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                                                 Union Calendar No. 20
116th Congress     }                                      {     Report
                        HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES
 1st Session       }                                      {     116-40

======================================================================



 
       AUTHORIZATION AND OVERSIGHT PLANS FOR ALL HOUSE COMMITTEES

                                _______
                                

 April 12, 2019.--Committed to the Committee of the Whole House on the 
              State of the Union and ordered to be printed

                                _______
                                

  Mr. Elijah E. Cummings, from the Committee on Oversight and Reform, 
                        submitted the following

                              R E P O R T

                    OVERSIGHT IN THE 116TH CONGRESS

        RECOMMENDATIONS OF THE COMMITTEE ON OVERSIGHT AND REFORM

                              I. OVERVIEW

    Conducting oversight is a core responsibility of Congress 
under the Constitution. It is through the oversight function 
that Congress performs its role as a check on abuses by the 
other branches of government. It is Congress' responsibility to 
utilize the oversight process to review, monitor, and supervise 
the implementation of public policy to ensure the effective and 
efficient operation of the nation's laws, as well as to 
recommend improvements to those laws.
    As the Supreme Court recognized more than 60 years ago in 
Watkins v. United States:

          The power of the Congress to conduct investigations 
        is inherent in the legislative process. That power is 
        broad. It encompasses inquiries concerning the 
        administration of existing laws as well as proposed or 
        possibly needed statutes. It includes surveys of 
        defects in our social, economic or political system for 
        the purpose of enabling Congress to remedy them.\1\
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    \1\Watkins v. United States, 354 U.S. 178, 187 (1957).

    It is by conducting oversight that the 116th Congress will 
identify ways to lower healthcare costs for the American 
people, increase wages for working families, fix the nation's 
crumbling roads, bridges, and infrastructure, and ensure that 
taxpayer funds go to the programs and agencies for which they 
are intended.
    In fiscal year 2018, the federal government made $4.1 
trillion in outlays to fund operations and programs.\2\ 
Congress has a responsibility to conduct oversight to ensure 
that those funds are protected from waste, fraud, and abuse. 
Oversight will allow Congress to root out government 
corruption, strengthen democracy by countering threats to 
voting rights and election security, and provide transparency 
to improve ethics laws and ensure that government officials are 
working in the public's interest.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    \2\Committee on Oversight and Reform, Testimony of Comptroller 
General Gene L. Dodaro, Government Accountability Office, Hearing on 
High-Risk Series: Substantial Efforts Needed to Achieve Greater 
Progress on High-Risk Areas, 116th Cong. (GAO-19-392T) (Mar. 6, 2019).
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    The tangible benefits of congressional oversight can be 
difficult to quantify, but the Government Accountability Office 
(GAO), which conducts investigations at the request of Members 
of Congress, has determined that the financial benefits of 
addressing high-risk issues highlighted by its work saved the 
federal government nearly $350 billion since 2006, or $27 
billion per year.\3\ Through its activities, GAO's oversight 
work saved taxpayers $75.1 billion in fiscal year 2018 and 
resulted in 1,294 specific improvements in federal government 
operations.\4\
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    \3\Government Accountability Office, GAO's 2019 High-Risk Series: 
Substantial Efforts Needed to Achieve Greater Progress on High-Risk 
Areas (GAO-19-157SP) (Mar. 6, 2019).
    \4\Government Accountability Office, Performance and Accountability 
Report Fiscal Year 2018 (GAO-19-1SP) (Nov. 15, 2018) (online at 
www.gao.gov/products/GAO-19-1SP).
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    Similarly, according to the Council of the Inspectors 
General on Integrity and Efficiency (CIGIE), ``in FY 2017, 
approximately 13,000 employees at 73 [Offices of Inspector 
General (OIGs)] conducted audits, inspections, evaluations, and 
investigations that resulted in . . . improvements to the 
economy and efficiency of programs Governmentwide, with 
potential savings totaling approximately $54.6 billion. . . . 
The potential savings total includes: $32.7 billion in 
potential savings from audit recommendations and $21.9 billion 
from investigative receivables and recoveries.''\5\
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    \5\Council of the Inspectors General on Integrity and Efficiency, 
Annual Report to the President and Congress (Fiscal Year 2017) (online 
at www.ignet.gov/sites/default/files/files/
FY17_Annual_Report_to_the_President_and_Congress.pdf#page=2).
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    Although congressional committees may not track and 
aggregate the cost savings associated with oversight in the 
same way as GAO or OIGs, the tangible impact of the oversight 
conducted by Congress is no less significant. While the 
Committee on Oversight and Reform is the principal oversight 
committee of the House of Representatives, the various standing 
committees of the House each play an important role in 
conducting oversight on matters within their respective 
jurisdictions. House Rule X, Clause 2 recognizes Congress' 
critical oversight duties by establishing a process whereby 
each standing committee is required to adopt an oversight plan 
at the beginning of a new Congress. Under this rule, the 
Committee on Oversight and Reform is to review the various 
plans and, in consultation with the Speaker, the Majority 
Leader, and the Minority Leader, report to the House the 
oversight plans along with any recommendations that the House 
leadership and the Committee may have to ensure effective 
coordination. Pursuant to this rule, the Committee on Oversight 
and Reform has reviewed and consulted with House leadership 
about the oversight plans of the standing House committees for 
the 116th Congress. These plans outline a thoughtful and 
thorough approach for carrying out Congress' oversight 
responsibilities. The oversight agendas of the various House 
committees address a broad array of priorities focused on 
developing policy solutions for working families.
    The Oversight Committee has several recommendations 
regarding coordination of oversight in the House of 
Representatives.
    First, the Committee recommends that all committees draw on 
the wide variety of available oversight resources in their 
ongoing efforts to evaluate oversight needs and priorities. 
GAO, in particular, has vast experience both in conducting and 
evaluating the need for oversight. On March 6, 2019, GAO issued 
its biannual ``High Risk Report,'' which identifies government 
programs that are particularly vulnerable to waste, fraud, or 
abuse.\6\ Since its first iteration in 1990, the High Risk 
Report ``has focused attention on government operations with 
greater vulnerabilities to fraud, waste, abuse, and 
mismanagement, or that are in need of transformation to address 
economy, efficiency, or effectiveness challenges.''\7\ Another 
valuable resource for congressional oversight is the agency 
Inspectors General, who can provide guidance to Congress 
through their audit plans and individual counsel. Committees 
also may wish to review relevant court rulings, past committee 
legislative and oversight reports, and the findings of other 
experts.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    \6\See, e.g., Government Accountability Office, High Risk Series: 
Progress on Many High-Risk Areas, While Substantial Efforts Needed on 
Others (GAO-17-317) (Feb. 15, 2017).
    \7\Government Accountability Office, GAO's 2019 High-Risk Series: 
Substantial Efforts Needed to Achieve Greater Progress on High-Risk 
Areas (GAO-19-157SP) (Mar. 6, 2019).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    In addition, in any oversight effort, committees should 
seek the expertise of the Committee on House Administration and 
Committee on Ethics if any questions arise regarding 
appropriate use of House resources and the standards of conduct 
applicable to members and staff.
    Finally, the task of ensuring accountability and 
appropriate policies on complex issues often requires the 
participation of multiple committees. Based on their respective 
jurisdictions and experience, different committees can lend 
varying types of expertise to the evaluation of a given matter. 
The oversight plans submitted by the standing committees for 
the 116th Congress recognize that a number of key issues demand 
scrutiny by several different committees. With respect to these 
issues, committees and subcommittees should be in close 
communication to ensure that they share the benefits of their 
findings and unique expertise.
    Part II below describes a few examples of important areas 
identified by committees on which these recommendations may be 
instructive.

                  II. EXAMPLES OF KEY OVERSIGHT AREAS


                               HEALTHCARE

    The nation's health care system continues to be one of the 
most expensive in the world, and health care costs continue to 
grow. In particular, skyrocketing prescription drug prices 
continue to impose tremendous burdens on patients, taxpayers, 
and the entire health care system. In addition, approximately 
21 million Americans gained health care coverage under the 
Affordable Care Act (ACA) and its Medicaid expansion, but these 
individuals are now at risk of losing this coverage if the 
Administration is successful in its attempts to undo and 
undermine the law. Several House committees will conduct 
coordinated oversight of these and other pressing health 
issues.
    The Committee on Energy and Commerce plans to examine the 
availability, affordability, and quality of health care, 
including administrative efforts to undermine the ACA and the 
Medicaid program, and initiatives to address high prescription 
drug prices and other medical costs. The Committee will examine 
the ability of the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to ensure 
the safety of drugs, devices, and cosmetics and to carry out 
tobacco control initiatives. The Committee also will continue 
to review federal efforts to protect the public health, 
including pandemic preparedness and efforts to address the 
opioid epidemic.
    The Committee on Ways and Means will conduct oversight of 
the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services and the 
administration of the Medicare program, including Medicare 
Advantage, fee-for-service, and prescription drugs. The 
Committee will continue to examine the Executive Branch 
implementation of the ACA and review issues related to private 
health coverage, including surprise billing and prescription 
drug prices.
    The Committee on Education and Labor will conduct oversight 
of the Administration's efforts to expand the use of short-
term, limited duration health plans and Association Health 
Plans, as well as the impact of these efforts on the larger 
health care system.
    The Committee on Armed Services will continue its review of 
military health policies, including TRICARE benefits and 
policies to address opioid use. In addition, the Committee on 
Veterans Affairs will work to improve the provision of health 
care to veterans, including oversight of the Department of 
Veterans Affairs' (VA) efforts to develop Community Care 
Networks, improve mental health and suicide prevention efforts, 
and reduce health iniquities among veterans.
    The Committee on Foreign Affairs will examine global health 
challenges, including efforts to address infectious disease 
outbreaks, the reauthorization of the President's Emergency 
Plan for AIDS Relief, and the impact of the Administration's 
reinstatement of the Global Gag Rule.
    The Committee on Agriculture plans to review FDA's 
implementation of the Food Safety Modernization Act, the 
Committee on Financial Services will examine health hazards in 
the nation's public housing system, the Committee on Natural 
Resources will examine health disparities among indigenous 
peoples and the ongoing operation of the Indian Health Service, 
and the Committee on Small Business will examine ways to 
improve the provision of health care while reducing costs to 
small businesses.
    Finally, the Committee on Oversight and Reform will 
investigate the actions of drug companies in raising 
prescription drug prices in the United States. In addition, the 
Committee will examine the need for expanded access to 
treatment and support services to address the opioid crisis. 
The Committee will examine actions by the Executive Branch that 
inhibit access to high-quality, affordable health care, 
including implementation of the ACA and the Medicaid program. 
The Committee also will examine the extent to which communities 
of color, women, and the LGBTQ population are able to access 
the full continuum of health care services.

                  WAGES, JOBS, AND ECONOMIC PROSPERITY

    During the 116th Congress, House committees will conduct 
rigorous oversight to examine ways to promote jobs, higher 
wages, and economic prosperity; review investments in 
infrastructure and innovation industries; and respond to 
challenges to workers' freedom to join together and negotiate 
strong worker protections.
    The Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure plans to 
examine current and future infrastructure investments to bring 
the nation's crumbling transportation infrastructure to a state 
of good repair while examining new technologies and innovative 
mobility solutions to move people and goods more safely and 
efficiently. The Committee will conduct oversight to ensure 
that the Capital Investment Grant program is implemented 
consistent with Congress' intent. The Fixing America's Surface 
Transportation Act (FAST Act; P.L. 114-94) authorized $2.3 
billion for each of fiscal years 2016-2020, but recent 
presidential budget requests propose phasing out that program. 
The Committee will conduct oversight to ensure that America's 
airports remain safe and efficient to compete as global hubs of 
air commerce. The Committee will examine the need for continued 
investment in U.S. water-related infrastructure that: (1) 
prioritizes the creation of American jobs and the utilization 
of American-made products; (2) supports a healthy and 
sustainable economy and environment; and (3) protects public 
health and safety.
    The Committee on Education and Labor plans to conduct 
oversight of Department of Labor (DOL) programs, policies, and 
enforcement practices and the impact on our nation's workers. 
The Committee will review federal government actions regarding 
overtime pay, workers' rights to retain tips, and child labor 
protections under the Fair Labor Standards Act. The Committee 
will conduct oversight to ensure that the National Labor 
Relations Board is fairly enforcing the National Labor 
Relations Act. The Committee will monitor the impact to 
retirement savers from the Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals' 
decision to vacate DOL's fiduciary rule. The Committee will 
also examine the costs and consequences to workers, retirees, 
businesses, and communities, as well as to the Pension Benefit 
Guaranty Corporation, if Congress does not address the 
multiemployer pension crisis.
    The Committee on Financial Services plans to examine ways 
to expand access to mainstream financial services among 
traditionally underserved segments of the U.S. population. The 
Committee will evaluate consumer financial laws to ensure that 
they are meeting the evolving needs of the American people. The 
Committee will examine the health of the nation's housing 
finance system and the extent to which it is serving all 
creditworthy borrowers, especially among low and moderate 
income, minority, rural, and other underserved borrowers. The 
Committee will monitor the current state of consumer financial 
protection by assessing the adequacy of protections for all 
consumers.
    The Committee on Small Business plans to investigate 
policies to encourage more participation in the labor market 
through initiatives that can be offered by small businesses, 
such as increased minimum wages, paid sick leave, paid parental 
leave, and flexible work arrangements. The Committee will 
conduct oversight of Small Business Administration (SBA) 
programs, including examining the effectiveness of 
entrepreneurial development programs in creating jobs at 
startups and traditional firms and enhancing coordination among 
federal agencies in aiding entrepreneurs. The Committee will 
conduct oversight of federal agencies, including SBA, that 
provide capital to America's entrepreneurs. The Committee will 
monitor the effectiveness of capital access programs to 
generate jobs in small businesses, investigate whether lenders 
are meeting their goals to lend to small businesses and create 
jobs, and examine methods to enhance equity financing to meet 
the needs of small business borrowers.
    The Committee on Oversight and Reform plans to focus on the 
current Administration's efforts to weaken collective 
bargaining rights and protections affecting federal workers. 
The Committee will seek to ensure that such efforts do not 
undermine the statutory right to bargain, the ability of 
employee unions to represent federal workers, or employee due 
process rights. The Committee will work to prevent the return 
of the current merit-based civil service to a patronage system.

                   CLIMATE CHANGE AND THE ENVIRONMENT

    The standing committees of the House will conduct 
coordinated oversight on ways to protect the environment and to 
address the generational crisis posed by climate change. On 
January 9, 2019, the House made oversight of these issues a 
priority when, through House Resolution 6, the House authorized 
the establishment of a Select Committee on the Climate Crises 
with investigative jurisdiction to ``study, make findings, and 
develop recommendations on policies, strategies, and 
innovations to achieve substantial and permanent reductions in 
pollution and other activities that contribute to the climate 
crisis.'' The standing committees of the House plan augment 
oversight of these issues.
    The Committee on Energy and Commerce intends to examine the 
economic, environmental, and health effects of climate change, 
including disproportionate impacts on low income communities 
and other vulnerable populations. The Committee will identify 
opportunities for federal action to reduce negative impacts, 
create new businesses and jobs, and make communities safer and 
more resilient to changes already underway. The Committee 
anticipates assessing state funding programs and other efforts 
by agencies to ensure states and local communities have the 
resources needed to prepare for and respond to severe weather 
events and natural disasters. The Committee will review federal 
rulemakings and program implementation under the Clean Air Act, 
conduct oversight of environmental contamination and clean up, 
review drinking water risks and safety, examine the regulation 
of dangerous chemical substance, and conduct general oversight 
of Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) operations and 
management. The Committee also will review energy programs and 
policy, fuel efficiency standards, and federal actions related 
to nuclear waste.
    The Committee on Natural Resources plans to examine the 
role of the federal government in facilitating the development 
of clean, renewable resources in the most appropriate places on 
public lands and waters, consistent with other land management 
responsibilities and with an eye on federal actions that 
maximize economic opportunities and improve health and quality 
of life for areas facing climate disruption. The Committee will 
consider the role protected ecosystems play in helping preserve 
and protect ecosystems services, land use values, and 
functional ecosystems, all of which aid in climate change 
adaptation. The Committee will examine ways to mitigate the 
immediate catastrophic impacts of the changing climate on 
Insular Areas, which are especially vulnerable to climate 
change because of their small size, low elevation, remote 
geographical location, and concentration of infrastructure 
along coastlines.
    The Committee on Science, Space and Technology plans to 
aggressively track emerging issues and scientific studies 
regarding global warming and climate science and elicit 
thoughtful science-based discussions on potential solutions and 
remedies to reduce Greenhouse Gas Emissions. This includes 
examining the role of federally funded research and innovative 
technology demonstration and development related to cutting-
edge mitigation and adaptation strategies. The Committee will 
examine issues surrounding extreme weather events, including 
the science behind these hazards and how climate change has 
increased the frequency and severity of these events, 
improvements to forecasting and warning, and proposed methods 
to reduce their impact. The Committee also will investigate the 
scrubbing of references to climate change from federal agency 
websites.
    The Committee on Foreign Affairs plans to examine the 
effectiveness of U.S. policy on climate change, including the 
Administration's announced intent to withdraw from the Paris 
Climate Accord and its impacts on our diplomatic relations, as 
well as the impacts of climate change on national security and 
its contributions to displacement and social unrest across the 
globe. The Committee also plans to conduct oversight on other 
environmental issues including wildlife trafficking, 
international conservation efforts, and the role and safety of 
environmental activists across the globe.
    The Committee on Oversight and Reform intends to conduct 
oversight of government and nongovernment activities related to 
climate change and environmental protection. The Committee will 
explore the Executive Branch's role in global climate change 
mitigation efforts and examine the decision-making processes 
related to international agreements. The Committee will examine 
the practices of the private sector in addressing the 
anthropogenic causes of climate change, as well as mitigating 
its current and future effects. The Committee also will examine 
the Flint water crisis and the federal government's response to 
Hurricanes Irma and Maria in Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin 
Islands in 2017.

          EXECUTIVE BRANCH ETHICS AND ANTI-CORRUPTION REFORMS

    During the 116th Congress, House committees will conduct 
coordinated oversight to clean up corruption in government, 
fight secret money in politics, and make it easier for American 
citizens across this country to vote. Several committees share 
legislative jurisdiction over a landmark bill designed to 
address those issues--H.R. 1, the For the People Act--which is 
one of the boldest reform packages to be considered in the 
history of the House of Representatives.\8\
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    \8\House Democrats' Big Democracy Reform Package is Good Policy, 
and Smart Politics, Vox (Dec. 10, 2018) (online at www.vox.com/
polyarchy/2018/12/10/18134994/house-democrats-democracy-reform-
package); Democracy Task Force, Leading Grassroots Advocacy 
Organizations Endorse House Democrats' Once-In-A-Generation Reform 
Package (Jan. 9, 2019) (online at democracyreform-sarbanes.house.gov/
newsroom/press-releases/leading-grassroots-advocacy-
organizations-endorse-house-democrats-once-in-a).
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    The Committee on House Administration plans to review 
federal campaign finance laws and regulations and examine the 
operations of the Federal Election Commission and the Election 
Assistance Commission. The Committee also plans to examine the 
role and impact of political organizations on federal 
elections.
    The Committee on the Judiciary plans to examine ways to 
enhance the ability of citizens to participate in federal 
elections by removing unnecessary barriers to access the polls, 
addressing voter suppression efforts, and other means to fully 
guarantee the right to vote for all eligible individuals. The 
Committee will conduct oversight on the influence of foreign 
governments, foreign corporations, and other foreign entities 
on the federal government, and review the adequacy of current 
law to prevent non-United States persons from making financial 
contributions to federal campaigns.
    The Committee on Ways and Means plans to conduct oversight 
to examine legislative proposals and tax law related to 
Presidential and Vice-Presidential tax returns.
    The Committee on Oversight and Reform will investigate 
specific allegations that Executive Branch officials are not 
acting in the best interest of American taxpayers, including by 
taking actions to benefit themselves, former employers, or 
former clients. The Committee will examine allegations that 
Executive Branch employees are violating ethics laws, 
regulations, and guidance.\9\ The Committee will investigate 
reports that White House and other Administration officials are 
obstructing GAO and OIG investigations, failing to comply with 
government transparency laws, and retaliating against 
government whistleblowers.
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    \9\See, e.g., Wilbur Ross Scheduled Meetings with Chevron, Boeing 
Despite Conflicts of Interest, Forbes (Oct. 25, 2018) (online at 
www.forbes.com/sites/danalexander/2018/10/25/wilbur-ross-scheduled-
meetings-with-chevron-boeing-despite-conflicts-of-interest/
#30c51af94d0e).
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                            III. CONCLUSION

    The oversight plans submitted by the standing House 
committees together form a coherent blueprint for Congress to 
address issues of concern to working families across the 
country. The Committee on Oversight and Reform will continue to 
work with the other House committees and the House leadership 
throughout the 116th Congress to promote effective 
congressional oversight. The oversight plans of all House 
committees follow.

                        COMMITTEE ON AGRICULTURE

TO: The Elijah E. Cummings, Chairman, House Committee on Oversight and 
        Reform, The Honorable Zoe Lofgren, Chairperson, Committee on 
        House Administration
FROM: The Honorable Collin Peterson, Chairman, House Committee on 
        Agriculture
DATE: March 1, 2019
SUBJECT: Oversight Plan for the House Committee on Agriculture for the 
        116th Congress
    This oversight plan is filed pursuant to Rule X, clause 
2(d)(1) of the Rules of the U.S. House of Representatives for 
the 116th Congress. This plan was prepared in consultation with 
the Ranking Member and was presented to the Members of the 
Committee, with proper notice, for their consideration.
    While much of the work in the 116th Congress will focus on 
oversight of the implementation of the Agriculture Improvement 
Act of 2018, the Committee and its subcommittees expect to 
exercise appropriate oversight activity regarding the issues 
listed below. The Committee will also have a general focus on 
the condition of the farm economy and will conduct any other 
general oversight as necessary. The Committee will consult, as 
appropriate, with other committees of the House that may share 
subject matter interest.

                             116TH CONGRESS

                             OVERSIGHT PLAN

    The Committee expects to exercise appropriate oversight 
activity regarding the following issues:
Biotechnology
     Review implementation of biotechnology policies 
and authorities contained in the Agriculture Improvement Act of 
2018;
     Evaluate USDA's efforts to develop and promote 
benefits of biotechnology for increasing agricultural 
productivity and combating hunger globally;
     Review USDA's implementation of biotechnology 
labeling standards; and
     Review the regulatory process for gene-edited 
plants and animals.
Commodity Exchanges
     Review the general operations of the Commodity 
Futures Trading Commission (CFTC) to provide a reauthorization 
of the Commission;
     Review enforcement and oversight policies and 
their implementation by the CFTC;
     Review rulemakings, guidance, and other actions 
taken by the Commission and its staff for consistency and 
compliance with the Commodity Exchange Act and Congressional 
intent;
     Review the impact of the 2013 lapse in 
authorization and the lapse in fiscal year 2019 appropriations 
on CFTC enforcement, oversight, and market surveillance 
functions;
     Review the impact of emerging financial 
technologies on commodity and derivatives markets, and examine 
the authority of the Commission to deter fraud and 
manipulation, promote market integrity, and protect investors 
in virtual commodity derivatives and at organized virtual 
commodity trading platforms; and
     Review international treatment of the U.S. 
derivatives industry, including market participants and 
infrastructure.
Conservation and Forestry
     Review USDA's implementation of the conservation 
policies and authorities contained in the Agriculture 
Improvement Act of 2018;
     Review the effectiveness of farm bill conservation 
programs in addressing wildlife habitat, water quality/
quantity, and promoting soil health;
     Review the interaction between conservation 
practices and risk management;
     Review USDA's realignment that resulted in the 
Farm Production and Conservation mission area, including its 
impact on programs, customers, and staff;
     Review current U.S. Forest Service (USFS) 
management and workforce challenges; and
     Review USFS's strategy for dealing with wildfire, 
including the effect of hazardous fuels management, forest 
health efforts, and fire preparedness.
Dairy
     Review USDA's implementation of the dairy risk 
management provisions in the Agriculture Improvement Act of 
2018; and
     Review milk pricing and dairy product purchase 
programs.
Energy
     Review agriculture's role in a renewable energy 
economy;
     Review the implementation of the Renewable Fuel 
Standard and its impact on agriculture; and
     Review USDA's farm bill energy programs.
Farm Credit, Rural Development, and the Rural Economy
     Review implementation of rural development 
policies and authorities contained in the Agriculture 
Improvement Act of 2018;
     Review the state of the farm economy;
     Review credit conditions and availability in rural 
America;
     Review the availability of mental health 
counseling and mediation services in rural areas;
     Review access to and success of rural development 
programs in persistent poverty areas;
     Review broadband delivery in rural America; and
     Review rural development loan and grant programs, 
including their role in combating opioid abuse and increasing 
medical care in rural areas.

Federal Crop Insurance and Risk Management

     Review USDA's implementation of crop insurance 
provisions authorized in the Agriculture Improvement Act of 
2018;
     Review the role and effectiveness of Federal crop 
insurance;
     Review the development and delivery of new crop 
insurance products for livestock, specialty crops, and dairy;
     Review the expansion and availability of Whole-
Farm Revenue Protection; and
     Monitor the effectiveness of USDA's disaster 
programs.

Food Waste

     Review USDA's implementation of food waste and 
loss reduction authorities in the Agriculture Improvement Act 
of 2018.

Foreign Agriculture/Trade

     Monitor pending--and review existing--trade 
agreements and their impact on agriculture;
     Review USDA's trade promotion activities;
     Review the effectiveness of USDA's trade 
mitigation programs;
     Review the impacts of USDA food aid and 
development programs;
     Monitor agricultural export programs to determine 
how well they are promoting the interests of U.S. agriculture;
     Review the activities of the newly created office 
of the Undersecretary for Trade and Foreign Agricultural 
Affairs; and
     Review the impact of retaliatory tariffs on U.S. 
agricultural producers and agribusinesses.

General Farm Commodities

     Review USDA's realignment that resulted in the 
Farm Production and Conservation mission area, including its 
impact on programs, customers, and staff;
     Review implementation of changes to the Price Loss 
Coverage program, Agriculture Risk Coverage program, and 
marketing assistance loans as enacted in the Agriculture 
Improvement Act of 2018; and
     Review USDA's enforcement of the Grain Standards 
Act and inspection activities.

Horticulture

     Review USDA's implementation of horticulture 
related programs authorized in the Agriculture Improvement Act 
of 2018;
     Review the use of commodity checkoff programs;
     Review USDA's regulation of organic standards;
     Monitor USDA's programming as it relates to local 
food production and marketing; and
     Review the implementation of the Food Safety 
Modernization Act.

Livestock and Animals

     Review USDA's implementation of livestock and 
animal related policies and authorities in the Agriculture 
Improvement Act of 2018;
     Review USDA's inspection of meat and poultry 
products;
     Review USDA's mandatory livestock price reporting 
system; and
     Review animal health threats and prevention and 
response capabilities.

Nutrition

     Review USDA's implementation of nutrition programs 
and authorities in the Agriculture Improvement Act of 2018 
(including provisions yet to be implemented from the 
Agricultural Act of 2014);
     Review the proposed rule regarding waivers of the 
time limit (and subsequently the work requirement) for able-
bodied adults without dependents (ABAWDs) in the Supplemental 
Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP);
     Review SNAP work pilots;
     Review the long-term impact of the lapse in fiscal 
year 2019 appropriations on state and local agencies as it 
pertains to operating federally-authorized nutrition programs;
     Review ongoing technological challenges regarding 
the delivery of SNAP benefits;
     Review the make-up and status of the ABAWD SNAP 
population;
     Review retailer operations;
     Review the process by which the 2020-2025 Dietary 
Guidelines for Americans will be decided; and
     Review SNAP quality control measures.

Outreach and Civil Rights

     Review USDA's implementation of outreach and civil 
rights policies, programs and authorities authorized in the 
Agriculture Improvement Act of 2018;
     Monitor USDA's outreach efforts to beginning, 
small, and underserved farmers and ranchers; and
     Monitor USDA's outreach efforts to military 
veterans interested in careers in agriculture.

Regulations

     Review the effect of regulatory activities carried 
out pursuant to the Endangered Species Act, or any proposed 
legislative changes to such Act, on agricultural producers and 
rural communities;
     Review the effect of regulatory activities by the 
Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) relative to the Federal 
Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act on agricultural 
producers and industry stakeholders;
     Review the designated representative provision 
within EPA's 2015 Worker Protection Standards to assure 
protection of both farm workers and producer interests;
     Review the effect of regulatory activities carried 
out by the EPA and the Department of the Army regarding the 
Waters of the United States; and
     Review USDA's regulatory activities related to 
gray wolves.

Research

     Review USDA's implementation of research, 
education and extension programs authorized in the Agriculture 
Improvement Act of 2018;
     Review the proposed relocation of the National 
Institute of Food and Agriculture (NIFA) and the relocation/
realignment of the Economic Research Service (ERS);
     Review access to and release of World Agricultural 
Supply and Demand Estimates;
     Review access to and release of World Agricultural 
Outlook Board meetings data;
     Review the effectiveness of data gathering at the 
National Agricultural Statistics Service (NASS);
     Review efforts to leverage Federal research 
investment with state, local, and private sources of funding; 
and
     Review the sufficiency of research funding under 
the Agricultural Research Service, ERS, NASS and NIFA.

Consultation With Other Committees

     With Natural Resources on forestry issues, 
livestock predation, and aquaculture;
     With Science, Space and Technology on research;
     With Ways and Means and Education and Labor on 
nutrition programs;
     With Ways and Means on tax and trade issues;
     With Judiciary on immigrant agricultural labor;
     With Energy and Commerce on food safety, 
regulation of cell-cultured meat, and biomass energy;
     With Transportation and Infrastructure on certain 
Clean Water Act compliance issues, livestock hauling, and food 
aid delivery;
     With Financial Services on Dodd-Frank and emerging 
issues such as digital assets;
     With Foreign Affairs on food aid and trade issues;
     With Small Business on addressing economic 
opportunities for rural America; and
     Any other committee as appropriate.

                      COMMITTEE ON ARMED SERVICES

                 OVERSIGHT PLAN FOR THE 116TH CONGRESS

                     U.S. HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES

                           TABLE OF CONTENTS

                                                                   Page
INTRODUCTION.....................................................    16
OVERSIGHT AGENDA.................................................    17
POLICY ISSUES....................................................    18
National Defense Strategy, National Military Strategy, and 
  Related Defense Policy Issues..................................    18
Deterrence.......................................................    19
Countering Terrorism.............................................    20
Operation Freedom's Sentinel.....................................    21
Operation Inherent Resolve.......................................    22
Nuclear Non-Proliferation........................................    22
Emerging Threats and Security Cooperation........................    23
Organization and Management of the Department of Defense.........    23
Homeland Defense.................................................    24
Acquisition......................................................    24
Financial Management.............................................    25
READINESS........................................................    25
Maintenance and Training.........................................    25
Logistics........................................................    26
Life-Cycle Sustainment...........................................    26
Organic Industrial Base..........................................    27
Civilian Personnel...............................................    27
Personnel Background Investigations..............................    28
Energy and Environment...........................................    28
Military Construction, Facilities Sustainment, and Real Property 
  Management.....................................................    29
MILITARY PERSONNEL AND HEALTH CARE ISSUES........................    29
Military Manpower and Force Structure............................    29
Military Benefits and Compensation...............................    30
Military Health System...........................................    30
Military Personnel Policy........................................    30
Uniform Code of Military Justice.................................    30
Military Family Readiness........................................    31
Morale, Welfare and Recreation Programs and Military Resale 
  Programs.......................................................    31
Prisoner of War and Missing in Action............................    31
Arlington National Cemetery......................................    31
MODERNIZATION AND INVESTMENT ISSUES..............................    32
Overview.........................................................    32
Armored Vehicle Modernization....................................    32
Tactical Wheeled Vehicles........................................    32
Rotorcraft Programs..............................................    33
Communications and Network Programs..............................    33
Individual Soldier and Marine Equipment..........................    33
Fixed-Wing Tactical and Training Aircraft........................    34
Tactical Missiles and Munitions..................................    34
Bomber Force Structure...........................................    35
Aerial Refueling Aircraft........................................    35
Airlift Programs.................................................    36
Surface Warfare Programs.........................................    36
Undersea Warfare Programs........................................    37
Military Intelligence, Surveillance, and Reconnaissance Programs.    37
Nuclear Forces...................................................    38
Missile Defense..................................................    38
National Security Space..........................................    39
INTELLIGENCE AND EMERGING THREATS AND CAPABILITIES...............    40
Intelligence.....................................................    40
Science and Technology...........................................    40
Military Operations in Cyberspace................................    41
Operations in the Information Environment........................    42
Protecting Critical Technology and National Security Information.    43
Oversight of Sensitive Military Operations.......................    43
Irregular Warfare................................................    44

                              Introduction

    The oversight responsibilities of the Committee on Armed 
Services are conducted throughout the calendar year. They are 
instrumental in the committee's consideration of the annual 
defense authorization bill, which covers the breadth of the 
operations of the Department of Defense as well as the national 
security functions of the Department of Energy and other 
related areas. The annual national defense budget involves 
millions of military and civilian personnel, thousands of 
facilities, and hundreds of agencies, departments, and commands 
located throughout the world. The complexity of the current 
threat environment will continue to expand the range of topics 
requiring committee oversight including strategic, operational, 
and budgetary issues.
    The committee has jurisdiction over laws, programs, and 
agencies under permanent authority in numerous titles of the 
United States Code, including title 10 (Armed Forces), title 32 
(National Guard), title 37 (Pay and Allowances of the Uniformed 
Services), title 41 (Public Contracts), title 42 (Atomic 
Energy), title 46 (Shipping), and title 50 (War and National 
Defense).
    The jurisdiction of the committee, pursuant to clause 1(c) 
of rule X of the Rules of the House of Representatives is as 
follows:
          1. Ammunition depots; forts; arsenals; Army, Navy, 
        and Air Force reservations and establishments.
          2. Common defense generally.
          3. Conservation, development, and use of naval 
        petroleum and oil shale reserves.
          4. The Department of Defense generally, including the 
        Departments of the Army, Navy, and Air Force generally.
          5. Interoceanic canals generally, including measures 
        relating to the maintenance, operation, and 
        administration of interoceanic canals.
          6. Merchant Marine Academy, and State Merchant Marine 
        Academies.
          7. Military applications of nuclear energy.
          8. Tactical intelligence and intelligence-related 
        activities of the Department of Defense.
          9. National security aspects of merchant marine, 
        including financial assistance for the construction and 
        operation of vessels, the maintenance of the U.S. 
        shipbuilding and ship repair industrial base, cabotage, 
        cargo preference, and merchant marine officers and 
        seamen as these matters relate to national security.
          10. Pay, promotion, retirement, and other benefits 
        and privileges of members of the armed services.
          11. Scientific research and development in support of 
        the armed services.
          12. Selective service.
          13. Size and composition of the Army, Navy, Marine 
        Corps, and Air Force.
          14. Soldiers' and sailors' homes.
          15. Strategic and critical materials necessary for 
        the common defense.
          16. Cemeteries administered by the Department of 
        Defense.
    In addition to its legislative jurisdiction and general 
oversight function, the committee has special oversight 
functions with respect to international arms control and 
disarmament and the education of military dependents in schools 
pursuant to clause 3(b) of rule X of the Rules of the House of 
Representatives.

