Report text available as:

  • TXT
  • PDF   (PDF provides a complete and accurate display of this text.) Tip ?

116th Congress }                                          { Rept. 116-202
                        HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES
 1st Session   }                                          { Part 1

======================================================================



 
             SOUTH FLORIDA CLEAN COASTAL WATERS ACT OF 2019

                                _______
                                

 September 11, 2019.--Committed to the Committee of the Whole House on 
            the State of the Union and Ordered to be printed

                                _______
                                

    Ms. Johnson of Texas, from the Committee on Science, Space, and 
                  Technology, submitted the following

                              R E P O R T

                        [To accompany H.R. 335]

      [Including cost estimate of the Congressional Budget Office]

    The Committee on Science, Space, and Technology, to whom 
was referred the bill (H.R. 335) to require the Inter-Agency 
Task Force on Harmful Algal Blooms and Hypoxia to develop a 
plan for reducing, mitigating, and controlling harmful algal 
blooms and hypoxia in South Florida, and for other purposes, 
having considered the same, report favorably thereon with an 
amendment and recommend that the bill as amended do pass.

                                CONTENTS

                                                                   Page
   I. Amendment.......................................................2
  II. Purpose of the Bill.............................................3
 III. Background and Need for the Legislation.........................3
  IV. Committee Hearings..............................................5
   V. Committee Consideration and Votes...............................5
  VI. Summary of Major Provisions of the Bill.........................6
 VII. Section-By-Section Analysis (By Title and Section)..............6
VIII. Committee Views.................................................7
  IX. Cost Estimate...................................................7
   X. Congressional Budget Office Cost Estimate.......................7
  XI. Federal Mandates Statement......................................8
 XII. Committee Oversight Findings and Recommendations................8
XIII. Statement on General Performance Goals and Objectives...........8
 XIV. Federal Advisory Committee Statement............................9
  XV. Duplication of Federal Programs.................................9
 XVI. Earmark Identification..........................................9
XVII. Applicability to the Legislative Branch.........................9
XVIII.Statement on Preemption of State, Local, or Tribal Law..........9

 XIX. Changes in Existing Law Made by the Bill, as Reported...........9
  XX. Exchange of Committee Correspondence...........................15
 XXI. Proceedings of the Full Committee Markup.......................17


                              I. Amendment

    The amendment is as follows:
  Strike all after the enacting clause and insert the 
following:

SECTION 1. SHORT TITLE.

  This Act may be cited as the ``South Florida Clean Coastal Waters Act 
of 2019''.

SEC. 2. SOUTH FLORIDA HARMFUL ALGAL BLOOMS AND HYPOXIA ASSESSMENT AND 
                    ACTION PLAN.

  (a) In General.--The Harmful Algal Bloom and Hypoxia Research and 
Control Act of 1998 (Public Law 105-383; 33 U.S.C. 4001 et seq.) is 
amended--
          (1) by redesignating sections 605 through 609 as sections 606 
        through 610, respectively; and
          (2) by inserting after section 604 the following:

``SEC. 605. SOUTH FLORIDA HARMFUL ALGAL BLOOMS AND HYPOXIA.

  ``(a) South Florida.--In this section, the term `South Florida' 
means--
          ``(1) all lands and waters within the administrative 
        boundaries of the South Florida Water Management District;
          ``(2) regional coastal waters, including Biscayne Bay, the 
        Caloosahatchee Estuary, Florida Bay, and Indian River Lagoon; 
        and
          ``(3) the Florida Reef Tract.
  ``(b) Integrated Assessment.--Not later than 540 days after the date 
of enactment of the South Florida Clean Coastal Waters Act of 2019, the 
Task Force, in accordance with the authority under section 603, shall 
complete and submit to Congress and the President an interim integrated 
assessment. Not later than 3 years after such date of enactment, the 
Task Force shall finalize, and submit to Congress and the President, 
such assessment. Such assessment shall examine the causes, 
consequences, and potential approaches to reduce harmful algal blooms 
and hypoxia in South Florida, and the status of, and gaps within, 
current harmful algal bloom and hypoxia research, monitoring, 
management, prevention, response, and control activities that directly 
affect the region by--
          ``(1) Federal agencies;
          ``(2) State agencies;
          ``(3) regional research consortia;
          ``(4) academia;
          ``(5) private industry;
          ``(6) nongovernmental organizations; and
          ``(7) Indian tribes (as defined in section 4 of the Indian 
        Self-Determination and Education Assistance Act (25 U.S.C. 
        5304)).
  ``(c) Action Plan.--
          ``(1) In general.--Not later than 2 years after the date of 
        the enactment of the South Florida Clean Coastal Waters Act of 
        2019, the Task Force shall develop and submit to Congress a 
        plan, based on the integrated assessment under subsection (b), 
        for reducing, mitigating, and controlling harmful algal blooms 
        and hypoxia in South Florida.
          ``(2) Contents.--The plan submitted under paragraph (1) 
        shall--
                  ``(A) address the monitoring needs identified in the 
                integrated assessment under subsection (b);
                  ``(B) develop a timeline and budgetary requirements 
                for deployment of future assets;
                  ``(C) identify requirements for the development and 
                verification of South Florida harmful algal bloom and 
                hypoxia models, including--
                          ``(i) all assumptions built into the models; 
                        and
                          ``(ii) data quality methods used to ensure 
                        the best available data are utilized; and
                  ``(D) propose a plan to implement a remote monitoring 
                network and early warning system for alerting local 
                communities in the region to harmful algal bloom risks 
                that may impact human health.
          ``(3) Requirements.--In developing the action plan, the Task 
        Force shall--
                  ``(A) consult with the State of Florida, and affected 
                local and tribal governments;
                  ``(B) consult with representatives from regional 
                academic, agricultural, industry, and other stakeholder 
                groups;
                  ``(C) ensure that the plan complements and does not 
                duplicate activities conducted by other Federal or 
                State agencies, including the South Florida Ecosystem 
                Restoration Task Force;
                  ``(D) identify critical research for reducing, 
                mitigating, and controlling harmful algal bloom events 
                and their effects;
                  ``(E) evaluate cost-effective, incentive-based 
                partnership approaches;
                  ``(F) ensure that the plan is technically sound and 
                cost-effective;
                  ``(G) utilize existing research, assessments, 
                reports, and program activities;
                  ``(H) publish a summary of the proposed plan in the 
                Federal Register at least 180 days prior to submitting 
                the completed plan to Congress; and
                  ``(I) after submitting the completed plan to 
                Congress, provide biennial progress reports on the 
                activities toward achieving the objectives of the 
                plan.''.
  (b) Clerical Amendment and Correction.--The table of contents in 
section 2 of the Coast Guard Authorization Act of 1998 (Public Law 105-
383) is amended by striking the items relating to title VI and 
inserting the following new items:

              ``TITLE VI--HARMFUL ALGAL BLOOMS AND HYPOXIA

``Sec. 601. Short title.
``Sec. 602. Findings.
``Sec. 603. Assessments.
``Sec. 603A. National Harmful Algal Bloom and Hypoxia Program.
``Sec. 603B. Comprehensive research plan and action strategy.
``Sec. 604. Northern Gulf of Mexico hypoxia.
``Sec. 605. South Florida harmful algal blooms and hypoxia.
``Sec. 606. Great Lakes hypoxia and harmful algal blooms.
``Sec. 607. Protection of States' Rights.
``Sec. 608. Effect on other Federal authority.
``Sec. 609. Definitions.
``Sec. 610. Authorization of appropriations.''.

