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116th Congress    }                                          {    Report
                           HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES
 1st Session      }                                          {   116-132

======================================================================



 
              VERA RUBIN SURVEY TELESCOPE DESIGNATION ACT

                                _______
                                

 June 27, 2019.--Committed to the Committee of the Whole House on the 
              State of the Union and ordered to be printed

                                _______
                                

    Ms. Johnson of Texas, from the Committee on Science, Space, and 
                  Technology, submitted the following

                              R E P O R T

                        [To accompany H.R. 3196]

      [Including cost estimate of the Congressional Budget Office]

    The Committee on Science, Space, and Technology, to whom 
was referred the bill (H.R. 3196) to designate the Large 
Synoptic Survey Telescope as the ``Vera Rubin Survey 
Telescope'', having considered the same, reports favorably 
thereon without amendment and recommends that the bill do pass.

                                CONTENTS

                                                                   Page
   I. Purpose of the Bill.............................................1
  II. Background and Need for the Legislation.........................2
 III. Committee Hearings..............................................2
  IV. Committee Consideration and Votes...............................2
   V. Summary of Major Provisions of the Bill.........................3
  VI. Section-By-Section Analysis (By Title and Section)..............3
 VII. Committee Views.................................................3
VIII. Cost Estimate...................................................3
  IX. Congressional Budget Office Cost Estimate.......................4
   X. Compliance with Public Law 104-4 (Unfunded Mandates)............4
  XI. Committee Oversight Findings and Recommendations................4
 XII. Statement on General Performance Goals and Objectives...........4
XIII. Federal Advisory Committee Statement............................4
 XIV. Duplication of Federal Programs.................................4
  XV. Earmark Identification..........................................5
 XVI. Applicability to the Legislative Branch.........................5
XVII. Statement on Preemption of State, Local, or Tribal Law..........5
XVIII.Proceedings of Full Committee Markup............................5


                         I. PURPOSE OF THE BILL

    The purpose of the bill is to designate the Large Synoptic 
Survey Telescope (LSST) as the ``Vera Rubin Survey Telescope''.

              II. BACKGROUND AND NEED FOR THE LEGISLATION

    Dr. Vera Cooper Rubin was a renowned astronomer and an 
advocate for women in science. After graduating from Vassar 
College in 1948 as the only woman astronomer in her class, Dr. 
Rubin hoped to pursue her doctoral studies at Princeton. 
However, the Princeton astrophysics graduate program did not 
admit women at the time and declined to send her a course 
catalog. Dr. Rubin persisted and earned her master's degree at 
Cornell and her Ph.D. at Georgetown University before joining 
the Carnegie Institution's Department of Terrestrial Magnetism.
    In 1970, Dr. Rubin published some of the best evidence of 
the existence of dark matter. This groundbreaking work changed 
the conventional view of the universe from one dominated by 
light-emitting matter to one dominated by dark matter. Dr. 
Rubin went on to become the second woman astronomer elected to 
the National Academy of Sciences in 1981. She received the 
National Medal of Science in 1993.
    Dr. Rubin worked throughout her career to encourage girls 
to pursue STEM studies and careers. She advocated for more 
women members of the National Academy of Sciences and for more 
women on review panels and academic search committees.
    Under construction in Chile, LSST is an 8.4-meter wide-
field optical telescope that will begin operations in 2023 to 
survey the entire southern sky twice a week over the span of a 
decade. While LSST data can be used by scientists to conduct a 
wide range of studies, the project's primary science goals are 
to (1) probe the nature of dark matter and dark energy, (2) 
catalogue asteroids and other objects in the solar system, (3) 
examine how objects in the sky vary over time, and (4) study 
the structure and formation of the Milky Way galaxy. LSST 
design and construction were jointly funded by NSF and DOE 
($563 million) and private (non-federal) partners ($40 
million).
    H.R. 3196 will honor Dr. Rubin's legacy in the field of 
dark matter by designating the LSST facility--including the 
headquarters site, the base and summit facilities, and the data 
processing and access centers--as the Vera Rubin Survey 
Telescope. This is the first designation of a Federally-funded 
U.S. telescope in honor of a woman. This designation will 
cement Dr. Rubin's legacy, and elevate her work and career as a 
source of inspiration for women and girls interested in 
pursuing STEM studies and careers.