                            Oversight Agenda

    The committee will continue its oversight and assessment of 
threats to U.S. national security as it considers the fiscal 
year 2020 and fiscal year 2021 defense budget requests. This 
effort will involve appropriate oversight hearings with the 
Secretary of Defense; the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of 
Staff; the individual military service secretaries and chiefs 
of staff; combatant commanders; other officials of the 
Department of Defense and the military departments; officials 
from the intelligence community; and the Secretary of Energy, 
the Under Secretary for Nuclear Security, and other officials 
of the Department of Energy. In addition, the committee will 
invite the views and perspectives of outside experts in 
academia, industry, associations and advocacy organizations, 
and those in private life with expertise on these matters. 
Finally, the committee will continue its aggressive outreach 
program to seek the views and perspectives of service members 
and their families to include Active Duty, National Guard, and 
Reserve members across the United States and at deployed 
locations overseas.
    The committee carries out its oversight of the Department 
of Defense and its subordinate departments and agencies as well 
as portions of the Department of Energy through activities 
involving the full committee and its standing subcommittees. 
The committee will continue to conduct robust oversight and 
investigations regarding matters within the jurisdiction of the 
committee. Certain issues and activities will require more 
extensive review. Investigatory work that may support the 
oversight responsibilities of standing subcommittees will be 
conducted in a coordinated manner. Each subcommittee will 
conduct oversight of the programs within its jurisdiction in 
accordance with the committee's rules and the Rules of the 
House of Representatives.
    The oversight agenda below, unless otherwise noted, is 
designed to support the consideration by the committee and, 
ultimately, the House of Representatives of the annual defense 
authorization bill, as well as the committee's broader 
oversight responsibilities. The issues identified are expected 
to be ongoing areas of oversight activity throughout the 116th 
Congress. In addition, the committee will continue to pay 
attention to the mandates placed on executive departments and 
agencies. In this context, pursuant to clause 2(d)(1) of rule X 
of the Rules of the House of Representatives, the committee 
will continue to emphasize the examination of relevant rules, 
regulations, statutes, and court decisions affecting the 
Department of Defense and the Department of Energy for their 
effects on efficiency and good management practices.
    Given the unique nature of national security issues and 
related oversight of the Armed Forces, the committee believes 
that a qualifier is once again necessary with regard to the 
ability to plan comprehensively and predict all oversight 
activities. Much of the committee's most demanding oversight 
will be, by definition, event-driven and not subject to prior 
planning. Such events significantly complicate the ability to 
prescribe with great accuracy or specificity the committee's 
entire oversight agenda. For instance, the oversight of defense 
activities by the committee has historically involved in-depth 
assessments of military operations and other major events that 
are generally difficult to predict in advance, such as the 
recent operations in the Republic of Iraq and the Syrian Arab 
Republic to counter the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria, the 
war in the Islamic Republic of Afghanistan, and responses to 
catastrophic events. These reviews can dominate committee and 
staff resources, sometimes at the expense of other planned 
activities. The committee fully expects that this type of 
event-driven oversight will continue to be required.
    The committee has a long tradition of translating oversight 
activities into legislative action. In general, the committee 
will continue to maintain a strong linkage between formal 
oversight efforts and legislative initiatives.
    The committee has dedicated significant oversight to the 
examination of the implications of the Budget Control Act (BCA) 
of 2011 (Public Law 112-25) for national defense and defense 
sequestration. While past legislation has temporarily increased 
the BCA discretionary spending caps for fiscal years 2014 
through 2019, absent another budget agreement, fiscal year 2020 
will see a return to the BCA caps and defense sequestration. 
The committee continues to oppose the sequester of national 
defense funding and will continue to conduct oversight in the 
116th Congress to highlight the consequences for the military, 
the defense industrial base, and national security.
    In addition to the above, the following specific areas and 
subjects are identified for special attention during the 116th 
Congress.

                             Policy Issues


  NATIONAL DEFENSE STRATEGY, NATIONAL MILITARY STRATEGY, AND RELATED 
                         DEFENSE POLICY ISSUES

    The committee will monitor how the Department of Defense 
addresses complex security demands through the formulation and 
implementation of the National Defense Strategy, the National 
Military Strategy, and other strategic guidance. The committee 
will evaluate how the Department identifies and prioritizes 
strategic objectives toward meeting those demands and how it 
applies resources toward achieving its prioritized objectives. 
The committee will conduct oversight to ensure that vital 
Department of Defense capacities and functions, including 
readiness, doctrinal development, organization, training, 
education, exercises, materiel, leadership, personnel, 
facilities, and planning are appropriately aligned to support 
strategic requirements. In its oversight, the committee will 
take a comprehensive approach to evaluating the strategic risks 
confronting the United States and to assessing the factors that 
amplify strategic risks as well as the factors that reduce 
them. The committee will examine the assumptions inherent to 
the Department's strategic guidance and planning and with 
respect to balancing strategic risk and matching resources with 
strategic objectives. The committee will evaluate ongoing 
operational demands within the context of a broad strategic 
framework and whether those operational demands will affect the 
strategic risks associated with future challenges. The 
committee will also endeavor to reinforce the civil-military 
balance in the Department's formulation and implementation of 
strategy and national defense policy.

                               DETERRENCE

    The committee recognizes that U.S. defense posture must 
effectively deter actors posing strategic challenges to the 
United States, its allies, and partners. In particular, the 
committee will focus on efforts to ensure that the United 
States, in concert with allies and partners, is properly 
postured to deter military threats and to counter efforts by 
such actors to weaken our shared values, undermine our systems 
of government, threaten international norms, and disrupt the 
cohesion of our alliances and partnerships.
    The committee will continue to oversee the Department's 
global efforts to bolster military deterrence against Russian 
aggression. This will include oversight of a range of posture, 
force structure, and force readiness initiatives including the 
European Deterrence Initiative, Ukraine Security Assistance 
Initiative, and other efforts aimed at developing an effective, 
sustained deterrent posture against Russian hostility; measures 
to enhance cohesion of U.S. alliances and partnerships; and 
efforts to support the ability to respond to attempts to 
undermine U.S. values and democratic norms. At the same time, 
the committee will conduct oversight to ensure that concerns 
about strategic stability, miscalculation, and misunderstanding 
are properly accounted for as a component of deterrence against 
the Russian Federation.
    The Government of the Islamic Republic of Iran continues to 
conduct destabilizing activities in the Middle East region that 
pose challenges to the United States, its allies, and partners. 
The committee will conduct oversight to determine how the 
Department plans to deter Iran's malign activities without 
escalating toward conflict and pursue a sustainable regional 
posture in accordance with the National Defense Strategy.
    The People's Republic of China continues its efforts to 
assert influence, modernize its military, and take steps that 
erode security norms, increasing the risk of conflict, 
particularly in the South and East China Seas. The committee 
will continue to conduct oversight of the Department's response 
to China's efforts to extend its military reach and invest in 
its military forces. At the same time, the committee will 
continue to conduct oversight of the Department of Defense's 
military posture, force structure, and force readiness efforts, 
and plans to enhance capabilities, forward presence, posture, 
and training and exercises to deter and counter acts of 
aggression and protect vital U.S. and ally and partner 
interests.
    The Democratic People's Republic of Korea continues to pose 
a threat to the Korean Peninsula, the United States, U.S. 
forces, allies, and partners in East Asia. While North Korea 
has not conducted a nuclear test in more than a year, the 
intelligence community assesses that North Korea ``is unlikely 
to give up all of its nuclear weapons and production 
capabilities, even as it seeks to negotiate partial 
denuclearization steps to obtain key US and international 
concessions.'' The intelligence community further assesses that 
U.S. allies and partners are responding to changing U.S. 
security policies by potentially seeking new bilateral and 
multilateral partnerships. As such, with respect to the Korean 
Peninsula, the committee will continue to oversee the 
Department of Defense's efforts to implement a range of 
posture, force structure, and force readiness initiatives; 
infrastructure and force realignments, including U.S.-Republic 
of Korea Special Measures Agreements consultations; and 
bilateral and multilateral training and exercises.
    Alliances and partnerships are essential to advance U.S. 
national security objectives, promote global security, preserve 
regional stability, deter adversaries, uphold and strengthen 
shared values, and address common security challenges. The 
committee will conduct oversight of Department of Defense 
activities related to enduring alliances, such as the North 
Atlantic Treaty Organization, and other ongoing partnerships to 
ensure that they are supported and utilized in a manner that 
enhances these goals. The committee will continue to oversee 
and, where appropriate, encourage the Department of Defense's 
efforts to strengthen its partnerships and cooperative efforts 
to ensure global stability and security.
    With regard to nuclear deterrence, the committee will 
continue to conduct oversight of nuclear deterrence policy and 
posture. This oversight will include examining the role of 
nuclear weapons and purpose of nuclear deterrence; options to 
reduce the risk of miscalculation that could lead to nuclear 
war in a crisis and reduce the risk of a nuclear arms race or a 
lowered threshold to nuclear weapons use; options to maintain 
credible nuclear extended deterrence; and the impact of 
proposed new nuclear weapons capabilities and policies on 
regional and strategic stability.

                          COUNTERING TERRORISM

    Since the September 11, 2001 attacks, countering terrorism 
has been a central focus and mission of the Department of 
Defense. U.S. Armed Forces have deployed around the globe to 
confront al-Qaida, the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria (ISIS), 
and other terrorist groups. While these terrorist groups have 
been degraded, they have not been defeated.
    The committee will conduct oversight, often in classified 
form, over terrorism issues. The committee will continue to 
monitor terrorism threats and examine counterterrorism 
policies, strategies, and operations, including by maintaining 
oversight of changes to those policies, strategies, and 
operations. The committee will also pay particular attention to 
the military force posture; special operations capabilities; 
intelligence, information operations, and cyber capabilities; 
interagency coordination; role of allies and partners; and 
resources necessary to carry out an effective counterterrorism 
strategy.
    The committee recognizes the need to counter the violent 
extremist ideology spread by al-Qaida, ISIS, and other 
terrorist groups, and that such challenges require a 
coordinated interagency and international approach. The 
committee plans to examine the role of the Department of 
Defense in addressing this challenge and how the Department 
engages with other U.S. departments and agencies and foreign 
partners.
    The committee will conduct oversight of the Department's 
efforts to ensure ISIS affiliates and other terrorist groups do 
not threaten U.S. and partner interests in the Middle East, 
Africa, and Southeast Asia. The committee will continue to 
oversee the Department's efforts to engage multiple regional 
allies and partners of varying counterterrorism capabilities 
and assess the Department's regional approach.
    The committee will maintain its oversight of the U.S. 
military's counterterrorism activities in the Republic of Yemen 
and the Saudi-led coalition efforts to counter Houthi rebels in 
the region, including any U.S. support to the coalition and 
compliance with the laws of armed conflict and other related 
international norms.
    The committee will conduct oversight of U.S. detention 
operations and policy worldwide, including the executive 
branch's application of statute and relevant human rights 
standards, management of national security concerns, and 
handling of the military tribunals and detention facility 
located in Guantanamo Bay, Cuba.
    Lastly, the committee will continue to examine the legal 
basis for the President's military actions against ISIS, other 
terrorist groups, and regional actors. The committee will 
examine the President's use of aspects of the 2001 
Authorization for Use of Military Force (Public Law 107-40) and 
the Authorization for Use of Military Force Against Iraq 
Resolution of 2002 (Public Law 107-243) relevant to its 
jurisdiction.

Operation Freedom's Sentinel

    The committee will continue to conduct oversight of the 
U.S. military effort in the Islamic Republic of Afghanistan 
with a focus on the Administration's South Asia Strategy and 
its ability to measure progress for accomplishing U.S. 
objectives in Afghanistan and the region. The committee will 
commensurately extend its related oversight activities on the 
U.S.-led Operation Freedom's Sentinel counterterrorism mission 
and the North Atlantic Treaty Organization Resolute Support 
Mission (NATO-RSM) train, advise, and assist mission. 
Additionally, the committee will examine the regional security 
environment focusing on the Islamic Republic of Pakistan, other 
neighboring countries, and the international community. 
Specifically, the committee is interested in the Department of 
Defense's activities to deny safe havens for the Taliban, al-
Qaida, the Haqqani Network, the Islamic State of Iraq and 
Syria-Khorasan, and other extremist organizations; support for 
the Government of Afghanistan's security efforts; NATO and 
other troop contributing countries' support for NATO-RSM; and 
assessments of Russian influence and its possible impacts on 
Afghanistan's security. The committee will provide oversight to 
other critical efforts in Afghanistan such as the authorities, 
activities, and resources allocated to counterterrorism and the 
development and sustainment of effective Afghan National 
Security Forces, and the safety and security of U.S. and allied 
forces. Finally, the committee will monitor the ongoing 
political situation in Afghanistan and whether a national 
government can effectively lead and secure Afghanistan.

Operation Inherent Resolve

    The U.S. and coalition forces continue to conduct 
operations against the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria (ISIS) 
as part of Operation Inherent Resolve. The committee will 
continue to assess the sufficiency of authorities, resources, 
equipment, basing, and personnel to support the Operation 
Inherent Resolve missions and policy objectives. The committee 
will maintain congressional oversight of the Counter-ISIS Train 
and Equip programs and their effectiveness.
    The committee recognizes that the security landscape in the 
Republic of Iraq and the Syrian Arab Republic continues to be 
complex and that the humanitarian crisis in those countries is 
dire. The committee will examine the presence and influence 
exerted by other actors in Syria, particularly the Russian 
Federation, the Islamic Republic of Iran, and the Republic of 
Turkey, and the implications for U.S. objectives regarding ISIS 
and regional security and stability. Furthermore, the committee 
will continue to examine the flow of foreign fighters to and 
from the region, and the linkages between ISIS and actors who 
conduct directed or inspired terrorist attacks in the U.S. and 
elsewhere. Additionally, the committee will monitor the 
political, economic, and social dynamics in both Iraq and 
Syria, which have, in part, fostered the context and political 
climate for ISIS to expand and grow. It will also monitor the 
stability of the countries in the region of Iraq and Syria and 
any growth or expansion of ISIS and continue to oversee the 
security assistance authorities and resources provided through 
the annual defense authorization act to address these 
challenges.

                       NUCLEAR NON-PROLIFERATION

    The committee will continue to monitor the National Nuclear 
Security Administration Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation 
activities. The threat of nuclear weapons-grade material, 
technology, and know-how remains a threat to the United States, 
particularly in light of new technological developments that 
may complicate the cost and the ability to detect such 
activity. The committee will focus on U.S. capabilities related 
to detection of proliferation to ensure their sustainability, 
and international cooperation on safeguarding and reducing the 
use of nuclear-weapons grade materials. The spread of nuclear 
weapons and nuclear weapons-usable materials remain a grave 
threat to the United States, and as such, the committee is 
committed to ensuring oversight over these critical activities 
and leveraging new technologies and opportunities as they 
arise.

               EMERGING THREATS AND SECURITY COOPERATION

    The United States faces a complex array of threats to 
national security in the political, economic, military, and 
social domains. State and non-state actors are increasingly 
leveraging rapid advances in technology to pose new and 
evolving threats, particularly in the realm of space, 
cyberspace, proliferation of weapons of mass destruction, high 
performance computing, and other emerging and disruptive 
technologies. Furthermore, threats to national security are no 
longer isolated to state or non-state actors. As identified by 
the intelligence community, infectious disease outbreaks and 
climate change threaten security and stability around the globe 
and have significant implications for U.S. national security as 
well as military operations.
    The committee will conduct oversight of numerous cross-
cutting Department of Defense activities central to addressing 
these emerging and unforeseen threats, including oversight of 
countering weapons of mass destruction programs, 
counterterrorism operations, humanitarian assistance 
operations, and security cooperation.
    Further, the committee will conduct oversight of security 
cooperation and building partner capacity (BPC) programs in the 
116th Congress. The National Defense Authorization Act for 
Fiscal Year 2017 (Public Law 114-328) contained comprehensive 
reform of the authorities, funding, programs, and oversight of 
security cooperation. The committee will monitor and evaluate 
the implementation of these security cooperation provisions to 
ensure that they are sufficient to meet requirements, properly 
executed, and consistent with national security objectives. The 
committee will also review and act upon additional reforms, as 
appropriate.
    The committee will maintain oversight of the Department's 
activities in theaters where security cooperation is the 
primary means of achieving U.S. objectives, such as Africa and 
Central and South America. Additionally, the committee will 
continue to examine the Department's coordination within the 
interagency to ensure the range of the Department's activities 
occurring in Africa contribute to U.S. national security 
objectives. The committee will examine the issues affecting 
U.S. national security in Central and South America, including 
illicit trafficking and transnational organized crime. The 
committee is particularly concerned about instability in 
Central America.

        ORGANIZATION AND MANAGEMENT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE

    The committee will review the organization of the 
Department of Defense and oversee its management to ensure that 
the Department can address complex security challenges. The 
committee will: carefully review organizational changes; work 
to enhance organizational performance and to promote efficient 
and cost-effective practices throughout the Department of 
Defense enterprise; work to enable specific Department of 
Defense mission sets and to ensure that they are optimally 
aligned within the Department's organizational structure; and 
apply strict managerial accountability standards to the 
Department's leadership. In overseeing the Department's 
organization and management, the committee will endeavor to 
preserve and to enhance the Department's civil-military 
balance.

                            HOMELAND DEFENSE

    The committee will conduct oversight of the missions and 
capabilities of U.S. Northern Command and the Department of 
Defense's Homeland Defense and Global Security directorate, and 
their evolution since inception. The committee will review and 
conduct oversight with regard to integration into response 
planning and exercises, as well as requests for support from 
other departments and agencies. The committee will also review 
Defense Support of Civil Authorities, and the recent policies 
and procedures the Department has established as well as the 
implementation of recommendations from historical and recent 
studies. Finally, the committee will review how the Department 
of Defense integrates and provides support to domestic crises 
response.

                              ACQUISITION

    The committee will continue its ongoing effort to improve 
the agility of the Department of Defense acquisition system and 
the environment driving acquisition choices in the Department, 
industry, and Congress. Through its oversight function, the 
committee will monitor the efforts of the Department, and the 
Under Secretary of Defense for Acquisition and Sustainment, to 
implement recent statutory changes and recommendations of 
commissioned reports. The committee will also continue to push 
for accountability and integrity in contracting.
    The committee remains concerned that the Department's 
current acquisition system is not sufficiently agile to support 
warfighter demands. Technological change has been rapidly 
generating new, and often unforeseeable, innovations that can 
improve the warfighter's capabilities. The defense acquisition 
system must respond to potential threats from global 
adversaries quickly and incorporate innovation seamlessly to 
reflect the jointness that the military has achieved at the 
operating level. The committee will continue to examine the 
United States export control regime and its effectiveness in 
preventing the transfer of sensitive military-related 
technologies to potential adversaries in coordination with the 
Committee on Foreign Affairs of the House of Representatives.
    The committee will take a measured approach in addressing 
the lack of agility in the requirements, acquisition, budget, 
and oversight processes. Investments in innovation should be 
leveraged to support broader acquisition improvements and 
defense industrial base sustainment activities by appropriate 
integration and requirements maturation. The committee will 
focus oversight on the development of training, exercises, 
doctrine, tactics, and procedures for acquisition as tied to 
workforce development and retention for civilian and military 
acquisition personnel. The committee will examine and consider 
what policies are necessary to provide incentives to the 
industrial base for infrastructure improvements to improve 
efficiencies and increase participation in the Department's 
supply chain. This effort will be an iterative process embedded 
in the committee's regular work throughout the 116th Congress.

                          FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT

    The committee will continue to oversee military 
effectiveness and fiscal responsibility in a dynamic budgeting 
environment. Under the Budget Control Act of 2011 (Public Law 
112-25), as modified by the Bipartisan Budget Act of 2018 
(Public Law 115-23), the past 2 years have seen significant 
increases in national defense discretionary spending. Unless 
modified by further legislation, the cap for fiscal year 2020 
defense discretionary funding will be more than $70 billion 
below the level provided for in fiscal year 2019, and any 
funding in excess of that cap will be subject to sequester. The 
committee continues to oppose the sequester of national defense 
funding and will continue to conduct oversight in the 116th 
Congress in order to highlight the consequences of a sequester 
for the military, the defense industrial base, and national 
security.
    The Comptroller General of the United States has 
consistently identified the Department of Defense's financial 
management as a high-risk area since 1995. The Department of 
Defense has made some progress in modernizing its financial 
management capabilities, but arcane and obsolete financial 
management processes continue to fail to accurately track and 
account for billions of dollars and funding and tangible 
assets, which undermines confidence in the Department's 
financial management systems and requires significant 
congressional oversight.
    The committee will continue to review efforts to implement 
the Financial Improvement and Audit Readiness (FIAR) plan, as 
mandated by the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal 
Year 2010 (Public Law 111-84). The Inspector General of the 
Department of Defense conducted the first agency-wide financial 
audit of the Department in fiscal year 2018, and it will 
continue to conduct such audits annually. The committee will 
continue to oversee the Department's efforts to achieve an 
unmodified audit opinion, including corrective actions and 
process improvements.
    The committee will monitor the interdependencies between 
the FIAR plan and the funds being spent on business systems 
modernization programs as the Department works to correct the 
weaknesses in its financial statements. Both the Department and 
Congress depend on the objective tools provided by proper 
financial management processes and statements in order to make 
informed decisions.

                               Readiness


                        MAINTENANCE AND TRAINING

    Years of continuous overseas deployments left little 
opportunity for the Department of Defense to conduct essential 
maintenance on major assets and prioritize training for high-
end threats. Congress provided infusions of resources in the 
previous 3 fiscal years to reverse this decline, and the 
committee will continue to monitor the effect of readiness 
funding on training and maintenance recovery goals. The 
committee will pay attention to: Navy shipyard maintenance 
availabilities; Army force generation and large-scale training 
exercises; Marine Corps amphibious training; and aircraft 
sustainment and training across the military services. The 
committee also recognizes the importance of training for the 
broad range of future missions the military may face, from 
gray-zone conflict to high-intensity conflict. The committee 
will conduct oversight of how the military services adapt 
training concepts, maintenance plans, and analytical tools to 
ensure personnel and equipment are adequately prepared to meet 
these threats. Finally, the committee notes the importance of 
prioritizing long-term readiness and believes long term 
readiness can best be achieved by adequately sustaining the 
Department's substantial investment in ships, aircraft, and 
combat vehicles. To that end, the committee will examine the 
Department's investments to support training and sustainment of 
existing weapons systems.

                               LOGISTICS

    Survivable logistics is a key combat support area and a 
critical enabler underpinning U.S. military power, and the 
committee notes the importance of investing in a more secure 
and resilient logistics and transportation infrastructure. The 
committee will conduct oversight of the Department's efforts 
to: protect and sustain its prepositioned stocks; 
communications networks; and tanker, strategic airlift, and 
military sealift fleets. The committee will continue its 
oversight of the Defense Logistics Agency (DLA), the Department 
of Defense entity responsible for managing the global supply 
chain and providing goods and services in support of the total 
force. Specifically, the committee will continue to conduct 
oversight of the disposition of the equipment program and the 
DLA program that transfers excess equipment to law enforcement, 
to make certain these programs are executed appropriately and 
in compliance with the law. The committee will also carefully 
evaluate any proposed changes to the Department's logistical 
and transportation demands that would be imposed by priority 
contingencies identified in the National Defense Strategy. 
Finally, the committee notes the importance of conducting 
wargames and exercises that accurately reflect our competitors' 
growing ability to target U.S. strategic mobility assets as 
well as other threats to the joint logistics enterprise.

                         LIFE-CYCLE SUSTAINMENT

    The committee will focus on reducing the total-ownership 
costs of weapons systems and equipment by ensuring the 
Department of Defense is considering life-cycle support and 
sustainment requirements when it develops acquisition 
strategies for each program.
    The committee will also hold the Department accountable for 
improving its estimates of total weapon system life-cycle costs 
to better inform sustainment strategies, such as the cost 
effectiveness of acquiring technical data from original 
equipment manufacturers to allow future changes in sustainment 
path.
    Finally, the committee will continue to monitor the 
military services' reset strategies to repair, recapitalize, 
and replace equipment used in ongoing operations, and will also 
monitor progress toward reconstitution of prepositioned stocks.

                        ORGANIC INDUSTRIAL BASE

    A vital component to maintaining warfighting readiness 
across multiple domains is the Department of Defense's organic 
industrial base. The arsenals, depots, air logistics complexes, 
and shipyards provide long-term sustainment through programmed 
maintenance as well as the critical capability to conduct 
repair and modernization upgrades as necessary. These 
facilities and their skilled workforce provide a national-level 
insurance policy against the unknown strategic operating 
environment. The committee is concerned about the future health 
of the organic industrial base during a period of fiscal 
uncertainty and increasing maintenance and sustainment 
requirements.
    The committee will continue to conduct oversight on how the 
Department's organic industrial base is viably positioned for 
long-term sustainability and have the workforce, equipment, and 
facilities for efficient operations to meet the Nation's 
current and future requirements. This includes oversight of how 
the military services are planning to ensure workforce 
capabilities and skills support emerging requirements as well 
as how the military services are recruiting, training, and 
preparing to retain the future workforce.
    The committee will conduct oversight into the use of new 
technologies such as additive manufacturing, robotics, and 
artificial intelligence as pathways to improve management of 
spares inventory and supply chain operations. The committee 
will continue oversight of depot, arsenal, and shipyard 
operations and management, the use of performance-based 
logistics, the role of public-private partnerships, and the 
military services' logistics enterprise resource planning 
systems.
    The committee will continue its work to oversee carryover 
management at the depots and arsenals, its work to ensure 
capital investment continues at the depots, arsenals, and 
shipyards in order to maintain a level of modern capability 
sufficient to meet the needs of the Armed Forces. Furthermore, 
the committee will examine how previous efficiency and 
workforce optimization initiatives continue to impact depot, 
shipyard, and arsenal capability, how more recent steps to 
increase arsenal and depot visibility among program managers 
and program offices are working, and how well programs and 
plans designed to assure the availability of critical organic 
manufacturing capabilities are being executed.

                           CIVILIAN PERSONNEL

    The Federal civilian workforce of the Department of Defense 
plays a critical role in the readiness of our military forces. 
Recognizing this, the committee enacted several legislative 
initiatives in the 115th Congress to address the challenges 
confronting the workforce. Through its oversight activities in 
the 116th Congress, the committee will review implementation of 
these provisions to monitor compliance with congressional 
intent and determine whether additional legislation is 
necessary.
    Providing the Department of Defense with the proper tools 
to invest in its workforce and ensuring that the Department has 
the people with the right skills to contribute effectively to 
the success of the Department's mission will remain a focus of 
the committee. This will include oversight of the various tools 
provided to the Department to hire, retain, and train a 
qualified civilian workforce, such as the acquisition workforce 
fund.
    Regarding civilian hiring, the National Defense 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2017 (Public Law 114-328), 
the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2018 
(Public Law 115-91) and the John S. McCain National Defense 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2019 (Public Law 115-232) 
included direct hiring authorities for the Department of 
Defense to use for expediting hiring of Department of Defense 
civilians with certain skills. These skills include financial 
management experts, post-secondary students and recent 
graduates, cybersecurity positions, maintenance positions, and 
others. The committee will continue to conduct oversight of 
these authorities to ensure they are being used in compliance 
with current law.
    The Department of Defense effective civilian workforce 
includes approximately 770,000 contracted and 700,000 Federal 
civilian employees who serve various functions worldwide. In 
the 116th Congress, the committee will continue to search for 
strategies to determine the contracted workforce's costs to the 
taxpayer and monitor how the Department develops its workforce 
mix of Federal civilians, contractors and service members to 
meet mission and cost requirements.

                  PERSONNEL BACKGROUND INVESTIGATIONS

    Since the timeliness of obtaining a security clearance 
became a concern, Congress included section 925 in the National 
Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2018 (Public Law 115-
91), which directed the Department of Defense to develop and 
begin executing a plan to transfer the background investigation 
and security clearance process for the Department of Defense 
from the Office of Personnel Management to the Department of 
Defense.
    Given the importance of conducting security, suitability 
and credentialing background investigations for the Department 
of Defense personnel, and the fact that the Department has this 
responsibility, the committee will continue its oversight of 
this transition during the 116th Congress to ensure the 
transition occurs and clearances are investigated and 
adjudicated in a timelier fashion.

                         ENERGY AND ENVIRONMENT

    Energy is a key readiness enabler for the Department of 
Defense. Energy resilient installations and increased 
efficiency enhance operational effectiveness of the military 
and improve our national security posture. Therefore, the 
committee will monitor the Department and military services' 
efforts to address resiliency gaps and improve energy 
efficiency on military installations and for military 
operations.
    In addition, the committee will conduct oversight of the 
Department and military services' environmental management. The 
committee believes more attention is required to monitor the 
Department's efforts to address the impacts of climate change 
on training and installation resilience. The committee will 
examine the Department's efforts with respect to emerging 
contaminants including adherence to Federal, state, and local 
compliance requirements. The committee will continue to provide 
oversight of the military services' efforts to remediate 
existing contamination both on and off Federal lands with 
particular attention paid to locations where contamination may 
be affecting local populations. Additionally, the committee 
will oversee Department efforts to leverage technological 
innovation and implementation of best practices to minimize 
adverse environmental impacts and thereby reduce future cleanup 
costs. The committee intends to continue to monitor activities 
of the Department to ensure that military training is in full 
compliance with applicable Federal, state, and local 
environmental laws.

   MILITARY CONSTRUCTION, FACILITIES SUSTAINMENT, AND REAL PROPERTY 
                               MANAGEMENT

    The committee will review the Department of Defense's 
military construction program to manage the overall capacity of 
the Department's infrastructure and to ensure prudent long-term 
military construction investments. The committee will also 
oversee the Department's investments in facility sustainment, 
restoration, and modernization, as well as the Department's 
utilization of new or more flexible authorities provided by the 
National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2018 (Public 
Law 115-91) and the John S. McCain National Defense 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2019 (Public Law 115-232) 
related to facility investments.
    The real property management process requires extensive 
oversight to maintain almost $749.0 billion in infrastructure. 
The committee is concerned that inadequate asset visibility, 
poor requirements development, and project planning 
inefficiencies result in poorly coordinated investment 
decisions and sub-optimal facility construction. The committee 
will provide increased oversight of the Military Housing 
Privatization Initiative program particularly with respect to 
maintenance and sustainment of housing developments. The 
committee will seek to apply best practices across the 
Department of Defense in order to efficiently develop and 
maintain the military services' ranges, facilities, and 
infrastructure.

               Military Personnel and Health Care Issues


                 MILITARY MANPOWER AND FORCE STRUCTURE

    During the 116th Congress, the committee will continue to 
assess the military's manpower requirements to meet its current 
and future global military commitments. Specifically, the 
committee will continue to provide aggressive oversight of 
military manpower levels, skill sets, and force structure to 
ensure they support the National Defense Strategy. During the 
115th Congress, the end strength increased for each military 
service to meet demands and growth in specialized fields such 
as cyber, intelligence, pilots, and maintainers. In the 116th 
Congress, the committee will examine trends in overall total 
force structure requirements, end strength, recruiting, 
retention, morale, and benefits and compensation. The committee 
will continue its oversight of military recruiting, 
particularly the quality of the recruits needed to fulfill the 
increased end-strength requirements.

                   MILITARY BENEFITS AND COMPENSATION

    During the 116th Congress, the committee will scrutinize 
any proposals from the Department of Defense or other 
organizations calling for any changes to military compensation 
and other benefit programs. Any such proposals must ensure they 
are thoroughly assessed with respect to their positive or 
negative impacts to the All-Volunteer Force. Specifically, the 
expected Department of Defense proposals to reform the Reserve 
Component call-up duty status authorities will overhaul the way 
a Reserve Component service member is activated. The 
committee's oversight in this area will concentrate on the 
proper implementation of the new authorities to ensure that the 
pay and benefits for Reserve Component members are not 
adversely affected.

                         MILITARY HEALTH SYSTEM

    During the 116th Congress, the committee will continue its 
oversight of military health policies of the Department of 
Defense. The Department will be charged with both supporting 
the readiness requirements of the warfighter and delivering a 
robust military health benefit, all while creating efficiencies 
and implementing cost savings initiatives that may alter the 
composition of the existing Military Health System. The 
committee will examine military medical manning requirements, 
TRICARE benefit delivery, wounded warrior programs, resiliency, 
opioid policy, and ongoing reform efforts that are 
transitioning Military Treatment Facilities and other 
organizational structures from the military service departments 
to the Defense Heath Agency. The committee will also continue 
to monitor the implementation of the Genesis Electronic Health 
Record, as well as other health-related collaborations between 
the Department of Defense and Department of Veterans Affairs. 
Finally, the committee will seek a better understanding of 
environmental health challenges that may be related to burn 
pits, mold, lead paint, contaminated water, and other potential 
exposure issues.

                       MILITARY PERSONNEL POLICY

    During the 116th Congress, the personnel policies of the 
Department of Defense will remain under considerable scrutiny 
as the military services compete to recruit, manage, and retain 
the best and brightest men and women. The committee will 
continue to give close examination to proposals from the 
Department of Defense and other organizations calling for any 
major changes to personnel policies including recruiting, 
promotions, career paths, or changes to military retention and 
other policy programs in order to assess the impact of any 
proposed changes on the viability of the All-Volunteer Force.

                    UNIFORM CODE OF MILITARY JUSTICE

    The committee will continue to provide oversight of 
military justice, as well as the implementation of the National 
Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2017 (Public Law 114-
328) comprehensive overhaul of the Uniform Code of Military 
Justice, which took effect January 1, 2019. The committee will 
also continue its robust oversight of the Department of 
Defense's sexual assault prevention and response programs with 
a focus on implementation of best practices for prevention 
programs.

                       MILITARY FAMILY READINESS

    During the 116th Congress, the committee will continue to 
focus on the support provided to families of service members, 
particularly during deployments. The committee will assess the 
methods used by the military services to identify the needs of 
military families and to identify the programs and policies 
that can be implemented or modified to improve their quality of 
life. As Armed Forces end strength continues to grow, the 
committee will examine the Department of Defense and military 
service family support programs to ensure the programs are 
adequately resourced to support an increase in family members. 
In addition, the committee will continue its oversight on the 
quality and availability of services at Department of Defense 
child development centers.

  MORALE, WELFARE AND RECREATION PROGRAMS AND MILITARY RESALE PROGRAMS

    The committee believes the cost-efficient sustainment of 
Morale, Welfare, and Recreation (MWR) and military resale 
programs (commissaries and exchanges) is required to protect 
quality of life in military communities. The committee will 
provide oversight efforts directed toward that end in 
conjunction with major reforms, begun in the 114th Congress, to 
ensure the viability of these programs.
    Additionally, the committee believes that MWR and military 
resale programs must remain competitive with private sector 
entities to ensure that service members and their families 
benefit fully from these programs. The committee will monitor 
current practices and policies to ensure that MWR and military 
resale programs are employing the full range of strategies 
available to private sector competitors to inform authorized 
patrons about the benefits associated with these programs and 
encourage their participation. Finally, the committee will 
monitor and oversee the changes required by the commissary 
reform plan with an emphasis on maintaining this valuable 
benefit without interruption.

                 PRISONER OF WAR AND MISSING IN ACTION

    During the 116th Congress, the committee will continue 
oversight of the Department of Defense's Prisoner of War/
Missing in Action activities. Specifically, the committee will 
focus on the operations of the Defense Personnel Accounting 
Agency to ensure they are meeting the requirement that the 
accounting effort achieve at least 200 identifications 
annually.

                      ARLINGTON NATIONAL CEMETERY

    The committee will continue its oversight from the 115th 
Congress of Arlington National Cemetery. The John S. McCain 
National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2019 (Public 
Law 115-232) directed the Secretary of the Army to establish 
revised eligibility criteria for interment at Arlington 
National Cemetery to ensure that the cemetery remains an active 
burial ground well into the future. The Secretary of the Army 
is required to establish the revised criteria not later than 
September 30, 2019.