                        II. Purpose of the Bill

    H.R. 335, sponsored by Rep. Mast, amends the Harmful Algal 
Bloom and Hypoxia Research and Control Act of 1998 to require 
the Interagency Task Force on Harmful Algal Blooms (HABs) and 
Hypoxia to produce an integrated assessment on the causes, 
consequences, and mitigation options for HABs and hypoxia in 
South Florida, and to identify gaps in research, monitoring and 
management.
    It also requires the Task Force to develop an action plan, 
in consultation with local stakeholders, in response to the 
integrated assessment that details methods for reducing and 
mitigating HABs and hypoxia in South Florida, and to provide 
progress reports on the implementation of the plan biennially. 
The bill is co-sponsored by Representatives Soto, Rooney, 
Posey, and Waltz.

              III. Background and Need for the Legislation

    A harmful algal bloom (HAB) is an explosion of growth of a 
colony of algae within an ocean or freshwater ecosystem that 
produces toxins or other harmful effects on wildlife or 
humans.\1\ Depending on the species of algae and the aquatic 
and atmospheric conditions, HABs can produce toxins that may 
harm or kill organisms ranging from fish, and other aquatic 
life, to land inhabitants like birds and mammals, including 
pets. HABs negatively affect human health as well, and rarely, 
they have caused human illnesses and even death. HABs can 
obstruct the gills of fish, cover corals and aquatic 
vegetation, and contaminate shellfish and drinking water.\2\
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    \1\NOAA, ``What is a harmful algal bloom?'' April 27, 2016. https:/
/www.noaa.gov/what-is-harmful-algal-bloom
    \2\Ibid.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    When massive algae blooms die and sink to the bottom, the 
decomposition of the bloom by bacteria consumes dissolved 
oxygen in the water, creating a condition of hypoxia, or low 
oxygen.\3\ Since most organisms require oxygen to survive, 
hypoxic waters can cause harm or even death to aquatic 
organisms affected by the hypoxia.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    \3\Ibid.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Marine and freshwater HABs have been reported in every 
state in the United States.\4\ HABs negatively affects human 
health and ecosystems. This can also impact coastal economies, 
particularly the fishing and tourism industries.\5\
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    \4\https://oceanservice.noaa.gov/hazards/hab/
    \5\Ibid.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Research shows that climate change will cause significant 
changes to marine conditions, which overall will increase the 
frequency, geographic distribution, and intensity of HABs. 
Warming water, salinity changes, more dissolved carbon dioxide, 
and sea level rise, will all make conditions more favorable to 
some species of harmful algae.\6\ Nutrient pollution from 
upstream human sources such as agriculture, urban runoff, and 
lawn fertilizers also exacerbates HABs; adding extra nitrogen 
and phosphorus pollution causes algae to grow faster than 
ecosystems can handle.\7\
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    \6\https://www.epa.gov/nutrientpollution/climate-change-and-
harmful-algal-blooms
    \7\https://www.epa.gov/nutrientpollution/issue
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    South Florida experiences HABs in both its marine and 
freshwater systems annually. In the summer, red tide and brown 
tide blooms occur in the Gulf of Mexico and South Atlantic 
Ocean along the East coast of Florida, as well as in the Indian 
River Lagoon system that is also along the Atlantic Coast of 
Florida. Red tide causes eye and respiratory ailments for 
coastal residents, large fish kills, and bright crimson 
water.\8\ Though brown tide has not been found to cause human 
health concerns, it kills fish and shellfish as well as 
seagrasses crucial to water quality and protection for fish.\9\ 
Lake Okeechobee and its surrounding rivers, canals, and 
estuaries, the Indian River Lagoon, the Everglades, and the 
Atlantic and Gulf coasts, experience toxic blue-green algal 
blooms, which cause eye, skin, and respiratory 
irritation.\10\\11\ The red, brown, and blue-green blooms have 
been intensifying in recent years due to increased nutrient 
pollution and climate change.\12\
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    \8\https://oceanservice.noaa.gov/news/redtide-florida/
    \9\https://myfwc.com/research/redtide/monitoring/historical-events/
brown-tide
    \10\https://miami.cbslocal.com/2019/06/07/blue-green-algae-bloom-
florida-lake-okeechobee
    \11\https://fl.audubon.org/crisis-indian-river-lagoon-solutions-
imperiled-ecosystem
    \12\https://floridadep.gov/sites/default/files/
The%20Effects%20of%20Climate%20Change
%20on%20Florida%27s%20Ocean%20and%20Coastal%20Resources_0.pdf
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) 
conducts research on marine HABs to better understand the 
conditions under which they form, and NOAA's satellite, buoy, 
and other observations contribute to detection, forecasting and 
warnings for HABS.\13\ The Harmful Algal Bloom and Hypoxia 
Research and Control Act of 1998 (HABHRCA) authorized 
appropriations for NOAA to conduct research, monitoring, 
education, and management activities to reduce HABs. In 
addition, HABHRCA created the Inter-Agency Task Force on 
Harmful Algal Blooms and Hypoxia to develop action plans 
combatting HABs and hypoxia. The HABHRCA reauthorizations of 
2004, 2014, and 2017 reasserted and expanded this mandate.\14\
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    \13\https://www.noaa.gov/what-is-harmful-algal-bloom
    \14\https://coastalscience.noaa.gov/research/stressor-impacts-
mitigationhabhrca/
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    In the 2014 amendments to HABHRCA, Congress directed the 
Inter-Agency Task Force on Harmful Algal Blooms and Hypoxia to 
submit an integrated assessment each for the Great Lakes and 
northern Gulf of Mexico that examines the causes, impacts, and 
potential mitigation strategies for HABs and hypoxia in those 
areas, and to create and submit to Congress a plan for each to 
carry out mitigation actions.\15\ H.R 335 identifies the need 
for a similar combination of integrated assessment and action 
plan, in order to examine and combat the intensifying HABs and 
hypoxia conditions in South Florida.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    \15\https://www.govinfo.gov/content/pkg/BILLS-113s1254eah/pdf/
BILLS-113s1254eah.pdf
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

                         IV. Committee Hearings

    For the purposes of section 103(i) of H. Res. 6 of the 
116th Congress, the following hearings were used to develop the 
legislation:
    On March 7, 2019, the Honorable Lizzie Fletcher presiding 
over the Environment Subcommittee of the Committee on Science, 
Space, and Technology held a hearing focused on climate change 
impacts on our nation's oceans and coasts, where harmful algal 
blooms were discussed as a major associated impact. There were 
four witnesses: (1) Dr. Sarah Cooley, Director of the Ocean 
Acidification Program at Ocean Conservancy. Dr. Cooley provided 
testimony on the science of ocean warming, acidification, and 
deoxygenation and resulting impacts to marine ecosystems and 
human, including more frequent or toxic HABs. (2) Dr. Radley 
Horton, Lamont Associate Research Professor at Columbia 
University Earth Institute's Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory. 
Dr. Horton testified on sea level rise projections and impacts 
to coastal communities. (3) Dr. Thomas K. Frazer, Professor and 
Director of the School of Natural Resources and Environment at 
the University of Florida, testified on the impacts of climate 
change to fisheries and the need for increased federal 
investment in research. In response to a question from Mr. 
Crist on the causes of severity of the most recent red tide 
outbreak in Florida, Dr. Frazer highlighted the need for better 
observations in areas with HABs. (4) Ms. Margaret A. Pilaro, 
Executive Director of the Pacific Coast Shellfish Growers 
Association. Ms. Pilaro provided testimony on how 
acidification, HABs, ocean warming, hypoxia, and other trends 
affect shellfish hatcheries and how their industry has started 
to adapt.