                        III. COMMITTEE HEARINGS

    The Committee held no hearings on this bill.

                 IV. COMMITTEE CONSIDERATION AND VOTES

    On June 11, 2019, Representative Eddie Bernice Johnson, for 
herself and Representative Jenniffer Gonzalez-Colon of Puerto 
Rico introduced H.R. 3196, the Vera Rubin Survey Telescope 
Designation Act, to designate the Large Synoptic Survey 
Telescope as the ``Vera Rubin Survey Telescope''.
    The Committee on Science, Space, and Technology met to 
consider H.R. 3196 on Thursday, June 20, 2019 and considered no 
amendments to the bill. Ms. Johnson moved that the Committee 
favorably report the bill, H.R. 3196, to the House with the 
recommendation that the bill be approved. The motion was agreed 
to by a voice vote.

               V. SUMMARY OF MAJOR PROVISIONS OF THE BILL

    Designates the LSST as the ``Vera Rubin Survey Telescope''.

         VI. SECTION-BY-SECTION ANALYSIS (BY TITLE AND SECTION)

Section 1. Short title

    Vera Rubin Survey Telescope Designation Act

Section 2. Findings

    This section presents Congress's findings.

Section 3. Designation

    This section designates the LSST as the ``Vera Rubin Survey 
Telescope''.

Section 4. References.

    This section directs any reference to the LSST be deemed a 
reference to the ``Vera Rubin Survey Telescope''.

                          VII. COMMITTEE VIEWS

    The LSST was ranked the highest-priority large ground-based 
facility in the 2010 U.S. Decadal Survey, New Worlds, New 
Horizons in Astronomy and Astrophysics. This unique facility 
will provide an unprecedented data set for scientists to probe 
the nature of dark matter and explore the time-variable 
universe for decades to come.
    The Committee believes that Dr. Vera Rubin's legacy, 
including her contributions to the field of dark matter and her 
efforts to expand opportunities for women in the sciences, is 
richly deserving of this designation.
    All current references to ``Large Synoptic Survey 
Telescope'' and ``LSST'' on NSF's and AURA's websites and in 
budget documents and all other public-facing documents, media, 
and buildings should be replaced with ``Vera Rubin Survey 
Telescope'' or ``VRST''. Individual components of the facility 
may be otherwise named.

                          VIII. COST ESTIMATE

    Pursuant to clause 3(c)(2) of rule XIII of the Rules of the 
House of Representatives, the Committee adopts as its own the 
estimate of new budget authority, entitlement authority, or tax 
expenditures or revenues contained in the cost estimate 
prepared by the Director of the Congressional Budget Office 
pursuant to section 402 of the Congressional Budget Act of 
1974.

             IX. CONGRESSIONAL BUDGET OFFICE COST ESTIMATE

                                     U.S. Congress,
                               Congressional Budget Office,
                                     Washington, DC, June 25, 2019.
Hon. Eddie Bernice Johnson,
Chairwoman, Committee on Science, Space, and Technology,
House of Representatives, Washington, DC.
    Dear Madam Chairwoman: The Congressional Budget Office has 
reviewed H.R. 3196, the Vera Rubin Survey Telescope Designation 
Act, as ordered reported by the House Committee on Science, 
Space, and Technology on June 20, 2019. The bill would 
designate the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope as the Vera Rubin 
Survey Telescope.
    CBO estimates that enacting H.R. 3196 would have no 
significant effect on the federal budget and would not affect 
direct spending or revenues; therefore, pay-as-you-go 
procedures do not apply. CBO estimates that enacting the 
legislation would not increase on-budget deficits in any of the 
four consecutive 10-year periods beginning in 2030.
    H.R. 3196 contains no intergovernmental or private-sector 
mandates as defined in the Unfunded Mandates Reform Act.
    If you wish further details on this estimate, we will be 
pleased to provide them. The CBO staff contact is Janani 
Shankaran.
            Sincerely,
                                             Mark P. Hadley
                                           (For Phillip L. Swagel).
    Enclosure.