                  Modernization and Investment Issues


                                OVERVIEW

    During the 116th Congress, the committee will conduct 
oversight of military equipment modernization strategies and 
programs and assess the effectiveness of those strategies to 
mitigate threats in the near-term and long-term from near-peer 
and peer competitors. The committee's efforts will continue to 
focus on full-spectrum, combat-effective lethality through 
near-term modernization efforts that utilize acquisition reform 
initiatives to better streamline the development and fielding 
of solutions to the warfighter in a timely and efficient 
manner. The committee will devote attention to the military 
service's implementation and utilization of new, innovative 
agile acquisition reform authorities to recapitalize, upgrade, 
or enhance the performance of current and future combat 
systems. Concurrently, the committee will conduct oversight on 
the military services' ability to aggressively control 
development and procurement costs, implement reasonable, 
executable and accountable sustainment strategies that preserve 
system affordability, as well as manage strategic risk in 
critical areas of the U.S. defense industrial base.
    The committee, through diligent oversight and legislative 
action, will implement actions and provide resources to help 
mitigate cost growth and schedule delays of modernization 
programs. The committee will assess the need for legislative 
action, if required, by: late determination of programmatic 
requirements; unjustified requirements growth and failure to 
properly mitigate requirements changes; insufficient analyses 
of alternatives; concurrency in test and evaluation master 
plans; military services proceeding prematurely with 
development of immature technology; poor cost estimating; 
inadequate funding profiles; over-estimation of potential 
production rates; program instability; and, improper use of new 
and agile acquisition reform authorities.

                     ARMORED VEHICLE MODERNIZATION

    The committee will focus on oversight of the Army and 
Marine Corps' evolving plans to improve the capability and 
extend the operating lives of its current heavy and medium-
weight armored combat vehicles, as well as lay the foundation 
for successful development, production, and timely fielding of 
its next generation of these systems. The committee will 
specifically monitor management of these programs: M1 Abrams 
tank, the M2 Bradley Fighting Vehicles, the family of Stryker 
Combat Vehicles, the family of Amphibious Combat Vehicles, the 
Light Armored Vehicle, the M109A7 Paladin Integrated 
Management, the Armored Multipurpose Vehicle, the Army's mobile 
protected firepower, and Active Protection Systems for combat 
vehicles.

                       TACTICAL WHEELED VEHICLES

    The committee will focus on oversight of the Army and 
Marine Corps' sustainment of their current and future tactical 
wheeled vehicle (TWV) fleets, including their families of 
light, medium, and heavy TWVs and the family of Mine Resistant 
Ambush Protected Vehicles. The committee will specifically 
oversee management of these programs: Family of Medium Tactical 
Vehicles, Heavy Expanded Mobility Tactical Truck, Joint Light 
Tactical Vehicle, Ground Mobility Vehicle, and High Mobility 
Multipurpose Wheeled Vehicle.

                          ROTORCRAFT PROGRAMS

    The committee will focus oversight efforts on rotorcraft 
modernization, force structure, and readiness, with an emphasis 
on how the military services are balancing their plans to 
accelerate development of next generation rotorcraft platforms 
with current requirements to upgrade current legacy rotorcraft 
platforms. Program areas of oversight interest for the 
committee will focus on, but not be limited to, the following 
rotorcraft programs: UH-60 Black Hawk utility rotorcraft, AH-64 
Apache Attack rotorcraft, CH-47 Chinook heavy lift rotorcraft, 
UH-1 Huey utility helicopters, AH-1 attack rotorcraft, the CH-
53K heavy lift rotorcraft program, the UH-1N utility helicopter 
replacement program, Combat Rescue Helicopter, the TH-XX 
trainer helicopter replacement program, and the Future Vertical 
Lift (FVL) development program.
    The committee will also focus oversight efforts on the need 
for advanced aircraft survivability equipment upgrades to 
provide warning and protection against evolving threats, as 
well as monitor the Improved Turbine Engine program designed to 
improve lift capability on the AH-64, UH-60, and FVL platforms.

                  COMMUNICATIONS AND NETWORK PROGRAMS

    The committee will continue to devote attention to 
oversight of the research, development, and procurement of 
tactical battlefield communications networks. Specifically, the 
committee will conduct oversight of the Army's plans for future 
battlefield network research and development programs, the 
Army's Tactical Network Modernization roadmap, and efforts on 
the incremental development and fielding of the Integrated 
Tactical Network and other tactical radio programs.

                INDIVIDUAL SOLDIER AND MARINE EQUIPMENT

    The committee will continue to devote attention to the 
oversight of research, development, and procurement of soldier 
and marine individual equipment, as well as other complementary 
personal protective equipment programs. Focus areas will 
continue to include, but are not limited to: advances in weight 
reduction (``lightening the load'') in individual equipment; 
development and procurement of the Enhanced Night Vision 
Goggle-Binocular; small arms and small caliber ammunition 
modernization with particular emphasis on the Army's next 
generation combat weapon; procurement and fielding of enhanced 
performance small caliber rounds; improved combat helmets to 
help mitigate traumatic brain injury; and the development and 
fielding of the Integrated Visual Augmentation System.

               FIXED-WING TACTICAL AND TRAINING AIRCRAFT

    During the 116th Congress, the committee will continue 
oversight efforts on the size, composition, capability, and 
capacity of the Department of Defense's tactical and training 
aircraft force structure. The committee will continue to engage 
the Department to understand its aircraft force-mix strategy 
and composition regarding procurement of 5th and 6th generation 
tactical aircraft to replace legacy tactical aircraft to ensure 
that mission areas related to air superiority, interdiction, 
and kinetic support to ground forces maintain combat 
effectiveness requirements. The committee will engage with the 
Air Force, Navy, and Marine Corps to understand the strategies 
to mitigate any potential tactical aircraft inventory 
shortfalls that would impact the Department's ability to meet 
the tenets and implementation of the National Defense Strategy. 
The committee will monitor the Department's efforts to improve 
capabilities and reliability among the legacy fleet of aircraft 
to maintain, and where necessary, gain sufficient force-
structure capacity and lethality that complements next-
generation aircraft. The committee will continue to monitor the 
impact on aviation readiness related to procurement of initial 
spare or repaired parts and supplies.
    During the 116th Congress, the committee will continue 
oversight of the F-35 program, particularly with regard to 
affordability issues and concerns related to program life-cycle 
cost, production and fielding schedules, aircraft and support 
system performance, and sustainment strategy planning and 
execution. The committee will also focus efforts on the F-35's 
performance during the Initial Operational Test and Evaluation 
phase, Block 4 software development, and the follow-on 
modernization program known as Continuous Capability 
Development and Delivery. The committee's area of focus on the 
F-35 will include but not be limited to production efficiency, 
software development and testing related to the operational 
flight program and mission data files, addressing F135 engine 
problems, the Autonomic Logistics Information System 
development, fielding and integration into operational F-35 
units, depot stand-up, and supply chain management required to 
support concurrent production and operational maintenance and 
sustainment requirements.
    In addition, the committee will have particular interest in 
any acquisition strategies related to the experimentation 
effort of the Air Force's Light Attack and Armed Reconnaissance 
platform. The committee will also continue to monitor Air Force 
and Navy execution of efforts for mitigating physiological 
episodes that were experienced by pilots operating certain 
tactical and training aircraft.

                    TACTICAL MISSILES AND MUNITIONS

    During the 116th Congress, the committee will continue to 
engage with the Department of Defense to understand testing and 
war-reserve material requirements and subsequent production 
strategies to support and maintain sufficient inventories of 
conventional missiles and munitions at an acceptable risk 
level. The committee will also focus its attention on the 
Department's identification, assessment, and strategies for 
management of risk in the associated defense industrial base 
and issues related to diminishing manufacturing sources, 
obsolescence issues, sole-source supply of components and major 
sub-systems, and production capabilities needed to support both 
annual production and surge requirements when necessary. The 
committee will monitor the stability and predictability of the 
Department's near and long-term budget planning and execution 
to control cost and reduce uncertainty in the industrial base.
    In particular, the committee will focus on the following 
missile and ammunition programs: high-energy lasers, Maneuver 
Short Range Air Defense, Indirect Fire Protection Capability, 
Iron Dome, Long-Range Precision Fires missile, Advanced 
Precision Kill Weapon System, Joint Air-to-Ground missile, the 
Army Tactical Missile System, and all weapons employed from 
fixed-wing tactical aircraft of the military services.

                         BOMBER FORCE STRUCTURE

    During the 116th Congress, the committee anticipates that 
the Air Force will continue to propose significant investments 
for engineering, manufacturing, and development of the B-21A 
Raider long-range strike bomber aircraft. While many details 
regarding the specific requirements and capabilities of the new 
bomber remain classified, the committee will maintain oversight 
of the new bomber acquisition program to ensure that the Air 
Force develops an affordable aircraft to timely meet future 
requirements and partially recapitalize the long-range strike 
bomber fleet.
    As Global Strike Command's bomber vector plan continues to 
develop, the committee will monitor how the Air Force chooses 
to invest and modernize its current fleet of bombers to ensure 
they can continue to effectively respond to current and future 
threats. Furthermore, the committee will continue to assess the 
bomber fleet's ability to comply with the Federal Aviation 
Administration's January 1, 2020, Next Generation Air Space 
Control mandate.

                       AERIAL REFUELING AIRCRAFT

    During the 116th Congress, the committee will review the 
Air Force aerial refueling aircraft modernization and 
recapitalization programs, along with the Navy's nascent 
refueling capability associated with the MQ-25 program.
    Currently, the Air Force requires 479 air refueling tankers 
to meet the National Military Strategy but only possesses 395 
KC-135 and 59 KC-10 tankers for a total of 454 tankers. The 
addition of KC-46A aircraft will eventually grow the tanker 
force to 479 aircraft. Subsequently, the Air Force plans to 
replace its older tankers one-for-one with the planned 179 KC-
46A aircraft. The remaining 300 KC-135 aircraft will need to be 
modernized. The committee will also monitor how the Air Force 
plans to conduct operations in a future contested airspace.
    The committee will also review the MQ-25 program as the 
Navy seeks to develop an unmanned aerial vehicle that provides 
air-refueling and intelligence, surveillance, and 
reconnaissance capabilities. The committee is concerned about 
limiting the scope of the MQ-25 to relieve the tanking burden 
borne by the F-18 fleet and to provide a modest level of 
additional ISR capability. The committee will also monitor the 
possibility to add additional capabilities to the MQ-25 should 
the Navy chooses to pursue them.

                            AIRLIFT PROGRAMS

    During the 116th Congress, the committee will continue to 
assess the risk in the Air Force's current plan to maintain the 
intratheater airlift aircraft inventory of 300 total aircraft. 
As such, the committee will assess the force structure results 
of the Mobility Capability Requirements Study that was required 
by the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2018 
(Public Law 115-91). While pleased with Air Force efforts to 
modernize Air National Guard and Reserve C-130H aircraft with 
Avionics Modernization Program increments 1 and 2, propulsion 
and propeller upgrades, the committee will continue to review 
the C-130H modernization program to ensure it is capable of 
meeting airlift requirements. The committee is committed in 
supporting technologies that increase capabilities, increase 
reliability and decrease overall life cycle costs.
    Regarding strategic airlift aircraft capabilities, the 
committee will continue to provide oversight of the C-5 and C-
17 modernization programs. With regard to the C-5, the 
committee will assess options associated with the Reliability 
Enhancement and Re-engine Program.
    The committee will continue oversight of all airlift 
aircraft inventories and capabilities during the 116th Congress 
to ensure that a robust and effective fleet of airlift aircraft 
is maintained to meet mobility airlift requirements of the 
Department of Defense.

                        SURFACE WARFARE PROGRAMS

    The Department of the Navy must expand the core 
capabilities of U.S. seapower to achieve a blend of peacetime 
engagement and major combat operations capabilities as part of 
the Navy's 355-ship requirement. In pursuing this goal, the 
committee will provide oversight of the composition, capacity, 
and capabilities of the surface fleet. The committee will also 
assess the large and small surface combatant requirements to 
ensure oversight of the force structure and the associated 
weapons and sensors employed on the surface force with a 
specific emphasis on Frigate capabilities. The committee will 
continue to conduct oversight of the Littoral Combat Ship and 
the sensors that will be fielded as part of the mission 
modules. Further oversight of the amphibious forces will also 
be pursued to include amphibious assault in a contested 
environment, integration of advanced data capabilities and the 
amphibious assault connectors. The committee will continue its 
oversight of the DDG-51 Arleigh Burke class Destroyer program 
and will follow the transition to the Flight III variant that 
will incorporate the new air and missile defense radar. The 
committee will also monitor the requirements associated with 
the new large surface combatant that the Navy indicates will be 
fielded in fiscal year 2023. In addition to the manned 
platforms, the committee will review options for the Navy to 
augment the surface force structure with both unmanned and 
optionally manned platforms. Finally, the committee will review 
the combat logistics forces and the Maritime Security Program 
to ensure sufficient capacity is available to support national 
security objectives.
    As part of this oversight, the committee will continue to 
place a significant emphasis on improving affordability in 
shipbuilding programs through: ensuring stable requirements; 
the use of acquisition best practices; stability within the 
overall program; increased reliance on common systems and open 
architecture; and industrial base capacity, process, and 
facility improvements at the shipyards.

                       UNDERSEA WARFARE PROGRAMS

    The ability to operate freely at sea is one of the most 
important enablers of joint and interagency operations, and sea 
control requires capabilities in all aspects of the maritime 
domain. There are many challenges to our ability to exercise 
sea control, perhaps none as significant as the growing number 
of nations operating submarines, both advanced diesel-electric 
and nuclear propelled. Exercising sea control in the undersea 
domain is essential to maintaining the freedom of navigation in 
support of U.S. maritime interests. The committee will continue 
to review the undersea domain to ensure warfare dominance. 
Specifically, the committee will review short- and long-term 
options to reverse the decline in the attack submarine force 
structure as well as options to augment the undersea fleet with 
unmanned underwater vehicles. The committee will also assess 
whether sufficient resources and technological maturity are 
available for the recapitalization of the ballistic missile 
submarine force. Additionally, the committee will closely 
monitor the development of the requirements associated with the 
follow-on attack submarine to the Virginia class. Finally, the 
committee will assess the weapons and sensors employed in the 
undersea domain to retain maritime dominance, to include the 
capacity and capabilities of unmanned undersea vehicles.
    As part of this oversight, the committee will place 
specific emphasis on the efficacy of multi-year procurement, 
rigorous assessment of requirements, and management of an 
expanding undersea industrial base capacity.

    MILITARY INTELLIGENCE, SURVEILLANCE, AND RECONNAISSANCE PROGRAMS

    The committee will focus oversight activities on cost, 
schedule, and performance outcomes of tactical manned and 
unmanned aerial (UAS) intelligence, surveillance, and 
reconnaissance (ISR) systems. The committee will examine the 
entire ISR enterprise for balance in inventory, satisfaction of 
military collection requirements, timeliness and redundancy of 
dissemination architecture, and modernization of analysis and 
exploitation capabilities for video and imagery. The committee 
will also scrutinize the Department of Defense's ISR policy 
development and implementation.
    In particular, the committee will evaluate the Department 
of Defense's long-term ISR architecture modernization and next-
generation acquisition strategy, the supporting analysis behind 
programmatic decisions, and the management of risk across ISR 
collection capabilities and capacities, and the corresponding 
resources to process, exploit, and disseminate raw data and 
finished analysis. The committee will monitor improvements made 
to ISR transmission and down-link architecture that provide 
rapid delivery of collected information supporting timely and 
effective defense operations.
    The committee's oversight efforts will focus on, but not be 
limited to, the following ISR programs: RQ-4 Global Hawk UAS 
Block 30 and Block 40, MQ-9 Reaper UAS, MQ-1C Gray Eagle UAS, 
MQ-4C Triton UAS, MQ-8 Fire Scout, MQ-25 Stingray, Marine Air 
Ground Task Force UAS Expeditionary, and U-2 aircraft.

                             NUCLEAR FORCES

    The committee oversees the atomic energy defense activities 
of the Department of Energy and nuclear policies and programs 
of the Department of Defense to ensure the safety, security, 
reliability, and credibility of the U.S. nuclear deterrent. The 
committee will ensure that we maintain a safe, secure, and 
reliable nuclear arsenal to address current and future threats. 
The committee will conduct oversight of the Department of 
Energy and the Department of Defense's nuclear modernization 
and sustainment plans, including programs and policies included 
in the 2018 Nuclear Posture Review.
    In particular, the committee will oversee funding levels 
and requirements for the nuclear deterrence mission and nuclear 
enterprise, including relevant nuclear delivery platforms and 
their associated warheads to ensure resources are provided and 
allocated effectively and efficiently across Department of 
Energy and Department of Defense. With regard to the Department 
of Defense, the committee will emphasize oversight of major 
acquisition programs that will recapitalize U.S. nuclear forces 
and the supporting complex for decades into the future, 
including but not limited to the Ground-based Strategic 
Deterrent system, the Long-Range Standoff cruise missile, and 
missiles associated with the new Columbia-class submarine. The 
committee will also place particular emphasis on investments in 
nuclear enterprise programs that fall under the purview of the 
Department of Energy, including but not limited to 
infrastructure investments, warhead life extension programs, 
stockpile stewardship programs, stockpile management programs, 
cost savings and efficiency initiatives, safety and security, 
and progress on the nuclear clean-up activities.
    In addition, the committee will continue oversight of the 
nuclear command and control programs that underpin a reliable 
nuclear deterrent.
    Alongside overseeing and authorizing U.S. nuclear 
enterprise programs, the committee will also monitor foreign 
nuclear weapon development and modernization programs. In 
addition to these programs, the committee will provide 
oversight of the U.S. nuclear policy and posture, extended 
deterrence policy, arms control activities, and nuclear force 
structure requirements. Particular emphasis will be placed on 
oversight of nuclear weapon employment and declaratory 
policies, force structure, arms control agreements, and 
modernization plans.

                            MISSILE DEFENSE

    The committee oversees the Department of Defense's efforts 
to develop, test, and field layered missile defense 
capabilities to protect the United States, its deployed forces, 
and allies and partners against missile threats.
    The committee will continue to place emphasis on cost-
effective and reliable missile defenses that contribute to 
strategic stability. The committee will continue to oversee 
U.S. homeland missile defense development, European Phased 
Adaptive Approach implementation, developmental and operational 
testing, cyber security to protect BMDS data, force structure 
and inventory requirements, continued integration of ``left-of-
launch'' capabilities, and science and technology investments 
(in areas such as boost-phase intercept, space sensor layer, 
and continuous improvements to discrimination). The committee 
will also monitor progress of the Department of Defense 
Conventional Prompt Strike program as a potential ``left-of-
launch'' capability and related policies that minimize the risk 
of ambiguity.
    The committee will oversee implementation of the 2019 
Missile Defense Review by the Department of Defense and 
opportunities to strengthen international missile defense 
cooperation with allies and partners to defend against 
ballistic and cruise missiles.
    The committee will continue to provide oversight of the 
roles, responsibilities, and acquisition policies of the 
Missile Defense Agency and military services as they relate to 
missile defense.
    The committee also intends to continue overseeing the 
Army's Lower Tier Air and Missile Defense System modernization 
efforts, including the Patriot weapon system, the Lower Tier 
Air and Missile Defense Sensor (as that program transitions to 
a rapid prototyping effort), and efforts to improve 
interoperability of Army and Ballistic Missile Defense System 
capabilities.

                        NATIONAL SECURITY SPACE

    The committee oversees the national security space policies 
and programs of the Department of Defense, including combat 
support agencies and elements of the Department of Defense that 
are also part of the intelligence community. The committee will 
place attention on current and projected foreign space threats 
and development of effective deterrence policies for space. The 
committee will also assess the Department's space security and 
defense programs to include space situational awareness, space 
protection, space control, resilience, operationally responsive 
space activities including capabilities for rapid constellation 
reconstitution and replenishment, and use of commercial 
capabilities and international cooperation.
    The committee will also focus on improving the organization 
and management of the Department's space program, and related 
policies, to posture the military to maintain our space 
advantage, address new threats in space, elevate the focus 
within the Department on space as a warfighting domain, and 
create a culture that recognizes the importance of space for 
national security.
    The committee will continue oversight of national security 
space activities in support of warfighter operations and plans; 
improvement of space acquisition strategies that provide 
necessary warfighter capability, while reducing cost and 
technical risk and supporting the industrial base; maintaining 
cost-effective and competitive assured access to space; efforts 
to address gaps in space capabilities for key warfighter needs; 
investments in science and technology to improve the 
capabilities of space systems; efforts to appropriately 
leverage commercial space capabilities; improvements of the 
synchronization between satellite, ground, and terminal 
acquisition programs; and efforts that develop and sustain an 
expert space workforce.

           Intelligence and Emerging Threats and Capabilities


                              INTELLIGENCE

    The committee will examine the organization, functions, and 
operations of the Defense Intelligence Enterprise to ensure 
comprehensive, timely, and objective intelligence support to 
Department of Defense plans and operations. The committee will 
provide oversight into the formulation and execution of the 
military intelligence program. In accordance with section 3038 
of title 50, United States Code, the committee will also 
scrutinize the management and execution of national 
intelligence program capabilities within Department activities 
to ensure these resources are adequate to satisfy the overall 
intelligence needs of the Department, and appropriately 
integrated with the intelligence activities of the Department.
    The committee will examine how the Defense Intelligence 
Enterprise is postured to analyze and address new and trending 
threats, while balancing intelligence support to established 
National Defense Strategy priority challenges with ongoing 
counterterrorism operations. The committee will focus on 
current and planned modernization activities, inclusive of 
developments in machine learning and artificial intelligence, 
across the Defense Intelligence Enterprise and intelligence 
community as a means to create current, informed foundational 
intelligence to support military operations and advanced 
weapons systems. The committee will continue to study the 
ongoing activities by Office of the Under Secretary of Defense 
for Intelligence (OUSD(I)) to balance roles and 
responsibilities of combat support agencies.
    Additionally, the committee will examine the roles and 
responsibilities of the OUSD(I), Director for Security Service 
in the development of an efficient, effective process to enable 
timely and comprehensive issuance of security clearances.
    Finally, the committee will conduct oversight of all 
intelligence organizations, programs, and activities of the 
Department of Defense in accordance with the committee's 
jurisdiction listed in clause 1(c) of rule X of the Rules of 
the House of Representatives. In coordination with the 
committee, the Subcommittee on Intelligence and Emerging 
Threats and Capabilities will continue to coordinate as 
appropriate with the House Permanent Select Committee on 
Intelligence on matters related to Department of Defense 
intelligence and counterintelligence activities in the course 
of oversight and the authorization of appropriations for 
intelligence activities shared by the two committees.

                         SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY

    The committee will ensure the Department of Defense fosters 
a robust and balanced science and technology ecosystem 
comprised of laboratories, test and evaluation entities, 
academia, and the private sector in order to deliver the best 
capabilities to the warfighter in the near, mid, and long-term. 
Specifically, the committee will conduct oversight of the 
Department's science and technology activities to ensure 
planning and execution of investments are aligned with national 
strategies and other interagency efforts to maintain 
technological superiority. This includes examination of the 
Department's efforts relating to the eight rapid technological 
advancements outlined in the National Defense Strategy: 
advanced computing; ``big data'' analytics; artificial 
intelligence; autonomy; robotics; directed energy; hypersonics; 
and biotechnology. Further, the committee will conduct 
oversight of science and technology investments in 
countermeasures to adversary capabilities and other emerging 
threats, such as infectious disease and demographic changes.
    The committee will also examine science and technology 
strategy and doctrine, concepts of employment, and other 
organizing concepts pursued by the military services and the 
Office of the Secretary of Defense. This includes: examination 
of how capabilities contribute to new security strategies; how 
they will be supported by rigorous technical analysis and 
relevant concepts of employment; and how the Department will 
develop plans to transition matured technologies to the field. 
The Subcommittee on Intelligence and Emerging Threats and 
Capabilities will continue to oversee performance of the 
Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, Defense Innovation 
Unit, and Strategic Capabilities Office, as well as other 
service-specific innovation centers and partnerships with 
private industry to ensure coordination, synchronization, 
transition of technology, and prudent use of fiscal resources.

                   MILITARY OPERATIONS IN CYBERSPACE

    Military operations in cyberspace have become increasingly 
important as state and non-state actors seek to exploit the 
information environment to achieve political, military, and 
economic objectives. Cyber operations by threat actors below 
the level of conflict, such as Russian cyber intrusions to 
undermine democratic institutions or exfiltration of controlled 
unclassified information from the defense industrial base by 
the People's Republic of China, pose a dynamic challenge to 
U.S. national security. It is anticipated that non-state actors 
and strategic competitors will increasingly build and integrate 
cyber espionage, attack, and influence capabilities into their 
efforts to influence U.S. policies and advance their own 
national security interests. Therefore, the Department of 
Defense, when appropriate, must be prepared to address cyber 
threats across the spectrum of operations and in all types of 
conflict.
    The committee will conduct oversight of cyber operations to 
ensure that the proper legal and policy frameworks are in place 
and adhered to. The committee will also scrutinize military 
cyber operations, specifically those operations executed under 
National Security Presidential Memoranda 13 and other relevant 
memoranda, as well associated presidential determinations and 
directives. The committee will ensure that military operations 
are properly coordinated and deconflicted with the interagency, 
integrated into combatant commanders' operational plans, 
include appropriate rules of engagement, and ensure that 
adequate capabilities exist or are in development to employ 
these cyberspace operational tools with rigor and discretion to 
support a full range of options for the Nation's decision 
makers.
    The committee expects transparency on sensitive military 
cyber operations in accordance with section 395 of title 10, 
United States Code, and transparency from the Administration on 
cyber authorities delegated by the National Command Authority 
to the Secretary of Defense for certain missions or objectives 
so the committee may oversee the policy and political 
implications of such operations.
    The committee will also examine the Department of Defense's 
cyber organization, manning, training and funding to ensure 
that the Cyber Mission Force and other military cyber forces 
are prepared to conduct the range of missions in the Nation's 
defense in concert with other U.S. Government agencies, and 
when appropriate, to support other interagency and 
international partners. This includes an examination of the 
roles and responsibilities for planning, coordinating, and 
executing military operations in cyberspace, such as 
understanding the supported and supporting combatant commands 
relationship.
    The committee will also focus oversight on the development 
of training, exercises, doctrine, tactics, techniques, and 
procedures for operating in the cyber domain, as well as 
oversee implementation of authorities provided in prior years' 
national defense authorization acts to promote workforce 
development and retention for civilian and military personnel, 
including implementation of the Cyber Excepted Service. 
Additionally, the committee will continue to oversee 
utilization of the limited acquisition authority granted in the 
National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2016 (Public 
Law 114-92) to the Commander, U.S. Cyber Command.

               OPERATIONS IN THE INFORMATION ENVIRONMENT

    The role of information has become increasingly important 
to military operations as the global information environment 
continues to evolve. Both state and non-state actors seek to 
exploit the information environment and spread disinformation 
to achieve political, economic, and military objectives in ways 
that undermine U.S. national security interests and challenge 
U.S. military operations.
    In addition to presenting challenges to U.S. national 
security, simultaneously, the global information environment 
provides an opportunity to gain an advantage in military 
planning and operations, as well as to achieve strategic U.S. 
objectives through a whole-of-government approach.
    The John S. McCain National Defense Authorization Act for 
Fiscal Year 2019 (Public Law 115-232) included a provision to 
strengthen the authority of the Department of State's Global 
Engagement Center to enhance integration between the Department 
of Defense and interagency in countering the narrative of both 
state and non-state actors. The committee will continue to 
examine ways to strengthen interagency collaboration and 
cohesion for effective strategic communications and influence 
activities in support of U.S. national security.
    Additionally, the committee will continue to conduct 
oversight of military operations in the information environment 
and other related efforts in the Department of Defense. This 
includes oversight of U.S. Special Operations Command as the 
joint proponent for military information support operations and 
implementation of section 1637 of the National Defense 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2018 (Public Law 115-91). The 
committee will also continue to examine Department of Defense 
agencies, services, and other elements roles and 
responsibilities in the information environment, as well as 
coordination and de-confliction mechanisms. Finally, the 
committee will conduct oversight of legal, operational, and 
funding authorities related to operations in the information 
environment.

    PROTECTING CRITICAL TECHNOLOGY AND NATIONAL SECURITY INFORMATION

    According to a memorandum issued by the Secretary of 
Defense on October 24, 2018, ``each year, it is estimated that 
American industry loses more than $600 billion to theft and 
expropriation. Far worse, the loss of classified and controlled 
unclassified information is putting the Department's 
investments at risk and eroding the lethality and survivability 
of our forces.'' Protection of key data, classified and 
controlled unclassified information, and intellectual property, 
when appropriate, is necessary for the U.S. to maintain a 
warfighting advantage.
    The committee will conduct oversight of the Department of 
Defense's efforts to protect critical technology and national 
security information while maintaining civil liberties and an 
open research environment. This includes oversight of the 
Department's activities to improve cybersecurity standards and 
compliance, as well as Department efforts to better understand 
counterintelligence threats in academia. Additionally, the 
committee will focus on investing in and promoting innovation, 
science, technology, engineering, and math in academia to 
ensure a strong science and technology future workforce capable 
of promoting U.S. technological superiority.

               OVERSIGHT OF SENSITIVE MILITARY OPERATIONS

    The committee will continue to conduct extensive oversight 
of sensitive military operations outside of the United States 
and outside of the Republic of Iraq, the Syrian Arab Republic, 
and the Islamic Republic of Afghanistan in accordance with 
section 130f of title 10, United States Code. As appropriate, 
oversight will be conducted in classified forums. The committee 
will pay particular attention to the legal, policy, 
operational, and funding authorities, including section 127e of 
title 10, United States Code, associated with such operations. 
In conducting this oversight, the committee will also review 
and consider presidential guidance documents, operational 
authorities granted to military commanders by the Department of 
Defense, use of funding authorities granted by Congress, and 
other relevant information necessary for oversight. Further, 
the committee will ensure that sensitive military operations 
conducted outside of the United States and outside of Iraq, 
Syria, and Afghanistan are in line with national security 
strategy and policy, as well as supported and coordinated as 
appropriate with interagency partners. Finally, the committee 
will oversee implementation of provisions relating to reducing 
the likelihood of civilian casualties included in the National 
Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2018 (Public Law 115-
91) and the John S. McCain National Defense Authorization Act 
for Fiscal Year 2019 (Public Law 115-232), and examine ways to 
further reduce the likelihood of civilian casualties resulting 
from military operations.

                           IRREGULAR WARFARE

    Malign actors employ both military and non-military means 
such as surrogates, cyber operations, disinformation campaigns, 
and political bribes in order to accomplish their strategic 
national objectives. These hybrid warfare tactics applied 
across the spectrum of conflict by threat actors undermine the 
national security interests of the United States, our allies, 
and our partners. The Department of Defense must address 
irregular threats in concert with other Government agencies and 
like-minded allies. Elsewhere in the oversight plan, the 
committee articulates these irregular warfare challenges and 
intent to conduct oversight of programs and activities related 
to addressing such threats.
    During the 116th Congress, the committee will conduct 
oversight of section 1202 of the National Defense Authorization 
Act for Fiscal Year 2018 (Public Law 115-91), which provides 
the Department of Defense limited authority to provide support 
to foreign forces, irregular forces, groups, or individuals 
engaged in supporting or facilitating ongoing and authorized 
irregular warfare operations by U.S. Special Operations Forces.
    The committee will examine the prudent and appropriate use 
of this limited authority and related operational authorities. 
Further, the committee will ensure support provided under this 
authority is coordinated with other agencies, aligned with the 
geographic combatant commander's intent, and approved by the 
relevant chief of mission.

                        COMMITTEE ON THE BUDGET

 OVERSIGHT PLAN OF THE COMMITTEE ON THE BUDGET FOR THE 116TH CONGRESS 
                        HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES

                  COMMITTEE JURISDICTION AND OVERSIGHT

    Under clause 2(d) of House Rule X, the Chair of each 
Committee is required to prepare, in consultation with the 
Ranking Member, and submit to the Committees on Oversight and 
Government Reform and House Administration an oversight plan by 
March 1 of the first session of each Congress.\1\ The Budget 
Committee's oversight responsibilities are determined by both 
the breadth of the federal budget and the relatively narrow 
focus of the Committee's legislative jurisdiction.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    \1\Consistent with House rules, a copy of this plan was provided to 
each Member of the Committee at least seven calendar days before 
submission.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Under clause 1(d)(1) of House Rule X, the primary 
responsibility of the Budget Committee is to develop a 
concurrent resolution on the budget for the fiscal year. This 
concurrent resolution sets spending and revenue levels in 
aggregate and across budget functions (a set of programs that 
serve a shared purpose or activity, such as agriculture, 
health, or national defense).
    Although the subject matter of the budget is inherently 
broad, the Committee's formal oversight responsibility focuses 
on laws governing the budget process and the agencies 
responsible for administering elements of those laws. Under 
clauses 1(d)(1)-(3) of House Rule X, the major laws falling 
within its oversight include the Budget and Accounting Act of 
1921, the Congressional Budget Act of 1974, the Balanced Budget 
and Emergency Deficit Control Act of 1985, the Budget 
Enforcement Act of 1990, the Statutory Pay-As-You-Go Act of 
2010, and the Bipartisan Budget Act of 2018. The two agencies 
with primary responsibility for administering elements of these 
laws and hence which fall under the Committee's jurisdiction 
are the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) and the 
Congressional Budget Office (CBO).
    In addition to these general oversight responsibilities, 
the Budget Committee has the special oversight responsibility 
under clauses 3(c) and 4(b) of House Rule X to study the effect 
on budget outlays of existing and proposed legislation and to 
request and evaluate continuing studies of tax expenditures.

                 OVERSIGHT PLAN FOR THE 116TH CONGRESS

                           Budget Priorities

    In the process of developing the annual concurrent budget 
resolution, the Committee will hold hearings and receive 
testimony from Members of Congress, Cabinet-level and other 
federal officials, and expert witnesses to review the 
President's budget submissions and to review other budget 
priorities.
    In the 116th Congress, the Committee will be active in its 
oversight duties. The Committee plans to focus on a range of 
issues, including immigration, climate change, health care, and 
tax policy. The Committee will focus on how these issues, in 
the broadest terms, impact the federal budget.
    The Committee will continually assess the performance of 
federal agencies in both administration and service delivery by 
reviewing performance data in the President's budget 
submissions and the relevant reports and audits of the 
Government Accountability Office and the Offices of the 
Inspectors General. It will also review budget rules and 
processes.
    The Committee will draw on the authorizing committees' 
Views and Estimates, which are submitted to it pursuant to 
section 301(d) of the Congressional Budget Act of 1974, to 
coordinate development of the annual concurrent budget 
resolution.

                           Budget Enforcement

    The Committee will provide ongoing oversight of OMB's 
implementation of budget submission, control, execution, and 
enforcement procedures under the Budget and Accounting Act of 
1921, the Congressional Budget Act of 1974, the Budget 
Enforcement Act of 1990, the Balanced Budget and Emergency 
Deficit Control Act of 1985, the Statutory Pay-As-You-Go Act of 
2010, the Bipartisan Budget Act of 2018, and other applicable 
laws. In addition, the Committee will examine the accuracy, 
timeliness, and responsiveness of OMB.
    The Committee will work with the Appropriations and 
authorizing committees to ensure that spending and tax 
legislation does not breach the levels set in the budget 
resolution, as required under sections 302(f) and 311(a) of the 
Congressional Budget Act of 1974. The Committee will also 
monitor compliance with the House Pay-As-You-Go (PAYGO) rule 
requiring that direct spending increases and revenue losses be 
offset with either direct spending reductions or revenue 
increases.