                  V. Committee Consideration and Votes

    As summarized in Section IV of this report, the 
Subcommittee on Environment heard testimony in the 116th 
Congress relevant to the activities authorized in H.R. 335 at a 
hearing held on March 7, 2019.
    On January 8, 2019, Representative Brian Mast introduced 
H.R. 335, the South Florida Clean Coastal Waters Act of 2019, 
to produce an integrated assessment on the causes, 
consequences, and potential mitigation options to reduce HABs 
and hypoxia in South Florida, and to develop a subsequent 
mitigation plan.
    On July 23, 2019 the House Committee on Science, Space and 
Technology met to consider H.R. 335 and three energy research 
and development bills. The Committee considered the following 
amendment to the bill:

          1. Mr. Waltz offered a manager's amendment that 
        broadens the definition of South Florida to reflect the 
        interconnectedness of Lake Okeechobee, the Indian River 
        Lagoon, the Gulf and Atlantic coasts, and other bodies 
        of water in South Florida to ensure that all of these 
        affected water bodies are eligible for the integrated 
        assessment and action plan required by the bill. The 
        amendment also makes several other minor changes to the 
        bill based on technical assistance from NOAA. The 
        amendment was agreed to by a voice vote.

    Ms. Johnson moved that the Committee favorably report the 
bill, H.R. 335, as amended, to the House with the 
recommendation that the bill be approved. The motion was agreed 
to by a voice vote.

              VI. Summary of Major Provisions of the Bill

    H.R. 335 requires the Inter-Agency Task Force on Harmful 
Algal Blooms and Hypoxia to produce an integrated assessment on 
the causes, consequences, and potential mitigation options to 
reduce HABs and hypoxia in South Florida, and to develop a plan 
for reducing, mitigating, and controlling harmful algal blooms 
and hypoxia in South Florida, among other purposes.

        VII. Section-by-Section Analysis (by Title and Section)


Section 1. Short title

    South Florida Clean Coastal Waters Act of 2019

Section 2. South Florida Harmful Algal Blooms and Hypoxia assessment 
        and action plan

    This section amends the Harmful Algal Bloom and Hypoxia 
Research and Control Act of 1998 to require the Interagency 
Task Force on Harmful Algal Blooms (HABs) and Hypoxia to 
produce an integrated assessment on the causes, consequences, 
and potential mitigation options to reduce HABs and hypoxia in 
South Florida, as well as identify the current status and gaps 
in research, monitoring, and management efforts. An interim 
integrated assessment is required to be submitted to Congress 
and the President 540 days after enactment of the bill, with 
the final assessment report required to be submitted no later 
than 3 years after the bill's enactment.
    This section also requires the Task Force to develop an 
action plan based on the integrated assessment that details 
methods for reducing, mitigating, and controlling HABs and 
hypoxia in South Florida. This includes proposing a monitoring 
network and early warning system, as well as a timeline and 
budget requirements for implementation of such strategies. In 
developing the plan, the Task Force is required to consult with 
State, affected local and tribal governments, and non-federal 
stakeholder groups such as academia and industry; ensure the 
plan does not duplicate existing efforts; and evaluate 
approaches that are cost-effective and partnership based. A 
summary of the proposed plan must be published in the Federal 
Register at least 180 before submitting to Congress. The Task 
Force is required to submit the action plan to Congress no 
later than 2 years after enactment of the bill, followed by 
biennial progress reports on activities toward achieving the 
plan.

                         VIII. Committee Views

    The Committee recognizes the unique need of South Florida 
to develop a blueprint for action to mitigate HABs, which will 
help federal, state, and local decision makers mobilize and 
coordinate actions around this issue. South Florida has been 
suffering from economically and ecologically costly HABs in its 
marine and freshwater bodies for decades, and the problem is 
intensifying with climate change and fertilizer runoff from 
farms and lawns. For example, in 2018, a toxic red tide bloom 
in South Florida caused mass mortality of dolphins, manatees, 
and fish, and $130 million in damage to local businesses.
    The Committee believes that an integrated assessment and 
action plan for this region will strengthen federal research in 
this area, resulting in improved forecasts and responses to 
HABs. The Inter-agency Task Force on Harmful Algal Blooms and 
Hypoxia has created integrated assessments and action plans for 
other regions in the past, namely the northern Gulf of Mexico 
and the Great Lakes, with great success in improving knowledge 
of those areas and coordinating stakeholders around action. The 
amended version of H.R. 335 incorporates technical assistance 
from NOAA and broadens the definition of South Florida to 
include additional freshwater bodies, coastal waters, and the 
Florida Reef Tract to ensure all water bodies affected by the 
most common types of HABs are eligible for evaluated in the 
assessment.

                           IX. Cost Estimate

    Pursuant to clause 3(c)(2) of rule XIII of the Rules of the 
House of Representatives, the Committee adopts as its own the 
estimate of new budget authority, entitlement authority, or tax 
expenditures or revenues contained in the cost estimate 
prepared by the Director of the Congressional Budget Office 
pursuant to section 402 of the Congressional Budget Act of 
1974.

              X. Congressional Budget Office Cost Estimate

                                     U.S. Congress,
                               Congressional Budget Office,
                                    Washington, DC, August 6, 2019.
Hon. Eddie Bernice Johnson,
Chairwoman, Committee on Science, Space, and Technology,
House of Representatives, Washington, DC.
    Dear Madam Chairwoman: The Congressional Budget Office has 
prepared the enclosed cost estimate for H.R. 335, the South 
Florida Clean Coastal Waters Act of 2019.
    If you wish further details on this estimate, we will be 
pleased to provide them. The CBO staff contact is Robert Reese.
            Sincerely,
                                             Mark P. Hadley
                                 (For Phillip L. Swagel, Director).
    Enclosure.

    [GRAPHIC(S) NOT AVAILABLE IN TIFF FORMAT]
    

    H.R. 335 would amend the Harmful Algal Bloom and Hypoxia 
Research and Control Act of 1998 to direct the interagency task 
force on harmful algal blooms to develop and submit to the 
Congress within two years a plan to reduce, mitigate, and 
control harmful algal blooms in southern Florida. The 
interagency task force includes the National Oceanic and 
Atmospheric Administration, the Environmental Protection 
Agency, the Department of the Interior, the Department of 
Agriculture, and other agencies.
    Using information on the cost of completing similar 
reports, CBO estimates that implementing H.R. 335 would cost 
less than $500,000 over the 2019-2024 period. Any such spending 
would be subject to the availability of appropriated funds.
    The CBO staff contact for this estimate is Robert Reese. 
The estimate was reviewed by H. Samuel Papenfuss, Deputy 
Assistant Director for Budget Analysis.

                     XI. Federal Mandates Statement

    H.R. 335 contains no unfunded mandates.

         XII. Committee Oversight Findings and Recommendations

    The Committee's oversight findings and recommendations are 
reflected in the body of this report.