                     X. FEDERAL MANDATES STATEMENT

    H.R. 3196 contains no unfunded mandates.

          XI. COMMITTEE OVERSIGHT FINDINGS AND RECOMMENDATIONS

    The Committee`s oversight findings and recommendations are 
reflected in the body of this report.

       XII. STATEMENT ON GENERAL PERFORMANCE GOALS AND OBJECTIVES

    The goal of this legislation is to designate the LSST 
facility as the ``Vera Rubin Survey Telescope''.

               XIII. FEDERAL ADVISORY COMMITTEE STATEMENT

    H.R. 3196 does not create any advisory committees.

                  XIV. DUPLICATION OF FEDERAL PROGRAMS

    Pursuant to clause 3(c)(5) of rule XIII of the Rules of the 
House of Representatives, the Committee finds that no provision 
of H.R. 3196 establishes or reauthorizes a program of the 
federal government known to be duplicative of another federal 
program, including any program that was included in a report to 
Congress pursuant to section 21 of Public Law 111-139 or the 
most recent Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance.

                       XV. EARMARK IDENTIFICATION

    Pursuant to clause 9(e), 9(f), and 9(g) of rule XXI, the 
Committee finds that H.R. 3196 contains no earmarks, limited 
tax benefits, or limited tariff benefits.

              XVI. APPLICABILITY TO THE LEGISLATIVE BRANCH

    The Committee finds that H.R. 3196 does not relate to the 
terms and conditions of employment or access to public services 
or accommodations within the meaning of section 102(b)(3) of 
the Congressional Accountability Act (Public Law 104-1).

      XVII. STATEMENT ON PREEMPTION OF STATE, LOCAL, OR TRIBAL LAW

    This bill is not intended to preempt any state, local, or 
tribal law.

            XVIII. PROCEEDINGS OF THE FULL COMMITTEE MARKUP
                                 



                        MARKUPS: H.R. 2528, STEM
                       Opportunities Act of 2019;
                  H.R. 36, Combating Sexual Harassment
                        in Science Act of 2019;
                 H.R. 3196, Vera Rubin Survey Telescope
                          Designation Act; and
            H.R. 3153, Expanding Findings for Federal Opioid
                       Research and Treatment Act

=======================================================================

                                 MARKUP

                               BEFORE THE

              COMMITTEE ON SCIENCE, SPACE, AND TECHNOLOGY
                        HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES

                     ONE HUNDRED SIXTEENTH CONGRESS

                             FIRST SESSION

                               __________

                             JUNE 20, 2019

                               __________

                          Serial No. CP 116-4

                               __________

 Printed for the use of the Committee on Science, Space, and Technology
 
 
 
[GRAPHIC(S) NOT AVAILABLE IN TIFF FORMAT] 
 


       Available via the World Wide Web: http://science.house.gov
       
       
       
                            _________ 

                U.S. GOVERNMENT PUBLISHING OFFICE
                   
                      WASHINGTON : 2019             
       
       
              COMMITTEE ON SCIENCE, SPACE, AND TECHNOLOGY

             HON. EDDIE BERNICE JOHNSON, Texas, Chairwoman
ZOE LOFGREN, California              FRANK D. LUCAS, Oklahoma,
DANIEL LIPINSKI, Illinois              Ranking Member
SUZANNE BONAMICI, Oregon             MO BROOKS, Alabama
AMI BERA, California,                BILL PPOSEY, Florida
  Vice Chair                         RANDY WEBER, Texas
CONOR LAMB, Pennsylvania             BRIAN BABIN, Texas
LIZZIE FLETCHER, Texas               ANDY BIGGS, Arizona
HALEY STEVENS, Michigan              ROGER MARSHALL, Kansas
KENDRA HORN, Oklahoma                RALPH NORMAN, South Carolina
MIKIE SHERRILL, New Jersey           MICHAEL CLOUD, Texas
BRAD SHERMAN, California             TROY BALDERSON, Ohio
STEVE COHEN, Tennessee               PETE OLSON, Texas
JERRY McNERNEY, California           ANTHONY GONZALEZ, Ohio
ED PERLMUTTER, Colorado              MICHAEL WALTZ, Florida
PAUL TONKO, New York                 JIM BAIRD, Indiana
BILL FOSTER, Illinois                JAIME HERRERA BEUTLER, Washington
DON BEYER, Virginia                  JENNIFFER GONZALEZ-COLON, Puerto 
CHARLIE CRIST, Florida                   Rico
SEAN CASTEN, Illinois                VACANCY
KATIE HILL, California
BEN McADAMS, Utah
JENNIFER WEXTON, Virginia