                  Federal Spending and Tax Incentives

    The Committee will evaluate continuing studies of tax 
incentives and spending by the federal government and consider 
whether changes are warranted.

                           OVERSIGHT SCHEDULE

    The following are the Committee's initial plans for 
hearings and other oversight activities:
First Session (2019)
Winter 2019--Hearing on CBO's Economic and Budget Outlook: 
Director of CBO.

Winter 2019--Hearing on the President's Fiscal Year 2020 
Budget: Director of OMB.

Winter 2019--Hearing on the President's Fiscal Year 2020 
Budget: Secretary of the Treasury.

Winter 2019--Hearing on the President's Fiscal Year 2020 
Budget: Members of Congress.

Winter 2019--Receive Views and Estimates from other committees 
to coordinate development of the annual concurrent budget 
resolution.

Winter/Spring 2019--Hearing on the economy: Chairman of the 
Federal Reserve Board.

    Possible additional hearings on the budgetary implications 
of climate change, immigration reform, policies to make health 
care more affordable and accessible including a single-payer 
health care system, retirement security, and other topics to be 
announced.
Second Session (2020)
Winter 2020--Hearing on CBO's Economic and Budget Outlook: 
Director of CBO.

Winter 2020--Hearing on the economy: Chairman of the Federal 
Reserve Board.

Winter 2020--Hearing on the President's Fiscal Year 2021 
Budget: Director of OMB.

Winter 2020--Hearing on the President's Fiscal Year 2021 
Budget: Secretary of the Treasury.

Winter 2020--Hearing on the President's Fiscal Year 2021 
Budget: Members of Congress.

Winter 2020--Receive Views and Estimates from other Committees 
to coordinate development of the annual concurrent budget 
resolution.

    Possible hearings on the causes, effects, and budgetary 
implications of rising income inequality and other topics to be 
announced.

                             MINORITY VIEWS

  OVERSIGHT PLAN OF THE COMMITTEE ON THE BUDGET FOR THE 116TH CONGRESS

    The Oversight Plan presented by Committee Democrats 
reflects misplaced and misguided priorities. The Oversight Plan 
fails to show a serious focus on the number one issue facing 
our Committee--the national debt.
    It is unfortunate that the Committee's Oversight Plan for 
the 116th Congress fails to fully address major areas of 
oversight within the Committee on the Budget's jurisdiction, 
including oversight of the Congressional Budget Office. 
Additionally, the Committee's oversight plan addresses various 
policy issues that impact the federal budget without adequately 
focusing on the Nation's fiscal condition.

                         Budget Process Reform

    It is appreciated that Committee Democrats have included a 
reference to budget process reform after consulting with 
Committee Republicans. However, it is a sincere hope this issue 
will be prioritized and acted upon soon. Since the adoption of 
the Congressional Budget Act in 1974, the budget process has 
been amended several times, adding complexity and confusion to 
an already complicated process. As a result, the process has 
become cumbersome, frustrating, and ineffective. Congress now 
frequently abandons it in favor of ad hoc procedures. In 
addition, fiscal conditions have changed dramatically over the 
past forty-five years, including the inexorable growth of 
mandatory spending as a share of the total federal budget and 
the recent explosion of government debt that threatens to 
overwhelm the federal budget and the economy.
    In the second session of the 115th Congress, the Joint 
Select Committee on Budget and Appropriations Process Reform 
(Joint Select Committee) produced a bipartisan, bicameral 
consensus package of reforms to the federal budget process 
after holding numerous hearings and meetings. During the final 
debate on the bill, many members indicated that they had no 
objection to the package's underlying reforms. However, the 
bill and report failed to secure the necessary supermajority of 
votes to pass under the Joint Select Committee's rules.
    Despite the unfortunate outcome of the Joint Select 
Committee's work, there is no refuting that the federal budget 
process is still broken. It is vital that Congress continue 
efforts to reform the budget and appropriations process this 
Congress, and in the years beyond. It is the sincere hope of 
Committee Republicans that budget process reform efforts 
continue in the 116th Congress on a bipartisan and bicameral 
basis.

              Oversight of the Congressional Budget Office

    The Congressional Budget Office's (CBO) primary 
responsibility and function is to serve the House and Senate 
Committees on the Budget by providing information regarding the 
federal budget, legislation considered by Congress, federal 
revenues, and related matters. However, Committee Democrats 
failed to outline any plan regarding oversight of CBO. Last 
Congress, the Committee held a series of CBO oversight 
hearings, which were educational for all Members of the 
Committee. The Committee values CBO's recent transparency 
efforts and responsiveness to Congress. It is the view of 
Committee Republicans that the Committee should continue 
oversight efforts of CBO in the 116th Congress. Instead, 
Committee Democrats have prioritized examining the Office of 
Management and Budget's (OMB) ``accuracy, timeliness, and 
responsiveness.'' While Committee Republicans believe oversight 
of OMB is important to the Committee's work, questions remain 
as to what these oversight efforts may involve.

                   Misplaced Budget Policy Priorities

    The Budget Committee has a special oversight responsibility 
to study the effects of existing and proposed legislation. 
However, it is the view of Committee Republicans that the 
topics presented in the Oversight Plan reflect a missed 
opportunity. Listed are hearings on a range of issues, but 
notably absent is the $21 trillion issue that will impact every 
individual in this country--the national debt. The opioids 
crisis and rising college costs are also examples of national 
priority issues which deserve attention from a federal budget 
context. It is unclear why Committee Democrats would ignore 
these issues.
    Committee Republicans also believe that affordable health 
care is an important issue that needs to be addressed, but 
instead Committee Democrats have forsaken exploring any other 
options other than their preordained choice of government run, 
single-payer health care. Medicare for All is likely to delay 
getting tests and treatments, eliminate private insurance which 
currently serves 198 million Americans, require massive tax 
increases and cost at least an additional $30 trillion over the 
first 10 years. Committee Republicans would welcome a sincere 
conversation about how to lower health care costs and improve 
access, but it is noteworthy that Committee Democrats chose to 
highlight only one proposal--radical, unbelievably expensive, 
and disruptive Medicare for All. This is disappointing for the 
Committee tasked with fiscal responsibility.

                    COMMITTEE ON EDUCATION AND LABOR

                             116TH CONGRESS

  SUBMISSION OF OVERSIGHT PLAN OF THE COMMITTEE ON EDUCATION AND LABOR

    Mr. Scott, from the Committee on Education and Labor, 
submitted to the Committee on Oversight and Reform and the 
Committee on House Administration the following.

                             116TH CONGRESS

  SUBMISSION OF OVERSIGHT PLAN OF THE COMMITTEE ON EDUCATION AND LABOR

              Preparation and Submission of Oversight Plan

    Each standing committee of the U.S. House of 
Representatives (other than the Committee on Appropriations, 
the Committee on Ethics, and the Committee on Rules) is 
required to prepare and submit an oversight plan at the 
beginning of each Congress. Specifically, clause 2(d)(1) of 
Rule X of the Rules of the House of Representatives states:

    (d)(1) Not later than March 1 of the first session of a 
Congress, the chair of each standing committee (other than the 
Committee on Appropriations, the Committee on Ethics, and the 
Committee on Rules) shall--
          (A) prepare, in consultation with the ranking 
        minority member, an oversight plan for that Congress;
          (B) provide a copy of that plan to each member of the 
        committee for at least seven calendar days before its 
        submission; and
          (C) submit that plan (including any supplemental, 
        minority, additional, or dissenting views submitted by 
        a member of the committee) simultaneously to the 
        Committee on Oversight and Reform and the Committee on 
        House Administration.

          Jurisdiction of the Committee on Education and Labor

    Rule X of the Rules of the House of Representatives vests 
in the Committee on Education and Labor (Committee) 
jurisdiction over issues dealing with students, education, 
workers, and labor policy. Specifically, clause 1(e) of Rule X 
vests the Committee with jurisdiction over the following 
subject-matter:
          (1) Child labor.
          (2) Gallaudet University and Howard University and 
        Hospital.
          (3) Convict labor and the entry of goods made by 
        convicts into interstate commerce.
          (4) Food programs for children in schools.
          (5) Labor standards and statistics.
          (6) Education or labor generally.
          (7) Mediation and arbitration of labor disputes.
          (8) Regulation or prevention of importation of 
        foreign laborers under contract.
          (9) Workers' compensation.
          (10) Vocational rehabilitation.
          (11) Wages and hours of labor.
          (12) Welfare of miners.
          (13) Work incentive programs.
          (14) Organization, administration, and general 
        management of the Department of Education.
          (15) Organization, administration, and general 
        management of the Department of Labor.

                   General Oversight Responsibilities

    Clause 2 of Rule X of the Rules of the House of 
Representatives provides in part:
    (a) The various standing committees shall have general 
oversight responsibilities as provided in paragraph (b) in 
order to assist the House in--
          (1) its analysis, appraisal, and evaluation of--
                  (A) the application, administration, 
                execution, and effectiveness of Federal laws; 
                and
                  (B) conditions and circumstances that may 
                indicate the necessity or desirability of 
                enacting new or additional legislation; and
          (2) its formulation, consideration, and enactment of 
        changes in Federal laws, and of such additional 
        legislation as may be necessary or appropriate.
    (b)(1) In order to determine whether laws and programs 
addressing subjects within the jurisdiction of a committee are 
being implemented and carried out in accordance with the intent 
of Congress and whether they should be continued, curtailed, or 
eliminated, each standing committee (other than the Committee 
on Appropriations) shall review and study on a continuing 
basis--
          (A) the application, administration, execution, and 
        effectiveness of laws and programs addressing subjects 
        within its jurisdiction;
          (B) the organization and operation of Federal 
        agencies and entities having responsibilities for the 
        administration and execution of laws and programs 
        addressing subjects within its jurisdiction;
          (C) any conditions or circumstances that may indicate 
        the necessity or desirability of enacting new or 
        additional legislation addressing subjects within its 
        jurisdiction (whether or not a bill or resolution has 
        been introduced with respect thereto); and
          (D) future research and forecasting on subjects 
        within its jurisdiction.
    (2) Each committee to which subparagraph (1) applies having 
more than 20 members shall establish an oversight subcommittee, 
or require its subcommittees to conduct oversight in their 
respective jurisdictions, to assist in carrying out its 
responsibilities under this clause. The establishment of an 
oversight subcommittee does not limit the responsibility of a 
subcommittee with legislative jurisdiction in carrying out its 
oversight responsibilities.

                 Exercise of Oversight Responsibilities

    The Constitution of the United States vests in Congress the 
authority and responsibility to make laws and ensure that those 
laws are properly enforced and enacted. Oversight is a 
constitutional prerogative, an important responsibility of the 
Congress, and a core objective of the Committee. Accordingly, 
the Committee will thoroughly oversee and investigate the 
various departments, agencies, and programs within its 
jurisdiction. In so doing, the Committee will actively consult 
with House committees that have concurrent or related 
jurisdiction.
    In its oversight proceedings, the Committee will make full 
use of hearings in Washington, D.C. and of regional field 
hearings to ensure all relevant voices are heard and included 
as part of the official record. Among other investigative 
techniques, the Committee will visit relevant sites, correspond 
with affected parties, request briefings by federal agencies 
and departments, review assessments and analyses by the 
Congressional Research Service (CRS), and review audits and 
investigations by the Government Accountability Office (GAO) 
and the Offices of the Inspectors General of the U.S. 
Departments of Education (ED), Labor (DOL), Health and Human 
Services (HHS), Agriculture (Ag), and Justice (DOJ).
    The Committee will lead aggressive oversight in its areas 
of jurisdiction, which include programs and statutes 
administered and enforced by ED, DOL, HHS, Ag, DOJ, and various 
independent agencies as well as the organization, 
administration, and general management of ED and DOL. The 
Committee will work to ensure that these programs and statutes 
are administered consistent with constitutional requirements of 
faithful execution of laws passed by Congress and long-
established principles of federalism. Additionally, the 
Committee will conduct oversight to ensure that they are 
operated and executed in an effective, efficient, and 
transparent manner as well as follow congressional intent in 
their scope, activities, and operations.
    The Committee has identified priority areas for oversight 
and investigation in the 116th Congress. These areas include, 
but are not limited to, the following:
           Implementation of the Every Student Succeeds 
        Act: Since the passage of the bipartisan Every Student 
        Succeeds Act (ESSA) in 2015, there have been no 
        oversight hearings at which ED officials have testified 
        regarding ESSA's implementation. In the 116th Congress, 
        the Committee will conduct oversight on ESSA's 
        implementation.
           Recommendations on School Safety: The 
        Committee will conduct oversight on the Federal School 
        Safety Commission's report as well as on ED's interest 
        in redirecting taxpayer money legislatively directed to 
        schools for mental health treatment, anti-bullying 
        programming, and drug prevention to the purchasing of 
        guns for teachers and school staff.
           Education in the Wake of Natural Disasters: 
        The Committee will assess and conduct oversight on the 
        recovery and rebuilding of schools in Puerto Rico and 
        the U.S. Virgin Islands following the 2017 hurricane 
        season, the Northern Mariana Islands following Super 
        Typhoon Yutu, and other areas impacted by disasters.
           Students and Workers with Disabilities: The 
        Committee will conduct oversight on ED's rulemaking to 
        impede implementation of the Individuals with 
        Disabilities Education Act's significant 
        disproportionality requirements that were enacted to 
        address disparities in the treatment of disabled 
        students of color. The Committee also will monitor the 
        activities of DOL's Office of Disability Employment 
        Policy (ODEP) to ensure it is fulfilling its mission to 
        improve educational opportunities for people with 
        disabilities and provide technical assistance to 
        employers to support people with disabilities.
           Student and Taxpayer Protections: The 
        Committee will conduct oversight on ED's efforts to 
        roll back consumer protections and expose taxpayers to 
        greater risk of waste, fraud, and abuse of federal 
        funds through Higher Education Act rulemaking.
           Student Aid: The Committee will conduct 
        oversight on the policies and priorities of the Office 
        of Federal Student Aid (FSA), especially as they relate 
        to for-profit colleges, the administration of federal 
        financial aid programs including the servicing of 
        federal student loans, the Public Student Loan 
        Forgiveness program, and the Experimental Sites 
        Initiative.
           Department of Labor's Training and 
        Enforcement Programs: The Committee will conduct 
        oversight on DOL's workforce training programs and the 
        Department's enforcement policies and practices as they 
        impact our nation's workers. This includes reviewing 
        the policies and expenditures of apprenticeship 
        programs operated by DOL, including both the Registered 
        Apprenticeship Program and the newly developed Industry 
        Recognized Apprenticeship Program. The Committee will 
        review the Occupational Safety and Health 
        Administration's actions impacting health and safety 
        standards, the Wage and Hour Division's actions 
        regarding overtime pay, workers' rights to retain tips, 
        and child labor protections under the Fair Labor 
        Standards Act. The Committee will evaluate whether the 
        Mine Safety and Health Administration's standards and 
        policies are sufficient to stem rising rates of black 
        lung disease and changes to its enforcement policies.
           Guestworker Programs: The Committee will 
        conduct oversight on the implementation of the 
        provisions in the Immigration and Nationality Act that 
        protect the wages and working conditions of both U.S. 
        and foreign workers.
           Collective Bargaining Rights: The Committee 
        will conduct oversight and investigations to ensure 
        that the National Labor Relations Board is fairly 
        enforcing the National Labor Relations Act.
           Retirement Security and Multiemployer 
        Pensions: The Committee will continue to monitor the 
        impact to retirement savers from the Fifth Circuit 
        Court of Appeals' decision to vacate DOL's fiduciary 
        rule. The Committee will also continue to examine the 
        costs and consequences to workers, retirees, 
        businesses, and communities, as well as to the Pension 
        Benefit Guaranty Corporation, if Congress does not 
        address the multiemployer pension crisis.
           Opioid Prescribing Policies: The Committee 
        will conduct oversight on DOL's policies regarding 
        opioid prescribing in federal workers' compensation 
        programs.
           Black Lung Benefits Program: The Committee 
        will review factors impacting the solvency of the Black 
        Lung Disability Trust Fund, including the December 31, 
        2018, sunset of the black lung excise tax.
           International Labor Rights: The Committee 
        will investigate, where appropriate, international 
        labor issues, including those involving trade 
        agreements and labor rights abuses, and oversee the 
        management and operations of the International Labor 
        Affairs Bureau within DOL.
           Affordable Care Act: The Committee will 
        conduct oversight on the Administration's 
        implementation of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) as well 
        as the Administration's efforts to undermine the law's 
        protections for Americans with pre-existing conditions.
           Short-Term, Limited Duration Health Plans: 
        The Committee will conduct oversight to assess the 
        impact on workers and consumers of the Administration's 
        rule to expand the use of short-term health plans.
           Association Health Plans: The Committee will 
        conduct oversight on DOL's rule to promote enrollment 
        in Association Health Plans (AHPs) and its impact on 
        consumers and the health care system.
           Civil Rights: The Committee will oversee the 
        implementation of civil rights laws pertaining to 
        education, labor and employment, and health care to 
        ensure that such protections are sustained and robustly 
        enforced. Oversight shall include reviewing the 
        policies and priorities of ED's Office for Civil 
        Rights, DOL's Office of Federal Contract Compliance 
        Programs, and the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity 
        Commission.
           Juvenile Justice: The Committee will 
        carefully monitor and conduct oversight on the 
        implementation of the bipartisan Juvenile Justice and 
        Delinquency Prevention Act (JJDPA), which was enacted 
        in 2018.
           Unaccompanied Minors: The Committee will 
        assess and conduct oversight on the provision of 
        education and related services to unaccompanied minors 
        in secure detention due to the Administration's family 
        separation policy.
           Child Nutrition: The Committee will monitor 
        and conduct oversight on the Department of 
        Agriculture's administration of child nutrition 
        programs within the Committee's jurisdiction and any 
        proposed policies and regulations that impact these 
        nutrition programs.
    The Committee reserves the right to review and investigate 
general legislative, administrative, and regulatory issues 
affecting its jurisdiction.
    Signatories:
                                   Robert C. ``Bobby'' Scott.
                                   Susan A. Davis.
                                   Raul M. Grijalva.
                                   Joe Courtney.
                                   Marcia L. Fudge.
                                   Gregorio Kilili Camacho Sablan.
                                   Frederica S. Wilson.
                                   Suzanne Bonamici.
                                   Mark Takano.
                                   Alma S. Adams.
                                   Mark DeSaulnier.
                                   Donald Norcross.
                                   Pramila Jayapal.
                                   Joseph D. Morelle.
                                   Susan Wild.
                                   Josh Harder.
                                   Lucy McBath.
                                   Kim Schrier.
                                   Lauren Underwood.
                                   Jahana Hayes.
                                   Donna E. Shalala.
                                   Andy Levin.
                                   Ilhan Omar.
                                   David J. Trone.
                                   Haley M. Stevens.
                                   Susie Lee.
                                   Lori Trahan.
                                   Joaquin Castro.

                             MINORITY VIEWS

                             116TH CONGRESS

  SUBMISSION OF OVERSIGHT PLAN OF THE COMMITTEE ON EDUCATION AND LABOR

    The American people deserve an open, accountable government 
that works efficiently and effectively. Congress must use its 
constitutional authority to ensure that laws are properly 
enforced, taxpayer money is spent wisely in accordance with 
congressional intent, and government policy does not harm the 
American people. Congressional oversight of federal programs 
and activities is a critical part of this authority. Oversight 
is a constitutional prerogative, an important responsibility of 
the Congress, and a core objective of the Committee. 
Accordingly, the Committee should responsibly oversee, 
investigate, and hold accountable the various agencies, 
departments, and programs within its jurisdiction.
    Oversight may not be glamorous or exciting, but it is 
important to be diligent, thoughtful, and responsible in its 
implementation. It is equally important to be objective. It 
would be inappropriate and a misuse of our authority to fall 
prey to rumors or presume conclusions to the Committee's 
investigations and inquiries before they are completed. If the 
Committee's work is to be effective, then it is important for 
all members to keep open minds, examine potential problems, 
assess the actual facts and evidence, and finally determine if 
there are concerns that need to be addressed.

                 Exercise of Oversight Responsibilities

    Under the Rules of the House of Representatives, the 
Committee has jurisdiction over programs and statutes 
administered and enforced by the U.S. Departments of Education, 
Labor, Health and Human Services, Agriculture, Justice, and 
various independent agencies. The Committee should continue to 
ensure these programs and statutes are operated in an effective 
and efficient manner and administered consistent with the 
appropriate federal role and following congressional intent. In 
so doing, the Committee should actively consult with House 
committees that have concurrent or related jurisdiction.
    The Committee should pursue several particular areas for 
oversight and investigation in the 116th Congress. These areas 
are discussed below:
           Every Student Succeeds Act. In 2015, 
        Congress passed, and the President signed, a 
        bipartisan, bicameral bill to replace No Child Left 
        Behind with commonsense reforms to allow states and 
        communities the flexibility needed to provide all 
        students an excellent education. The Committee should 
        continue to work with the Trump administration to 
        ensure the Every Student Succeeds Act is properly 
        implemented, including following the significant 
        changes made to the Preschool Development Grants.
           Student Aid. The U.S. Department of 
        Education manages $1.4 trillion in outstanding federal 
        student loans and disburses billions in grants and 
        work-study funds each year. The Committee should 
        continue to monitor the costs and performance of these 
        programs.
           Higher Education Regulations. Institutions 
        of higher education are subject to myriad federal 
        regulations and reporting requirements that are often 
        burdensome and costly. The Committee should continue 
        its oversight of regulatory policies and challenge 
        those that enlarge the federal footprint in higher 
        education, which tends to interfere with academic 
        freedom, infringe on the authorities of the states, 
        limit student choice, and unfairly target particular 
        sectors of higher education.
           Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act. In 
        2014, Congress passed, and the President signed, a 
        bipartisan, bicameral bill to fix the nation's broken 
        workforce development system. The Workforce Innovation 
        and Opportunity Act was focused on helping workers 
        attain skills for 21st century jobs, providing greater 
        accountability to taxpayers, and helping to put 
        Americans back to work. The Committee should continue 
        to work with the administration to ensure the law is 
        properly implemented.
           Affordable Care Act. The Committee should 
        continue oversight of the Affordable Care Act and 
        related health care issues. In particular, the 
        Committee will focus on how the ACA regulations and 
        sub-regulatory guidance have harmed employers' ability 
        to provide high quality, affordable health care to 
        employees, including educators and school-staff, and 
        what the Trump Administration has done to provide 
        relief from these costly and burdensome requirements.
           Employer and Employee Protections. The 
        Committee should conduct oversight and investigations, 
        as appropriate, to ensure employee and employer rights 
        under the National Labor Relations Act (NLRA) are 
        protected and applied consistently and without bias. 
        The Committee should work to ensure the National Labor 
        Relations Board properly fulfills its responsibilities, 
        giving particular scrutiny to the Board's anticipated 
        changes to the joint-employer standard, union election 
        rules, unit determinations, and employees' right to 
        decertify unions under the NLRA.
           Retirement Security. The retirement system 
        works best when workers have access to voluntary, 
        robust, portable, and secure savings options. The 
        Committee should monitor the U.S. Department of Labor's 
        activities to ensure regulations and sub-regulatory 
        guidance benefit the long-term retirement security of 
        working families and do not restrict access to 
        affordable retirement advice.
           Multiemployer Pensions. Extreme and 
        continuing underfunding in multiemployer defined 
        benefit pension plans threaten the Pension Benefit 
        Guaranty Corporation's (PBGC) solvency as well as 
        benefits promised to workers and retirees who 
        participate in these plans. To prevent further 
        deterioration of the plans' funding and to protect the 
        security of worker and retiree benefits, the Committee 
        should explore meaningful and responsible structural 
        reforms, consistent with the Employee Retirement Income 
        Security Act of 1974 that ensure the future stability 
        of multiemployer pension plans. The Committee should 
        continue to monitor the implementation of the 
        Multiemployer Pension Reform Act of 2014 and the 
        activities of the PBGC to develop needed bipartisan 
        reforms that will protect both taxpayers and workers 
        while encouraging employer participation.
           Regulatory Process. An open and transparent 
        process for revising and implementing regulations will 
        benefit students, institutions, employers, and workers 
        alike. The Committee should work to ensure that 
        stakeholders have sufficient time to review and provide 
        public comment on regulatory actions within the 
        Committee's jurisdiction.
           Wage and Hour Laws. Various federal labor 
        laws were enacted during the past century for a very 
        different workforce from the one that exists today. The 
        Committee should continue to examine how these laws 
        affect economic growth and job creation. In addition, 
        the Committee should continue to encourage the agencies 
        in its jurisdiction, especially the U.S. Department of 
        Labor, to focus on compliance assistance to help 
        employers understand and follow federal labor laws.
           Government Spending. The Committee should 
        closely monitor all agencies under its jurisdiction to 
        determine whether the expenditure of taxpayers' money 
        is leading to efficient, high-quality outcomes for 
        students and workers.
           Union Transparency. Workers who have chosen 
        to be represented by unions want to be sure their dues 
        are being properly managed. The Committee should 
        examine the efficacy of current union reporting 
        requirements and work to ensure that employees have 
        access to information that clearly shows how their dues 
        are being spent. In particular, the Committee should 
        conduct oversight to ensure federal labor laws are 
        properly applied to worker centers.
           Executive Action. The Obama administration 
        took a number of executive actions that encroach on the 
        constitutional authority of Congress to write the law. 
        The Committee should continue to monitor and analyze 
        those actions and work with the current administration 
        to reign in those efforts and check executive 
        authority. It should also be prepared to resist any 
        executive actions in this administration that could 
        encroach on the constitutional authority of Congress.
    Along with the oversight objectives already outlined, the 
Committee should examine the programs within its jurisdiction 
whose authorizations have expired or will soon expire. Based 
upon the results of that oversight, the Committee should 
determine the appropriate next steps.

                               Conclusion

    Committee Republicans believe responsible, fact-driven 
oversight of the agencies over which this Committee has 
jurisdiction is vitally important. The Committee must ensure 
that agencies are being good stewards of hard-working taxpayer 
dollars and are implementing the laws Congress passed with 
fidelity. Committee Republicans looks forward to pursuing 
oversight opportunities that meet those goals and look forward 
to working with our Democrat colleagues in this endeavor.
    Signatories:
                                   Virginia Foxx.
                                   Phil Roe.
                                   Glenn Thompson.
                                   Tim Walberg.
                                   Brett Guthrie.
                                   Bradley Byrne.
                                   Glenn Grothman.
                                   Elise Stefanik.
                                   Rick Allen.
                                   Francis Rooney.
                                   Lloyd Smucker.
                                   Jim Banks.
                                   Mark Walker.
                                   James Comer.
                                   Ben Cline.
                                   Russ Fulcher.
                                   Steven Watkins.
                                   Ron Wright.
                                   Daniel Meuser.
                                   William Timmons.
                                   Dusty Johnson.

                    COMMITTEE ON ENERGY AND COMMERCE

         OVERSIGHT PLAN OF THE COMMITTEE ON ENERGY AND COMMERCE

              U.S. HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES 116TH CONGRESS

               THE HONORABLE FRANK PALLONE, JR., CHAIRMAN

    Rule X, clause 2(d) of the Rules of the House requires each 
standing Committee to develop an oversight plan for the two-
year period of the Congress and to submit the plan to the 
Committee on Oversight and Reform and to the Committee on House 
Administration not later than March 1 of the first session of 
the Congress.
    This is the oversight plan of the Committee on Energy and 
Commerce for the 116th Congress. It includes areas where the 
Committee expects to conduct oversight during the 116th 
Congress, subject to staff and resource limitations, but does 
not preclude oversight or investigation of additional matters. 
The Committee will continue to consult with other committees 
that have jurisdiction over the same or related laws, programs, 
or agencies with the objective of ensuring maximum coordination 
and cooperation. Specifically, the Committee will continue to 
work with other committees to facilitate expiring programs, 
coordinate with the Congressional Budget Office regarding 
lapsed authorizations and upcoming expirations, and hold member 
and staff-level meetings with relevant committees and House and 
Senate conferences.

                    ENERGY AND ENVIRONMENTAL ISSUES

                             Climate Change

    Climate change affects every region across the country and 
inflicts large costs on the U.S. economy each year. States, 
cities, tribes, and communities across America are taking steps 
to mitigate and prepare for the impacts of climate change. The 
Committee intends to examine the economic, environmental, and 
health effects of climate change, including disproportionate 
impacts on low income communities and other vulnerable 
populations. The Committee will also identify opportunities for 
federal action to reduce negative impacts, create new 
businesses and jobs, and make all communities safer and more 
resilient to changes already underway. The Committee will also 
review actions needed to meet our obligations under the Paris 
Climate Agreement and examine the climate impacts of regulatory 
efforts and programs by the Department of Energy (DOE), the 
Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the Department of Health 
and Human Services (HHS) and other agencies within the 
Committee's jurisdiction. The Committee expects to examine 
governmental and nongovernmental activities and policies to 
reduce greenhouse gas emissions. The Committee also anticipates 
assessing state funding programs and other efforts by agencies 
within the Committee's jurisdiction to ensure states and local 
communities have the resources needed to prepare for and 
respond to severe weather events and natural disasters.

                             Clean Air Act

    The Committee expects to review significant rulemakings and 
program implementation under the Clean Air Act and associated 
public health and environmental benefits. Review will also 
include oversight of EPA decisions, management strategies, and 
other actions affecting efforts to meet Clean Air Act 
standards, including EPA actions that affect state efforts to 
meet public health goals. In addition, the Committee will 
examine the current role of and proposed changes to the 
accounting of cost, benefits, and feasibility in Clean Air Act 
rulemakings. The Committee will also continue to conduct 
oversight of EPA's implementation of the Renewable Fuel 
Standard.

                Environmental Contamination and Cleanup

    The Committee will conduct oversight of EPA's 
implementation of the Comprehensive Environmental Response 
Compensation & Liability Act (CERCLA), including the 
development and implementation of the recommendations from the 
Superfund Task Force. The Committee will also oversee 
implementation of recent updates to the Brownfields program. 
The Committee anticipates investigating the impacts of climate 
change and extreme weather on exposure from contaminated sites 
and cleanup costs. The Committee will also examine EPA's 
decision not to finalize financial responsibility requirements 
under CERCLA Section 108(b) and the impacts of that decision on 
cleanups and taxpayers.

                       Hazardous and Solid Waste

    The Committee will examine state and federal implementation 
of legislation governing disposal of coal ash, including the 
EPA's response to recent court decisions finding federal 
regulations insufficient and state response to recent extreme 
weather events that led to coal ash releases.

              Regulation of Dangerous Chemical Substances

    The Committee will conduct oversight of EPA's 
implementation of the reformed Toxic Substances Control Act as 
the Agency moves forward with the first risk evaluations and 
risk management rules under the new law. This oversight will 
look at decisions being made by EPA to exclude certain uses, 
exposures, vulnerable populations, and scientific studies from 
their review. The Committee will examine the impacts these 
decisions are having on the most vulnerable and 
disproportionately impacted, including workers, infants and 
children, and hot spot communities. The Committee will also 
examine risk management activities and decisions related to 
pesticides and other non-TSCA regulated chemicals and actions 
of other agencies in the Committee's jurisdiction charged with 
addressing these issues, including DOE and the Agency for Toxic 
Substances and Disease Registry.

                    Drinking Water Risks and Safety

    The Committee will examine drinking water risks, including 
risks from lead service lines and emerging contaminants. The 
Committee will conduct oversight of state and federal 
implementation of drinking water standards, and EPA's process 
for adopting new drinking water standards. In addition, the 
Committee will continue to review the impact on communities of 
regulatory ambiguity under the Safe Drinking Water Act 
regarding hydraulic fracturing, as well as government 
activities in hydraulic fracturing research and regulation.

                     EPA Management and Operations

    The Committee will conduct general oversight of EPA. This 
will include review of agency funding decisions, resource 
allocations, office and program reorganization, grants, 
research activities, contracts awarded to outside parties, 
enforcement activities. The Committee will also conduct general 
oversight of EPA relations with state and local governments, 
public transparency, and adherence to economic, procedural, 
public health, and environmental standards in regulatory 
actions. The Committee intends to examine how staff reductions 
and cuts to the EPA budget would impact the agency's programs 
and effectiveness in protecting human health and the 
environment.

                         National Energy Policy

    The Committee will examine policies that relate to energy 
efficiency and conservation, and the exploration, production, 
distribution, and consumption of electricity, oil and natural 
gas, coal, hydroelectric power, nuclear power, and renewable 
energy. The Committee will inquire into the impact of 
government policies and programs on the exploration, 
production, storage, supply, marketing, pricing, and regulation 
of domestic energy resources, including issues relating to the 
nation's energy infrastructure. The Committee will also 
continue to examine safety, security, public health and climate 
issues relating to energy exploration, production, and 
distribution.

           Electricity and Natural Gas Markets and Regulation

    The Committee will review the federal electricity and 
natural gas policies of the Federal Energy Regulatory 
Commission (FERC) and DOE related to competitive markets for 
compliance with relevant statutes. The Committee will also 
examine the activities of the FERC and DOE relating to 
protection of consumers and the environment with regard to 
electricity, natural gas and hydroelectric power, including the 
development of efficient and vigorous wholesale markets for 
electricity. Additionally, the Committee will closely examine 
actions regarding pipeline safety by the Department of 
Transportation's Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety 
Administration as well as actions regarding pipeline security 
by the Department of Homeland Security's Transportation 
Security Administration.

                  Energy and Fuel Efficiency Mandates

    The Committee will continue to oversee federal programs 
setting energy efficiency standards for home appliances crafted 
by DOE, to ensure that the programs maximize the benefit to 
consumers. The Committee will also examine greenhouse gas and 
fuel economy standards for motor vehicles developed by EPA and 
the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), 
respectively.

  Management of the Department of Energy and its National Laboratories

    The Committee will continue to oversee governance, 
management, and operations issues at DOE, including the 
National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) and the 
National Laboratories. This will include a continued focus on 
DOE's management of the contractors that operate the national 
laboratories. The Committee's oversight work will also include 
review of the implementation of security and safety reforms at 
NNSA and DOE facilities, ongoing safety and security matters, 
and the Office of Environmental Management's cleanup program, 
as well as the work of the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety 
Board. This work will also include the Committee's oversight 
functions over DOE grant and loan guarantee programs as well as 
programs and activities relating to nonmilitary energy research 
and development.

                             Nuclear Waste

    The Committee will continue to review the actions of DOE 
and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) regarding 
obligations of these agencies under the Nuclear Waste Policy 
Act. The Committee will also examine other nuclear waste 
cleanup and disposal programs under its jurisdiction.

                   The Nuclear Regulatory Commission

    The Committee will continue to examine the programs and 
activities of NRC. The Committee will review NRC's budget 
requests and conduct oversight of the manner in which the 
Commission discharges its various responsibilities, including 
the Commission's regulatory actions, licensing activity, the 
safety and security of nuclear power facilities, and nuclear 
materials licensees.

                     HEALTH AND HEALTH CARE ISSUES

                        The Affordable Care Act

    The Committee will continue to examine issues related to 
the Department of Health and Human Services' (HHS) 
implementation of the Affordable Care Act (ACA), including 
attempts to administratively and illegally undermine the ACA 
and the Administration's refusal to defend the 
constitutionality of the law. This oversight will also examine 
the effect that Administration decisions have had on access to 
comprehensive, affordable health care.

                     HHS Management and Operations

    The Committee will conduct general oversight of HHS and its 
agencies to ensure it is fulfilling its mission to enhance and 
protect the health of all Americans.

                Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services

    The Committee will review the management, operations, and 
activities of the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services 
(CMS) and the programs it administers. The Committee will study 
the positive economic effect of Medicaid expansion and impact 
of Medicaid expansion on access to care, and review insurance 
coverage rates for children and state outreach efforts to 
enroll uninsured children. The Committee will examine attempts 
to administratively and illegally undermine the Medicaid 
program, which provides critical services to over 70 million 
individuals. The Committee will also examine the increasing 
out-of-pocket drug costs for seniors under the Medicare program 
and the positive effects of giving the Secretary of HHS the 
authority to negotiate drug prices.

            Food and Drug Administration and Product Safety

    The Committee will review the management, operations, and 
activities of the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), including 
the ability of the agency to ensure the safety of the nation's 
food, drugs, devices, and cosmetics. The Committee will examine 
FDA's statutory authorities for protecting the nation's food 
supply with a view towards identifying any gaps and whether 
FDA's financial and personnel resources are adequate to protect 
the public from unsafe food. The Committee will also 
investigate FDA's enforcement of current drug supply chain and 
safety laws and its foreign drug inspection program. The 
Committee will also review the FDA's efforts to combat youth 
access to tobacco and electronic nicotine delivery systems 
products, as well as the agency's enforcement and 
implementation of the Tobacco Control Act. The Committee will 
also review FDA's efforts to improve and modernize the 
regulatory framework for medical devices and the impact for 
medical device safety. Further, the Committee will review the 
safety of cosmetics and personal care products in light of the 
substantial increase in cosmetic imports, one of FDA's larger 
categories of imports.

                Public Health and Pandemic Preparedness

    The Committee will examine the roles of various federal 
agencies responsible for protecting the public health, 
including program management and implementation. Specifically, 
the Committee will continue to conduct oversight of federal 
efforts on pandemic preparedness, including influenza 
preparedness, as well as the United States' response to 
emerging foreign infectious disease threats. The Committee will 
also continue its review of efforts to combat the opioid 
epidemic, including state and federal responses, and the roles 
of participants in the health care delivery chain. 
Additionally, the Committee will also study the role our 
federal public health agencies play and the actions such 
agencies can take to reduce health disparities among racial and 
ethnic minorities, and to address the health impacts caused by 
gun violence in our communities. Further, the Committee will 
also continue to monitor implementation of mental health 
reforms and the work done by the Assistant Secretary for Mental 
Health and Substance Use, as well as issues related to the 
health and safety of athletes, including youth athletes.

                       Health Care Affordability

    The Committee will examine the Administration's actions and 
policies related to the rising costs of health care and 
prescriptions drugs. This will include examining the role FDA 
and the National Institutes of Health (NIH) play in the 
discovery, development, and delivery of innovative medications. 
The Committee will also investigate the impacts higher health 
care costs, including rising out-of-pocket costs and surprising 
billing, are having on American families, including seniors, 
and what actions may be taken to improve affordability within 
our health care system. The Committee will also continue to 
review policies proposed by the Administration to lower the 
costs of prescription drug prices and will investigate how 
actions taken by brand name and generic drug manufacturers have 
impacted such costs, including abuses and gaming of current 
regulatory requirements. Further, the Committee will study the 
role rebates play in the costs of prescription drugs and to our 
federal health care system and study how changes to rebates may 
impact such costs.

                Reunification of Unaccompanied Children

    The Committee will conduct oversight of HHS efforts to 
reunify and provide appropriate care to unaccompanied children. 
The Committee will also review HHS's role in significant 
policies that affect the placement and coordination of 
unaccompanied children. Review will also include HHS-contracted 
facilities' compliance with federal laws and regulations, and 
HHS's oversight thereof.

                         Indian Health Service

    The Committee expects to investigate the quality and 
adequacy of health care prevention and treatment services 
provided by the Indian Health Service. The Committee will also 
review current implementation of the Indian Health Care 
Improvement Act and how this law and the care provided by the 
Indian Health Service is working for American Indians and 
Alaska Natives in order to inform the Committee on ways to 
improve care for those who rely on these services.

                  COMMUNICATIONS AND TECHNOLOGY ISSUES

      Federal Communications Commission Management and Operations

    The Committee will continue to conduct oversight of the 
operations, management, and activities of the Federal 
Communications Commission (FCC), including the effect of its 
decisions on protecting consumers, promoting privacy and data 
security, increasing the availability of broadband, 
technologies and services, increasing competition, and ensuring 
adequate emergency communications capability. Additionally, the 
Committee will evaluate the effect of FCC actions on network 
resiliency and public safety, as well as data, video, voice, 
and audio services.

 National Telecommunications and Information Administration Management 
                             and Operations

    The Committee will continue to conduct oversight of the 
operations, management, and activities of the National 
Telecommunications and Information Administration (NTIA) within 
the Department of Commerce, including its efforts to promote 
cybersecurity, supply chain security, consumer privacy, and the 
responsible use of emergency consumer communications 
technologies. Additionally, the Committee will evaluate the 
work of the NTIA in representing the interests of the United 
States in international meetings and negotiations relating to 
telecommunications and internet governance.

  Broadband Internet Deployment, Affordability Adoption, and Openness

    The Committee will conduct oversight of funding mechanisms 
for broadband deployment and adoption, including the Universal 
Service Fund and whether such programs adequately and 
efficiently promote broadband deployment and adoption for 
consumers. The Committee will also oversee the effect 
deregulation has had on the availability, affordability, and 
adoption of broadband. The Committee will exercise its 
jurisdiction to oversee the process--and the effects on 
consumers, small business, and free speech--associated with the 
repeal of net neutrality. The Committee will exercise its 
jurisdiction over broadband to ensure continued growth and 
investment in the internet. The Committee will also continue to 
exercise its jurisdiction over wireless and wired 
communications to ensure our nation's policies governing voice, 
video, audio, and data services are promoting investment, 
innovation, access, affordability, and job creation.

                      Public Safety Communications

    The Committee will continue to examine the progress being 
made to ensure that first responders have interoperable 
communications capabilities with local, state, and federal 
public safety officials, including through the efforts of the 
Emergency Communications Division within the Department of 
Homeland Security. The Committee will also examine the progress 
being made by the First Responder Network Authority in carrying 
out the mandates of the Middle Class Tax Relief and Job 
Creation Act of 2012. In addition, the Committee will conduct 
oversight regarding the implementation of legacy 911 and Next 
Generation 911 (NG911) services. The Committee will review 
efforts to promote deployment of these advanced systems and 
challenges to realizing ubiquitous NG911.

                          Spectrum Management

    The Committee will continue to oversee the Federal 
Communications Commission's and the National Telecommunications 
and Information Administration's (NTIA) management and 
allocation of the nation's spectrum for government and 
commercial use to ensure efficient use of public airwaves for 
consumers. The Committee will further examine whether plans for 
allocating spectrum encourage competition, benefit consumers, 
and are in the public interest. The Committee will oversee FCC 
and NTIA implementation of the Middle Class Tax Relief and Job 
Creation Act of 2012, the Bipartisan Budget Act of 2015 and the 
RAY BAUM's Act.

                CONSUMER PROTECTION AND COMMERCE ISSUES

                          Privacy and Security

    The Committee will examine issues relating to the privacy 
and security of methods, information, and data collected by 
businesses about consumers and the potential for improving 
protection and benefiting consumers. The Committee will also 
continue to investigate whether all companies that collect 
consumer data are implementing data security and privacy 
standards that ensure consumers' personal information is not 
stolen or misused.

   Consumer Product Safety Commission Management and Operations and 
                          Consumer Protection

    The Committee will continue to review the Consumer Product 
Safety Commission's overall operations, including the 
effectiveness of its rulemaking, its enforcement activities, 
engagement in standard-setting activities, and the 
modernization of its staff and infrastructure. The Committee 
will also exercise its jurisdiction to improve the safety of 
products purchased and used by consumers to prevent injuries 
and deaths.

        NHTSA Management and Operations and Motor Vehicle Safety

    The Committee will continue oversight of the National 
Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), including the 
effectiveness of the agency's regulations, investigations, 
structure, research activities, and enforcement actions 
pertaining to motor vehicle safety. The Committee will examine 
NHTSA's ability to effectively oversee advancing safety 
technologies including semi-autonomous and autonomous 
technologies. The Committee will also examine whether NHTSA 
effectively monitors and investigates safety issues, and 
whether it effectively manages recalls. The Committee will also 
work to improve motor vehicle safety to protect drivers, 
passengers, and all others who share the roadways.

    Federal Trade Commission Management and Operations and Consumer 
                               Protection

    The Committee will review the management, authorities, 
operations, rulemaking, and enforcement actions of the Federal 
Trade Commission. The Committee will review consumer protection 
activities related to privacy, data security, and false and 
deceptive advertising.

     Consumer Financial Protection Bureau Management and Operations

    The Committee will review the management, operations, 
rulemaking, and enforcement actions of the Consumer Financial 
Protection Bureau, and whether the Bureau is achieving its 
consumer protection mission.

Department of Commerce Management and Operations and Manufacturing and 
                                 Trade

    The Committee will conduct oversight of the Commerce 
Department and its efforts to promote manufacturing and 
exports. The Committee will monitor and examine interstate 
commerce as well as bilateral agreements and multilateral trade 
agreements as those agreements relate to services, commodities, 
and industries within the Committee's jurisdiction, including 
energy, telecommunications, consumer products, electronic 
commerce, food, and drugs. The Committee will examine whether 
these agreements adequately protect the interests of domestic 
and foreign workers, the environment, and consumers. The 
Committee will also explore the state of manufacturing in the 
United States to identify factors that are hampering or 
furthering U.S. competitiveness and factors that benefit or 
hurt American workers.

                             MISCELLANEOUS

                             Cybersecurity

    The Committee will continue to examine the protection of 
information and technology vital to our national and economic 
security by examining vulnerabilities and paths to defend 
against future attacks. The Committee will conduct oversight of 
actions and programs of the National Institute of Standards and 
Technology as well as efforts of relevant agencies to implement 
the Homeland Security Act of 2002. Additionally, the Committee 
will review the efforts of agencies within its jurisdiction to 
secure their networks. The Committee will also examine 
initiatives to improve cybersecurity both in the private and 
public sectors, and review efforts at agencies within the 
Committee's jurisdiction to regulate cybersecurity.

                 Bioterrorism Preparedness and Response

    The Committee will continue to monitor the roles of HHS 
agencies in assisting the nation's capability, detection, and 
response to possible biological attacks. The Committee will 
also evaluate the potential impact and preparedness of the 
nation's public health system. The Committee will continue to 
review the extent of the coordination between HHS and the 
Department of Homeland Security (DHS), especially as it relates 
to Project Bioshield, and implementation of the Public Health 
Security and Bioterrorism Preparedness and Response Act of 2002 
by HHS.

         Federal Oversight of High-Containment Bio Laboratories

    The Committee will conduct oversight of issues related to 
high-containment bio laboratories, which handle some of the 
most dangerous and exotic diseases, including anthrax, 
smallpox, Ebola virus, and foot and mouth disease. Among the 
issues under review will be the adequacy of the security and 
practices of high-containment bio laboratories and federal 
efforts to oversee the laboratories, and whether some of these 
efforts are overlapping and duplicative.

              Safety and Security for Chemical Facilities

    The Committee will conduct oversight of mandates across 
agencies to ensure the safety and security of chemical 
facilities, including implementation of DHS's Chemical 
Facilities Anti-Terrorism Standards Program and EPA's Risk 
Management Planning program. The Committee will also examine 
threats to these facilities from climate change and extreme 
weather.

                Scientific and Risk Assessment Programs

    The Committee will review programs to assess the 
objectives, transparency, and integrity of scientific 
assessments that inform regulatory and public health policies. 
The Committee will examine issues relating to the numerous 
Federal science programs assessing public health risks, 
including the Integrated Risk Information System at the EPA, 
the Report on Carcinogens produced by the National Toxicology 
Program at HHS, and assessments proposed or ongoing in other 
Federal departments and agencies.

                         Waste, Fraud and Abuse

    The Committee will conduct oversight of departments and 
agencies under its jurisdiction to ensure adequate and prompt 
implementation of recommendations from the Government 
Accountability Office, Offices of Inspectors General, and other 
sources to eliminate waste, fraud, and abuse.

                        Critical Infrastructure

    The Committee will examine DHS's activities with respect to 
identifying high-priority assets and implementing plans to 
protect these assets in areas within the Committee's 
jurisdiction. The Committee will also examine the activities of 
DOE, FERC, and other Federal agencies related the physical and 
cybersecurity of the nation's energy infrastructure, including 
DOE's authorities and responsibilities as the sector-specific 
agency for energy security. The Committee will also conduct 
oversight of HHS and EPA's responsibilities and authorities as 
sector-specific agencies for activities related to the nation's 
critical infrastructure for communications, chemicals, 
emergency services, and others within the Committee's 
jurisdiction. Additionally, the Committee will examine the 
roles and responsibilities of other relevant agencies such as 
the FCC as well as the private sector.

                           Nuclear Smuggling

    The Committee will continue to monitor private sector and 
Federal government efforts at seaports, border crossings, and 
mail facilities. The Committee's review will examine and assess 
DOE and U.S. Customs and Border Protection efforts, including 
international efforts, aimed at detecting and preventing the 
smuggling of dangerous commerce, particularly radiological and 
nuclear weapons of mass destruction.

                Online Platform And Consumer Protection

    The Committee will examine the effect of online platform 
practices on the public good, free speech, and democratic 
principles. In particular, the Committee will review the effect 
on consumers of certain content moderation techniques and the 
potential for algorithmic bias and discrimination. The 
Committee will also review the extent to which competition 
exists among online platforms, and how consolidation affects 
consumers.

  Diversity and Inclusion in Federally-Funded Entities and Activities

    The Committee will provide oversight over all agencies 
under its jurisdiction to promote policies of diversity and 
inclusion in order to ensure that these federally-funded 
agencies are representative of the nation as a whole and are 
working to support the interests of all communities and all 
segments of the overall population.

                    COMMITTEE ON FINANCIAL SERVICES

  OVERSIGHT PLAN OF THE COMMITTEE ON FINANCIAL SERVICES FOR THE 116TH 
                                CONGRESS

    Pursuant to clause 2(d)(1) of rule X of the House of 
Representatives, the following constitutes the oversight plan 
of the Committee on Financial Services for the 116th Congress. 
It includes areas in which the Committee and its subcommittees 
expect to conduct oversight during the 116th Congress; it does 
not preclude oversight or investigation of additional matters 
or programs as they arise. The Committee will consult, as 
appropriate, with other Committees of the House that may share 
jurisdiction on any of the subjects listed below.

                   HOUSING AND COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT

    Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) and U.S. 
Department of Agriculture (USDA). The Committee will monitor 
the budget requests submitted by HUD and USDA for programs 
under the Committee's jurisdiction, including careful 
consideration of any legislative recommendations included in 
those requests, and will review HUD's and the Rural Housing 
Service's (RHS) general codes of conduct and other policies.
    Homelessness. The Committee will examine the current state 
of homelessness in the United States of America and the federal 
response to ending homelessness, including oversight of the 
Continuum of Care (CoC) and Emergency Solutions Grant (ESG) 
programs under the Department of Housing and Urban Development 
(HUD), the HUD Veteran Affairs Supported Housing program (HUD-
VASH), as well as efforts by the U.S. Interagency Council on 
Homelessness (USICH) to coordinate various federal agencies 
towards the national goals to end homelessness. The Committee 
will review the causes and possible solutions to address 
homelessness, including in parts of the country where 
homelessness has reached crisis levels. The Committee will also 
consider ways to better serve those who are at risk of 
homelessness.
    Rental Housing Crisis. The Committee will examine the 
current rental housing crisis that is burdening families across 
the country with unaffordable rents. The Committee will examine 
the role of existing federal housing programs in addressing the 
rental housing crisis, including public housing, Section 8 
Housing Choice Vouchers (HCVs), Section 8 project-based rental 
assistance (PBRA), the Section 202 Supportive Housing for the 
Elderly program, the Section 811 Supportive Housing for Persons 
with Disabilities program, the HOME Investment Partnerships 
program (HOME), the Low Income Housing Tax Credit (LIHTC) 
program, and the Housing Trust Fund (HTF). As part of its 
review, the Committee will examine the conduct of landlords 
participating in these programs as well as investigate HUD's 
oversight of landlord participants to ensure rules and 
regulations are being followed. The Committee will also review 
the limitations of existing programs at current funding levels. 
The Committee will consider solutions to address the rental 
housing crisis, including proposals to enhance preservation of 
affordable rental housing, increase the affordable rental 
housing stock, and ensure that affordable rental housing is 
accessible for persons who are elderly and/or disabled. The 
Committee will monitor HUD's implementation and oversight of 
the Moving to Work (MTW) demonstration programs and the effects 
of such programs on tenants.
    Public Housing. The Committee will examine the rising 
maintenance and capital needs of the aging public housing stock 
and the limitations of current federal funding levels to 
address these needs. As part of its examination, the Committee 
will investigate the presence of lead, mold, and other health 
hazards in the nation's public housing system and seek ways to 
ensure capital repairs are made in order to improve the health 
and well-being of residents. The Committee will review the role 
of public housing as part of a federal strategy to address 
affordable housing needs and will monitor HUD's use of the 
Rental Assistance Demonstration (RAD) and the demolition and 
disposition processes as they affect public housing and its 
residents.
    Rural Housing. The Committee will examine the affordable 
housing needs in rural communities and whether there are 
limitations in meeting those needs by existing programs because 
of current funding levels. In particular, the Committee will 
examine the aging stock of properties with Section 515 Rural 
Rental Housing Loans and 516 Farm Labor Housing Loans, and the 
adequacy of the USDA's efforts for preserving these properties 
and preventing tenant displacement. The Committee will consider 
legislation to help preserve these properties and prevent the 
displacement of tenants. The Committee will also monitor USDA's 
management of the Section 521 Rental Assistance (RA) program, 
the Rural Development Voucher program, the Section 502 Direct 
and Guaranteed Loan programs the Multifamily Housing 
Preservation and Revitalization Demonstration Loans and Grants, 
and the Section 523 Mutual Self-Help grant program.
    Community Development. The Committee will consider 
opportunities to better leverage and coordinate housing 
development with neighborhood resources such as transportation 
and community centers through programs like the Community 
Development Block Grant (CDBG).
    Disaster Recovery, Resilience, and Sustainable Development. 
The Committee will conduct oversight of the Community 
Development Block Grant Disaster Recovery (CDBG-DR) program and 
ongoing efforts to provide relief for disaster-stricken areas, 
with an emphasis on the timeliness of Federal Register notice 
publications, Action Plan reviews, any administrative delays in 
the disbursement process, and the monitoring of State and 
Territory funds received in connection with the 2017 and 2018 
natural disasters. The Committee will review proposals to 
enhance our nation's ability to withstand future disasters in 
the face of climate change, which is contributing to increasing 
frequency and magnitude of natural disasters. The Committee 
will also examine proposals to transition to more efficient and 
sustainable homes.
    Fair Housing. The Committee will conduct oversight of fair 
housing enforcement under HUD, including reviewing the 
integrity of investigations being carried out by the Office of 
Fair Housing and Equal Opportunity (FHEO). The Committee will 
also monitor HUD's ongoing rulemaking processes on the 
Affirmatively Furthering Fair Housing (AFFH) mandate and the 
disparate impact standard under the Fair Housing Act.
    Native American and Native Hawaiian Housing. The Committee 
will conduct oversight of programs under the Native American 
Housing and Self Determination Act of 1996 (NAHASDA) and 
consider proposals for reauthorization of those programs. The 
Committee will also monitor HUD's administration of the recent 
appropriation of an additional $100 million for the Native 
American Housing Block Grants program, which will be allocated 
through a competitive grant process.
    Housing Finance and Access to Homeownership. The Committee 
will examine the health of our housing finance system and the 
extent to which it is serving all creditworthy borrowers, 
especially among low and moderate income (LMI), minority, 
rural, and other underserved borrowers. The Committee will 
consider proposals to reform the housing finance system.
    Federal Housing Finance Agency (FHFA), Federal National 
Mortgage Association (Fannie Mae), Federal Home Loan Mortgage 
Corporation (Freddie Mac), Federal Home Loan Banks (FHLBs). The 
Committee will monitor the operations, activities and 
initiatives of the FHFA, and review its general code of conduct 
and other agency policies. The Committee will monitor Fannie 
Mae and Freddie Mac's activities under conservatorship, 
including their recent pilot programs exploring front-end 
credit risk sharing and recent policy changes allowing for 
waivers of appraisal requirements. The Committee will also 
review the FHFA's proposed rule related to capital held by 
Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac. The Committee will monitor the 
capital requirements and financial stability of the FHLB 
system, as well as the FHLB system's ability to fulfill its 
housing and community economic development mission and provide 
liquidity to member banks in a safe and sound manner.
    Government National Mortgage Association (Ginnie Mae). The 
Committee will examine Ginnie Mae to ensure that the agency has 
the necessary resources, procedures, and oversight to manage 
its portfolio, including Ginnie Mae's response to its growing 
exposure to nonbank risks.
    Federal Housing Administration (FHA). The Committee will 
examine FHA to ensure that it has the necessary resources, 
procedures, and oversight to manage its portfolio, including 
ongoing challenges due to an aging technological 
infrastructure. The Committee will also review the FHA's 
premium rates.
    Private Mortgage Insurance (PMI). The Committee will 
examine the role that private mortgage insurance plays in the 
housing finance system in providing access to homeownership and 
consider the effects of capital requirements placed on PMI 
companies by Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac.
    Mortgage Servicing. The Committee will examine the adequacy 
of existing regulatory requirements and oversight of the 
servicing industry, including the adequacy of the federal 
response to the growing share of nonbank servicers. The 
Committee will consider whether FHFA needs additional authority 
to establish prudential management and operations standards for 
its servicers. The Committee will also consider legislative 
solutions to enhance FHA's oversight and enforcement of its 
loss mitigation requirements and to address policies that may 
cause unnecessary foreclosures on seniors with reverse 
mortgages and on those who have been affected by natural 
disasters.

                               INSURANCE

    National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP). The Committee will 
examine the role of the NFIP in providing affordable insurance 
to homeowners, renters, and businesses, investing in 
mitigation, and providing maps to aid communities in their 
flood plain management efforts. The Committee will examine 
proposals to reauthorize and reform the NFIP to enhance 
affordability, mapping, and mitigation, and to improve the 
efficiency and transparency associated with the processing of 
claims submitted by policyholders. The NFIP is set to expire on 
May 31, 2019.
    Federal Insurance Office (FIO). The Committee will conduct 
oversight of FIO's work on domestic and international insurance 
policy, including the extent to which traditionally underserved 
communities and consumers have access to affordable insurance 
products.
    Terrorism Risk Insurance Program. The Committee will 
examine proposals to reauthorize and reform the Terrorism Risk 
Insurance Act, which is set to expire on December 31, 2020.
    Insurance Sector Supervision. The Committee will monitor 
the insurance sector generally, which may include examining the 
role of capital requirements in the insurance sector, including 
state, federal, and international efforts to revise capital 
requirements for insurance companies, the application of 
federal capital requirements for insurance companies that own 
depository institutions, the role of state guaranty funds, 
issues related to consumer protection and discrimination in the 
insurance sector, and issues or gaps in the regulation of 
insurers that could contribute to a systemic crisis in the 
insurance industry or the U.S. financial system. The Committee 
will also review implementation of the Military Personnel 
Financial Services Protection Act, which was enacted in 
response to abuses in the marketing and sale of securities and 
life insurance products to servicemembers.
    International Insurance Developments. The Committee will 
monitor developments related to international regulatory 
standards for insurance companies, including actions taken by 
the Financial Stability Board, the International Association of 
Insurance Supervisors, and the Organization for Economic 
Cooperation and Development. The Committee will also monitor 
any developments related to covered agreements made pursuant to 
the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act 
of 2010 (Dodd-Frank Act).
    Cyber Insurance. The Committee may examine developments 
related to the market for cyber insurance and the insurance 
industry's susceptibility to cybersecurity risks.
    Auto Insurance. The Committee may review the state of the 
automobile insurance market in America with a particular focus 
on issues of access and affordability for lower- and middle-
income Americans, minorities, and traditionally underserved 
communities.

             CONSUMER PROTECTION AND FINANCIAL INSTITUTIONS

    Government Shutdown. The Committee will examine the effect 
of the longest shutdown of the Federal government in U.S. 
history that commenced on December 22, 2018. This will include 
considering the effect the shutdown has on the financial system 
and the U.S. economy, as well as assessing the effect on 
consumers--including Federal government employees, contractors, 
and other individuals and any adverse consequences they may 
face through no fault of their own.
    Protecting Consumers. The Committee will monitor the 
current state of consumer financial protection by assessing the 
adequacy of protections for all consumers. The Committee will 
examine any unique challenges experienced in, and faced by, 
traditionally underserved communities and populations to obtain 
mainstream consumer financial products and services, including 
the root causes for credit deserts in rural and urban 
communities that have resulted in millions of unbanked and 
underbanked consumers. The Committee will consider methods to 
improve the financial well-being of other vulnerable consumers 
such as older Americans, active-duty servicemembers, veterans, 
students, young adults, racial and ethnic minorities, and 
immigrants.
    Consumer Financial Protection Bureau. The Committee will 
closely examine the exercise of the regulatory, supervisory, 
and enforcement power of the Consumer Financial Protection 
Bureau (Consumer Bureau). The Committee will conduct oversight 
to ensure that the Consumer Bureau is fully complying with both 
the spirit and letter of its purpose, objectives, and mission 
articulated under Title X of the Dodd-Frank Act to combat 
unfair, deceptive, abusive acts and practices in the offering 
and provision of consumer financial products. This oversight 
will evaluate, among other things, the allocation of resources 
and use of tools by the Consumer Bureau, its collaboration with 
other Federal and state agencies, and Tribal governments, the 
transparency and effectiveness of its consumer complaint 
database, and its code of conduct and other agency policies. 
The Committee will monitor to what extent the Consumer Bureau 
promptly addresses any unfair, deceptive and abusive acts and 
practices in the financial consumer marketplace, including as 
it relates to: mortgage lending, auto lending, including 
indirect auto lending, forced arbitration, and other financial 
services, products and practices.
    Student Debt Crisis. The Committee will examine the 
financial and economic implications of the growing student debt 
crisis, including how a borrower's inability to repay student 
debt can serve as a barrier to homeownership, entrepreneurship, 
and other economic activities. The Committee will monitor the 
effectiveness of student borrower protections, including as it 
relates to student loan servicing standards.
    Consumer Protections for Military Servicemembers. The 
Committee will examine the adequacy, supervision, and 
enforcement of all consumer financial protections, including 
those provided through the Military Lending Act (MLA) and the 
Servicemembers Civil Relief Act (SCRA), afforded to active-duty 
servicemembers and their families.
    High Cost Short-Term Credit and Debt Collection. The 
Committee will review the effectiveness and extent to which 
consumer protections are implemented and enforced with respect 
to payday lending, other forms of short-term credit, and debt 
collection. The Committee will also review the use of overdraft 
services, and its impact on consumers.
    Mandatory Arbitration. The Committee will monitor the use 
and effect of mandatory pre-dispute arbitration agreements, and 
similar provisions, that limit consumers' ability to 
participate in a class action case against financial 
institutions when they've been harmed.
    Fair Access to Affordable Consumer Financial Products and 
Services. The Committee will consider ways to expand access to 
mainstream financial services among traditionally underserved 
segments of the U.S. population. The Committee will evaluate 
proposals to update certain Federal consumer financial laws to 
ensure that they are meeting the evolving financial needs of 
consumers.
    Discrimination in Lending. The Committee will examine the 
effectiveness of regulators' fair lending oversight and 
enforcement efforts to ensure that the Federal government does 
not tolerate discrimination. The Committee will also examine 
the quantity and quality of data, including that provided under 
the Home Mortgage Disclosure Act (HMDA), to ensure 
discriminatory practices can be identified and addressed.
    Community Reinvestment Act (CRA). The Committee will 
monitor any legislative and regulatory proposals to reform the 
Community Reinvestment Act of 1977.
    Department of the Treasury, Financial Stability Oversight 
Council (FSOC) and Office of Financial Research (OFR). The 
Committee will review the operations and resources of the 
Department of the Treasury, as well as its code of conduct and 
other policies. The Committee will monitor financial stability 
and systemic risk issues, including all matters relating to the 
operations, activities, and initiatives of the FSOC and OFR to 
identify and mitigate threats to financial stability in the 
United States. This will also include a review of shifts in the 
mortgage market, including the subprime market, from bank 
financing to non-bank financing.
    Supervision and Enforcement of Financial Institutions. The 
Committee will review the operations, activities, initiatives, 
codes of conduct and other agency policies of the Federal 
Reserve Board of Governors, the Office of the Comptroller of 
the Currency (OCC), Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation 
(FDIC), and National Credit Union Administration (NCUA). This 
work will include examining financial regulators' supervision 
of the banking, thrift and credit union industries for safety 
and soundness and compliance with laws and regulations. The 
Committee will also monitor their enforcement activities, 
including ensuring the compliance of regulated institutions 
with existing consent orders, settlement agreements, deferred 
prosecution agreements, or similar arrangements. The Committee 
will also evaluate the supervision of nonbank financial 
companies by the Consumer Bureau.
    Enhanced Prudential Standards for Large Banks. The 
Committee will monitor how enhanced prudential standards are 
being applied to the largest banks operating in the United 
States, including foreign-based institutions. This will include 
oversight of the adequacy of capital, liquidity, leverage and 
stress testing requirements.
    Orderly Liquidation Authority and Living Wills. The 
Committee will oversee efforts to promote the orderly 
resolution of any large financial institution operating in the 
United States that fails, including through Dodd-Frank Act's 
living wills requirements and the Orderly Liquidity Authority.
    Banking Activities and the Volcker Rule. The Committee will 
examine the financial regulators' implementation of Section 619 
of the Dodd-Frank Act, known as the ``Volcker Rule.'' The 
Committee will also monitor the structure, ownership, 
activities and risk-taking by large depository institutions and 
their holding companies.
    Residential and Commercial Real Estate Mortgage Loans. The 
Committee will monitor the residential and commercial real 
estate mortgage markets, including examining access to 
affordable and fair home mortgage lending, and the 
effectiveness of disclosures provided to borrowers about the 
terms and conditions of these loans. The Committee will also 
review proposals related to home improvement loans for 
improving the energy efficiency of a house.
    Community Development Financial Institutions Fund (CDFI 
Fund). The Committee will monitor the operations of the CDFI 
Fund and the administration of initiatives to help reduce 
unbanked and underbanked populations, including in rural areas.
    Federal Deposit and Share Insurance. The Committee will 
monitor the solvency of the Deposit Insurance Fund administered 
by the FDIC, and the National Credit Union Share Insurance Fund 
administered by the NCUA.
    Community Financial Institutions. The Committee will review 
issues related to the health, growth, safety, and soundness of 
community banks and credit unions, as well as their role in 
lending to small businesses and promoting economic growth.
    Access to Credit for Small Businesses. The Committee will 
consider proposals that facilitate access to affordable credit 
for small businesses, and will examine the ability for the 
public, regulators, and Congress to monitor trends in small 
business lending. The Committee will also review the 
effectiveness of the State Small Business Credit Initiative 
(SSBCI), which was administered by the U.S. Department of the 
Treasury and expired in 2017 and consider proposals to 
reauthorize the SSBCI.
    Cybersecurity and Privacy. The Committee will monitor the 
effectiveness of cybersecurity in the U.S. financial system. 
The Committee will evaluate the current level of safeguards 
relating to protecting the security and confidentiality of 
personally identifiable information from loss, unauthorized 
access, or misuse. The Committee will also examine the 
effectiveness of data breach notifications, and issues of 
privacy and consumer control of their own data, including 
sensitive financial and credit information.
    Credit Scores and Credit Reports. The Committee will 
examine the state of the credit reporting system, including the 
accuracy of credit scores to assess creditworthiness, the 
impact medical debt can have on credit scores, and the extent 
of consumer protections throughout the credit reporting system. 
The Committee will also examine implementation of the 
provisions related to credit reporting and credit scores in the 
Economic Growth, Regulatory Relief, and Consumer Protection 
Act.
    Financial Technology (fintech). The Committee will examine 
the rapid developments with fintech, including marketplace 
lending for consumers and small businesses, partnerships with 
traditional financial institutions, cryptocurrency, blockchain, 
alternative data utilized in credit underwriting, artificial 
intelligence, and machine learning. The Committee will monitor 
the activities of financial regulators relating to fintech, 
including assessing existing authorities and regulatory gaps. 
The Committee will consider what legislation may be needed to 
promote responsible financial innovation.
    Payments System. The Committee will review government and 
private sector efforts to improve the timeliness and 
effectiveness of the payments system in the United States, and 
its potential effect on consumers and small businesses.
    Credit and other Payment Cards. The Committee will monitor 
payment card industry practices, including consumer protections 
with respect to the use of credit cards, debit cards, and 
prepaid cards. The Committee will also examine the 
effectiveness of the Credit Card Accountability Responsibility 
and Disclosure (CARD) Act of 2009.
    Money Services Businesses, Remittances, and De-risking. The 
Committee will examine the operations of money services 
businesses and the role they play in the financial system. The 
Committee will also oversee the ability of consumers to utilize 
financial services to affordably remit cross-border payments, 
as well as consider proposals to mitigate financial 
institutions engaged in de-risking that results in unnecessary 
account closures.
    Financial Education. The Committee will review efforts to 
promote greater financial literacy among consumers, 
particularly matters affecting traditionally underserved 
communities and populations.
    Cannabis Banking. The Committee will examine the 
difficulties, including public safety concerns, cannabis-
related businesses experience as a result of being unable to 
access basic banking services. The Committee will also review 
legislative proposals that alleviate legal and compliance risks 
for financial institutions related to providing such services 
to cannabis-related businesses in states where cannabis use, 
sale, or distribution is authorized.

                            MONETARY POLICY

    The Federal Reserve System. The Committee will conduct 
oversight of the operations and activities of the Federal 
Reserve System, including its conduct of monetary policy, its 
regulation and supervision of the financial services sector, 
its role in the payment system, and its susceptibility to 
cybersecurity threats and other security risks. The Committee 
will convene hearings to receive the testimony of the Chairman 
of the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System and 
related semi-annual reports on the conduct of monetary policy. 
As part of this effort, the Committee will review issues 
associated with monetary policy and the state of the economy, 
including whether the current path of monetary policy is 
consistent with the Federal Reserve's dual mandate of price 
stability and maximum employment, and how the independence of 
the Federal Reserve affects market participants' confidence in 
the conduct of monetary policy.
    The Economy and its Impact on Living Standards. The 
Committee will examine the extent to which changes in the 
economy, and in particular, changes in labor and capital 
markets, public policy, and trade have altered the way in which 
policymakers should think about the relationship between 
economic growth, productivity growth, and growth in employment 
and incomes. The Committee will examine these relationships to 
determine policy responses that will increase our ability to 
improve the standard of living for American families.
    Tax Legislation and the Effect on the Economy. The 
Committee will examine how the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act of 2017 
affects the economy, including its impact on the national 
deficit and debt, the wealth gap, and low- and middle-income 
communities and minority communities. Additionally, the 
Committee will examine the effects of the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act 
on the financial services industry, specifically with respect 
to the effect of the lower corporate tax rate and pass-through 
tax provisions.
    Coins and Currency. The Committee will conduct oversight of 
the printing and minting of U.S. currency and coins, including 
the activities of the Bureau of the Mint and the Bureau of 
Engraving and Printing, and of the operation of programs 
administered by the U.S. Mint for producing congressionally 
authorized commemorative coins, bullion coins for investors, 
and Congressional gold medals. The Committee will review 
efforts to detect and combat the counterfeiting of U.S. coins 
and currency in the United States and abroad. The Committee 
will also examine methods to reduce the cost of minting coins 
using alternative metals and will examine efforts to make 
currency more accessible to the visually impaired.