      XIII. Statement on General Performance Goals and Objectives

    The goal of H.R. 335 is to require the Inter-Agency Task 
Force on Harmful Algal Blooms and Hypoxia (Task Force) to 
produce an integrated assessment on the causes, consequences, 
and potential mitigation options to reduce HABs and hypoxia in 
South Florida. Congress and the President will receive an 
interim assessment 540 days after the enactment of the bill and 
the final assessment no later than 3 years after enactment of 
the bill. The goal is also to require the Task Force to develop 
a plan for reducing, mitigating, and controlling harmful algal 
blooms and hypoxia in South Florida. A summary of the proposed 
plan must be published in the Federal Register at least 180 
before submitting to Congress. The Task Force is required to 
submit the action plan to Congress no later than 2 years after 
enactment of the bill, followed by biennial progress reports on 
activities toward achieving the plan.

               XIV. Federal Advisory Committee Statement

    H.R. 335 does not create any advisory committees.

                  XV. Duplication of Federal Programs

    Pursuant to clause 3(c)(5) of rule XIII of the Rules of the 
House of Representatives, the Committee finds that no provision 
of H.R. 335 establishes or reauthorizes a program of the 
federal government known to be duplicative of another federal 
program, including any program that was included in a report to 
Congress pursuant to section 21 of Public Law 111-139 or the 
most recent Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance.

                      XVI. Earmark Identification

    Pursuant to clause 9(e), 9(f), and 9(g) of rule XXI, the 
Committee finds that H.R. 335 contains no earmarks, limited tax 
benefits, or limited tariff benefits.

             XVII. Applicability to the Legislative Branch

    The Committee finds that H.R. 335 does not relate to the 
terms and conditions of employment or access to public services 
or accommodations within the meaning of section 102(b)(3) of 
the Congressional Accountability Act (Public Law 104-1).

     XVIII. Statement on Preemption of State, Local, or Tribal Law

    This bill is not intended to preempt any state, local, or 
tribal law.

       XIX. Changes in Existing Law Made by the Bill, as Reported

    In compliance with clause 3(e) of rule XIII of the Rules of 
the House of Representatives, changes in existing law made by 
the bill, as reported, are shown as follows (existing law 
proposed to be omitted is enclosed in black brackets, new 
matter is printed in italic, and existing law in which no 
change is proposed is shown in roman):

          Changes in Existing Law Made by the Bill, as Reported

  In compliance with clause 3(e) of rule XIII of the Rules of 
the House of Representatives, changes in existing law made by 
the bill, as reported, are shown as follows (existing law 
proposed to be omitted is enclosed in black brackets, new 
matter is printed in italic, and existing law in which no 
change is proposed is shown in roman):

                 COAST GUARD AUTHORIZATION ACT OF 1998



           *       *       *       *       *       *       *
SEC. 2. TABLE OF CONTENTS.

  The table of contents for this Act is as follows:

Sec. 1. Short title.
Sec. 2. Table of contents.
     * * * * * * *

               [TITLE VI--HARMFUL ALGAL BLOOMS AND HYPOXIA

[Sec. 601. Short title.
[Sec. 602. Findings.
[Sec. 603. Assessments.
[Sec. 604. Northern Gulf of Mexico hypoxia.
[Sec. 605. Authorization of appropriations.
[Sec. 606. Protection of States' rights.]

               Title VI--Harmful Algal Blooms and Hypoxia

Sec. 601. Short title.
Sec. 602. Findings.
Sec. 603. Assessments.
Sec. 603A. National Harmful Algal Bloom and Hypoxia Program.
Sec. 603B. Comprehensive research plan and action strategy.
Sec. 604. Northern Gulf of Mexico hypoxia.
Sec. 605. South Florida harmful algal blooms and hypoxia.
Sec. 606. Great Lakes hypoxia and harmful algal blooms.
Sec. 607. Protection of States' Rights.
Sec. 608. Effect on other Federal authority.
Sec. 609. Definitions.
Sec. 610. Authorization of appropriations.
     * * * * * * *



               TITLE VI--HARMFUL ALGAL BLOOMS AND HYPOXIA



     * * * * * * *

SEC. 605. SOUTH FLORIDA HARMFUL ALGAL BLOOMS AND HYPOXIA.

  (a) South Florida.--In this section, the term ``South 
Florida'' means--
          (1) all lands and waters within the administrative 
        boundaries of the South Florida Water Management 
        District;
          (2) regional coastal waters, including Biscayne Bay, 
        the Caloosahatchee Estuary, Florida Bay, and Indian 
        River Lagoon; and
          (3) the Florida Reef Tract.
  (b) Integrated Assessment.--Not later than 540 days after the 
date of enactment of the South Florida Clean Coastal Waters Act 
of 2019, the Task Force, in accordance with the authority under 
section 603, shall complete and submit to Congress and the 
President an interim integrated assessment. Not later than 3 
years after such date of enactment, the Task Force shall 
finalize, and submit to Congress and the President, such 
assessment. Such assessment shall examine the causes, 
consequences, and potential approaches to reduce harmful algal 
blooms and hypoxia in South Florida, and the status of, and 
gaps within, current harmful algal bloom and hypoxia research, 
monitoring, management, prevention, response, and control 
activities that directly affect the region by--
          (1) Federal agencies;
          (2) State agencies;
          (3) regional research consortia;
          (4) academia;
          (5) private industry;
          (6) nongovernmental organizations; and
          (7) Indian tribes (as defined in section 4 of the 
        Indian Self-Determination and Education Assistance Act 
        (25 U.S.C. 5304)).
  (c) Action Plan.--
          (1) In general.--Not later than 2 years after the 
        date of the enactment of the South Florida Clean 
        Coastal Waters Act of 2019, the Task Force shall 
        develop and submit to Congress a plan, based on the 
        integrated assessment under subsection (b), for 
        reducing, mitigating, and controlling harmful algal 
        blooms and hypoxia in South Florida.
          (2) Contents.--The plan submitted under paragraph (1) 
        shall--
                  (A) address the monitoring needs identified 
                in the integrated assessment under subsection 
                (b);
                  (B) develop a timeline and budgetary 
                requirements for deployment of future assets;
                  (C) identify requirements for the development 
                and verification of South Florida harmful algal 
                bloom and hypoxia models, including--
                          (i) all assumptions built into the 
                        models; and
                          (ii) data quality methods used to 
                        ensure the best available data are 
                        utilized; and
                  (D) propose a plan to implement a remote 
                monitoring network and early warning system for 
                alerting local communities in the region to 
                harmful algal bloom risks that may impact human 
                health.
          (3) Requirements.--In developing the action plan, the 
        Task Force shall--
                  (A) consult with the State of Florida, and 
                affected local and tribal governments;
                  (B) consult with representatives from 
                regional academic, agricultural, industry, and 
                other stakeholder groups;
                  (C) ensure that the plan complements and does 
                not duplicate activities conducted by other 
                Federal or State agencies, including the South 
                Florida Ecosystem Restoration Task Force;
                  (D) identify critical research for reducing, 
                mitigating, and controlling harmful algal bloom 
                events and their effects;
                  (E) evaluate cost-effective, incentive-based 
                partnership approaches;
                  (F) ensure that the plan is technically sound 
                and cost-effective;
                  (G) utilize existing research, assessments, 
                reports, and program activities;
                  (H) publish a summary of the proposed plan in 
                the Federal Register at least 180 days prior to 
                submitting the completed plan to Congress; and
                  (I) after submitting the completed plan to 
                Congress, provide biennial progress reports on 
                the activities toward achieving the objectives 
                of the plan.