                         C  O  N  T  E  N  T  S

                             June 20, 2019

                                                                   Page
H.R. 2528--STEM Opportunities Act of 2019........................    11

H.R. 36--Combating Sexual Harassment in Science Act of 2019......    11

H.R. 3196--Vera Rubin Survey Telescope Designation Act...........    11

H.R. 3153--Expanding Findings for Federal Opioid Research and 
  Treatment Act..................................................    11



                        MARKUPS: H.R. 2528, STEM



                       Opportunities Act of 2019;



                 H.R. 36, Combating Sexual Harassment



                        in Science Act of 2019;



                H.R. 3196, Vera Rubin Survey Telescope



                          Designation Act; and



               H.R. 3153, Expanding Findings for Federal



                   Opioid Research and Treatment Act

                              ----------                              


                        THURSDAY, JUNE 20, 2019

                          House of Representatives,
               Committee on Science, Space, and Technology,
                                                   Washington, D.C.
    The Committee met, pursuant to notice, at 10:04 a.m., in 
room 2318, Rayburn House Office Building, Hon. Eddie Bernice 
Johnson [Chairwoman of the Committee] presiding.
    Chairwoman Johnson. Good morning. The Committee will come 
to order. And without objection, the Chair is authorizes to 
declare recess at any time. Pursuant to Committee rule 2(e) and 
House rule XI, the Chair announces that she may postpone roll 
call votes.
    Pursuant to notice, the Committee meets to consider the 
following measures: H.R. 2528, STEM Opportunities Act of 2019; 
H.R. 36, Combating Sexual Harassment in Science Act of 2019; 
H.R. 3196, Vera Rubin Survey Telescope Designation Act; and 
H.R. 3153, Expanding Findings for Federal Opioid Research and 
Treatment Act.
    I want to welcome everyone to today's markup. Today, we 
meet to mark up four good bipartisan bills. First, we will 
consider the STEM Opportunities Act, which has been a priority 
of mine of course for many years. This bill will help us 
address the disparity in the number of women and minorities in 
the STEM fields.
    Without including all of our Nation's brain power in the 
fight for 21st-century competitiveness, it is unlikely that our 
country will remain the world leader in science and innovation. 
It is therefore my hope that this bill will play a major role 
in ensuring our country's competitiveness in the coming years.
    It is not enough to simply attract women to the STEM 
fields. We must also ensure they stay in these fields, and the 
second bill in our markup addresses one of the reasons women 
leave the STEM sciences in such high rates: Sexual harassment. 
The problem of sexual harassment in the STEM fields has not 
been addressed in a comprehensive fashion. I hope that the 
Combating Sexual Harassment in Science Act of 2019 can play an 
important role in focusing Federal efforts to stamp out sexual 
harassment in the sciences.
    I want to take a moment to recognize my colleague Ranking 
Member Lucas, who is an original co-sponsor of both of these 
bills. Both he and his staff have provided very constructive 
input into these bills and the hearings we held on these 
topics. I think the bills before us today are better off 
because of these efforts, and I want to sincerely thank him and 
his staff for their work.
    The third bill before us today is the Vera Rubin Survey 
Telescope Designation Act. I'll speak more about this bill in a 
minute, but I think it is appropriate that on the same day our 
Committee tries to address the issues facing women in the STEM 
fields, we also take a moment to recognize a woman who overcame 
the hurdles she faced to provide significant contributions to 
the field of astronomy.
    Finally, we will consider the Expanding Findings for 
Federal Opioid Research and Treatment Act, which is offered by 
Ms. Wexton. The scourge of opioid addiction is one of the most 
serious problems facing our Nation right now. It only makes 
sense to bring all of our resources to bear on this issue, and 
I think the National Science Foundation (NSF) can bring unique 
capabilities to the fight to better understand and deal with 
this critical issue.
    I look forward to a productive markup and moving these 
bills very quickly to the House floor.
    [The prepared statement of Chairwoman Johnson follows:]

