA HORN, Oklahoma                RALPH NORMAN, South Carolina
MIKIE SHERRILL, New Jersey           MICHAEL CLOUD, Texas
BRAD SHERMAN, California             TROY BALDERSON, Ohio
STEVE COHEN, Tennessee               PETE OLSON, Texas
JERRY McNERNEY, California           ANTHONY GONZALEZ, Ohio
ED PERLMUTTER, Colorado              MICHAEL WALTZ, Florida
PAUL TONKO, New York                 JIM BAIRD, Indiana
BILL FOSTER, Illinois                JAIME HERRERA BEUTLER, Washington
DON BEYER, Virginia                  JENNIFFER GONZALEZ-COLON, Puerto 
CHARLIE CRIST, Florida                   Rico
SEAN CASTEN, Illinois                VACANCY
KATIE HILL, California
BEN McADAMS, Utah
JENNIFER WEXTON, Virginia

                         C  O  N  T  E  N  T  S

                             June 20, 2019

                                                                   Page
H.R. 2528--STEM Opportunities Act of 2019........................    11

H.R. 36--Combating Sexual Harassment in Science Act of 2019......    11

H.R. 3196--Vera Rubin Survey Telescope Designation Act...........    11

H.R. 3153--Expanding Findings for Federal Opioid Research and 
  Treatment Act..................................................    11



                        MARKUPS: H.R. 2528, STEM



                       Opportunities Act of 2019;



                  H.R. 36, Combating Sexual Harassment



                        in Science Act of 2019;



                 H.R. 3196, Vera Rubin Survey Telescope



                          Designation Act; and



               H.R. 3153, Expanding Findings for Federal



                   Opioid Research and Treatment Act

                              ----------                              


                        THURSDAY, JUNE 20, 2019

                          House of Representatives,
               Committee on Science, Space, and Technology,
                                                   Washington, D.C.
    The Committee met, pursuant to notice, at 10:04 a.m., in 
room 2318, Rayburn House Office Building, Hon. Eddie Bernice 
Johnson [Chairwoman of the Committee] presiding.
    Chairwoman Johnson. Good morning. The Committee will come 
to order. And without objection, the Chair is authorizes to 
declare recess at any time. Pursuant to Committee rule 2(e) and 
House rule XI, the Chair announces that she may postpone roll 
call votes.
    Pursuant to notice, the Committee meets to consider the 
following measures: H.R. 2528, STEM Opportunities Act of 2019; 
H.R. 36, Combating Sexual Harassment in Science Act of 2019; 
H.R. 3196, Vera Rubin Survey Telescope Designation Act; and 
H.R. 3153, Expanding Findings for Federal Opioid Research and 
Treatment Act.
    I want to welcome everyone to today's markup. Today, we 
meet to mark up four good bipartisan bills. First, we will 
consider the STEM Opportunities Act, which has been a priority 
of mine of course for many years. This bill will help us 
address the disparity in the number of women and minorities in 
the STEM fields.
    Without including all of our Nation's brain power in the 
fight for 21st-century competitiveness, it is unlikely that our 
country will remain the world leader in science and innovation. 
It is therefore my hope that this bill will play a major role 
in ensuring our country's competitiveness in the coming years.
    It is not enough to simply attract women to the STEM 
fields. We must also ensure they stay in these fields, and the 
second bill in our markup addresses one of the reasons women 
leave the STEM sciences in such high rates: Sexual harassment. 
The problem of sexual harassment in the STEM fields has not 
been addressed in a comprehensive fashion. I hope that the 
Combating Sexual Harassment in Science Act of 2019 can play an 
important role in focusing Federal efforts to stamp out sexual 
harassment in the sciences.
    I want to take a moment to recognize my colleague Ranking 
Member Lucas, who is an original co-sponsor of both of these 
bills. Both he and his staff have provided very constructive 
input into these bills and the hearings we held on these 
topics. I think the bills before us today are better off 
because of these efforts, and I want to sincerely thank him and 
his staff for their work.
    The third bill before us today is the Vera Rubin Survey 
Telescope Designation Act. I'll speak more about this bill in a 
minute, but I think it is appropriate that on the same day our 
Committee tries to address the issues facing women in the STEM 
fields, we also take a moment to recognize a woman who overcame 
the hurdles she faced to provide significant contributions to 
the field of astronomy.
    Finally, we will consider the Expanding Findings for 
Federal Opioid Research and Treatment Act, which is offered by 
Ms. Wexton. The scourge of opioid addiction is one of the most 
serious problems facing our Nation right now. It only makes 
sense to bring all of our resources to bear on this issue, and 
I think the National Science Foundation (NSF) can bring unique 
capabilities to the fight to better understand and deal with 
this critical issue.
    I look forward to a productive markup and moving these 
bills very quickly to the House floor.
    [The prepared statement of Chairwoman Johnson follows:]