SEC. [605.]  606. GREAT LAKES HYPOXIA AND HARMFUL ALGAL BLOOMS.

  (a) Integrated Assessment.--Not later than 18 months after 
the date of enactment of the Harmful Algal Bloom and Hypoxia 
Research and Control Amendments Act of 2014, the Task Force, in 
accordance with the authority under section 603, shall complete 
and submit to the Congress and the President an integrated 
assessment that examines the causes, consequences, and 
approaches to reduce hypoxia and harmful algal blooms in the 
Great Lakes, including the status of and gaps within current 
research, monitoring, management, prevention, response, and 
control activities by--
          (1) Federal agencies;
          (2) State agencies;
          (3) regional research consortia;
          (4) academia;
          (5) private industry; and
          (6) nongovernmental organizations.
  (b) Plan.--
          (1) In general.--Not later than 2 years after the 
        date of enactment of the Harmful Algal Bloom and 
        Hypoxia Research and Control Amendments Act of 2014, 
        the Task Force shall develop and submit to the Congress 
        a plan, based on the integrated assessment under 
        subsection (a), for reducing, mitigating, and 
        controlling hypoxia and harmful algal blooms in the 
        Great Lakes.
          (2) Contents.--The plan shall--
                  (A) address the monitoring needs identified 
                in the integrated assessment under subsection 
                (a);
                  (B) develop a timeline and budgetary 
                requirements for deployment of future assets;
                  (C) identify requirements for the development 
                and verification of Great Lakes hypoxia and 
                harmful algal bloom models, including--
                          (i) all assumptions built into the 
                        models; and
                          (ii) data quality methods used to 
                        ensure the best available data are 
                        utilized; and
                  (D) describe efforts to improve the 
                assessment of the impacts of hypoxia and 
                harmful algal blooms by--
                          (i) characterizing current and past 
                        biological conditions in ecosystems 
                        affected by hypoxia and harmful algal 
                        blooms; and
                          (ii) quantifying effects, including 
                        economic effects, at the population and 
                        community levels.
          (3) Requirements.--In developing the plan, the Task 
        Force shall--
                  (A) coordinate with State and local 
                governments;
                  (B) consult with representatives from 
                academic, agricultural, industry, and other 
                stakeholder groups, including relevant Canadian 
                agencies;
                  (C) ensure that the plan complements and does 
                not duplicate activities conducted by other 
                Federal or State agencies;
                  (D) identify critical research for reducing, 
                mitigating, and controlling hypoxia events and 
                their effects;
                  (E) evaluate cost-effective, incentive-based 
                partnership approaches;
                  (F) ensure that the plan is technically sound 
                and cost effective;
                  (G) utilize existing research, assessments, 
                reports, and program activities;
                  (H) publish a summary of the proposed plan in 
                the Federal Register at least 180 days prior to 
                submitting the completed plan to Congress; and
                  (I) after submitting the completed plan to 
                Congress, provide biennial progress reports on 
                the activities toward achieving the objectives 
                of the plan.

SEC. [606.]  607. PROTECTION OF STATES' RIGHTS.

  (a) Nothing in this title shall be interpreted to adversely 
affect existing State regulatory or enforcement power which has 
been granted to any State through the Clean Water Act or 
Coastal Zone Management Act of 1972.
  (b) Nothing in this title shall be interpreted to expand the 
regulatory or enforcement power of the Federal Government which 
has been delegated to any State through the Clean Water Act or 
Coastal Zone Management Act of 1972.

SEC. [607.]  608. EFFECT ON OTHER FEDERAL AUTHORITY.

  (a) Authority Preserved.--Nothing in this title supersedes or 
limits the authority of any agency to carry out its 
responsibilities and missions under other laws.
  (b) Regulatory Authority.--Nothing in this title may be 
construed as establishing new regulatory authority for any 
agency.

SEC. [608.]  609. DEFINITIONS.

  In this title:
          (1) Action strategy.--The term ``Action Strategy'' 
        means the comprehensive research plan and action 
        strategy established under section 603B.
          (2) Administrator.--The term ``Administrator'' means 
        the Administrator of the Environmental Protection 
        Agency.
          (3) Harmful algal bloom.--The term ``harmful algal 
        bloom'' means marine and freshwater phytoplankton that 
        proliferate to high concentrations, resulting in 
        nuisance conditions or harmful impacts on marine and 
        aquatic ecosystems, coastal communities, and human 
        health through the production of toxic compounds or 
        other biological, chemical, and physical impacts of the 
        algae outbreak.
          (4) Hypoxia.--The term ``hypoxia'' means a condition 
        where low dissolved oxygen in aquatic systems causes 
        stress or death to resident organisms.
          (5) Program.--The term ``Program'' means the national 
        harmful algal bloom and hypoxia program established 
        under section 603A.
          (6) State.--The term ``State'' means each of the 
        several States of the United States, the District of 
        Columbia, the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, the Virgin 
        Islands, Guam, American Samoa, the Commonwealth of the 
        Northern Mariana Islands, any other territory or 
        possession of the United States, and any Indian tribe.
          (7) Task force.--The term ``Task Force'' means the 
        Inter-Agency Task Force on Harmful Algal Blooms and 
        Hypoxia under section 603(a).
          (8) Under secretary.--The term ``Under Secretary'' 
        means the Under Secretary of Commerce for Oceans and 
        Atmosphere.
          (9) United states coastal waters.--The term ``United 
        States coastal waters'' includes the Great Lakes.

SEC. [609.]  610. AUTHORIZATION OF APPROPRIATIONS.

  (a) In General.--There is authorized to be appropriated to 
the Under Secretary to carry out sections 603A and 603B 
$20,500,000 for each of fiscal years 2014 through 2018, and 
$20,500,000 for each of fiscal years 2019 through 2023.
  (b) Extramural Research Activities.--The Under Secretary 
shall ensure that a substantial portion of funds appropriated 
pursuant to subsection (a) that are used for research purposes 
are allocated to extramural research activities. For each 
fiscal year, the Under Secretary shall publish a list of all 
grant recipients and the amounts for all of the funds allocated 
for research purposes, specifying those allocated for 
extramural research activities.

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

[GRAPHIC(S) NOT AVAILABLE IN TIFF FORMAT]

             XXI. Proceedings of the Full Committee Markup

                                 ______

2019

                                MARKUPS:
                    H.R. 3597, SOLAR ENERGY RESEARCH
                      AND DEVELOPMENT ACT OF 2019;
                   H.R. 3607, FOSSIL ENERGY RESEARCH
                      AND DEVELOPMENT ACT OF 2019;
                    H.R. 3609, WIND ENERGY RESEARCH
                    AND DEVELOPMENT ACT OF 2019; AND
                     H.R. 335, SOUTH FLORIDA CLEAN
                       COASTAL WATERS ACT OF 2019

=======================================================================

                                 MARKUP

                               BEFORE THE

              COMMITTEE ON SCIENCE, SPACE, AND TECHNOLOGY
                        HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES

                     ONE HUNDRED SIXTEENTH CONGRESS

                             FIRST SESSION

                               __________

                             JULY 24, 2019

                               __________

                          Serial No. CP: 116-6

                               __________

 Printed for the use of the Committee on Science, Space, and Technology


       Available via the World Wide Web: http://science.house.gov
              COMMITTEE ON SCIENCE, SPACE, AND TECHNOLOGY