    I want to welcome everyone to today's markup. Today we meet to 
markup four good bipartisan bills.
    First, we will consider the STEM Opportunities Act, which has been 
a priority of mine for many years. This bill will help us address the 
disparity in the number of women and minorities in the STEM fields.
    Without including all of our Nation's brain power in the fight for 
21st century competitiveness, it is unlikely that our country will 
remain the world leader in science and innovation. It is therefore my 
hope that this bill will play a major role in ensuring our country's 
competitiveness in the coming years.
    It is not enough to simply attract women to the STEM fields. We 
must also ensure they stay in those fields, and the second bill in our 
markup addresses one of the reasons women leave the sciences in such 
high rates: sexual harassment.
    The problem of sexual harassment in the STEM fields has not been 
addressed in a comprehensive fashion. I hope that the Combating Sexual 
Harassment in Science Act of 2019 can play an important role in 
focusing federal efforts to stamp out sexual harassment in the 
sciences.
    I want to take a moment to recognize my friend and colleague, 
Ranking Member Lucas, who is an original cosponsor of both of these 
bills. Both he and his staff have provided very constructive input into 
these bills and the hearings we have held on these topics. I think the 
bills before us today are better off because of these efforts, and I 
want to sincerely thank him and his staff for their work.
    The third bill before us today is the Vera Rubin Survey Telescope 
Designation Act. I'll speak more about this bill in a minute, but I 
think it is appropriate that on the same day our Committee tries to 
address the issues facing women in the STEM fields, we also take a 
moment to recognize a woman who overcame the hurdles she faced to 
provide significant contributions to the field of astronomy.
    Finally, we will consider the Expanding Findings for Federal Opioid 
Research and Treatment Act, which is offered by Ms. Wexton. The scourge 
of opioid addiction is one of the most serious problems facing our 
nation right now.
    It only makes sense to bring all of our resources to bear on this 
issue, and I think the National Science Foundation can bring unique 
capabilities to the fight to better understand and deal with this 
critical issue.
    I look forward to a productive markup and moving these bills very 
quickly to the House floor.