    I want to welcome everyone to today's markup. Today we meet to 
markup four good bipartisan bills.
    First, we will consider the STEM Opportunities Act, which has been 
a priority of mine for many years. This bill will help us address the 
disparity in the number of women and minorities in the STEM fields.
    Without including all of our Nation's brain power in the fight for 
21st century competitiveness, it is unlikely that our country will 
remain the world leader in science and innovation. It is therefore my 
hope that this bill will play a major role in ensuring our country's 
competitiveness in the coming years.
    It is not enough to simply attract women to the STEM fields. We 
must also ensure they stay in those fields, and the second bill in our 
markup addresses one of the reasons women leave the sciences in such 
high rates: sexual harassment.
    The problem of sexual harassment in the STEM fields has not been 
addressed in a comprehensive fashion. I hope that the Combating Sexual 
Harassment in Science Act of 2019 can play an important role in 
focusing federal efforts to stamp out sexual harassment in the 
sciences.
    I want to take a moment to recognize my friend and colleague, 
Ranking Member Lucas, who is an original cosponsor of both of these 
bills. Both he and his staff have provided very constructive input into 
these bills and the hearings we have held on these topics. I think the 
bills before us today are better off because of these efforts, and I 
want to sincerely thank him and his staff for their work.
    The third bill before us today is the Vera Rubin Survey Telescope 
Designation Act. I'll speak more about this bill in a minute, but I 
think it is appropriate that on the same day our Committee tries to 
address the issues facing women in the STEM fields, we also take a 
moment to recognize a woman who overcame the hurdles she faced to 
provide significant contributions to the field of astronomy.
    Finally, we will consider the Expanding Findings for Federal Opioid 
Research and Treatment Act, which is offered by Ms. Wexton. The scourge 
of opioid addiction is one of the most serious problems facing our 
nation right now.
    It only makes sense to bring all of our resources to bear on this 
issue, and I think the National Science Foundation can bring unique 
capabilities to the fight to better understand and deal with this 
critical issue.
    I look forward to a productive markup and moving these bills very 
quickly to the House floor.