                INVESTOR PROTECTION AND ENTREPRENEURSHIP

    Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC). The Committee 
will examine the operations and organizational structure of the 
SEC, with emphasis on its rulemaking, compliance inspections 
and examinations, and enforcement functions, and will review 
the SEC's general codes of conduct and other policies. The 
Committee will also monitor the SEC's process for granting 
waivers of certain legal disqualifications that arise from 
illegal misconduct of bad actors. Additionally, the Committee 
will evaluate the sufficiency of the SEC's available resources 
and staffing levels in light of the hiring freeze under which 
the SEC has operated since the beginning of the Trump 
Administration.
    Investor Confidence. The Committee will examine the factors 
affecting investor confidence in U.S. capital markets, 
including investor perspectives on the quality, quantity, and 
utility of investment-related disclosures; the effectiveness of 
public companies' internal controls over financial reporting; 
corporate accountability to shareholders; and, the costs of 
trading securities. The Committee will also review the effect 
on investor confidence of fraud and other misconduct and the 
SEC's efforts to hold bad actors accountable.
    Fiduciary Duty of Financial Advisers. The Committee will 
examine the current regulation of and recent developments 
related to broker-dealers and investment advisers who provide 
financial advice to retail and institutional investors. The 
Committee will review the SEC's efforts to revise those 
regulations, consistent with Section 913(g) of the Dodd-Frank 
Act, to protect investors and reduce confusion by requiring all 
advisers, regardless of title, to comply with the same 
fiduciary standard that puts their clients' interests first. 
The Committee will also consider legislation related to the 
standard of care owed to investors by financial advisers.
    Mandatory Arbitration. The Committee will examine the 
effect of mandatory arbitration requirements on securities 
investors, as well as the balance, fairness, and efficiency of 
the current arbitration system.
    Entrepreneurship. The Committee will monitor market 
conditions affecting entrepreneurs' access to capital, with 
emphasis on the capital formation efforts of small businesses, 
including any unique challenges faced by minority-, women-, and 
veteran-owned small businesses. Additionally, the Committee 
will examine the conduct of intermediaries in the capital 
formation process, such as anti-competitive behavior among 
underwriters of initial public offerings (IPOs). The Committee 
will also consider legislative proposals to promote 
entrepreneurship and enhance the attractiveness of U.S. public 
equity markets to investors and businesses.
    Corporate Governance. The Committee will review 
developments and issues concerning corporate governance of 
public companies, including proposals to increase 
accountability to shareholders through improved shareholder 
access to management's proxy, shareholder nomination of 
directors, and majority voting. The Committee will also examine 
ways to improve the integrity of the shareholder voting process 
and corporate sustainability disclosures, including those 
related to the effects of climate change.
    Executive Compensation. The Committee will review the SEC's 
implementation of regulations requiring greater transparency in 
disclosures of executive compensation arrangements, including 
the SEC's and the other federal financial agencies' progress in 
completing related rulemakings mandated under the Dodd-Frank 
Act.
    Capital Formation in Private and Public Markets. The 
Committee will examine the private and public capital markets 
and the factors U.S. companies evaluate when deciding to go 
public, such as underwriting fees. The Committee will monitor 
the use of new and expanded private offering exemptions from 
the JOBS Act, including Regulation D, Regulation A+, and 
Regulation Crowdfunding, and examine ways to improve investor 
protections in private offerings. The Committee will examine 
the current definition of ``accredited investors'' and ways to 
improve that definition to ensure that those investors have the 
financial sophistication and wherewithal to invest in private 
offerings.

                            CAPITAL MARKETS

    Self-Regulatory Organizations (SROs). The Committee will 
monitor the operations, initiatives, and activities of SROs, 
including the Municipal Securities Rulemaking Board (MSRB) and 
Financial Industry Regulatory Authority, Inc. (FINRA). The 
Committee also will consider limitations or regulatory gaps in 
the current SRO system and ways to streamline and strengthen 
the regulatory, compliance, examination, and enforcement 
structure.
    Hedge Funds and Private Pools of Capital. The Committee 
will examine the current state of the hedge fund, private 
equity and alternative investment industry. The Committee will 
review the role hedge funds and private pools of capital serve 
in the capital markets, and their interaction with investors, 
financial intermediaries, and public companies. The Committee 
will also examine hedge funds and private equity funds as 
investment vehicles for pension funds.
    Investment Companies. The Committee will review the current 
state of regulation of investment companies and their advisers 
with respect to mutual fund operations, governance, disclosure, 
and sales in the States and Territories. The Committee also 
will review the effectiveness and efficiency of the approval 
process for new products, such as exchange-traded funds, and 
the SEC's efforts to standardize that process. The Committee 
will also review the role investment companies played in Puerto 
Rico's fiscal crisis. The Committee will review Real Estate 
Investment Trusts (REITs) as investment vehicles and how the 
industry uses REITs to finance various projects, including the 
financing of private prisons and immigration detention centers.
    Credit Rating Agencies. The Committee will examine the role 
that Nationally Recognized Statistical Ratings Organizations 
(NRSROs), also known as credit rating agencies, play in the 
U.S. capital markets, and review the effectiveness of the SEC's 
regulation and oversight of NRSROs. The Committee will also 
examine ways to limit conflicts associated with NRSROs 
compensation, approaches to increase their accountability, and 
the possibility of regulatory fee assessments.
    Financial Accounting and Auditing. The Committee will 
review the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board's 
(PCAOB's) oversight of auditors of public companies and broker-
dealers, including standard-setting and the results of the 
PCAOB's inspection programs. The Committee will also monitor 
the impact of exemptions to the scope of the auditing and 
internal controls requirements of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 
2002, and the adequacy of investor protections applicable to 
exempt entities. The Committee will also monitor the work of 
the Financial Accounting Standards Board (FASB) and 
Governmental Accounting Standards Board (GASB).
    Cybersecurity. The Committee will examine the risks that 
cybersecurity threats pose to the U.S. capital markets, 
including investment and operational risks associated with 
public companies. The Committee will also monitor the efforts 
of the SEC, self-regulatory organizations (SROs), and SEC-
registered firms to guard against cybersecurity risks and 
protect sensitive, market-moving data and personally 
identifiable information (PII) of investors.
    Cryptocurrencies. The Committee will review the emergence 
of the so-called ``initial coin offering'' (ICO) as a means of 
raising capital for blockchain-based enterprises. The Committee 
will examine concerns of increased risks of fraud and 
manipulation in the ICO markets. The Committee will also review 
the SEC's oversight of the ICO markets and will consider 
legislative proposals to improve regulatory clarity for ICO 
issuers and investors.
    Fixed income markets. The Committee will review recent 
developments in the U.S. corporate and municipal bond markets 
and the SEC's response to those developments.
    Derivatives Markets. The Committee will review recent 
developments in the U.S. derivatives markets and efforts to 
harmonize rules governing those markets domestically and 
internationally. The Committee will also examine the SEC's 
progress in implementing the remaining regulations of the 
security-based swaps markets as mandated by the Dodd-Frank Act.
    Equity and options markets. The Committee will review 
recent developments in the U.S. equity and options markets and 
the SEC's response to those developments. The Committee will 
also examine brokers' conflicts of interest arising from 
rebates and fees paid for client orders and the SEC's efforts 
to address those conflicts through, for example, an access fee 
pilot. The Committee will monitor the development, 
implementation, and maintenance of the Consolidated Audit Trail 
(CAT), a market surveillance tool that tracks order events, 
including quotes, orders, executions, allocations, and 
associated customer data, and identifies the broker-dealer 
handling them.
    Trade Policy Impact. The Committee will examine the impact 
of U.S. trade policy proclamations, announcements, decisions, 
and actions by the executive branch on U.S. securities markets, 
including market volatility, capital formation, corporate 
reinvestment, and investor confidence.

                           NATIONAL SECURITY

    Office of Terrorism and Financial Intelligence (TFI). The 
Committee will monitor TFI's development and implementation of 
U.S. government strategies and programs to combat terrorist 
financing, money laundering, and other financial crimes, both 
domestically and internationally.
    Financial Crimes Enforcement Network (FinCEN). The 
Committee will monitor the operations of FinCEN and its ongoing 
efforts to implement its regulatory mandates pursuant to the 
Bank Secrecy Act to safeguard the integrity of the financial 
system and combat money laundering, terrorist financing, and 
other illicit finance.
    Office of Foreign Assets Control (OFAC). The Committee will 
examine the efficacy of economic and trade sanctions 
designations and enforcement.
    Money Laundering and Terrorist Financing. The Committee 
will examine the implementation, effectiveness, and enforcement 
of anti-money laundering/counter-financing of terrorism (AML/
CFT) laws and regulations, including opportunities to enhance 
compliance with these rules without impairing the operations of 
law enforcement. The Committee will examine patterns and trends 
of money laundering and terrorist finance and consider 
proposals to prevent the abuse of the financial system.
    Counterterrorism Financing Policy. The Committee will 
monitor the role of the U.S. Department of the Treasury in 
promoting the adoption and implementation of counterterrorism 
standards around the world, through international organizations 
such as the Financial Action Task Force (FATF), the 
International Monetary Fund, and the Egmont Group. The 
Committee will also monitor the Office of Technical Assistance 
at Treasury and its coordination with the other agencies, in 
the delivery of counter-terrorism financing training and other 
technical assistance abroad.
    Sanctions. The Committee will examine sanctions programs to 
ensure that they are fully implemented consistent with 
Congressional intent and in alignment with U.S. foreign policy 
and national security goals. Particular attention will be paid 
to sanctions programs aimed at Russia, Iran, North Korea, and 
Cuba. The Committee will examine possible risks and 
consequences associated with the use of sanctions over the 
short and long term, as well as the role that multilateral 
cooperation may play in achieving effective sanctions programs.
    Beneficial Ownership. The Committee will consider proposals 
to strengthen the AML/CFT laws and streamline compliance for 
U.S. financial institutions, including legislation designed to 
crack down on the use of anonymous shell companies for illicit 
purposes by requiring U.S. companies to disclose their 
beneficial owners.
    Real Estate. The Committee will examine the risks of money 
laundering and terrorist financing in the real estate market, 
and review proposals to address any vulnerabilities identified 
in this sector.
    Trafficking. The Committee will examine methods and 
policies to dismantle the underlying enablers of trafficking 
and will review typologies and potential solutions related to 
specific categories of trafficking, including human 
trafficking, weapons trafficking, and narcotics trafficking. 
The Committee will examine the nexus of this illicit criminal 
activity with terrorists and their networks.
    De-Risking at Financial Institutions. The Committee will 
examine the practice by which financial institutions terminate 
accounts or limit services to broad categories of clients. The 
Committee will monitor the effectiveness of regulatory guidance 
and examine regulatory actions to ensure that such customers 
are not inappropriately denied access to the banking system.
    Corruption. The Committee will examine the methods by which 
corruption flourishes and the means to detect and deter the 
financial misconduct that fuels this driver of global 
instability. The Committee will monitor government efforts to 
educate about and enforce U.S. anti-corruption law and 
regulation.
    Fraud and Cyber Intrusion. The Committee will examine the 
facilitation and prevention of fraudulent activities that 
impact the financial system. It will also examine efforts to 
counter cyber intrusions that target the financial sector and 
system.
    Information Sharing. The Committee will examine the kinds 
of safeguards required to ensure that civil liberties and 
consumer privacy are not undermined in the sharing of sensitive 
information among financial institutions, federal agencies, and 
other entities.
    Emerging Technologies. The Committee will examine emerging 
technologies, such as cryptocurrencies, blockchain, and 
artificial intelligence. The Committee will monitor how such 
technologies affect and interact with the U.S. financial 
system, and how the technologies could be used to combat or be 
used in the pursuit of illicit purposes.
    Committee on Foreign Investment in the United States. The 
Committee will monitor implementation of the Foreign Investment 
Risk Review Modernization Act of 2018 (FIRRMA) and actions 
taken by CFIUS to identify and address foreign investments that 
pose threats to national security. The Committee will examine 
FIRRMA-related rulemaking, Administration resources devoted to 
CFIUS activities, and the effectiveness of pilot projects 
authorized by the legislation.
    Defense Production Act. The Committee will monitor the 
effectiveness of the Defense Production Act and its individual 
authorities in promoting national security and recovery from 
natural disasters.

                  INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT AND TRADE

    Global Economic Cooperation. The Committee will monitor the 
role of United States leadership in the governance of the 
global economic system. The Committee will examine the degree 
to which sustained international cooperation helps advance U.S. 
national security, economic interests, and values.
    Oversight of the International Financial Institutions. The 
Committee will examine U.S. participation in the international 
financial institutions (IFIs), including the International 
Monetary Fund, the World Bank, and the other multilateral 
development banks. The Committee will monitor accountability, 
openness, and transparency within the IFIs and the degree to 
which public participation in these institutions is a component 
of effective development and growth. The Committee will examine 
the World Bank's policies and operations in areas relating to 
labor markets and social protection policies.
    Global Poverty and Economic Inequality. The Committee will 
examine the role and effectiveness of the multilateral 
development banks (MBDs) in helping to foster growth and reduce 
poverty in Africa, Latin America, and in other poor regions in 
the world. The Committee will examine how some growth 
strategies appear more effective at reducing poverty than 
others and assess the degree to which economic growth has 
translated into sustained poverty reduction in countries 
assisted by the MDBs. The Committee will examine how increasing 
income inequality negatively affects the poverty-reducing 
effect of growth in a number of countries.
    International Financial Architecture. The Committee will 
review the annual report to Congress and testimony by the 
Secretary of the Treasury on the state of the international 
financial system and the International Monetary Fund (IMF). The 
Committee will examine the degree to which the IMF is focused 
on fighting corruption in its surveillance and program work, as 
well as its efforts, through technical assistance, to 
strengthen the capacity of Fund members to prevent money 
laundering and terrorist financing.
    IMF's 15th General Review of Quotas. The Committee will 
consider any request from the Administration for legislation to 
authorize U.S. commitments pursuant to an IMF quota reform 
agreement.
    World Bank Group Capital Increase. The Committee will 
consider any Administration request for congressional 
authorization for U.S. participation in capital increases for 
the International Bank for Reconstruction and Development and 
the International Finance Corporation.
    Replenishments of the International Development Association 
(IDA) and the African Development Fund (AfDF). The Committee 
will monitor U.S. participation in the replenishment 
negotiations for IDA and the AfDF.
    The International Development Association (IDA) and the 
International Finance Corporation (IFC). The Committee will 
examine financial transfers between IDA and the IFC with 
respect to both transparency and development impact. The 
Committee will monitor the degree to which IDA's bond issuances 
affect the ability of IDA to offer grants and highly 
concessional loans to the world's poorest countries.
    North American Development Bank (NADB). The Committee will 
examine the provision of financing by the NADB for 
environmental infrastructure projects along the U.S.-Mexico 
border region. The Committee will consider legislation to 
authorize the first general capital increase for NADB.
    Food Security and Climate Finance. The Committee will 
examine U.S. support for international agricultural development 
programs and multilateral cooperation on the global climate 
finance agenda.
    Developing Countries at Risk of Debt Distress. The 
Committee will monitor efforts by the United States to engage 
with other members of the IMF to pressure China to adopt global 
standards and practices on sustainable debt financing for 
developing countries, including a commitment to lending 
transparency.
    Global Capital Flows. The Committee will monitor the 
effects of the flow of capital globally, and, in particular, 
trends in foreign countries' investments of their large 
currency reserves in the United States and other countries. The 
Committee will examine the effects of the investment of these 
reserves on global financial stability and on multilateral 
policy initiatives. The Committee will also examine U.S. and 
multilateral policies on the regulation of capital flows.
    Trade in Financial Services. The Committee will monitor 
trade negotiations and discussions as they pertain to 
investment and trade in financial services. The Committee will 
monitor the progress of the United States' trading partners in 
meeting financial services and investment commitments under 
existing trade and investment agreements, particularly with 
respect to policies by China that limit the ability of U.S. 
financial services firms to access Chinese markets. The 
Committee will examine the Administration's articulation of a 
long-term economic development strategy with respect to both 
manufacturing and services.
    Brexit. The Committee will monitor the United Kingdom's 
process of withdrawal from the European Union, including its 
potential impact on the U.S. and global economy, transatlantic 
cooperation on economic and security issues including 
sanctions, counterterrorism efforts, and regulatory convergence 
between U.S. and foreign jurisdictions.
    Exchange Rates. The Committee will review the semi-annual 
report to Congress from the Secretary of the Treasury on 
international economic and exchange rate policies. The 
Committee will monitor developments related to the exchange 
rate policies of our major trading partners and monitor the 
effects of those policies on the competitiveness of U.S. firms 
and on the stability of the international financial system.
    Export-Import Bank of the United States. The Committee will 
examine the performance of the Export-Import Bank and its 
mission to support U.S. jobs by helping U.S. companies compete 
in the global economy. The Committee will consider legislation 
to reauthorize the Bank's charter before it expires on 
September 30, 2019. The Committee will also examine how the 
lack of a quorum on the Bank's Board of Directors has affected 
its ability to support American firms in the global market.
    Extractive Industries. The Committee will examine the 
establishment of a global standard for the public disclosure of 
payments that extractive companies make to governments, as well 
as the effectiveness of these revenue transparency laws abroad.
    Supply Chain Due Diligence. The Committee will examine 
supply chain due diligence laws in the U.S. and abroad, and 
their enforcement, and the effects of such laws on the ability 
of companies to responsibly manage risk associated with the 
financing of conflict, human trafficking, and child labor.

                        DIVERSITY AND INCLUSION

    Diversity Data. The Committee will review regulated 
entities' diversity data, including whether and how companies 
are: tracking internal and external workforce and supplier 
diversity activities to identify and mitigate vulnerable 
moments along the talent lifecycles; tying executives' 
performances to their ability to meet tangible diversity and 
inclusive goals; and, using such data to inform the composition 
of their boards of directors.
    Offices of Minority and Women Inclusion (OMWIs). The 
Committee will examine all matters relating to the diversity 
and inclusion activities within the agencies under the 
Committee's jurisdiction, including the implementation of 
Section 342 of the Dodd-Frank Act and Section 1116 of the 
Housing and Economic Recovery Act (HERA) by the OMWIs, which 
are responsible for handling all matters relating to diversity 
in management, employment, and business activities within most 
federal financial agencies. This review will include, among 
other things, monitoring whether the agencies have allocated 
appropriate resources for their OMWIs, maintained frequent 
interaction with and direct reporting lines between the heads 
of the agencies and their OMWI Directors, and established 
tangible and measurable outcomes within their long-term 
strategic plans and daily operations to achieve a diverse and 
inclusive culture throughout all levels of their agencies.
    Workforce, Supplier, and Business Diversity Efforts Within 
Agencies and Their Regulated Entities. The Committee will 
consider measures to further leverage diverse and inclusive 
perspectives, skills, and talents within the workforces of 
agencies under the Committee's jurisdiction, particularly at 
the middle- and senior-management level, executive, and C-suite 
positions, to help improve the agencies' services, foster 
greater innovation, and develop novel solutions. The Committee 
will also monitor agencies' policies and practices, as well 
those of their regulated entities, to ensure that workplace 
environments operate in a fair, transparent, and non-
discriminatory manner for all their employees by ensuring that 
racial, ethnic, and gender minorities, without regard to their 
sex, including sexual orientation; gender identity; sex 
stereotypes; and pregnancy, childbirth, or a related medical 
condition, have equal opportunities.
    Recruitment, Retention and Promotion. The Committee will 
review the policies and practices of all the agencies under the 
Committee's jurisdiction, and of their regulated entities, to 
promote the recruitment, retention, and promotion of a diverse 
pool of employees, throughout all levels, of each organization 
but particularly at the middle- and senior-management level, 
executive, C-suite, and board of director positions. The 
Committee will review the commitment and behavior of leaders, 
as well as consider measures, to ensure that diversity and 
inclusive goals are effectively transmitted throughout their 
organizations, including holding managers accountable for 
achieving diverse and inclusive environments.
    The Rooney Rule. The Committee will consider policies that 
mandate the consideration of diverse employment candidates 
(referred to as ``The Rooney Rule''), and whether and how it 
has affected diversity and inclusion efforts, including efforts 
by the Federal Reserve to identify and select a diverse pool of 
candidates for senior-management positions throughout the 
entire Federal Reserve System.
    Vendor, Contractor, and Business Diversity. The Committee 
will monitor the agencies' efforts to increase diversity within 
their vendor and contractor pools, and may consider methods to 
address any challenges, or other barriers, to the agencies' 
capacity to enhance their supplier and business diversity. The 
Committee will also consider changes to increase the 
transparency of the diversity practices of the FHFA's regulated 
entities, including requiring public reporting of the total 
dollar amounts these entities spend on third party vendors and 
service providers and the amounts paid to firms that are 
minority-owned, women-owned, disability-owned, and other 
diverse-owned businesses on a regular basis.
    Financial and Economic Inclusion. The Committee will 
monitor the availability and affordability of financial 
products and services to communities such as underserved rural, 
urban, Tribal, indigenous and other minority communities, and 
certain populations such as immigrants, active-duty 
servicemembers and veterans and their families, older 
(including retired) Americans, young adults and college 
students, state- and federally-recognized Tribes, indigenous 
peoples, and low- and moderate-income consumers. The Committee 
will evaluate methods to expand access to the traditional 
financial services system to people in different social, 
income, and economic segments in this country, including 
methods to broaden homeownership, increase wages, promote 
employment within high-growth industries, encourage savings 
(including retirement savings), and investments.
    Wealth, Income Inequality, and Income Mobility. The 
Committee will examine the existing differences in wealth and 
income among American households across the country. The 
Committee will evaluate proposals to reduce disparities in 
opportunity that continue to persist across different segments 
of our society and that were exacerbated in the run-up to, and 
the fallout from, the 2008 financial crisis. The Committee will 
consider how the economic disparities in this country compare 
with other countries and whether successful approaches by other 
countries to reduce such disparities could serve as models for 
the U.S. The Committee will also monitor, among other things, 
whether economic opportunity zones have been successful in 
promoting intra and intergenerational income mobility. This 
review will include an assessment of the effect on employment 
and income mobility of factory and manual workers from trade 
agreements and the increasing use of automation by companies.
    Public Companies. The Committee will consider proposals to 
enhance diversity and inclusion practices and policies at 
public companies, including by more transparently reporting 
information about the diversity of perspectives and 
backgrounds, and the selection process of those who serve in 
middle- and senior-management level, executive, C-suite 
positions, and boards of directors.
    Diverse Entrepreneurs and Access to Capital. The Committee 
will monitor challenges faced by, and consider solutions to, 
encouraging the creation and growth of diverse entrepreneurs' 
businesses, particularly any unique challenges faced by 
minority-owned businesses, women-owned businesses, veteran-
owned businesses, Native-owned businesses, disability-owned 
businesses, and small businesses in obtaining access to capital 
and opportunities to obtain a fair allocation of federal funds 
and participation in federal programs. The Committee will also 
review how corporations collaborate with minority-owned, women-
owned and other diverse-owned firms in their capital markets 
activities, including but not limited to, the investment of 
pension, union, and retirement funds; externally managed 
investment and non-indexed funds; and alternative investments. 
The Committee will also monitor the implementation of data 
collection measures that could more effectively and efficiently 
inform the public, investors, regulators, and Congress about 
patterns and trends of business lending and other types of 
financing.
    Minority Depository Institution (MDIs). The Committee will 
monitor the federal financial regulators' compliance with the 
goals under Section 308 of the Financial Institutions Reform, 
Recovery, and Enforcement Act (FIRREA) and may consider other 
ways to further support MDIs.

                      COMMITTEE ON FOREIGN AFFAIRS

                             Oversight Plan

                             116th Congress

1. INTRODUCTION
    Pursuant to the requirements of clause 2(d) of House Rule 
X, the Chairman of the Committee on Foreign Affairs (``the 
Committee'') has prepared this oversight plan for the 116th 
Congress, which will be submitted to the Committee on Oversight 
and Reform and the Committee on House Administration. This plan 
summarizes the Committee's oversight priorities for the next 
two years, subject to the understanding that new developments 
will undoubtedly affect priorities and work assignments in the 
months ahead.
    Agency and program oversight are key responsibilities of 
the legislative branch. Committee Rule 15 requires each 
Subcommittee to hold regular oversight hearings that, according 
to usual practice, include an annual hearing on the portions of 
the Administration's budget request within that Subcommittee's 
jurisdiction. A new Subcommittee on Oversight and 
Investigations has been created to enhance the Committee's 
oversight capabilities. Oversight activities will be 
coordinated between the Committee and the Subcommittees in 
order to facilitate comprehensive and strategic review of the 
programs and agencies within the Committee's jurisdiction.
    These Committee activities may include hearings, briefings, 
reports, and investigations, Member or staff-level meetings, 
correspondence, fact-finding and oversight travel, reports, and 
public statements. They may also include effective use and 
review of reports by the Government Accountability Office and 
by statutory Inspectors General, as well as Congressional 
Notifications submitted by executive branch agencies. The 
Committee will consult, as appropriate, with other committees 
of the House that may share jurisdiction over relevant issues 
and activities.
    The Committee's authorization and oversight activities will 
emphasize:
         effectiveness of U.S. foreign policy;
         effective implementation of U.S. law;
         the review of agencies and programs in the 
        Committee's jurisdiction;
         effective management and administration, and 
        institutional modernization;
         appropriate resourcing of U.S. foreign policy 
        and programs.