    Chairwoman Johnson. I now recognize the Ranking Member to 
present an opening statement.
    Mr. Lucas. Thank you, Chairwoman Johnson, for holding this 
markup.
    Today, we'll consider four bipartisan bills. The first is 
H.R. 2528, STEM Opportunities Act of 2019. H.R. 2528 continues 
this Committee's long bipartisan history of supporting and 
expanding STEM education for all. The only way we'll achieve 
our potential is by utilizing America's most valuable resource: 
Our people. That means developing a diverse STEM-capable 
workforce at every education level and from every background.
    One of the key provisions of H.R. 2528 is a requirement for 
more comprehensive data collection and analysis on the 
students, researchers, and faculty receiving Federal science 
grants. This data will help us identify and reduce the barriers 
that prevent underrepresented groups from entering and 
advancing in STEM. It will also help us measure the success of 
Federal STEM programs.
    The bill also includes a provision directing NSF to support 
computer science education through the existing Tribal Colleges 
and Universities program. Access to computer science resources 
and the development of computing skills is critical in today's 
economy. I am pleased to join Chairwoman Johnson in 
cosponsoring this legislation. I want to thank her and her 
entire staff for working with us to refine the bill for 
reintroduction and incorporating our feedback and ideas. I look 
forward to continuing to work with the Chairwoman and Members 
of the Committee to advance more STEM education efforts for 
this Congress to support, encourage, and develop the next 
generation of STEM students.
    Our second bill this morning is H.R. 36, Combating Sexual 
Harassment in Science Act of 2019. Chairwoman Johnson and I 
made this one of our highest priorities, introducing it on the 
first day of the 116th Congress. This bill has a foundation of 
more than a year of investigation, analysis, and 
recommendations to the Science Committee. Engaging more women 
in STEM studies and careers is essential to American 
competitiveness. Women make up half the workforce but account 
for less than 25 percent of America's STEM workforce.
    Unfortunately, too many women have been driven out of STEM 
careers due to a culture of harassment and abuse. H.R. 36 takes 
the first steps to addressing this problem. The bill supports 
the adoption of uniform guidance across the Federal science 
agencies to reduce the prevalence of sexual harassment 
involving grant personnel. The bill also directs the NSF to 
conduct further research into the causes and consequences of 
harassment, as well as interventions to mitigate the problem.
    There is an established legal process in place within 
higher education and in the workplace for handling claims of 
sexual harassment. This bill does not alter that process. What 
this bill does do is create a uniform policy for universities 
and research institutions to report to Federal science agencies 
when an administrative action is taken that impacts the ability 
of a researcher to carry out a grant. We want to ensure the 
safety of all grant personnel supported by taxpayer funding. 
I'll be offering an amendment later in the markup that we hope 
makes this requirement even more clear.
    Again, thank you, Chairwoman Johnson, for working in a 
bipartisan and collaborative way to move this legislation 
forward.
    Next, we will consider H.R. 3196, Vera Rubin Survey 
Telescope Designation Act, sponsored by Chairwoman Johnson and 
Representative Jenniffer Gonzalez-Colon. This bill honors the 
contributions of the late Dr. Vera Rubin, an astronomer who 
made groundbreaking discoveries in the field of dark matter and 
was a pioneer and life-long advocate for women in astronomy.
    This new LSST (Large Synoptic Survey Telescope), under 
construction in Chile, funded by the National Science 
Foundation and the Department of Energy, will photograph the 
entire sky every few nights. One of the goals of the project is 
to study the nature of dark matter and dark energy. Naming the 
observatory in her honor is a fitting tribute to the 
contributions to the field, and I--her contributions to the 
field, I should note, and I hope will inspire future 
generations of women in astronomy.
    Finally, the Committee will consider H.R. 3153, Expanding 
Findings for Federal Opioid Research and Treatment Act. This 
legislation identifies current gaps that exist in research on 
the prevention and treatment of opioid addiction and authorizes 
the NSF to support research grants in those areas.
    I want to thank Representative Jennifer Wexton and 
Representative Jim Baird for their bipartisan work on this 
bill. Opioid addiction affects too many in our communities, and 
I applaud this effort to support more basic research on the 
science of addiction.
    Once again, thank you, Chairwoman Johnson, for holding 
today's markup, and I encourage the Members of the Committee to 
support all these bills.
    I yield back the balance of my time.
    [The prepared statement of Mr. Lucas follows:]