             HON. EDDIE BERNICE JOHNSON, Texas, Chairwoman
ZOE LOFGREN, California              FRANK D. LUCAS, Oklahoma,
DANIEL LIPINSKI, Illinois              Ranking Member
SUZANNE BONAMICI, Oregon             MO BROOKS, Alabama
AMI BERA, California,                BILL PPOSEY, Florida
  Vice Chair                         RANDY WEBER, Texas
CONOR LAMB, Pennsylvania             BRIAN BABIN, Texas
LIZZIE FLETCHER, Texas               ANDY BIGGS, Arizona
HALEY STEVENS, Michigan              ROGER MARSHALL, Kansas
KENDRA HORN, Oklahoma                RALPH NORMAN, South Carolina
MIKIE SHERRILL, New Jersey           MICHAEL CLOUD, Texas
BRAD SHERMAN, California             TROY BALDERSON, Ohio
STEVE COHEN, Tennessee               PETE OLSON, Texas
JERRY McNERNEY, California           ANTHONY GONZALEZ, Ohio
ED PERLMUTTER, Colorado              MICHAEL WALTZ, Florida
PAUL TONKO, New York                 JIM BAIRD, Indiana
BILL FOSTER, Illinois                JAIME HERRERA BEUTLER, Washington
DON BEYER, Virginia                  JENNIFFER GONZALEZ-COLON, Puerto 
CHARLIE CRIST, Florida                   Rico
SEAN CASTEN, Illinois                VACANCY
KATIE HILL, California
BEN McADAMS, Utah
JENNIFER WEXTON, Virginia
                            C O N T E N T S

                             July 24, 2019

                                                                   Page
H.R. 3597--Solar Energy Research and Development Act of 2019.....     1

H.R. 3607--Fossil Energy Research and Development Act of 2019....     1

H.R. 3609--Wind Energy Research and Development Act of 2019......     1

H.R. 335--South Florida Clean Coastal Waters Act of 2019.........     1


                                MARKUPS:



                    H.R. 3597, SOLAR ENERGY RESEARCH



                      AND DEVELOPMENT ACT OF 2019;



                   H.R. 3607, FOSSIL ENERGY RESEARCH



                      AND DEVELOPMENT ACT OF 2019;



                    H.R. 3609, WIND ENERGY RESEARCH



                    AND DEVELOPMENT ACT OF 2019; AND



                     H.R. 335, SOUTH FLORIDA CLEAN



                       COASTAL WATERS ACT OF 2019

                              ----------                              


                        WEDNESDAY, JULY 24, 2019

                          House of Representatives,
               Committee on Science, Space, and Technology,
                                                   Washington, D.C.
    The Committee met, pursuant to notice, at 10:07 a.m., in 
room 2318 of the Rayburn House Office Building, Hon. Eddie 
Bernice Johnson [Chairwoman of the Committee] presiding.
    Chairwoman Johnson. Good morning. The Committee will come 
to order. And without objection, the Chair is authorized to 
declare recess at any time. Pursuant to Committee rule 2(e) and 
House rule XI, the Chair announces that she may postpone roll 
call votes.
    Pursuant to the notice, the Committee meets to consider the 
following measures: H.R. 3597, the Solar Energy Research and 
Development Act of 2019; H.R. 3607, the Fossil Energy Research 
and Development Act of 2019; H.R. 3609, the Wind Energy 
Research and Development Act of 2019; and H.R. 335, the South 
Florida Clean Coastal Waters Act of 2019.
    Welcome to today's markup of four bipartisan bills. The 
first three bills, H.R. 3597 and 3607, as well as 3609, all 
deal with various aspects of research, development, and 
demonstration of advanced energy technology. All of these bills 
directly address the growing issue of climate change by 
focusing the Federal Government's energy research efforts 
toward cutting greenhouse gas emissions.
    Our Committee has held five hearings this Congress on 
various topics related to climate change. We've heard firsthand 
of the dangers to our society from increases in extreme heat, 
extreme weather, droughts, rising oceans, and the many other 
dangers associated with climate change. These climate change 
impacts are not just problems in the future. Our communities 
are already being affected by climate change. If we don't take 
serious steps to address this problem, our people are going to 
needlessly suffer as the effects of climate get worse. I say 
``needlessly suffer'' because we have the power to address 
climate change before worse impacts occur.
    Supporting the three energy research bills today is part of 
that effort. These bills support continuous investment in these 
critical areas of energy research: Solar power, wind power, and 
fossil fuel power. It is abundantly clear that we will need 
more renewable energy connected to our grid if we are going to 
reduce carbon emissions in America. H.R. 3597 and H.R. 3609 
provide for sustained investments in solar and wind research 
and development (R&D) to help drive down the costs of these 
technologies, and to help get them into the market. I want to 
recognize the bills' sponsors, Mr. McAdams and Mr. Tonko, for 
their hard work on these bills.
    It is also abundantly clear that fossil energy will 
continue to be a part of our electric grid for some time to 
come. Without real and sustained investments in research and 
development to more cleanly utilize fossil fuels, it would be 
extremely difficult to meaningfully cut carbon dioxide 
emissions from our power sector.
    H.R. 3607 calls for these investments, and I want to 
recognize my colleague from Texas, Mr. Veasey, for his efforts 
in moving this legislation forward.
    These three bills are all endorsed by industry trade groups 
like the Chamber of Commerce, the Solar Industry Association, 
the Wind Energy Association, and the Carbon Utilization 
Research Council. And they're also endorsed by environmental 
organizations like the Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC) 
and the Environmental Defense Fund (EDF).
    Finally, scientific societies like the American Chemical 
Society have also endorsed these bills. I hope folks can take a 
moment to realize how unusual it is to have these different 
organizations endorse the same bills. I'll ask that the full 
list of endorsements be placed into the record.
    [The information referred to follows:]
    Chairwoman Johnson. And finally, we are considering H.R. 
335, which is sponsored by Mr. Mast from Florida. This bill 
addresses harmful algal blooms, and I support Mr. Mast's 
efforts to address the problem.
    [The prepared statement of Chairwoman Johnson follows:]

    Welcome to today's markup of four good bipartisan bills. The first 
three bills: H.R. 3597, H.R. 3607, and H.R. 3609, all deal with various 
aspects of research, development, and demonstration of advanced energy 
technology. All of these bills directly address the growing issue of 
climate change by focusing the Federal Government's energy research 
efforts toward cutting greenhouse gas emissions.
    Our Committee has held five hearings this Congress on various 
topics related to climate change. We have heard first-hand of the 
dangers to our society from increases in extreme heat, extreme weather, 
droughts, rising oceans, and the many other dangers associated with 
climate change. These climate change impacts are not just problems in 
the future. Our communities are already being affected by climate 
change. If we don't take serious steps to address this problem, our 
people are going to needlessly suffer as the effects of climate get 
worse.
    I say ``needlessly suffer'' because we have the power to address 
climate change before the worst impacts occur. Supporting the three 
energy research bills before us today is part of that effort. These 
bills support continued investment in three critical areas of energy 
research: solar power, wind power, and fossil fuel power.
    It is abundantly clear that we will need more renewable energy 
connected to our grid if we are going to reduce carbon emissions in 
America. H.R. 3597 and H.R. 3609 provide for sustained investments in 
solar and wind research and development to help drive down the costs of 
these technologies, and help get them into the market. I want to 
recognize the bill sponsors, Mr. McAdams and Mr. Tonko for their hard 
work on these bills.
    It is also abundantly clear that fossil energy will continue to be 
a part of our electric grid for some time to come. Without real and 
sustained investments in research and development to more cleanly 
utilize fossil fuels, it will be extremely difficult to meaningfully 
cut carbon dioxide emissions from our power sector. H.R. 3607 calls for 
these investments, and I want to recognize my colleague from Texas, Mr. 
Veasey, for his efforts in moving this legislation forward. These three 
bills are all endorsed by industry trade groups like the Chamber of 
Commerce, the Solar Industry Association, the Wind Energy Association, 
and the Carbon Utilization Research Council. They are also endorsed by 
environmental organizations like the Natural Resources Defense Council 
and the Environmental Defense Fund. Finally scientific societies like 
the American Chemical Society have also endorsed these bills. I hope 
folks can take a moment to realize how unusual it is to have those 
different organizations endorse the same bills. I'll ask that the full 
list of endorsements be placed into the record.
    Finally, we are considering H.R. 335, which is sponsored by Mr. 
Mast from Florida. This bill addresses harmful algal blooms, and I 
support Mr. Mast's efforts to address the problem.