2. PRIORITY OVERSIGHT MATTERS

    a. Russia: The Committee will address the impact of 
Russia's foreign policy on U.S. security, political, and 
economic interests, as a result of its aggression and related 
hostile actions regarding NATO, Ukraine, Georgia, and other 
countries. It will also examine Kremlin-driven efforts to 
undermine the governments and other institutions of the U.S. 
and other countries through cyber intrusions, propaganda and 
other tools. The Committee will examine the range of options 
available to the U.S. to respond to these actions, including 
legislation to impose further sanctions on Russia and provide 
assistance to vulnerable countries. The Committee will also 
review the deteriorating domestic situation in Russia regarding 
democracy, civil society, the rule of law, and human rights. It 
will also examine ways to reduce Russia's ability to use its 
energy exports for political and economic coercion. In 
addition, the Committee will closely assess strategic stability 
and related arms control agreements with Russia to reduce the 
risk of nuclear conflict. The Committee will consult widely 
with experts to inform the measures the U.S. Government and 
other allies and partners should pursue on these matters. 
Working in tandem with other relevant committees, the Committee 
will investigate the substance and nature of President Trump's 
exchanges with Russian president Vladimir Putin as they relate 
to the development and implementation of U.S. foreign policy on 
Russia.
    b. Ukraine/Georgia: The Committee will closely monitor 
Russian-supported separatist activity and other aggressive 
actions aimed at undermining Ukraine's sovereignty, including 
the forcible and illegal annexation of Crimea. The Committee 
will continue to examine the U.S. response to this aggression 
in light of the long-standing U.S. foreign policy doctrine of 
non-recognition of territorial changes effected by force alone. 
The Committee will assess the situation in Georgia and consider 
measures the U.S. Government can take to promote effective, 
democratic governance in these while turning back Russian 
intrusion. In addition, the Committee will actively oversee 
efforts to work with these countries to strengthen their 
military and security services, promote economic growth, combat 
corruption, and promote an effective and democratic government.
    c. Europe/Eurasia: The Committee will review U.S. relations 
with European countries, with an emphasis on the European Union 
and NATO. Key issues include continued reassurance and support 
for our NATO allies, particularly in Central and Eastern 
Europe; rule of law and border security; U.S.-European 
cooperative efforts to combat terrorism and extremism; and 
diversification of energy sources to reduce reliance on Russian 
energy. The Committee will focus on strengthening our important 
strategic relationships with allies and partners in order to 
bolster American security and deter adversaries. The Committee 
will also scrutinize the nexus of populism, alignment of far 
left and far right political forces and increasingly autocratic 
governments, including those in Hungary, Poland, and Turkey. 
Similarly, the Committee will work to support comprehensive 
peace in the Balkans, including mutual diplomatic recognition 
between Serbia and Kosovo, while working to counter outside 
malign influences throughout the region. Similarly, the 
Committee will deeply engage on related Balkan matters such as 
NATO and EU accession for all countries in the region. The 
Committee will also continue oversight of U.S. political, 
security and economic policy in Central Asia, with a particular 
focus on strengthening partnerships to advance mutual security 
interests, including countering violent extremism, as well as 
efforts to promote economic development, human rights, and good 
governance.
    d. Turkey: The Committee will examine Turkey's evolving 
foreign policy orientation and its domestic political trends--
including but not limited to its crackdown on domestic 
freedoms, its efforts to combat ISIS and the spread of 
extremism, its role as it pertains to conflict and refugees in 
Syria, its relationship with the Kurds, its relationship with 
the European Union, its continued occupation of the Republic of 
Cyprus, and the health of the long term U.S.-Turkey strategic 
relationship.
    e. Afghanistan: The Committee will comprehensively review 
U.S. policy toward Afghanistan. Particular focus will be paid 
to the Administration's efforts to bring the war in Afghanistan 
to an end through a coordinated peace and reconciliation 
effort. The Committee will also pay close attention to the 
Afghan government's various reform efforts related to 
addressing corruption, improving governance, electoral reforms, 
and strengthening security. This review will assess the 
effectiveness of international aid and U.S. assistance 
programs, the broader political-military and associated 
counterterrorism strategies, and the full range of policies 
related to the post-2014 transition, including programs and 
budgeting processes.
    f. Pakistan: The Committee will review all elements of U.S. 
policy toward Pakistan, including efforts to eliminate safe 
havens for violent extremists and establish a stable, 
democratic country. This review will encompass both U.S. 
civilian and security assistance to Pakistan, in order to 
assess the extent to which such programs effectively advance 
U.S. national interests. The Committee will also conduct 
ongoing oversight of matters relating to Pakistan's nuclear 
program, including issues relating to nonproliferation, such as 
the legacy of the A.Q. Khan network.
    g. North Korea: The Committee will review and work to 
address the threat posed by North Korea. Particular focus will 
be paid to North Korea's nuclear, chemical and biological 
weapons programs, its ballistic missile program, and the 
possible proliferation of these weapons and delivery systems. 
The Committee will also examine North Korea's conventional 
weapon sales, other illicit activities, cyber-attacks, human 
rights violations, as well as U.S. efforts to assist North 
Korean refugees. The Committee will review U.S. diplomatic 
efforts, U.S. information dissemination efforts, the 
implementation of U.S. and international sanctions, the impact 
of current negotiations on U.S. alliances in Asia, whether the 
executive branch is keeping the legislative branch fully 
informed of regional developments and U.S. policy toward North 
Korea, and consider next steps in U.S. policy to address the 
North Korean threat.
    h. Indo-Pacific: The Committee will review the U.S.'s 
significant political, economic, and security interests in the 
Indo-Pacific, including East and Southeast Asia, South Asia, 
and the Pacific Islands. The Committee will conduct oversight 
of U.S. relations with countries in the Indo-Pacific, including 
foreign policy, foreign assistance, the strength of U.S. 
relationships with and among alliances and partners, security 
cooperation, territorial disputes, influence operations and 
trade relations, including export controls for sensitive 
technologies to China. The Committee will evaluate the State 
Department's participation in multilateral organizations such 
as the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) forum, the 
Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) and the East 
Asia Summit, and closely monitor any discussion of future trade 
agreements in Asia. The Committee will monitor the totality of 
the U.S. relationship with Taiwan as provided for in the Taiwan 
Relations Act.
    i. India: The Committee will review U.S. policy towards 
India and the continued expansion of bilateral cooperation. 
Particular attention will be paid to the U.S.-India security 
relationship, including cooperation on counterterrorism efforts 
and developments since the 2015 defense framework agreement and 
India's designation as a ``Major Defense Partner.'' The 
Committee will also focus on efforts to enhance U.S.-India 
economic and trade relations, and collaboration on efforts to 
address global climate change and support for the international 
rules-based order, stalled efforts to initiate civil nuclear 
cooperation and the implications of India's rapidly growing 
energy demands will also be reviewed.
    j. China: The Committee will examine China's role in the 
Asia-Pacific region and beyond. Particular focus will be placed 
on China's influence operations globally, its assertiveness in 
territorial disputes, military modernization, and human rights 
abuses, including treatment of Tibetans, Uyghurs and other 
religious and ethnic minorities. The Committee will also 
consider China's adherence to agreements made with Hong Kong 
under the ``one country, two systems'' principle enshrined in 
the Basic Law. In addition, the Committee will examine China's 
role in the global economy, including trade, technology, 
energy, infrastructure, and its approach to assistance, 
including its Belt and Road Initiative. The Committee will 
review China's cooperation on international nonproliferation 
efforts against North Korea. The Committee will investigate 
China's increasing use of cyber and economic espionage to 
affect foreign trade, and other policy outcomes.
    k. Sub-Saharan Africa: The Committee will review political, 
economic and security developments on the African continent, 
including the rise of geopolitical competition with Russia, 
China, and among the Gulf Arab States on the continent. Key 
issues will include efforts to strengthen democratic 
institutions, advance human rights, promote peace and security, 
and stimulate investment and equitable economic growth--
including through the implementation of the African Growth and 
Opportunity Act and the Electrify Africa Act. The Committee 
will also focus on strengthening ties to the African Union and 
its regional economic communities, which are key partners in 
facilitating regional economic integration, protecting human 
rights, and advancing peace and security on the continent. 
Particular attention is to be paid to developments in the 
Democratic Republic of the Congo, Nigeria, Sudan, Zimbabwe, 
South Sudan, Somalia, Ethiopia, South Africa, Kenya, Uganda, 
Cameroon, Mali, and Niger.
    l. Western Hemisphere: The Committee will assess the 
effectiveness of U.S. policy towards the countries of the 
Western Hemisphere and the strategic importance of a positive 
U.S. agenda in the Americas. Special emphasis will be placed on 
developments in political, security and economic cooperation 
with our partners in Canada and Mexico. Efforts for further 
collaboration with Argentina and Brazil will also be explored. 
The Committee will address the security challenges posed by 
transnational criminal organizations and other illegal armed 
actors. Challenges to democracy, human rights, the rule of law, 
anti-corruption efforts and press freedom in the Americas also 
will be examined. The Committee will closely monitor the 
humanitarian crisis in Venezuela and its impact on the 
Venezuelan people and countries throughout the region, as well 
as U.S. efforts to hold government actors in the country 
accountable. In the Northern Triangle countries of Central 
America, the Committee will assess the conditions that drive 
child and family migration and the appropriate response from 
the State Department, USAID and other international affairs 
agencies. In Nicaragua, the Committee will assess appropriate 
actions to continue to hold the country's government and 
security forces accountable for human rights abuses. In 
Colombia, the Committee will evaluate the implementation of the 
country's peace accords and ongoing counternarcotics efforts. 
The Committee will continue to closely monitor U.S.-Cuba 
relations and the health incidents impacting U.S. government 
personnel serving in Cuba. The Committee will continue its 
oversight of State Department and USAID assistance for 
reconstruction efforts in Haiti, as well as efforts to enhance 
U.S. energy, security and diplomatic cooperation with the 
countries of the Caribbean under the United States-Caribbean 
Strategic Engagement Act of 2016.
    m. Syria: The Committee will scrutinize U.S. efforts to 
address Syria's ongoing civil war, the war crimes committed by 
the Assad regime other parties, and the role of Iran, Russia, 
Turkey and our Kurdish partners in the conflict. Particular 
attention will be paid to the Administration's decision to 
withdraw most U.S. forces from Syria, and the implications of 
that decision on U.S. personnel, allies, and interests. The 
Committee will also examine the consequences of the 
Administration's decision to suspend stabilization assistance 
in Syria and evaluate U.S. efforts to prevent international 
reconstruction funds from assisting the Assad regime until a 
sustainable political solution is achieved and the regime 
allows for the safe, dignified and voluntary return of the 
outstanding six million displaced Syrians. The Committee will 
examine the impact of Syria's refugee crisis on regional states 
including Turkey, Jordan and Lebanon. The Committee will 
continue to review economic and diplomatic means by which to 
influence events in Syria.
    n. Countering Violent Extremism: The Committee will examine 
the current status of al-Qaeda and its affiliates, with a 
specific focus on recruitment efforts, evolving save havens, 
and efforts to obtain WMDs. The Committee will also scrutinize 
the Administration's efforts to defeat ISIS in the Middle East 
and around the world, including authorizations for such 
efforts, leveraging other countries' commitments, evaluating 
U.S. leadership in the Coalition to Defeat ISIS, and 
determining the success of U.S. policies that seek to address 
the socio-economic challenges that led to the initial 
establishment and growth of ISIS. The Committee will conduct 
oversight of the State Department's various counterterrorism 
programs, including those designed to counter violent extremism 
(CVE), as well as agreements with foreign governments relating 
to the transfer of detainees from Guantanamo Bay.
    o. U.S. Policies and Actions in the Arabian Peninsula: The 
Committee will evaluate the U.S. role in the Gulf, particularly 
the role that the United States plays in Yemen, as well as ways 
that the United States can help bring the conflict to an end 
and address the serious security and economic concerns that 
have plagued Yemen for decades. The Committee will also review 
the U.S. relationship with members of the Saudi-led coalition 
in Yemen as well as U.S. policy options to build leverage with 
the Houthis in order to encourage compromise and a sustainable 
resolution of the conflict. The Committee will examine the 
status of rights of women, journalists, political dissidents 
and bloggers in the Gulf, and the extent to which current U.S. 
policy prioritizes human rights, the core of U.S. values.
    p. Iran: The Committee will continue to closely review U.S. 
policy toward Iran, with a special focus on evaluating how the 
U.S. withdrawal from the JCPOA impacts the interests of the 
United States and our allies. The Committee will also review 
and work to address the threat posed by Iran's ballistic 
missile development, state sponsorship of terrorism and growing 
influence in Iraq, Syria, Yemen, and Lebanon, as well as the 
regime's ongoing human rights abuses, including the continued 
prolonged detention of Americans. The Committee also seeks 
greater understanding of the Administration's strategy to 
change Iran's behavior.
    q. Israel and Palestinian Issues/Middle East Peace: The 
Committee will evaluate efforts by the Administration to 
advance peace between Israelis and Palestinians and will 
examine whether the Administration's strategy and recent policy 
changes have helped bring the parties closer to a two-state 
solution. The Committee will also review how the Administration 
has sought to build ties between Israel and various Arab 
countries in the region. The Committee will examine the 
consequences of changes to U.S. assistance to Palestinians and 
the implications of these decisions for our allies and 
interests. The Committee will look at the various ways that the 
Administration seeks to build cooperation with Israel in an 
effort to expand this mutually beneficial relationship.
    r. Middle East and North Africa: The Committee will 
carefully review U.S. policy toward the Middle East and North 
Africa, to include: the extent to which U.S. foreign assistance 
is being utilized in Iraq to help address the inequities that 
brought about the initial rise of ISIS; the democratic 
transition in Tunisia; the status of political negotiations in 
Libya; the impact of Chinese economic and diplomatic investment 
in the Middle East; the consequences of low oil prices for 
various oil-producing states; human rights and challenges to 
the rule of law throughout the region; and United States 
policies, programs, authorities and funding to address these 
challenges.
    s. State Department and U.S. Agency for International 
Development Oversight, Authorization, and Modernization: The 
Committee will seek to pass a State Department Authorization 
bill as one has not been enacted since 2002. Emphasis will also 
be placed on modernizing personnel systems and practices, 
increasing workforce flexibility and improving recruitment and 
retention processes, with a focus on ensuring that Department 
of State personnel better represent the diversity of the United 
States. The Committee will continue to monitor and examine the 
operations, budget, programs, planning, workforce training, 
building, and security policies with an eye toward 
authorization for Fiscal Year 2020. In addition to hearings 
with the Secretary of State and other Administration officials 
regarding their budget proposals for the upcoming year, such 
efforts may include: revisions to the Foreign Service Act; the 
Foreign Assistance Act; consideration of reforms to Executive 
Branch reporting requirements; and a reduction or consolidation 
of offices with duplicative mandates and overlapping 
responsibilities. In the wake of increasing threats to U.S. 
personnel serving overseas, the Committee will continue to 
evaluate the security of our embassies and consulates, along 
with proposed reforms to the State Department's diplomatic 
security service to promote the personnel safety in the context 
of appropriate evaluation of risk.
    t. Employee Retaliation: The Committee will investigate 
ongoing allegations of politically-motivated retaliation 
against State Department and USAID employees, including 
individuals who have alleged they were subjected to prohibited 
personnel practices on account of their national origin, sexual 
identity, perceived political views, or in response to 
whistleblowing.
    u. Foreign Assistance: The Committee will review the 
underlying authorities for U.S. foreign assistance with an eye 
towards reducing duplication, increasing transparency and 
effectiveness, and modernizing the foreign assistance 
workforce. It will also review issues related to the 
implementation of U.S. foreign assistance programs and 
projects, including the role of U.S. missions and embassies in 
overseeing grants, contracts, and cooperative agreements. In 
addition, the Committee will review issues related to 
coordination between the U.S. Agency for International 
Development (USAID) and other U.S. Government agencies and 
departments involved in carrying out U.S. foreign assistance, 
as well as USAID's proposed Redesign of its internal structure 
to ensure its congruency with foreign policy priorities and the 
appropriate use of U.S. foreign assistance. Among a broad range 
of issues, the Committee will review U.S. foreign assistance 
initiatives aimed at providing life-saving humanitarian 
assistance, catalyzing economic growth, reducing aid 
dependence, and addressing food security and global health 
challenges, including food aid reform, maternal health and 
child survival, infectious disease surveillance and control, 
and resilience of developing communities to weather shocks and 
stresses, including climate change. The Committee will also 
exercise oversight over the implementation of the BUILD Act, 
P.L. 115-254, which will transform the Overseas Private 
Investment Corporation (OPIC) into the International 
Development Finance Corporation. Assistance provided through 
the Millennium Challenge Corporation will also receive close 
scrutiny.
    v. Global Health: The Committee will examine key global 
health issues, in particular the harmful impacts of 
Administration policies of re-imposing the Global Gag Rule and 
eliminating funding to UNFPA on women's health services and 
access to reproductive health. Additionally, the Committee's 
oversight will include reviewing the implementation of 
Congress's 2018 reauthorization of PEPFAR, progress on global 
TB elimination, support for maternal and child health, and the 
upcoming replenishment of the Global Fund to fight AIDS, TB and 
malaria. The Committee will also conduct oversight on 
infectious disease surveillance and control and strengthening 
of health care systems, particularly in light of the ongoing 
Ebola outbreak in DRC.
    w. Climate Change, Energy, and the Environment: The 
Committee will examine the effectiveness of U.S. policy on 
climate change, including this Administration's announced 
intent to withdraw from the Paris Climate Accord and its 
impacts on our diplomatic relations, our development 
assistance, and multilateral engagement. We will explore the 
impacts of climate change on national security, its 
contributions to displacement and social unrest across the 
globe, and how we can advance a path toward climate 
stabilization. We will consider the evolution of the global 
energy landscape, emphasize good governance of existing 
resources, and work to assure energy security for the U.S. and 
our allies. The committee will also oversee engagement on 
environmental issues including wildlife trafficking, 
international conservation efforts, and the role and safety of 
environmental activists across the globe.
    x. Economic Policy and Trade: The Committee will oversee 
international economic policy, including U.S. leadership in 
trade, finance, energy, technology, and development policy to 
promote economic prosperity and national security.
    y. Export Control Reform: The Committee will oversee the 
implementation of the Export Controls Act, contained in Title 
XVII of P.L. 115-232. The Committee also will oversee the 
implementation of Executive Branch reforms to U.S. strategic 
export controls. In particular, the Committee will assess the 
extent to which recent and any proposed new changes to the U.S. 
Munitions List and the Commerce Control List effectively 
safeguard critical technologies and national security, while 
supporting the defense industrial base and advancing U.S. 
commercial interests.
    z. U.S. Nonproliferation Policy: The Committee will examine 
the effectiveness of U.S. nonproliferation policy and the 
international nonproliferation regime in preventing the spread 
of weapons of mass destruction. The Committee will address 
opportunities to strengthen existing nonproliferation 
organizations, especially the International Atomic Energy 
Agency, increase cooperation with other countries, and enhance 
international nonproliferation agreements and mechanisms. 
Prominent issues will include the global expansion of civil 
nuclear power and the potential spread of technology, equipment 
and material useful in the development of nuclear weapons 
capabilities. The Committee will closely examine proposed and 
existing bilateral nuclear cooperation agreements with other 
countries, including their potential to promote U.S. 
nonproliferation objectives and commercial interests.
    aa. Security Assistance and Arms Transfer Policy: The 
Committee will assess the effectiveness of security assistance 
programs authorized under the Foreign Assistance Act and the 
Arms Export Control Act in advancing U.S. national interests. 
In addition, the Committee will review those security 
cooperation programs funded by the Department of Defense but 
which require concurrence of the Secretary of State, or 
otherwise give rise to the Committee's jurisdiction. The 
Committee will also review law and policy relating to U.S. arms 
transfers and related end-use monitoring, as well as various 
counterterrorism tools that impact foreign policy. The 
Committee will also continue to carefully review proposed arms 
sales to ensure they comport with U.S. foreign and national 
security policy and benefit the legitimate defense needs of the 
recipient countries, as well as the process by which the 
Administration consults with the Committee and the Congress on 
such sales to ensure proper oversight.
    bb. U.S. International Broadcasting: The Committee will 
continue to actively monitor and review the operations and 
organization of U.S. government-supported, civilian 
international broadcasting to respond more effectively to the 
challenges presented by state and non-state actors using modern 
communication platforms. The Committee will closely oversee the 
implementation of the reforms enacted in the 114th Congress, 
and seek further improvements in this critical area.
    cc. Human Rights and Democracy: The Committee will review 
whether the administration is maintaining America's 
longstanding role as a champion of human rights and democracy 
around the world, including in post-transition environments. 
The Committee will assess U.S. involvement with multilateral 
human rights organizations, to ensure that U.S. diplomacy 
serves to promote fundamental human rights and freedoms.
    dd. United Nations and International Organizations: The 
Committee will closely review all aspects of U.S. funding of, 
and participation in, international organizations. The 
Committee will closely monitor the work of the United Nations 
Department of Peacekeeping Operations and Department of Field 
Support, and particularly efforts to improve performance and 
enhance accountability. The Committee will also seek to ensure 
America's engagement with UN institutions will support 
international diplomatic and development goals, including the 
Sustainable Development Goals. Close attention will be paid to 
the extent to which the Administration's strategies in 
international organizations has led to better treatment of 
Israel and increased transparency, accountability, and reform 
of those organizations.
    ee. Cybersecurity: The Committee shall conduct oversight 
over U.S. efforts to examine and devise appropriate responses 
to cyber threats from foreign governments, non-state actors, 
and criminal networks that target the United States. The 
Committee will also examine efforts by U.S. adversaries to 
undermine the government, democratic and other institutions of 
the United States and other nations through cyber intrusions.
    ff. Conflicts of Interest Abroad: The Committee will 
investigate possible conflicts of interest presented by members 
of the Administration's personal and business interests abroad 
and the impact of such interests on the development and 
implementation of U.S. foreign policy.

                            ADDITIONAL VIEWS

    I appreciate being provided the opportunity to review the 
text of the Chairman's proposed oversight plan for the 116th 
Congress, pursuant to the recently revised House Rule X(2)(d). 
According to that revision, the formal author of the report is 
now the Chairman, rather than the Committee as a whole. As 
such, wherever the new report speaks of what ``the Committee'' 
intends to do, it should be read as reflecting the intent of 
the Chairman, exercising his prerogatives under House and 
Committee rules, rather than the Committee as a whole. 
Committee Rule 11(b) continues to preclude the release of any 
document purporting to express publicly the views of the 
Committee unless it has been approved by a majority of the 
Committee.
    In recent years, the Committee has exercised significant, 
proactive oversight over the agencies and programs within our 
jurisdiction, on an overwhelmingly bipartisan basis. I am 
hopeful that this commitment to even-handed oversight will 
continue into the future. To that end, I am encouraged to note 
the significant continuity between most of the Chairman's plan 
for the 116th Congress and the prior Committee Oversight Plan 
for the 115th Congress.
    Of course, the new oversight plan also includes changes and 
additions. Some are updates that reflect new circumstances and 
developments in the world. Others reflect the differing 
priorities of the new majority. Unfortunately, some changes are 
objectionable, and reflect the injection of partisan oversight 
priorities beyond what the prior majority indulged, even during 
a Democrat administration. It is unfortunate that their plan 
personally identifies the President and certain interactions 
with foreign leaders that fall within the constitutionally 
rooted Presidential Communications Privilege identified by our 
courts. It is also problematic that the ``Global Health'' 
subsection inserts new priorities related to abortion advocacy. 
Republican Members of the Committee continue to believe 
strongly that maintaining broad public support for our overseas 
programs requires precluding the expenditure of taxpayer funds 
for divisive and deeply objectionable purposes, such as funding 
for organizations overseas that perform or promote abortion as 
a method of family planning, or that support or participate in 
the management of a program of coercive abortion or involuntary 
sterilization. It is my sincere hope that the Committee will 
not expend its energies on these partisan pursuits when there 
are so many other issues vital to our national security that 
demand our attentions.
    I look forward to working with my friend Chairman Engel to 
maintain the traditional oversight standards of the Foreign 
Affairs Committee during the 116th Congress.

                                   Michael T. McCaul,
                                           Ranking Member.

                            DISSENTING VIEWS

    The Committee on Foreign Affairs Oversight Plan for the 
116th Congress states, ``The Committee will examine key global 
health issues, in particular the harmful impacts of 
Administration policies of re-imposing the Global Gag Rule and 
eliminating funding to UNFPA on women's health services and 
access to reproductive health.'' Incorporating Ranking Member 
McCaul's objection with respect to use of the term 
``Committee'' and noting that this Oversight Plan reflects the 
personal views of Chairman Engel as it was never subject to 
vote by the Committee, we believe that foreign assistance 
should be life-affirming: it should support the health of both 
women and their unborn children. Global health goals should be 
evaluated with this aim in mind.
    Use of the term ``Global Gag Rule'' is inartful and 
needlessly polemical. Protecting Life in Global Health 
Assistance (PLGHA) affirms respect for unborn life in foreign 
aid funding by requiring foreign nongovernmental organizations 
(NGOs) to agree, as a condition of their receipt of US federal 
grant money, to neither perform or promote abortion as a method 
of family planning overseas. Issued by President Trump on 
January 23, 2017, the PLGHA policy was implemented on May 9, 
2017, by the Secretary of State in coordination with Secretary 
of Health and Human Services (HHS). It applies to funds 
appropriated for global health assistance through the 
Department of State (DOS), U.S. Agency for International 
Development (USAID), and the Department of Defense (DOD).
    DOS, USAID, DOD, and HHS have been applying PLGHA to new 
grants and existing grants eligible to receive new funding. On 
February 7, 2018, DOS released a six-month review of PLGHA. At 
that point, PLGHA had been applied to 733 awards. Prime 
partners declined to sign in only four instances out of 733 
awards, so roughly 99.5% of prime partners who had the 
opportunity to accept the terms of PLGHA did so. If a partner 
declines to agree to the terms of PLGHA and funds are 
redirected to other organizations, the level of funding 
available for that country remains the same.
    U.S. foreign assistance should invest in women's 
healthcare, not abortion. PLGHA does not reduce funding for 
international health assistance or family planning. The choice 
is up to these organizations to either change their business 
practices or forego federal funding. If NGOs choose to stop 
performing and promoting abortion, they can again be eligible 
for federal grant money.
    For three decades, the United Nations Population Fund 
(UNFPA) has been widely denounced for its involvement in 
China's birth-limitation policy, which relies on coerced 
abortion. Yet it has refused to sever its links with the 
Chinese government.
    In 2016, China transitioned its ``one-child-per-family'' 
policy to a ``two-children-per-family'' policy. However, this 
revised state-imposed birth limitation does not eliminate the 
penalties that citizens face for violating the law. In China, 
reports of coerced abortions and sterilizations continue. 
According to DOS's 2017 Human Rights Report on China, many 
provinces require women who violate the family-planning policy 
to obtain an abortion. Some provinces, including Hubei, Hunan, 
and Liaoning, declare this explicitly; other provinces refer 
euphemistically to ``remedial measures.''\2\ Even in provinces 
that do not officially require abortions, local officials may 
still choose to coerce women into obtaining them.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    \2\https://www.state.gov/j/drl/rls/hrrpt/humanrightsreport/
index.htm?year=2017&dlid= 277073#wrapper.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    The Kemp-Kasten Amendment mandates that no U.S. government 
funds be distributed to ``any organization or program which, as 
determined by the President of the United States, supports or 
participates in the management of a program of coercive 
abortion or involuntary sterilization.'' Applying the Kemp-
Kasten Amendment, the Trump Administration determined for both 
fiscal year 2017 and 2018 that UNFPA had participated in 
China's coercive population programs. Funds were redirected to 
USAID's family planning, maternal health and reproductive 
health activities, thus vitiating any assertion of aggregated 
``harmful impact'' upon ``women's health services and access to 
reproductive health.''
    Until UNFPA recognizes China's coercion and disassociates 
itself, contributing to UNFPA would send a signal of U.S. 
approval for China's government control over birth permits and 
its forced sterilization and abortion. Redirecting U.S. foreign 
aid dollars sends a message that coercion is unacceptable and 
we will fund programs that provide true health care.
    Thank you for your consideration of these views.

                                   Christopher H. Smith.
                                   Ann Wagner.
                                   Scott Perry.
                                   Steve Chabot.
                                   Joe Wilson.
                                   Tim Burchett.

                     COMMITTEE ON HOMELAND SECURITY

                             OVERSIGHT PLAN

                     COMMITTEE ON HOMELAND SECURITY

                             116TH CONGRESS

    Pursuant to rule X, Clause 2(d) of the Rules of the House 
of Representatives for the 116th Congress, each standing 
Committee of the House of Representatives is required to submit 
an oversight plan to the Committee on Oversight and Reform and 
the Committee on House Administration by March 1 of the first 
session of the Congress. This is the oversight plan of the 
Committee on Homeland Security for the 116th Congress. The 
oversight plan includes the areas in which the Committee 
expects to conduct oversight this Congress but does not 
preclude oversight or investigation of additional matters.

               OVERSIGHT, MANAGEMENT, AND ACCOUNTABILITY

    During the 116th Congress, the Committee will conduct 
oversight of the Department of Homeland Security's (DHS) 
activities relating to human capital recruitment and retention, 
acquisitions, systems modernizations and other departmental 
functions essential to the Department effectively and 
efficiently fulfilling its critical missions. The Committee 
will also examine the Department's ongoing efforts to 
consolidate its headquarters at St. Elizabeths. Additionally, 
the Committee plans to conduct oversight of the Department's 
capstone strategy document, the Quadrennial Homeland Security 
Review (QHSR), which was required by law to be published in 
December 2017 but has not yet been released. Finally, the 
Committee will investigate homeland security programs and 
practices, as warranted.

                        Human Capital Management

    The Committee will monitor the Department's efforts to plan 
and implement strategic human capital management programs that 
address current and emerging human capital challenges, 
including persistent low morale among the Department's 
workforce and ongoing problems with retention and hiring at 
U.S. Customs and Border Protection as well as other components 
within the department. Additionally, the Committee will examine 
the authorities and activities of the Chief Human Capital 
Officer (CHCO) and the coordination of policy between and among 
the Department's CHCOs.

           Acquisition, Procurement, and Contract Management

    The Committee will review the Department's major 
acquisition programs and procurement and contracting practices 
to promote efficiency and effectiveness and prevent waste, 
fraud, and abuse. The Committee will also examine the 
Department's oversight of acquisitions and procurement, 
including components' compliance with policy and guidance. 
Further, the Committee will review the activities and 
authorities of the Under Secretary for Management and the Chief 
Procurement Officer to ensure the effective management of these 
key functions.

                 Systems Modernization and Integration

    The Committee will examine the Department's efforts to 
modernize and integrate its systems, including information 
technology and financial management systems. The Committee will 
monitor the development, implementation, and integration of new 
systems across components as well as management of the 
Department-wide portfolio of systems. Additionally, the 
Committee will review the authorities and activities of the 
Chief Information Officer (CIO) and the coordination of 
information technology policy among the Department's CIOs.

                  Policy Development and Coordination

    The Committee will monitor the efforts of the Department's 
Office of Strategy, Policy, and Plans to ensure coordination 
and integration of policy among components. The Committee will 
review the Department's efforts to establish clearer roles and 
responsibilities for the Office of Strategy, Policy, and Plans 
to enhance its ability to promote consistency and strengthen 
Departmental unity of effort. Additionally, the Committee will 
examine the Department's efforts to take a longer-term, 
strategic view of threats and hazards to the homeland, 
including through the publication of the QHSR.

          Departmental Waste, Fraud, Abuse, and Mismanagement

    Pursuant to rule X, clause 2(n)(1) of the Rules of the 
House of Representatives, the Committee will work to identify 
waste, fraud, abuse, or mismanagement in the Department's 
programs that may undermine its vital missions.

                      Privacy and Civil Liberties

    The Committee will continue to monitor the Department's 
efforts under Section 222 of the Homeland Security Act of 2002 
(Pub. L. 107-296), which created a Privacy Officer for the 
Department of Homeland Security, and Section 705 of the Act 
which established an Officer for Civil Rights and Liberties.

             BORDER SECURITY, FACILITATION, AND OPERATIONS

    In the 116th Congress, the Committee will examine how the 
Department can continue to enhance the security of America's 
borders by preventing the entry of terrorists and their 
weapons, stemming the flow of illegal drugs, and addressing 
unauthorized entries while also facilitating legitimate trade 
and travel to this country. Additionally, the Committee will 
review the Department's handling increasing numbers of families 
and children at the border, particularly the separation of 
children from their parents, conditions in holding facilities 
for children and other vulnerable populations, and the deaths 
of children in the Department's custody.

       Border Security Infrastructure, Technology, and Personnel

    The Committee will examine the Administration's efforts to 
deploy additional barriers along the southern border, including 
the President's national emergency declaration, the 
Department's Border Security Improvement Plan, metrics to 
assess effectiveness, costs to the taxpayers, the use of 
eminent domain to acquire private property, impacts on affected 
communities. The Committee will also examine the use of border 
security technology to enhance situational awareness. 
Furthermore, the Committee will review the infrastructure, 
technology and personnel needs at ports of entry, which 
currently limit the Department's ability to detect illegal 
narcotics and contraband entering the country and may slow the 
processing of individuals and goods.

                       Border Screening Programs

    The Committee intends to review efforts to assist border 
and consular officials in identifying, intercepting, and 
disrupting terrorists attempting to enter the United States. 
The Committee will examine the continued integration, security, 
and reliability of criminal, immigration, and terrorist 
databases used to screen persons seeking to enter this country, 
as well as operations at the Department's National Vetting 
Center. The Committee will also monitor the Department's 
progress toward completing a biometric entry and exit system at 
ports of entry.

                  TRANSPORTATION AND MARITIME SECURITY

    During the 116th Congress, the Committee plans to examine 
the Department's efforts to develop and implement strategies to 
address terrorist threats in varied transportation 
environments, including both air and surface transportation. 
The Committee will review the effectiveness of the 
Transportation Security Administration's (TSA) passenger, 
baggage, and cargo screening programs and operations. The 
Committee will also examine the challenges facing the TSA 
workforce, including limited protections for TSA agents and 
persistent low morale. Additionally, the Committee will examine 
the use of transportation security grants to better secure 
America's transportation system.

                           Aviation Security

    The Committee intends to review TSA's progress in 
developing and deploying passenger and baggage screening 
technologies, including the accuracy and cost-effectiveness of 
such technologies. The Committee will examine TSA's use of 
explosives detection canines to ensure that canine teams are 
utilized effectively. The Committee will also look at 
management of the agency's Screening Partnership Program. 
Additionally, the Committee also will review TSA's passenger 
search policies and practices, passenger pre-screening programs 
including the use of no-fly and selectee lists, and protocols 
for ensuring that passengers designated high-risk are receiving 
enhanced screening at the checkpoint. The Committee will assess 
whether there are additional ways for TSA to enhance security 
and improve risk-based strategies throughout the aviation 
system.
    As part of this oversight, the Committee plans to examine 
TSA's staffing needs and related matters affecting the TSA 
workforce, such as continued low morale and high attrition 
among transportation security officers. The Committee will also 
examine privacy and civil rights protections for the traveling 
public. Additionally, the Committee will examine the threats to 
aviation and other targets posed by unmanned aircraft or 
``drones.''

                    Surface Transportation Security

    The Committee will review TSA's efforts to secure surface 
transit systems, including the highest-risk mass transit and 
rail systems. The Committee's oversight will include a review 
of the Transit Security Grant Program to determine if it is 
supporting surface transportation security adequately. The 
Committee will also review the extent to which TSA effectively 
coordinates with its Federal, State, local, and private sector 
partners to secure our Nation's transportation systems. 
Additionally, the Committee will also assess the effectiveness 
of TSA's efforts to secure the Nation's pipeline systems 
through TSA's oversight and inspection activities.

                         Stakeholder Engagement

    The Committee will help ensure that TSA works appropriately 
with transportation sector stakeholders and labor through the 
Aviation Security Advisory Committee, the Surface 
Transportation Security Advisory Committee, collective 
bargaining, or other means. The Committee will also encourage 
TSA to find new ways to leverage private sector expertise, 
innovation, and technologies, including from small businesses, 
in its mission to secure the Nation's critical transportation 
systems in the most effective and efficient manner possible.

                           Maritime Security

    The Committee will examine various aspects of maritime 
security, including the security of port facilities and the 
screening of vessels, passengers, cargo, and crew, for 
potential terrorists, terrorist weapons, and contraband. The 
Committee plans to review the Coast Guard's statutorily defined 
homeland security missions, to include ports, waterways, and 
coastal security; drug interdiction; migrant interdiction; law 
enforcement; and defense readiness. The Committee will also 
review resource and asset needs within the Coast Guard to 
determine whether the service is operationally ready to address 
the varied threats to America's ports and waterways while 
pursuing a long-term sustainable path of fleet 
recapitalization. Additionally, the Committee will analyze and 
conduct oversight on the statutorily required security 
assessment of the Transportation Worker Identification 
Credential (TWIC) program.

                   INTELLIGENCE AND COUNTERTERRORISM

    During the 116th Congress, the Committee will examine the 
capabilities and efforts of the Department, along with its 
Federal, state, and local partners, to identify, prevent, 
deter, and respond to threats to the homeland. The Committee 
will examine worldwide threats to the homeland from foreign 
terrorist groups, including the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria 
(ISIS), al Qaeda, and other groups that seek to carry out 
attacks against the U.S. and its interests. The Committee will 
also examine the threats from homegrown violent extremists and 
terrorist networks in this country. Additionally, the Committee 
will review the growing threats to the U.S. from domestic 
terrorism movements.

               Homeland Security Intelligence Enterprise

    The Committee will conduct oversight of the Department's 
Intelligence Enterprise, including intelligence activities 
throughout the Department and component agencies. This will 
include a focus on the coordination and collaboration across 
intelligence offices and personnel within the Headquarters and 
component agencies. Additionally, the Committee will review 
efforts to build the intelligence, analytical, and assessment 
capabilities of the Department and to ensure its full 
participation in the Intelligence Community as part of its 
homeland security mission. The Committee will also examine the 
Department's role in managing, distributing, and using 
terrorist intelligence and threat information in furtherance of 
its homeland security mission. Furthermore, the Committee will 
monitor the extent to which DHS effectively coordinates and 
collaborates with other Federal, State, and local agencies to 
mitigate threats to the homeland. The Committee will also 
review how DHS agencies collect and share information, 
including through vital security vetting programs.
    The Committee will continue to assess the development of 
DHS counterintelligence and insider threat programs, including 
Departmental organizational changes, resources, monitoring 
programs, and training initiatives. DHS's counterintelligence 
efforts are intended to prevent adversaries from penetrating 
the Department to exploit sensitive information, operations, 
programs, personnel, and resources.

                          Information Sharing

    The Homeland Security Act of 2002 mandated routine sharing 
of homeland security-related information between and among 
Federal, State and local officials to assess the nature and 
scope of terrorist threats to the United States and to evaluate 
and act on that information. The Committee will examine 
information sharing among Federal, State and local governments, 
law enforcement entities, first responders, and emergency 
management personnel. The Committee will also examine the 
Department's initiatives to coordinate information sharing to 
and from state and local fusion centers throughout the country 
and will continue to evaluate the National Network of Fusion 
Centers to determine their impact on securing the homeland. The 
Committee will review coordination and information sharing 
procedures between state and local fusion centers and Joint 
Terrorism Task Forces as well. Additionally, the Committee will 
review U.S. counterterrorism cooperation with foreign partners, 
with the goal of improving the effectiveness of international 
information sharing, training and best practices, and 
coordination.

                      Privacy and Civil Liberties

    During the 116th Congress, the Committee will monitor the 
Department's efforts to ensure appropriate privacy and civil 
liberties protections in its intelligence and information 
sharing programs and activities.

                      United States Secret Service

    The Committee will examine the homeland security operations 
of the United States Secret Service, including protecting the 
President of the United States and other Executive branch 
officials and investigating financial and cybercrime, and 
review the agency's staffing model to determine whether it has 
adequate resources to meet its current and projected needs. The 
Committee will also examine the Secret Service's lead role in 
planning and executing security operations for National Special 
Security Events. Additionally, the Committee will conduct 
oversight into whether the agency is taking steps to address 
persistent concerns about hiring practices, promotion policies, 
and morale.

        CYBERSECURITY, INFRASTRUCTURE PROTECTION, AND INNOVATION

    During the 116th Congress, the Committee will conduct 
oversight of the cybersecurity, infrastructure protection, and 
science and technology activities of the Department.

                             Cybersecurity

    The Committee will examine implementation of H.R. 3359, the 
Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency Act, which 
operationalized the Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security 
Agency (CISA). The Committee will also conduct oversight of 
activities related to Executive Order 13800, Strengthening the 
Cybersecurity of Federal Networks and Critical Infrastructure, 
Presidential Policy Directive 41 (PPD-41), United States Cyber 
Incident Coordination, and implementation of the National Cyber 
Strategy. Toward that end, the Committee will continue to its 
oversight of CISA's EINSTEIN and Continuous Diagnostics and 
Mitigation (CDM) programs for securing Federal networks, as 
well as strategic initiatives carried out by the new National 
Risk Management Center to identify interdependencies and 
mitigate vulnerabilities across critical infrastructure 
sectors. The Committee will also examine ways to further build 
the Department's cybersecurity capability and capacity to 
implement its cyber statutory authorities.
    Additionally, the Committee will continue its work 
examining the implementation of cybersecurity legislation, 
including the National Cybersecurity Protection Act of 2014, 
(Pub. L. 113-282) (authorizing the National Cybersecurity 
Communications and Integration Center, or NCCIC); the Federal 
Information Security Modernization Act of 2014, (Pub. L. 113-
283) (authorizing DHS to carry out Federal information security 
activities); the Cybersecurity Enhancement Act of 2014, (Pub. 
L. 113-274) (providing for improvements to cybersecurity 
through public-private partnerships, education, awareness, and 
development of standards and best practices); and the 
Cybersecurity Workforce Assessment Act, (Pub. L. 113-246) 
(calling for a comprehensive cyber workforce strategy with 
workforce assessments every three years). The Committee will 
also examine CISA's election security activities.

                       Infrastructure Protection

    The Committee will examine CISA's programs to protect 
critical infrastructure, with key focus on internal 
coordination mechanisms to ensure that expertise can be 
leveraged efficiently and effectively and encourage CISA to 
proactively respond to new and emerging threats, such as the 
threat of unmanned aerial vehicles detected in sensitive 
airspace. The Committee will also review how DHS, through CISA, 
works with the various critical infrastructure sectors pursuant 
to Presidential Policy Directive 21, Critical Infrastructure 
Security and Resilience (PPD-21). During the 116th Congress the 
Committee will examine and work to reauthorize the Chemical 
Facility Anti-Terrorism Standard (CFATS) program, which 
requires high risk chemical facility owners and operators to 
report chemical holdings, perform vulnerability assessments, 
and adopt risk-based security measures to protect against the 
threat of a terrorist attack. Further, the Committee will 
continue to monitor the Department's efforts to establish a 
program to secure the sale and transfer of ammonium nitrate, as 
required by the Secure Handling of Ammonium Nitrate Act of 
2008, and potentially develop new access controls to prevent 
the illicit flow of other precursor chemicals commonly used in 
Improved Explosive Devices (IEDs).

                       Federal Protective Service

    The Committee will continue to monitor the security of 
Federal buildings and facilities, including the role and 
effectiveness of the Federal Protective Service (FPS) and will 
review the Secretary's recommendation regarding the appropriate 
placement for FPS pursuant to H.R. 3359. The Committee will 
also continue to examine the general management of FPS, 
including its personnel policies, training program, and 
oversight and management of Federal facility contract guard 
personnel.

                   Science and Technology Directorate

    The Committee will conduct oversight of the coordination of 
homeland security-related research, development, testing, and 
evaluation (RDT&E) within the Department and the adequacy of 
mission support provided by the Directorate to operational 
elements of the Department, state and local authorities, and 
the private sector. The Committee will also review the 
Department's efforts to attract the Nation's most talented 
scientists and build partnerships with the academic community 
through its Homeland Security Centers of Excellence and 
University Programs.

             EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS, RESPONSE, AND RECOVERY

    In the 116th Congress, the Committee will continue to 
conduct oversight of the Department's efforts to prevent, 
prepare for, respond to, and recover from acts of terrorism, 
natural disasters, and other major emergencies.

                  Preparedness, Response, and Recovery

    The Committee will examine the Federal Emergency Management 
Agency's (FEMA) response and recovery efforts for declared 
disasters to ensure capabilities incorporate lessons learned 
and Federal resources are used appropriately. Focus will 
include lessons learned from the 2017 disaster season, 
including Hurricanes Maria, Irma, and Harvey, ongoing recovery 
efforts in Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands, addressing 
the needs of underserved and vulnerable populations, and the 
impact of global warming on disasters. The Committee will also 
review the Department's training and exercise programs, 
including awareness of these resources among first responders 
and state and local governments. Further, the Committee will 
monitor the extent to which FEMA is incorporating information 
from national exercises into future training, planning, and 
response, recovery, and mitigation activities. Additionally, 
the Committee will conduct oversight of the Department's 
Countering Weapons of Mass Destruction Office efforts to 
counter threats from chemical, biological, radiological, and 
nuclear weapons.

     Assistance to State and Local Governments and First Responders

    The Committee will examine FEMA's allocation and 
administration of grants to enhance the ability of state and 
local governments and emergency response providers to prevent, 
prepare for, respond to, mitigate, and recover from a terrorist 
attack or other disaster. The Committee will review the 
coordination of grant programs within the Department in 
developing guidance and administering grants; the ability of 
state and local governments to access, obligate, and expend 
funds; the strength of regional partnerships developed through 
grants; and the risk-based distribution and expenditure of such 
grants at the state and local levels. Additionally, the 
Committee will examine the Department's work with state and 
local partners to support school safety and security and 
preparedness.