    Chairwoman Johnson. I now recognize the Ranking Member to 
present an opening statement.
    Mr. Lucas. Thank you, Chairwoman Johnson, for holding this 
markup.
    Today, we'll consider four bipartisan bills. The first is 
H.R. 2528, STEM Opportunities Act of 2019. H.R. 2528 continues 
this Committee's long bipartisan history of supporting and 
expanding STEM education for all. The only way we'll achieve 
our potential is by utilizing America's most valuable resource: 
Our people. That means developing a diverse STEM-capable 
workforce at every education level and from every background.
    One of the key provisions of H.R. 2528 is a requirement for 
more comprehensive data collection and analysis on the 
students, researchers, and faculty receiving Federal science 
grants. This data will help us identify and reduce the barriers 
that prevent underrepresented groups from entering and 
advancing in STEM. It will also help us measure the success of 
Federal STEM programs.
    The bill also includes a provision directing NSF to support 
computer science education through the existing Tribal Colleges 
and Universities program. Access to computer science resources 
and the development of computing skills is critical in today's 
economy. I am pleased to join Chairwoman Johnson in 
cosponsoring this legislation. I want to thank her and her 
entire staff for working with us to refine the bill for 
reintroduction and incorporating our feedback and ideas. I look 
forward to continuing to work with the Chairwoman and Members 
of the Committee to advance more STEM education efforts for 
this Congress to support, encourage, and develop the next 
generation of STEM students.
    Our second bill this morning is H.R. 36, Combating Sexual 
Harassment in Science Act of 2019. Chairwoman Johnson and I 
made this one of our highest priorities, introducing it on the 
first day of the 116th Congress. This bill has a foundation of 
more than a year of investigation, analysis, and 
recommendations to the Science Committee. Engaging more women 
in STEM studies and careers is essential to American 
competitiveness. Women make up half the workforce but account 
for less than 25 percent of America's STEM workforce.
    Unfortunately, too many women have been driven out of STEM 
careers due to a culture of harassment and abuse. H.R. 36 takes 
the first steps to addressing this problem. The bill supports 
the adoption of uniform guidance across the Federal science 
agencies to reduce the prevalence of sexual harassment 
involving grant personnel. The bill also directs the NSF to 
conduct further research into the causes and consequences of 
harassment, as well as interventions to mitigate the problem.
    There is an established legal process in place within 
higher education and in the workplace for handling claims of 
sexual harassment. This bill does not alter that process. What 
this bill does do is create a uniform policy for universities 
and research institutions to report to Federal science agencies 
when an administrative action is taken that impacts the ability 
of a researcher to carry out a grant. We want to ensure the 
safety of all grant personnel supported by taxpayer funding. 
I'll be offering an amendment later in the markup that we hope 
makes this requirement even more clear.
    Again, thank you, Chairwoman Johnson, for working in a 
bipartisan and collaborative way to move this legislation 
forward.
    Next, we will consider H.R. 3196, Vera Rubin Survey 
Telescope Designation Act, sponsored by Chairwoman Johnson and 
Representative Jenniffer Gonzalez-Colon. This bill honors the 
contributions of the late Dr. Vera Rubin, an astronomer who 
made groundbreaking discoveries in the field of dark matter and 
was a pioneer and life-long advocate for women in astronomy.
    This new LSST (Large Synoptic Survey Telescope), under 
construction in Chile, funded by the National Science 
Foundation and the Department of Energy, will photograph the 
entire sky every few nights. One of the goals of the project is 
to study the nature of dark matter and dark energy. Naming the 
observatory in her honor is a fitting tribute to the 
contributions to the field, and I--her contributions to the 
field, I should note, and I hope will inspire future 
generations of women in astronomy.
    Finally, the Committee will consider H.R. 3153, Expanding 
Findings for Federal Opioid Research and Treatment Act. This 
legislation identifies current gaps that exist in research on 
the prevention and treatment of opioid addiction and authorizes 
the NSF to support research grants in those areas.
    I want to thank Representative Jennifer Wexton and 
Representative Jim Baird for their bipartisan work on this 
bill. Opioid addiction affects too many in our communities, and 
I applaud this effort to support more basic research on the 
science of addiction.
    Once again, thank you, Chairwoman Johnson, for holding 
today's markup, and I encourage the Members of the Committee to 
support all these bills.
    I yield back the balance of my time.
    [The prepared statement of Mr. Lucas follows:]