    Chairwoman Johnson. I now recognize our Ranking Member for 
his opening statements.
    Mr. Lucas. Thank you, Chairwoman Johnson, for holding this 
markup.
    Today, we consider four pieces of legislation, three of 
which are bills the Committee is, as of this moment, unable to 
reach a bipartisan agreement on. I'm disappointed that we 
haven't made more progress in reaching a bipartisan consensus, 
especially since this Committee has one of the best track 
records in Congress of passing productive, bipartisan 
legislation.
    Now, I want to be clear. These three bills are well-
intentioned. I believe there is still a chance for 
bipartisanship in the future. Matter of fact, I expect it. But 
the fact is, our job in Congress is to set priorities and focus 
our limited Federal funds where we can see the best return on 
investment. Unfortunately, the bills we'll consider today don't 
meet that standard. Instead, they offer aspirational funding 
levels that we simply cannot afford.
    Now, we're reporting the bill.
    H.R. 335.
    Chairwoman Johnson. OK. We'll move now to I think the last 
bill, H.R. 335. We'll now consider the South Florida Clean 
Coastal Waters Act of 2019. The clerk will report the bill.
    The Clerk. H.R. 335, a bill.
    [The bill follows:]
    
    [GRAPHIC(S) NOT AVAILABLE IN TIFF FORMAT]
    
    Chairwoman Johnson. Without objection, the bill is 
considered as read and open to amendment at any point.
    I recognize myself for a brief statement on the bill.
    H.R. 335, the bipartisan South Florida Clean Coastal Waters 
Act of 2019, authorizes a scientific assessment and action plan 
to help address the problem of harmful algal blooms or HABs in 
south Florida. The assessment and action plan will be conducted 
by the Harmful Algal Bloom and Hypoxia Research and Control 
Task Force, which was established in 1998 and consists of 13 
Federal agencies. The assessment and action plan will help 
identify research gaps and detailed methods for mitigating and 
controlling the HABs and hypoxia in south Florida. These 
documents will help serve as a blueprint for Federal, State, 
and local decisionmakers and other stakeholders to coordinate 
actions to reduce these HABs and hypoxia in the region.
    South Florida has been suffering from the economically and 
ecologically costly blooms of harmful algae in both its marine 
and freshwater systems for years. It's only gotten worse in 
recent years. In 2018, a toxic red tide algal bloom persisted 
for well over a year. This bloom caused mass mortality of 
marine life, including dolphins, manatees, sea turtles, and 
hundreds of tons of dead fish to be collected from the beaches. 
It also caused local businesses at least $130 million in 
damages. Red tide and other types of HABs also pose health 
risks to humans from direct exposure and from eating infected 
seafood.
    This bill takes an important step in helping address the 
HABs and the hypoxia issue in south Florida, and I urge my 
colleagues to support it.
    Does anyone else wish to be recognized?
    Ms. Bonamici.
    Ms. Bonamici. I move to strike the last word.
    Chairwoman Johnson. The Chair recognizes Ms. Bonamici.
    Ms. Bonamici. Thank you very much, Chairwoman Johnson and 
Members.
    I'm the co-Chair of both the House Oceans Caucus and the 
congressional Estuary Caucus, so I'm glad our Committee is 
considering this bipartisan legislation to strengthen efforts 
to predict and monitor harmful algal blooms in marine and 
freshwater systems.
    I was pleased to work with Congressman Posey to reauthorize 
the Harmful Algal Blooms and Hypoxia Research and Control Act 
in 2014 and again last Congress, but there are still 
opportunities to strengthen Federal research efforts so we can 
better forecast and respond to blooms and recognize the 
distinct effects of harmful algal blooms and hypoxia on our 
oceans, estuaries, and waterways.
    The South Florida Clean Coastal Waters Act of 2019 is an 
important step to improve regional assessments of these 
progressing environmental stressors. Harmful algal blooms, 
HABs, affect marine coastal estuary and freshwater systems in 
all 50 States and U.S. territories. HABs can occur naturally 
and in response to certain environment stressors such as 
increased nutrient runoff, pollution, and changes in water 
flow. The presence of these blooms is expected to increase 
substantially as a result of climate change and warming water 
temperatures.
    HABs result in significant economic losses for our 
communities that rely on fishing, shellfish harvesting, 
tourism. In northwest Oregon, HABs have made our State's prized 
Dungeness crabs toxic. They've deprived fishing communities of 
income. The blooms have also stifled recreation activities on 
the Willamette River in Oregon and limited access to clean 
drinking water for residents of Salem, Oregon. And it wasn't 
too long ago that I heard about Lake Okeechobee in Florida 
being described as looking like guacamole.
    And as the algae die and decompose, they consume oxygen, 
leaving waterways in a hypoxic state that can result in the 
formation of dead zones where marine life cannot survive. 
According to the West Coast Ocean Acidification and Hypoxia 
Science Panel, Oregon now has a hypoxia season much like the 
wildfire season. We must improve our understanding of harmful 
algal blooms and develop a stronger strategy to help 
communities better predict and reduce the number of harmful 
algal blooms and hypoxic events.
    I'm working on another bill to strengthen Federal support 
for these important research programs at NOAA (National Oceanic 
and Atmospheric Administration), and I look forward to working 
with Congressman Posey, Congressman Mast, and others to clarify 
that the scientific assessments of marine and freshwater 
harmful algal blooms required under current law should have a 
regional focus so all communities, including those in the 
greater Everglades region, have the information necessary to 
respond to HABs and hypoxia.
    I thank Congressman Mast for his leadership on this bill. I 
urge all my colleagues to support it, and I yield back the 
balance of my time.
    Chairwoman Johnson. Thank you very much.
    The Chair now recognizes Ms. Sherrill.
    Ms. Sherrill. Thank you, Madam Chair.
    And thank you to Congressman Mast and to the Chairwoman for 
your bipartisan work on this important issue.
    Last week, I visited Lake Hopatcong, which is the largest 
freshwater lake in New Jersey. In June, the New Jersey 
Department of Environmental Protection issued an advisory 
against swimming in Lake Hopatcong and three other New Jersey 
lakes due to a harmful algal bloom or HAB.
    During the visit, I met with residents, business owners, 
and local leaders to discuss the impact this outbreak is having 
on the community. Imagine during the heat wave this past week 
to live on a beautiful lake and not be able to jump in and 
swim, waterski, kayak, or paddleboard.
    But this is not just about the loss of a recreational 
resource. The economic ripple effects on local businesses are 
devastating as fewer and fewer visitors travel to the lake due 
to the HAB. Local marina owners have seen their boat rental 
businesses plummet to a few boats each weekend despite the fact 
that the lake is still open to boats. The marina owners I spoke 
with estimate they are losing $20,000 per weekend. The story 
was the same for local restaurant owners. The community fears 
that the summer season is over for them already and worry about 
how this or future HAB outbreaks will continue to affect 
tourism in the coming years.
    So it's essential that we conduct additional research to 
better understand how and why these blooms form and to improve 
detection and forecasting of these events.
    I look forward to working with the Committee in a 
bipartisan way to continue advancing HAB research so we can 
help communities prepare and prevent adverse environmental, 
economic, and health effects associated with the HABs.
    Thank you so much, and I yield back.
    Chairwoman Johnson. Thank you very much.
    Now, we move--any further--Mr. Waltz.
    Mr. Waltz. Madam Chair, I have an amendment at the desk.
    Chairwoman Johnson. The clerk will report the amendment.
    The Clerk. Amendment No. 1 offered by Mr. Waltz of Florida.
    [The amendment of Mr. Waltz follows:]