    Thank you, Chairwoman Johnson, for holding this mark-up. Today we 
will consider four bipartisan bills.
    The first is H.R. 2528, STEM Opportunities Act of 2019. H.R. 2528 
continues this Committee's long bipartisan history of supporting and 
expanding STEM education for all.
    The only way we'll achieve our potential is by utilizing America's 
most valuable resource: our people. That means developing a diverse 
STEM-capable workforce at every education level and from every 
background.
    One of the key provisions of H.R. 2528 is a requirement for more 
comprehensive data collection and analysis on the students, 
researchers, and faculty receiving federal science grants. This data 
will help us identify and reduce the barriers that prevent 
underrepresented groups from entering and advancing in STEM. It will 
also help us measure the success of federal STEM programs.
    The bill also includes a provision directing NSF to support 
computer science education through the existing Tribal Colleges and 
Universities program. Access to computer science resources and the 
development of computing skills is critical in today's economy.
    I was pleased to join Chairwoman Johnson in co-sponsoring this 
legislation. I want to thank her and her staff for working with us to 
refine the bill for reintroduction and incorporating our feedback and 
ideas.
    I look forward to continuing to work with the Chairwoman and 
members of the Committee to advance more STEM education efforts this 
Congress to support, encourage and develop the next generation of STEM 
students.
    Our second bill this morning is H.R. 36, Combating Sexual 
Harassment in Science Act of 2019. Chairwoman Johnson and I made this 
one of our highest priorities, introducing it on the first day of the 
116th Congress. This bill has a foundation of more than a year of 
investigation, analysis, and recommendations to the Science Committee.
    Engaging more women in STEM studies and careers is essential to 
American competitiveness. Women make up half of the workforce, but 
account for less than 25 percent of America's STEM workforce.
    Unfortunately, too many women have been driven out of STEM careers 
due to a culture of harassment and abuse. H.R. 36 takes the first steps 
to addressing this problem. The bill supports the adoption of uniform 
guidance across the federal science agencies to reduce the prevalence 
of sexual harassment involving grant personnel. The bill also directs 
NSF to conduct further research into the causes and consequences of 
harassment, as well as interventions to mitigate the problem.
    There is an established legal process in place within higher 
education and in the workplace for handling claims of sexual 
harassment. This bill does not alter that process. What this bill does 
do, is create a new uniform policy that universities and research 
institutions report to federal science agencies when an administrative 
action is taken that impacts the ability of a researcher to carry out a 
grant.
    We want to ensure the safety of all grant personnel supported by 
taxpayer funding. I'll be offering an amendment later in the mark-up 
that we hope makes this requirement even more clear.
    Again, thank you Chairwoman Johnson for working in a bipartisan and 
collaborative way to move this legislation forward.
    Next we will consider H.R. 3196, Vera Rubin Survey Telescope 
Designation Act, sponsored by Chairwoman Johnson and Representative 
Jenniffer Gonzalez-Colon. This bill honors the contributions of the 
late Dr. Vera Rubin, an astronomer who made groundbreaking discoveries 
in the field of dark matter and was a pioneer and life-long advocate 
for women in astronomy.
    The new LSST Telescope under construction in Chile, funded by the 
National Science Foundation and the Department of Energy, will 
photograph the entire sky every few nights. One of the goals of the 
project is to study the nature of dark matter and dark energy. Naming 
the observatory in her honor is a fitting tribute to her contributions 
to the field and I hope will inspire future generations of women in 
astronomy.
    Finally, the Committee will consider H.R. 3153, Expanding Findings 
for Federal Opioid Research and Treatment Act. The legislation 
identifies current gaps that exist in research on the prevention and 
treatment of opioid addiction and authorizes NSF to support research 
grants in these areas.
    I thank Rep. Jennifer Wexton and Rep. Jim Baird for their 
bipartisan work on this bill. Opioid addiction affects too many in our 
communities, and I applaud this effort to support more basic research 
on the science of addiction.
    Once again, thank you Chairwoman Johnson for holding today's mark-
up, and I encourage the Members of this Committee to support these 
bills. I yield back the balance of my time.

    Chairwoman Johnson. Thank you, Mr. Lucas.

    H.R. 2528
    10:13 a.m.
    Chairwoman Johnson. We will now consider H.R. 2528, STEM 
Opportunities Act of 2019. The clerk will report the bill.
    The Clerk. H.R. 2528, a bill to direct the Director----
    [The bill follows:]
    
[GRAPHIC(S) NOT AVAILABLE IN TIFF FORMAT]
    