    Thank you, Chairwoman Johnson, for holding this mark-up. Today we 
will consider four bipartisan bills.
    The first is H.R. 2528, STEM Opportunities Act of 2019. H.R. 2528 
continues this Committee's long bipartisan history of supporting and 
expanding STEM education for all.
    The only way we'll achieve our potential is by utilizing America's 
most valuable resource: our people. That means developing a diverse 
STEM-capable workforce at every education level and from every 
background.
    One of the key provisions of H.R. 2528 is a requirement for more 
comprehensive data collection and analysis on the students, 
researchers, and faculty receiving federal science grants. This data 
will help us identify and reduce the barriers that prevent 
underrepresented groups from entering and advancing in STEM. It will 
also help us measure the success of federal STEM programs.
    The bill also includes a provision directing NSF to support 
computer science education through the existing Tribal Colleges and 
Universities program. Access to computer science resources and the 
development of computing skills is critical in today's economy.
    I was pleased to join Chairwoman Johnson in co-sponsoring this 
legislation. I want to thank her and her staff for working with us to 
refine the bill for reintroduction and incorporating our feedback and 
ideas.
    I look forward to continuing to work with the Chairwoman and 
members of the Committee to advance more STEM education efforts this 
Congress to support, encourage and develop the next generation of STEM 
students.
    Our second bill this morning is H.R. 36, Combating Sexual 
Harassment in Science Act of 2019. Chairwoman Johnson and I made this 
one of our highest priorities, introducing it on the first day of the 
116th Congress. This bill has a foundation of more than a year of 
investigation, analysis, and recommendations to the Science Committee.
    Engaging more women in STEM studies and careers is essential to 
American competitiveness. Women make up half of the workforce, but 
account for less than 25 percent of America's STEM workforce.
    Unfortunately, too many women have been driven out of STEM careers 
due to a culture of harassment and abuse. H.R. 36 takes the first steps 
to addressing this problem. The bill supports the adoption of uniform 
guidance across the federal science agencies to reduce the prevalence 
of sexual harassment involving grant personnel. The bill also directs 
NSF to conduct further research into the causes and consequences of 
harassment, as well as interventions to mitigate the problem.
    There is an established legal process in place within higher 
education and in the workplace for handling claims of sexual 
harassment. This bill does not alter that process. What this bill does 
do, is create a new uniform policy that universities and research 
institutions report to federal science agencies when an administrative 
action is taken that impacts the ability of a researcher to carry out a 
grant.
    We want to ensure the safety of all grant personnel supported by 
taxpayer funding. I'll be offering an amendment later in the mark-up 
that we hope makes this requirement even more clear.
    Again, thank you Chairwoman Johnson for working in a bipartisan and 
collaborative way to move this legislation forward.
    Next we will consider H.R. 3196, Vera Rubin Survey Telescope 
Designation Act, sponsored by Chairwoman Johnson and Representative 
Jenniffer Gonzalez-Colon.This bill honors the contributions of the late 
Dr. Vera Rubin, an astronomer who made groundbreaking discoveries in 
the field of dark matter and was a pioneer and life-long advocate for 
women in astronomy.
    The new LSST Telescope under construction in Chile, funded by the 
National Science Foundation and the Department of Energy, will 
photograph the entire sky every few nights. One of the goals of the 
project is to study the nature of dark matter and dark energy. Naming 
the observatory in her honor is a fitting tribute to her contributions 
to the field and I hope will inspire future generations of women in 
astronomy.
    Finally, the Committee will consider H.R. 3153, Expanding Findings 
for Federal Opioid Research and Treatment Act. The legislation 
identifies current gaps that exist in research on the prevention and 
treatment of opioid addiction and authorizes NSF to support research 
grants in these areas.
    I thank Rep. Jennifer Wexton and Rep. Jim Baird for their 
bipartisan work on this bill. Opioid addiction affects too many in our 
communities, and I applaud this effort to support more basic research 
on the science of addiction.
    Once again, thank you Chairwoman Johnson for holding today's mark-
up, and I encourage the Members of this Committee to support these 
bills. I yield back the balance of my time.

    Chairwoman Johnson. Thank you, Mr. Lucas.