                         Amendment to H.R. 335


                    Offered by Mr. Waltz of Florida


  Page 2, line 12, strike ``has the same meaning'' and all that 

follows through ``541).'' on line 15 and insert the following: 
``means--''

          (1) all lands and waters within the administrative 
        boundaries of the South Florida Water Management 
        District;
          (2) regional coastal waters, including Biscayne Bay, 
        the Caloosahatchee Estuary, Florida Bay, and Indian 
        River Lagoon; and
          (3) the Florida Reef Tract.

  Page 2, line 20, insert ``interim'' after ``President an''.
  Page 2, line 21, strike ``assessment that examines'' and 
insert the following: ``assessment. Not later than 3 years 
after such date of enactment, the Task Force shall finalize, 
and submit to Congress and the President, such assessment. Such 
assessment shall examine''.
  Page 3, line 7, strike ``and'' at the end.
  Page 3, line 8, strike the period at the end and insert ``; 
and''.
  Page 3, after line 8, add the following:

          (7) Indian tribes (as defined in section 4 of the 
        Indian Self-Determination and Education Assistance Act 
        (25 U.S.C. 5304)).

  Page 4, line 16, strike ``coordinate and''.
    Chairwoman Johnson. I ask unanimous consent to dispense 
with the reading, and without objection.
    Mr. Waltz is recognized.
    Mr. Waltz. Thank you, Madam Chair. I want to thank my 
colleagues, Congressman Mast and Senator Rubio, for drafting 
this important bill, the South Florida Clean Coastal Waters Act 
of 2019 to address the harmful algal blooms and to improve 
water quality in our State.
    I also want to give credit to Governor DeSantis for 
prioritizing clean water and to Congressman Posey for 
cosponsoring this manager's amendment.
    As the Chairwoman described, red tides and blue-green algae 
have plagued Florida in recent years, impacting Lake 
Okeechobee, the Everglades, and both the Gulf and Atlantic 
coasts. This bill assures that the interagency task force on 
harmful algal blooms will produce an integrated assessment on 
the causes, consequences, and potential mitigation options to 
reduce the blooms. It will identify current gaps in research 
and produce an action plan.
    The focus of the task force is the Everglades, and the 
health of the Everglades obviously impacts water quality of the 
entire State. And I think the key point here is that this is a 
Statewide issue. For example, Lake Okeechobee feeds into the 
Indian River Lagoon on the Atlantic coast. The Indian River 
Lagoon stretches as far north as my district in northeast 
Florida just south of Daytona, and as a result, the water 
quality discharges from Lake Okeechobee have a direct impact on 
much of the Atlantic coast.
    So the manager's amendment takes that into account and 
clarifies that adjacent bodies of water like the Indian River 
Lagoon estuary and others are eligible for the assessment and 
action plan required by the underlying bill. My hope is that 
these best practices will improve water quality management and 
prevent HABs across the State.
    In my district, we have already seen blue-green algae in 
the St. Johns River this year, so that means that it's 
spreading north and spreading across the State. And protecting 
the Blue Springs in Volusia County in my district is an ongoing 
effort. This bill should provide a coherent strategy for 
Florida to improve water quality.
    Moving forward, Congress should examine the Clean Water 
State Revolving Fund formula, especially if there is an effort 
to reauthorize the program. Currently, Florida has the third-
lowest allocation-to-population ratio. Given the water 
infrastructure needs of the State, frankly, that's 
unacceptable.
    I want to thank the Chairwoman, the Ranking Member, 
Representative Mast, Representative Posey for working with me 
on this amendment and assuring that we can move this important 
legislation through the Committee. I urge support for the 
amendment and passage of the underlying bill.
    Madam Chairwoman, I yield the balance of my time.
    Chairwoman Johnson. Thank you very much, Mr. Waltz.
    I'll offer a few quick comments on the amendment.
    The amendment offered by Mr. Waltz makes some improvements 
to the bill that take into account technical assistance of 
NOAA. The amendment also changes the definition of south 
Florida to ensure the assessment and action plan address the 
harmful red and brown tides of the west and east coasts of 
Florida. I appreciate the minority staff that worked with us to 
make this happen, and I support the amendment.
    Any further discussion?
    If not, the vote occurs on the amendment.
    All in favor, say aye.
    Those opposed, say nay.
    The amendment is adopted.
    Now, are there more amendments?
    If not, then a reporting quorum being present, I move that 
the Committee on Science, Space, and Technology report H.R. 
335, as amended, to the House with the recommendation that the 
bill be approved.
    Those in favor of the motion will signify by saying aye.
    Those opposed, no.
    The ayes have it, and the bill is favorably reported.
    Without objection, the motion to reconsider is laid upon 
the table, and I ask unanimous consent that the staff be 
authorized to make any necessary technical and conforming 
changes to the bill. Without objection, so ordered.
    And Members will have 2 subsequent calendar days in which 
to submit the supplementary minority or additional views on 
this measure.
    Now, we're at a point where we will ask for a 10-minute 
break, a recess, and we'll come back and vote the postponed 
votes. And I would ask all Members to please return for the 
markup. Thank you.
    [Recess.]
    Chairwoman Johnson. The Committee will come to order.
    We will start with the Norman amendment on bill H.R. 3597. 
And does everybody remember what the Norman amendment was? If 
not, vote anyway. The clerk will call the roll.
    The Clerk. Chairwoman Johnson?
    Chairwoman Johnson. No.
    The Clerk. Chairwoman Johnson, no.
    Ms. Lofgren?
    Ms. Lofgren. No.
    The Clerk. Ms. Lofgren, no.
    Mr. Lipinski?
    Mr. Lipinski. No.
    The Clerk. Mr. Lipinski, no.
    Ms. Bonamici?
    Ms. Bonamici. No.
    The Clerk. Ms. Bonamici, no.
    Mr. Bera?
    Mr. Bera. No.
    The Clerk. Mr. Bera, no.
    Mr. Lamb?
    Mr. Lamb. No.
    The Clerk. Mr. Lamb, no.
    Mrs. Fletcher?
    Mrs. Fletcher. No.
    The Clerk. Mrs. Fletcher, no.
    Ms. Stevens?

                                  [all]