    Chairwoman Johnson. Without objection, the bill is 
considered as read and open to amendment at any point.
    I recognize myself for comments.
    Dr. Vera Rubin was a renowned astronomer and a staunch 
advocate for women in science. Captivated by the sight of stars 
drifting across the night sky outside her bedroom window, her 
excitement for science was sparked at a young age. Dr. Rubin 
persisted despite facing barriers because of her gender 
throughout her career. She was also a fierce advocate for 
expanding opportunities for girls in STEM. She advocated for 
more women members of the National Academy of Sciences and more 
women on the review panels and academic research committees.
    In 1970, Dr. Rubin published some of the best evidence of 
the existence of dark matter. This groundbreaking work helped 
to change the conventional view of the universe from one 
dominated by light-emitting matter to one dominated by dark 
matter.
    Dr. Rubin went on to become the second woman astronomer 
elected to the National Academy of Sciences in 1981. She 
received the National Medal of Science in 1983.
    The Large Synoptic Survey Telescope, LSST, set to begin 
operations in 2023, will build on Dr. Rubin's legacy in 
advancing our understanding of dark matter. Funded jointly by 
the National Science Foundation and Department of Energy, LSST 
will survey the entire southern sky every 3 days. Among other 
scientific goals, this data will enable astronomers to probe 
the nature of dark matter.
    I cannot think of a more fitting tribute to Vera Rubin's 
legacy than to designate the LSST as the Vera Rubin Survey 
Telescope. I want to thank my colleague from Puerto Rico, Ms. 
Gonzalez-Colon for joining me in introducing H.R. 3196, and I 
urge my colleagues to support it.
    Is there anyone wishing to make--be recognized? The Chair 
recognizes--yes, I recognize Ms. Gonzalez-Colon.
    Ms. Gonzalez-Colon. Thank you, Madam Chairwoman. I really 
thank you for allowing this bill to go to markup today and for 
allowing me to be a co-lead on this bill. I think it's 
important.
    I want to thank also Ranking Member Lucas for holding this 
markup today with very important bills.
    I'm a proud co-lead, as I just said, of H.R. 3196, Vera 
Rubin Survey Telescope Designation Act, alongside Chairwoman 
Johnson.
    As the Chair just stated, Dr. Rubin encountered many 
obstacles during her academic and professional career. As a 
student, her application to Princeton University was denied 
because, at the time, women were not allowed to enroll in the 
astrophysics graduate program of this institution. Similarly, 
years later, she had problems accessing the Palomar Observatory 
in California, one of the most iconic scientific facilities in 
the world, also because she was a woman.
    Experiences such as this would be enough to discourage 
anyone from pursuing studies in STEM and to discourage a young 
student and a scientist. Still, Dr. Rubin persevered, 
demonstrating exceptional intellectual capabilities and 
character.
    Dr. Vera Rubin changed the way we understand the universe 
today. Her groundbreaking work on dark matter and galaxy 
rotations remain at the forefront of STEM research in the field 
of astronomy. Her legacy will undoubtedly continue to influence 
future generations of scientists and will hopefully be 
memorialized in the new Large Synoptic Survey Telescope in 
Chile. This telescope, it's currently on track to begin 
operations in 2023, jointly funded by the National Science 
Foundation, the Department of Energy, and private funding 
raised for the telescope. This telescope will soon be utilized 
by scientists to conduct a wide range of studies, including the 
nature of dark matter and dark energy, the fields of Dr. Vera 
Rubin. I'm very much looking forward to the great work that 
this facility will produce by research actually like Dr. Rubin.
    I would like to conclude by saying how grateful I am to be 
part of this legislation and this Committee. We need to find 
bipartisan solutions to encourage women and minorities to 
become and remain interested in careers in STEM. I believe 
highlighting the sacrifice of their contributions is one of the 
many ways we can do-- we can continue to do so.
    I would like to thank Chairman Johnson once more and 
commend the leadership of this Committee. As someone with a 
STEM background, I've represented many young girls and women 
who are either pursuing or interested in pursuing a career in 
STEM. I think this will encourage their work to be noticed.
    With that, I yield back.
    Chairwoman Johnson. Thank you very much.
    Are there others who wish to be recognized?
    If not, a reporting quorum being present, I move that the 
Com mittee on Science, Space, and Technology report H.R. 3196 
to the House with the recommendation that the bill be approved.
    Those in favor of the motion will signify by saying aye.
    Those opposed, no.
    The ayes have it, and the bill is favorably reported.
    Without objection, a motion to reconsider is laid on the 
table, and I ask unanimous consent that staff be authorized to 
make any necessary technical and conforming changes to the 
bill. Without objection, so ordered.
    Members will have 2 subsequent calendar days in which to 
submit supplementary, minority, or additional views on the 
measure.

    H.R. 3153
    10:45 a.m.
    Chairwoman Johnson. Now, we'll take up H.R. 3153 for 
consideration, the Expanding Findings for Federal Opioid 
Research and Treatment Act. And the clerk will report the bill.
    The Clerk. H.R. 3153, a bill----
    [The bill follows:]