    H.R. 2528
    10:13 a.m.
    Chairwoman Johnson. We will now consider H.R. 2528, STEM 
Opportunities Act of 2019. The clerk will report the bill.
    The Clerk. H.R. 2528, a bill to direct the Director----
    [The bill follows:]
    
[GRAPHIC(S) NOT AVAILABLE IN TIFF FORMAT]
    
    Chairwoman Johnson. Without objection, the bill is 
considered as read and open for amendment at any point.
    And I recognize Ms. Wexton, the bill's sponsor, to make any 
comments on the bill.
    Ms. Wexton. Thank you, Madam Chair.
    I am so pleased to be a part of the bipartisan work that 
takes place in this Committee, and I thank many of my 
colleagues across the aisle for supporting this important 
legislation.
    The opioid epidemic has taken a heartbreaking toll on 
families across America, including many in my State of 
Virginia. Tens of thousands of Americans and over 1,000 
Virginians are dying every year from overdoses. Since 2014, 
overdose fatalities have surpassed deaths of motor vehicle 
crashes and firearms as the top cause of unnatural deaths in 
the Commonwealth of Virginia, and it has only gone up since 
that time.
    Addiction is an illness, and fighting this crisis 
effectively requires adequate research and funding. The 
National Science Foundation has done an exceptional job in 
establishing some of the foundational understanding for the 
translational and clinical re search on opioid addiction, 
including research regarding the neuroscience of addiction, 
opioid abuse intervention, and the secondary effect on families 
and options for alternative therapies for pain.
    While this research has significantly increased the 
Nation's understanding of opioid addiction, research gaps 
remain in a wide range of disciplines, including social and 
behavioral issues such as stigma, socioeconomic status, or 
accessibility to treatment.
    The NSF has a unique strength in being able to help us 
close some of these gaps and in turn, help us to develop 
solutions. My legislation, the Expanding Findings for Federal 
Opioid Research and Treatment, or EFFORT Act, will work to do 
this by directing the NSF to support and conduct 
multidisciplinary research on opioid addiction. Both the NSF 
and NIH (National Institutes of Health) have recognized that 
research efforts would benefit greatly from this 
multidisciplinary approach. By expanding the NSF's research on 
opioid addiction both within its agency, as well as jointly 
with NIH when needed, we can effectively integrate clinical and 
basic research, obtain a broader understanding of opioid 
addiction and its impacts, equip health professionals with new 
tools to stop the cycle of addiction, and establish a more 
comprehensive effort against this crisis.
    As one of the founding members of the bipartisan Freshmen 
Working Group on Addiction, I have worked to be a strong 
advocate for addiction prevention and recovery efforts, and I 
am pleased to have introduced this legislation with my fellow 
freshman colleague, Congressman Baird. It's important that we 
work to better capture the severity of opioid addiction and 
expand Federal research--expanding Federal research will help 
us to do just that. I urge my colleagues to support this 
bipartisan legislation, and I yield back the balance of my 
time.
    Chairwoman Johnson. Thank you, Ms. Wexton.
    Anyone else wants to be recognized?
    Mr. Baird first and then Mr. Gonzalez.
    Mr. Baird. Thank you, Madam Chairwoman and Ranking Member 
Lucas. We appreciate you having this markup on House Resolution 
3153.
    You know, the opioid crisis has tragically destroyed the 
lives of many Hoosiers. According to the most recent available 
data from the National Institute of Drug Abuse, in 2017, drug 
overdose deaths in Indiana increased by 22.5 percent from the 
previous year. Indiana's 200--or 2017 rate of overdose deaths 
at just over 29 people per 100,000 was significantly higher 
than the national average of just over 21 per 100,000.
    This epidemic does not discriminate, and we must use 
evidence- based policy to ensure the health and well-being of 
current and future generations. The National Science 
Foundation's research has increased what we know about 
addiction, and while this research is at the top of its class, 
there are still gaps that remain in the prevention and 
treatment of opioid addiction.
    That's why I join my colleague Congresswoman Wexton to 
introduce this EFFORT Act, directing the National Science 
Foundation, in consultation with the National Institutes of 
Health, to support merit-reviewed and competitively awarded 
research on the science of opioid addiction. By expanding basic 
research, we can promote great collaboration and further 
understand how we better treat the multiple aspects of the 
opioid addiction. I hope we can see an end to this crisis soon, 
and I am proud that Congress is taking action to fight back. 
And I ask my colleagues to vote in favor of this bill. And I 
yield back.
    Chairwoman Johnson. Thank you very much.
    Anyone else wishing to be recognized? Mr. Gonzalez.
    Mr. Gonzalez. Thank you. Thank you, Madam Chairwoman and 
Ranking Member, for holding this important markup. And I'm 
pleased to see this Committee again move bipartisan bills to 
the House floor.
    I also want to thank my colleagues Congresswoman Wexton and 
Congressman Baird for their leadership to introduce legislation 
that prioritizes research on the prevention and treatment of 
opiate addiction. We cannot do enough to help those families 
suffering from the terrible consequences of this scourge.
    The opioid epidemic has ravaged entire communities in my 
home State of Ohio. According to CDC (Centers for Disease 
Control and Prevention) data, five counties with the highest 
per capita of fentanyl-related overdose death--overdose deaths 
are in the State of Ohio. Additionally, the CDC estimates the 
total economic burden of prescription opioid misuse alone in 
our country is $78.5 billion a year.
    That's why I'm pleased to support this legislation that 
will require the NSF and NIH to support merit-reviewed and 
competitively awarded research on the science of opioid 
addiction. Furthering research on improving prevention and 
treatment for addiction will help our communities confront this 
horrific epidemic in a more holistic way. I strongly encourage 
my colleagues to support the Expanding Findings for Federal 
Opioid Research and Treatment Act and provide much-needed 
research on opioid addiction impacting many of our communities. 
With that, thank you, and I yield back.
    Chairwoman Johnson. Thank you very much.
    Any further comments?
    [The prepared statement of Ms. Sherrill follows:]

    For my guest to the State of the Union this year, I brought Donna 
Andelora from Wayne, New Jersey. Donna lost her son Joey at the age of 
22 to a heroin overdose, and after his death started the Lost Angels 
Bereavement Group to help local families cope with loved ones lost to 
drug overdoses or struggling with opioid addiction.
    There are too many mothers like Donna in our country who face the 
scourge of addiction. Too many families like the Andeloras who have 
been ripped apart by over-prescription, ease of access to opioids, and 
the lack of resources to fight this epidemic.
    New Jersey knows this pain all too well. In 2018, we lost more than 
3,000 residents to overdose--that's an average of 8 people each day. 
That's more than the national average in a given year. Towns and 
counties in my district are working hard to address this issue. 
However, it is clear that the scope and scale of the addiction epidemic 
requires federal action.
    The Expanding Findings for Federal Opioid Research and Treatment 
Act or EFFORT Act, which I am proud to co-sponsor, identifies gaps that 
currently exist in the research on the prevention and treatment of 
opioid addiction and authorizes the National Science Foundation to 
support research grants in these areas. The addiction epidemic plaguing 
our country is a complicated and multifaceted problem that will require 
an equally complex solution. This research will help advance our 
understanding of how to effectively address and combat the opioid and 
addiction epidemic.

    Hearing none, are there any amendments?
    If not, then a reporting quorum being present, I move that 
the Committee on Science, Space, and Technology report H.R. 
3153 to the House with the recommendation that the bill be 
approved.
    Those in favor of the motion will signify by saying aye.
    Those opposed, no.
    The ayes have it, and the bill is favorably reported.
    Without objection, the motion to reconsider is laid upon 
the table, and I ask unanimous consent that the staff be 
authorized to make any necessary technical and conforming 
changes to the bill.
    Without objection, so ordered.
    Members have 2 subsequent calendar days in which to submit 
supplementary, minority, or additional views on this measure.
    Let me just say before we adjourn that I want to thank all 
of the staff on both sides of the aisle and all the Members for 
the great input that has brought us to marking up these 
bipartisan bills, and I hope that that participation will 
continue. Input is important from everyone, and I appreciate 
your participation. And I thank you for attending.
    And that concludes our markup for today, and the Committee 
is adjourned.
    [Whereupon, at 10:53 a.m., the Committee was adjourned.]