                        Emergency Communications

    The Committee will examine the coordination of various 
communications programs and offices within the Department, 
including the achievement and maintenance of interoperable 
communications capabilities among the Department's components, 
as required by the Department of Homeland Security 
Interoperable Communications Act (Pub. Law 114-29). The 
Committee will monitor activities of the First Responder 
Network Authority (FirstNet) and the development of the public 
safety interoperable wireless broadband network. In addition, 
the Committee will review the Department's Integrated Public 
Alert and Warning System to ensure timely and effective alerts 
and warnings are provided to the public in the event of an 
emergency.

                   COMMITTEE ON HOUSE ADMINISTRATION

                 Oversight Plan for the 116th Congress

                   Committee on House Administration

    As required by House Resolution 6, the Committee on House 
Administration's oversight plan for the 116th Congress is as 
follows:

                            MEMBER SERVICES

      Oversee Members' allowance amounts, including 
structure and regulations.
      Provide guidance and outreach to congressional 
offices to ensure compliance with committee regulations.
      Review and revise the Members Handbook, a set of 
regulations governing the appropriate use of the members' 
Representational allowance.
      Review and revise the guide to outfitting and 
maintaining an office of the United States House of 
Representatives, a set of regulations governing the 
acquisition, transfer, and disposal of furnishings, equipment, 
software, and related services.
      Review the calculation of the Members' 
Representational Allowances and ensure that all members have 
adequate resources for representing their constituents.
      Oversee the processing of vouchers and direct 
payments, including those for payroll. Continue to monitor the 
implementation of the electronic vouchering system.
      Work with the Officers of the House, the 
Architect of the Capitol and the legislative branch agencies to 
provide meaningful outreach to member offices and provide that 
the views of member offices are incorporated into their ongoing 
work.
New Member Orientation
      Plan, implement, and oversee the New Member 
Orientation program for newly-elected Members of Congress.
      Oversee the planning and implementation of the 
Congressional Research Service new member issues seminar in 
Williamsburg.
      Work with the Congressional Research Service and 
other support agencies to make available additional on-going 
professional development services for new members and staff.
Intern program
      In coordination with the Senate Committee on 
Rules and Administration, organize, administer, and oversee the 
intern lecture series.
      Review and consider revising the intern handbook 
and other publications and communication materials used in 
support of the intern program.
      Continue and expand the Gregg and Livingston 
Harper congressional internship program for individuals with 
intellectual disabilities.

                    COMMITTEE FUNDING AND OVERSIGHT

      Review monthly reports on committee activities 
and expenditures.
      Review the Committees' Congressional Handbook 
regulations governing expenditure of committee funds and update 
regulations as needed.
      Review primary and any secondary expense 
resolutions and approve authorization of committee-funding 
levels in committee and by House Resolution.
      Review committees' franking expenditures.
      Review the use of consultant contracts.

                CONGRESSIONAL ACCOUNTABILITY ACT OF 1995

      Monitor implementation of the Congressional 
Accountability Act of 1995 (caa, pl 104-1) and the reforms 
provided for in pl 115-397.
      Monitor the development and deployment of the 
climate survey.
      Review data on workplace rights information.
      Review regulations adopted by the Office of 
Congressional Workplace Rights.
      Evaluate resources available to the Office of 
Congressional Workplace Rights and House employing offices to 
facilitate implementation of the act.
      Conduct general oversight of the office of Office 
of Congressional Workplace Rights.
      Conduct specific oversight of the implementation 
of the Office of Congressional Workplace Rights IT system.
      Monitor ongoing judicial proceedings to determine 
the impact on the Congressional Accountability Act.
      Monitor for the ongoing anti-harassment and anti-
discrimination workplace rights training, including development 
of the curriculum and administration of in district trainings.
      Oversee the Office of Employee Advocate.

                          FRANKING COMMISSION

      Oversee the Members' use of the congressional 
frank and other unsolicited mass communications by providing 
guidance, advice, and counsel through consultation or advisory 
opinions.
      Review proposals to modernize the franking 
practices of members, and regulations governing such mailings 
and communications.
      Monitor current prohibition on mass mailings 90 
days before a primary or general election.
      Oversee efforts to ensure compliance with franked 
mailings and communications reporting requirements, and the 
Chief Administrative Officer's (CAO) implementation of new 
digital form procedures.
      Implement approved procedures to increase 
transparency and improve the accounting of franked mail costs.
      Revise the regulations on the use of the 
congressional frank and rules on practice in proceedings before 
the House Commission on Congressional Mailing Standards.
      Coordinate with the members services team to 
update, refine, and modernize policies related to the official 
use of communications resources.
      Coordinate with the Clerk of the House and CAO to 
identify and implement new applications, resources, and 
procedures for the House to be more transparent, accountable, 
accessible, and to meet Member and Committee office's 
obligations related to official communications.

                  HOUSE OFFICERS AND HOUSE OPERATIONS

      Coordinate with House Officers and officials to 
develop long term plans and goals for the administrative, 
financial and administrative functions of the House.
      Oversee an effort to recruit and retain a more 
diverse workforce among all the House Officers.
      Work with House Officers to identify and reduce 
spending and create more cost effective and efficient 
operations within the House.
      Analyze management improvement proposals and 
other initiatives submitted by the House Officers, the 
Inspector General, the Capitol Police Board, the Architect of 
the Capitol, the Library of Congress, and other legislative 
branch agencies.
      Coordinate with the subcommittee on Legislative 
Branch appropriations on matters impacting operations of the 
House and joint entities.
      Provide policy guidance to the House Officers, 
Inspector General and the joint entities as appropriate.
      Oversee compliance with the House Employee 
Classification Act (2 U.S.C. 291 et seq.).
      Assure coordination among officers and joint 
entities on administrative and technology matters, including 
reviewing existing it security policies.
      Provide policy guidance and conduct oversight of 
security and safety issues and congressional entities charged 
with such roles.
      Assure coordination among officers and joint 
entities on the development of a comprehensive district office 
support program.
Chief Administrative Officer
      Provide policy direction for the Chief 
Administrative Officer. Continue the review of functions and 
administrative operations assigned to the Chief Administrative 
Officer.
      Review existing assets management processes.
      Review House procurement policies and monitor the 
effectiveness of the Chief Administrative Officer's procurement 
and contract management functions. Review procedures for 
processing contracts with the House that exceed the threshold 
of $350,000.
      Continue to review ongoing process and technology 
upgrades to the House financial management system and ensuring 
appropriate internal controls are in place.
      Monitor reforms to the Office of Finance and 
Payroll and Benefits as provided for by the Inspector General 
and outside consultants.
      Review and oversee information technology 
services provided, maintained or hosted by House Information 
Resources. Continue oversight of failsafe procedures to 
guarantee continuity of operations.
      Review new technology initiatives to better serve 
members, committees, and the public.
      Review semi-annual financial and operational 
status reports; oversee implementation of changes in operations 
to improve services and increase efficiencies.
      Review training offerings available to members 
and staff through the congressional staff academy.
      Review the development and roll-out of the CAO's 
customer advocate program.
      Review the operations of the House gift shop and 
its management.
      Continued review of House restaurant operations; 
furniture policy, inventory and selection; and alternatives to 
the current mail delivery process to strengthen the services 
and tools available to members and staff.
      Examine Chief Administrative Officer's role in 
assuring accessibility to the House wing of the Capitol, the 
House office buildings and other House facilities consistent 
with the Americans with Disabilities Act.
      Review staff benefits offered by the House and 
proposals to modify benefits.
      Review the wounded warrior program and develop 
recommendations, in consultation with veteran's organizations, 
about improvements to the program.
      Review the official sanctioned ``app challenge''.
Clerk of the House
      Review and approve contracts and requests for 
proposals by the Clerk that exceed the $350,000 spending 
threshold.
      Review the Clerk's current IT configuration and 
redundancy posture.
      Oversee the House document repository.
      Review standards for the electronic exchange of 
legislative information among the houses of congress and 
legislative-branch agencies.
      Coordinate on matters under the jurisdiction of 
the House Fine Arts Board and the Capitol Preservation Board.
      Continue review of functions and administrative 
operations assigned to the Clerk.
      Review of semi-annual financial and operational 
status reports; recommend changes in operations to improve 
services and increase efficiencies.
      Review the printing needs of the Clerk to 
evaluate the potential for eliminating duplication.
      Review the application programming interface 
incorporated in the Clerk's newly-developed website.
      Oversee preparation of congressionally-authorized 
publications.
Sergeant-At-Arms
      Review and oversee security operations in the 
House, including the House Chamber, the galleries, the Capitol, 
House Office Buildings, Capitol Grounds, and district offices.
      Review and oversee initiatives designed to 
increase security and security awareness for Members and staff 
in district offices.
      Review annual financial and operational status 
reports; recommend changes in operations to improve services 
and increase efficiencies.
      Review impact of electronic access to controlled 
spaces.
      Continue review of functions and administrative 
operations assigned to the Sergeant-At-Arms.
      Review the security operation of House parking 
facilities, regulations, and allocation of parking spaces.
      Consult with the Sergeant-At-Arms on policies 
adopted by the Capitol Police Board.
      Review the policies and procedures for visitor 
access to the Capitol.
      Examine Sergeant-At-Arms' role in assuring 
accessibility to the House wing of the Capitol, the House 
Office Buildings, and other House facilities consistent with 
the Americans with Disabilities Act.
     Review staff ID standards.
     Review the impact on staff of garage security 
implementation.
     Review the use of technology generally in the 
protection of the House of Representatives.
     Review the effectiveness of district office 
security program, including the law enforcement coordinator 
program, enterprise-wide security system contract, and 
processes for mail sent to the district offices.
House Inspector General
     Review, and approve, proposed audit plan and audit 
reports, including the annual financial statements audit.
     Ensure that audits and their prioritization is 
based upon the assessment of risk to the operations of the 
House.
     Review comprehensive financial and operational 
audits of the House, investigate any irregularities uncovered, 
and monitor necessary improvements.
     Monitor progress of House audits.
     Continue review of functions and administrative 
operations assigned to the Inspector General.
     Direct Inspector General to conduct management 
advisories to improve implementation and operation of key House 
functions.
House Diversity Office
     Pursuant to House Resolution 6, oversee and direct 
implementation of the diversity office.
     Collaborating with the legislative branch 
appropriations subcommittee, oversee requirement for employment 
related survey of the congressional workforce.
     Review and assess diversity plan for each 
legislative branch agency.

           OVERSIGHT OF LEGISLATIVE BRANCH AND OTHER ENTITIES

Information and technology coordination
     Oversee, in conjunction with the Senate, forums 
for the sharing of technology plans and capabilities among the 
legislative branch agencies.
     Oversee, in conjunction with the Senate, the 
legislative branch cybersecurity working group with the goal of 
developing and implementing it standards across the legislative 
branch.
     Oversee management of the congress.gov website.
     Oversee work of the legislative branch financial 
managers' council.
     Provide direction to the bulk data task force.
Library of Congress
     Conduct a review of the progress that the Library 
has made in providing public access to government information, 
especially in electronic form.
     Continue oversight of the development of the 
Library's Visitor Experience project.
     Continue oversight of Library of Congress 
operations, including inventory and cataloguing systems.
     Continue oversight of Law Library operations.
     Continue oversight of Congressional Research 
Service operations and consider any need to modify management 
and organizational structure of the service.
     Review implementation of the Library of Congress 
fiscal operations improvement act of 2000 (public law 106-481), 
the Veterans' Oral History Project act (public law 106-380), 
the National Recording Preservation Act of 2000 (public law no: 
106-474), and the history of the House Awareness and 
Preservation Act (public law 106-99).
     Consider human-resources legislation proposed by 
the Library.
     Review the use of technology generally in Library 
of Congress operations, and specifically the ongoing work to 
centralize technology operations consistent with the guidance 
from the general accountability office.
     Continue oversight of the Library's technology 
hosting environment transition.
     Review reports by library of congress inspector 
general and implementation of audit recommendations. Examine 
options to improve operation and structure of the Library of 
Congress Inspector General's office.
     Focus oversight on national library services to 
provide the most effective service to their library partners, 
explore ways to increase the number of users under 65, review 
the format and content for those users and review proposals for 
a new physical headquarters.
Copyright Office
     Review the progress that the Copyright Office has 
made in providing copyright application and registration data 
(both past and current) online.
     Review the use of technology generally in 
Copyright Office operations, and specifically the office's 
modernization efforts.
     Conduct a review of the Copyright Office's efforts 
to communicate its modernization efforts to stakeholders.
     Conduct a review of security measures and 
processes for e-deposits submitted to both the Copyright Office 
and Library of Congress.
     Conduct a review of the Copyright Office's 
spending authority and its ability to budget for multi-year 
capital projects.
     Conduct a review of the examination process with a 
focus on the Copyright Office's initiatives aimed at improve 
examination efficiencies and reducing application pendency.
     Review availability of customer service support 
options available to applicants.
     Review Copyright Office rulemaking authority and 
processes.
     Review Copyright Office fee setting authority and 
the office's process for determining the actual cost of 
services they provide.
United States Capitol Police (USCP)
     Monitor administrative operations of the agency, 
including budgetary management, over-time use, civilian 
component, attrition rates, recruitment efforts and incentive 
programs for officers and civilian employees.
     Review proposals for additional USCP authorities, 
facilities and equipment.
     Review analysis of uniformed officer post/duty 
assignments to determine and authorize force levels to meet the 
agency's security requirements within the Capitol complex to 
include the Capitol visitor center, the Library of Congress and 
U.S. Botanic Garden.
     Conduct oversight on House-garage security 
implementation.
     Conduct oversight of the effectiveness of USCP 
pre-screeners.
     Review and consider proposals to improve USCP 
training program for new recruits, and in-service training.
     Authorize and oversee the installation and 
maintenance of new security systems and devices proposed by the 
police board.
     Review and authorize regulations prescribed by the 
police board for use of law enforcement authority by the 
Capitol Police.
     Examine Capitol Police role in assuring 
accessibility to the House wing of the Capitol, House Office 
Buildings and other facilities consistent with the Americans 
with Disabilities Act.
     Review reports by USCP Inspector General and 
implementation of audit recommendations. Examine options to 
improve operation and structure of the USCP Inspector General's 
Office.
     Review processes for ensuring adequate physical 
security for Members of Congress.
Government Publishing Office (GPO)
     Oversee operations of the Government Publishing 
Office, including the Superintendent of Documents.
     Review and adopt legislative proposals to reform 
government printing by eliminating redundancies and unnecessary 
printing, increasing efficiency, and enhancing public access to 
government publications.
     Continue efforts to reform Title 44, particularly 
provisions related to the federal depositary library program.
     Monitor implementation of remedial actions taken 
by management to address audit issues identified by the GPO 
Inspector General and outside financial auditors.
     Review the printing needs of the House of 
Representatives to identify the potential for eliminating 
duplication.
     Examine current GPO printing and binding 
regulations to determine advisability of change.
     Oversee Superintendent of Documents' sales and 
depository library programs.
     Review GPO labor practices and labor agreements.
     Review use of GPO facilities and other assets to 
identify possible alternatives enhancing value to the Congress 
and the public.
Architect of the Capitol (AOC)
     Review the operations and organizational structure 
of the office of the Architect.
     Participate in the selection process of a 
permanent Architect of the Capitol.
     Review the electronic and procured services 
provided by the Architect.
     Oversee Architect of the Capitol's maintenance of 
House Buildings and the House side of the Capitol, and review 
plans for rehabilitation of House Buildings, including 
oversight over the Cannon House Office Building renovation.
     Continue oversight of life safety measures, 
accessibility measures, and improved evacuation mechanisms in 
House buildings.
     Review the AOC office of sustainability's efforts 
to reduce energy and waste consumption by the Capitol Complex.
     Oversee operations of the Capitol Visitors Center 
including the re-design of exhibition hall, in conjunction with 
the Senate Committee on Rules and Administration.
     Review and identify ways to create organizational-
wide efficiencies and standards across all divisions of the 
AOC.
     Review reports by Architect of the Capitol 
Inspector General and implementation of audit recommendations. 
Examine options to improve operation and structure of the 
Architect of the Capitol Inspector General's office.
     Inventory space requirements for unmet and growing 
child care needs to employees of the legislative branch and 
incorporate child care space planning into the master campus 
plan.
     Review the pest management practices of the AOC.
Office of Congressional Accessibility Services
     Oversee management and operations of Office of 
Congressional Accessibility Services, such as the 
implementation of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), in 
conjunction with Senate Committee on Rules and Administration.
Smithsonian Institution
     Review the Smithsonian Inspector General's reports 
on the status of the Smithsonian, with a focus on 
cybersecurity.
     Oversee general museum and research facility 
operations of the Smithsonian institution.
     Review and evaluate the Smithsonian institution's 
use of authorized public funds.
     Review proposed appointments of citizen regents to 
the Smithsonian institution's board of regents.
     Review proposals for authorization of new 
Smithsonian facilities, including the National Women's History 
Museum and the National Museum of the American Latino. Review 
Smithsonian policies regarding initiation of planning, design 
and construction of projects.
     Review operations of the National Zoo.
     Oversee Smithsonian science and research 
facilities including the work being conducted in Panama.
     Oversee the development of the partnership with 
the Victoria and Albert Museum in London, England.
     Review operations and conduct oversight of 
Smithsonian enterprises.
     Review any proposals to charge fees for admission 
to any Smithsonian exhibits.

                      TECHNOLOGY USE BY THE HOUSE

     Continue oversight of House Information Resources 
and other technology functions of the House to improve 
technology governance, services and the electronic 
dissemination of information.
     Review and consider recommendations made by 
National Association of Public Administration in regard to 
enhancing technology assessment capabilities within the 
legislative branch.
     Review cyber security measures and develop 
strategic plans to improve policies.
     Review technology standards for hearing rooms as 
they relate to the committee broadcast program.
     Oversee and continue to implement an enterprise 
House disaster recovery program for House offices, standing and 
select Committees and Member offices.
     Task the House Officers to develop and coordinate 
a House strategic technology plan.
     Oversee plan for deployment of 5g.
     Oversee continuation and streamlining of House 
technology assessment in both new media and cloud services.
     In cooperation with Member Services, review 
available technology necessary to support New Member 
Orientation.
     Review procedures and standards for technology 
services provided by outside vendors, individuals, and other 
entities.
     Work with legislative branch agencies to 
communicate available technology services to all Member, 
Committee and Leadership Offices.

            OVERSIGHT OF FEDERAL ELECTION LAW AND PROCEDURES

     Recommend disposition of House election contests 
pending before the committee; monitor any disputed election 
counts.
     Use authority under Article 1, Section 4 of the 
United States Constitution to provide equivalent opportunities 
for voters to participate in federal elections.
     Review operations of the Federal Election 
Commission (FEC) and evaluate possible changes to improve 
efficiency, improve enforcement of the Federal Election 
Campaign Act, and improve procedures for the disclosure of 
contributions and expenditures. Consider authorization issues 
and make recommendations on the FEC'S budget.
     Review federal campaign-finance laws and 
regulations, including presidential and congressional public 
financing, and consider potential reforms.
     Examine the role and impact of political 
organizations on federal elections.
     Review operations of the Election Assistance 
Commission (EAC) and evaluate possible changes to improve 
efficiency and improve implementation of the Help America Vote 
Act (HAVA).
     Examine the impact of amendments made by HAVA and 
the Military and Overseas Voter Empowerment Act (MOVE Act) to 
the Uniformed and Overseas Citizens Absentee Voting Act 
(UOCAVA) and consider proposals to improve voting methods for 
those serving and living abroad.
     Build the congressional record in support of a 
reauthorized national Voting Rights Act.
     Review state and federal activities under the 
National Voter Registration Act to identify potential for 
improvement to voter registration and education programs and 
reducing costs of compliance for state and local government.
     Review all aspects of registration and voting 
practices in federal elections. Monitor allegations of fraud 
and misconduct during all phases of federal elections and 
evaluate measures to improve the integrity of the electoral 
process.

  ADDITIONAL MINORITY VIEWS ON OVERSIGHT OF FEDERAL ELECTION LAW AND 
                               PROCEDURES

    The majority election oversight plan covers the 
jurisdiction of the Committee and we share in most of these 
objectives. However, we differ in the priority of these 
objectives. As the 116th Congress progresses we hope to work 
with the majority in ensuring the integrity of our nation's 
election infrastructure, the rights of states to run their own 
elections without undue federal regulation, and the prohibition 
against predatory election tactics such as ballot harvesting.

                       COMMITTEE ON THE JUDICIARY

                 OVERSIGHT PLAN FOR THE 116TH CONGRESS

                             March 6, 2019

    The Rules of the House of Representatives assign to the 
Committee on the Judiciary jurisdiction over: (1) the judiciary 
and judicial proceedings, civil and criminal; (2) 
administrative practice and procedure; (3) apportionment of 
Representatives; (4) bankruptcy, mutiny, espionage, and 
counterfeiting; (5) civil liberties; (6) Constitutional 
amendments; (7) criminal law enforcement and criminalization; 
(8) Federal courts and judges, and local courts in the 
Territories and possessions; (9) immigration policy and non-
border enforcement; (10) interstate compacts generally; (11) 
claims against the United States; (12) meetings of Congress; 
attendance of Members, Delegates, and the Resident 
Commissioner; and their acceptance of incompatible offices; 
(13) national penitentiaries; (14) patents, the Patent and 
Trademark Office, copyrights, and trademarks; (15) Presidential 
succession; (16) protection of trade and commerce against 
unlawful restraints and monopolies; (17) revision and 
codification of the Statutes of the United States; (18) State 
and territorial boundary lines; and (19) subversive activities 
affecting the internal security of the United States.
    Under clause 2(d) of Rule X of the House of 
Representatives, the Committee is further charged with 
preparing an oversight plan for the 116th Congress.
    The Committee's work on oversight and investigations will 
be coordinated across the Full Committee and each of the 
Subcommittees. Oversight activities may include hearings, 
briefings, correspondence, reports, public statements, and site 
visits. In the 116th Congress, this work may address any of the 
following issues, agencies, or legislative matters under the 
Committee's jurisdiction.

                             FULL COMMITTEE

    U.S. Department of Justice: In conjunction with the 
Subcommittees, the Committee will conduct oversight of the U.S. 
Department of Justice, including all Department components and 
agencies. This effort will include the investigation of threats 
to the integrity and independence of the Department of Justice, 
the Federal Bureau of Investigation, and other federal law 
enforcement agencies.
    National Security: The Committee will conduct oversight of 
the national security missions of the Law Enforcement and 
Intelligence Communities and assess the impact of government 
surveillance on privacy and civil liberties. This work will 
include reform and reauthorization of the expiring provisions 
of the USA PATRIOT Act and related provisions of the Foreign 
Intelligence Surveillance Act.
    Executive Authority and Separation of Powers: The Committee 
will conduct oversight of executive orders, memoranda, and 
court filings issued by the White House, the Office of Legal 
Counsel, and other components of the Department of Justice, 
particularly as they may relate to an assertion of executive 
authority. These efforts will include a review of the 
Department's decision not to defend key provisions the 
Affordable Care Act.
    The U.S. Copyright Office: The Committee will conduct 
oversight of the Copyright Office. Oversight will include 
review of its recordation system, public access to its 
registration records, and other modernization efforts.
    Copyright Law and Policy: The Committee will examine the 
provisions of the Copyright Act to ensure it addresses the 
challenges faced by copyright owners, users, and consumers in 
the digital environment. This work may include oversight of the 
Office of the U.S. Intellectual Property Enforcement 
Coordinator and implementation of the Music Modernization Act.
    Intellectual Property Enforcement Agencies: The Committee 
will review the intellectual property enforcement efforts of 
the Department of Justice and U.S. Customs and Border 
Protection. To the extent it involves non-copyright-related 
intellectual property issues, this work will be closely 
coordinated with Subcommittee on Courts, Intellectual Property, 
and the Internet.

        SUBCOMMITTEE ON CRIME, TERRORISM, AND HOMELAND SECURITY

    U.S. Department of Justice: The Subcommittee will conduct 
oversight of the law enforcement agencies of the U.S. 
Department of Justice, including:
          D the Federal Bureau of Investigation;
          D the Drug Enforcement Administration;
          D the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms, and 
        Explosives;
          D the U.S. Marshals Service;
          D the Office of the Federal Detention Trustee;
          D the Federal Bureau of Prisons; and
          D Federal Prison Industries, Inc.
    In addition, the Subcommittee will conduct oversight of the 
Office of Justice Programs, the Office on Violence Against 
Women, the Community Oriented Policing Services Office, and the 
Office of Juvenile Justice Delinquency Prevention, as well as 
the substantive statutes associated with these offices.
    Implementation of the FIRST STEP Act: The Subcommittee will 
conduct oversight of various reforms to federal sentencing laws 
and the operation of federal prisons enacted by the FIRST STEP 
Act of 2018, as well as various additional reforms with regard 
to criminal justice.
    Federal Grants: The Subcommittee will conduct oversight on 
law enforcement assistance grants, Violence Against Women Act 
grants, community policing grants, and other grants 
administered by the Department of Justice.
    Office of the Pardon Attorney: The Subcommittee will 
conduct oversight of the Office of the Pardon Attorney.
    U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS): The 
Subcommittee will conduct oversight of DHS law enforcement 
components, including:
          D the U.S. Secret Service;
          D U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement;
          D U.S. Customs and Border Protection;
          D the U.S. Coast Guard; and
          D the Federal Air Marshals Service.
    U.S. Sentencing Commission: The Subcommittee will review 
the mission and operations of the U.S. Sentencing Commission.
    Policing Strategies: The Subcommittee, through the 
Committee's Policing Strategies Working Group, will continue 
working with state and local governments and groups to foster 
positive police-community relations, and ensure law enforcement 
has the tools it needs to do its job.
    Gun Violence: The Subcommittee will continue to examine 
ways to reduce firearms-related violence.
    Encryption and Handheld Electronic Devices: The 
Subcommittee will conduct oversight on both the benefits of 
strong encryption and efforts by law enforcement agencies to 
access encrypted information.
    Electronic Communications Privacy Act: The Subcommittee 
will continue its work to update this 1986 statute in light of 
the digital revolution that has taken place since the statute's 
enactment.
    Cybersecurity: The Subcommittee will review the laws and 
law enforcement tools designed to combat and prevent cyber-
attacks, particularly attacks on the independence and integrity 
of U.S. elections.
    Marijuana: The Subcommittee will review the laws related to 
the possession of marijuana and the impact of those laws on our 
communities.

  SUBCOMMITTEE ON THE CONSTITUTION, CIVIL RIGHTS, AND CIVIL LIBERTIES

    Protection of U.S. Citizens' Constitutional and Civil 
Rights: The Subcommittee will conduct oversight of the Civil 
Rights Division of the Department of Justice. The Subcommittee 
will examine the adequacy of current protections for U.S. 
citizens' constitutional and civil rights.
    Voting Rights: The Subcommittee will examine ways to 
enhance the ability of citizens to participate in federal 
elections by removing unnecessary barriers to access to the 
polls, addressing voter suppression efforts, and other means to 
fully guarantee the right to vote for all eligible individuals.
    Foreign Influence: The Subcommittee will conduct oversight 
on the influence of foreign governments, foreign corporations, 
and other foreign entities on the federal government. The 
Subcommittee will also examine the adequacy of current law to 
prevent non-United States persons from making financial 
contributions to federal campaigns.
    The Scope of Executive Authority: The Subcommittee will 
examine the proper scope and application of executive 
authority, including but not limited to executive actions 
intended to personally benefit the President of the United 
States. This work may include a review of current ethics rules, 
the Foreign Emoluments Clause of the U.S. Constitution, the 
National Emergencies Act, and pardons granted by the President.
    Office of Government Ethics: The Subcommittee will consider 
the priorities and operation of the Office of Government 
Ethics.
    Religious Freedom: The Subcommittee will consider the 
protection of Americans' rights under the Free Exercise and 
Establishment Clauses, including the attempt to qualify entry 
into the United States on the basis of religion and potential 
discrimination against those with minority religious beliefs.
    LGBT Equality: The Subcommittee will examine the legality 
and enforcement of actions taken by the Administration and the 
states with respect to the equal treatment of lesbian, gay, 
bisexual, and transgender persons.
    Reproductive Rights: The Subcommittee will examine the 
legality and enforcement of actions taken by the Administration 
and the states with respect to women's equality and 
reproductive choice.
    Free Speech and Free Press: The Subcommittee will examine 
the state of free speech and the freedom of the press in the 
United States, including any attempts by the President of the 
United States to undermine the freedom of the press.
    Detention of Suspected Terrorists: The Subcommittee will 
conduct oversight on matters related to the long-term detention 
of suspected terrorists. The Subcommittee will also examine the 
legality of any government proposal to subject detainees to 
cruel or inhumane treatment, engage in so-called ``enhanced 
interrogation'' techniques, or re-establish ``black site'' 
facilities for the detention of allegedly unlawful enemy 
combatants.
    United States Commission on Civil Rights: The Subcommittee 
will review the work of the Commission, its management, and its 
implementation.
    The Judgment Fund: The Subcommittee will examine payments 
made from the Judgment Fund, its management, and how it is 
administered.

              SUBCOMMITTEE ON IMMIGRATION AND CITIZENSHIP

    Executive Orders Signed by President Trump: The 
Subcommittee will conduct oversight of Executive Orders 
regarding immigration and border security signed by President 
Trump.
    Family Separation: The Subcommittee will conduct oversight 
of the Trump Administration's policy of separating minors from 
their parents at the border between the United States and 
Mexico, and the care of those minors while in government 
custody.
    Dreamers and Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals: The 
Subcommittee will conduct oversight of attempts to deport 
individuals who qualify or who had previously qualified for 
deferred action under the Deferred Action for Childhood 
Arrivals program.
    Temporary Protected Status: The Subcommittee will conduct 
oversight of procedures for determining whether to extend or 
terminate Temporary Protected Status (TPS) designations.
    Department of Homeland Security: The Subcommittee will 
conduct oversight of the components within DHS that are 
responsible for administering and enforcing United States 
immigration laws, including U.S. Immigration and Custom 
Enforcement and U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services 
(USCIS).
    Nonimmigrant Worker Visa Programs: The Subcommittee will 
conduct oversight of the H-1B, H-2A, H-2B and various other 
nonimmigrant worker visa programs.
    Student Visa Programs: The Subcommittee will conduct 
oversight of the F, J, and M visa programs.
    Immigrant Investor Visa Program: The Subcommittee will 
conduct oversight of the immigrant investor visa program.
    Refugee Program: The Subcommittee will conduct oversight of 
the refugee program and the Office of Refugee Resettlement 
within the Department of Health and Human Services.
    Visa Security: The Subcommittee will conduct oversight of 
the screening of visa applicants.
    Executive Office for Immigration Review: The Subcommittee 
will conduct oversight of the Department of Justice's 
adjudication of immigration cases.

    SUBCOMMITTEE ON COURTS, INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY, AND THE INTERNET

    U.S. Patent and Trademark Office: The Subcommittee will 
conduct oversight of the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office 
(USPTO). This work may include the status of pending patent and 
trademark applications, patent and trademark quality, 
implementation of the America Invents Act, and USPTO's fee-
setting authority.
    U.S. Patent and Trademark Office Global Intellectual 
Property Rights Attache Program: The Subcommittee will conduct 
oversight on the Global Intellectual Property Rights Attache 
program's efforts to promote high international standards for 
protection and enforcement.
    International Intellectual Property Laws: The Subcommittee 
will conduct oversight of the impact of international 
intellectual property laws, regulations, and policies upon 
American interests. This work may include oversight of 
international trade agreements.
    Federal Judiciary: The Subcommittee will conduct oversight 
of the federal judiciary, including judicial ethics and 
disclosure, the PACER system, and the operation of the federal 
court system. In addition, the Subcommittee will examine the 
resources available to Article III courts, including judicial 
salaries and security for federal judges. The Subcommittee will 
investigate attempts by the White House to threaten or 
discredit a federal judge or to undermine the independence of 
the federal judiciary.
    Technology Issues: The Subcommittee will examine 
developments in technology and the Internet affecting public 
policy, including issues surrounding Internet governance.
    Legal Services Corporation: The Subcommittee will review 
the mission and operations of the Legal Services Corporation.

     SUBCOMMITTEE ON ANTITRUST, COMMERCIAL, AND ADMINISTRATIVE LAW

    Administrative Process and Procedure: The Subcommittee will 
examine specific regulations and proposed regulations, as well 
as issues related to the implementation of the Administrative 
Procedure Act and other federal statutes. The Subcommittee will 
also conduct oversight of the Office of Information and 
Regulatory Affairs within the Office of Management and Budget.
    Bankruptcy: The Subcommittee will conduct oversight of the 
Bankruptcy Code, bankruptcy judgeships, and the federal 
bankruptcy system.
    Department of Justice: The Subcommittee will conduct 
oversight of the Civil Division, the Environment and Natural 
Resources Division, the Antitrust Division, the Tax Division, 
the Executive Office for United States Trustees and the U.S. 
Trustee Program, and the Office of the Solicitor General.
    Administrative Conference of the United States: The 
Subcommittee will conduct oversight of the Administrative 
Conference of the United States.
    Antitrust and Competition Policy: The Subcommittee will 
conduct oversight on a range of antitrust issues, including 
specific mergers, enforcement of federal antitrust laws, and 
enforcement of antitrust laws overseas, and matters involving 
competition policy.
    Arbitration: The Subcommittee will review the operation of 
the Federal Arbitration Act.

                     COMMITTEE ON NATURAL RESOURCES

                             OVERSIGHT PLAN

                             116TH CONGRESS

                       Chairman Raul M. Grijalva

                              INTRODUCTION

    Under clause 2 of Rule X of the House of Representatives, 
each standing committee of the House has general oversight 
responsibilities to determine whether federal laws and programs 
addressing subjects within its respective jurisdictions are 
being implemented and carried out in accordance with the intent 
of Congress.
    The Natural Resources Committee (``Committee'') has a key 
responsibility to ensure that our relevant federal agencies and 
entities are effectively administering the law and open and 
transparent in their operations and organization.
    During previous Congresses, the Committee ignored the 
science and reality behind climate change, attacked 
environmental laws that protect communities, species, and 
habitats, and spent public resources catering to polluting 
industries. This was all done in the face of stronger 
hurricanes, more intense droughts, rising sea levels, and 
deadlier wildfires.
    Addressing climate change is the greatest challenge of our 
time. The solution is far from simple, and Congress won't find 
solutions without meaningful effort across both chambers. The 
Committee will conduct a thorough review of the impacts of 
climate change and work collaboratively with other committees 
to craft solutions while ensuring that all stakeholders--
including minority, low-income, rural, tribal, and indigenous 
communities--have a voice.
    This oversight plan outlines the intended and primary 
focuses of the Committee and Subcommittees. Additional 
oversight activities may arise throughout the 116th Congress.
Full Committee
    The Full Committee will conduct oversight on a variety of 
topics in coordination with the Subcommittees, as well as on 
specific jurisdictional items that reside at the Full Committee 
level.
    These Full Committee jurisdictional matters include:
    Climate Change: Climate change affects every issue in the 
Committee's jurisdiction. Such a profound, sprawling and 
complex challenge demands a policy response that is backed by 
good faith inquiry into the effects and a wide range of 
options. The Committee will explore the anticipated effects of 
climate change on the places, issues, and bureaus in its 
jurisdiction and ways those effects can be mitigated. It will 
explore the ways in which the assets of each bureau can be 
mobilized to reduce the worst effects science tells us we can 
still avoid. The Committee will consider the role protected 
ecosystems play in helping preserve and protect ecosystems 
services, land use values, and functional ecosystems, all of 
which aid in climate change adaptation.
    The Committee will also examine the role of the federal 
government in facilitating the development of clean, renewable 
resources in the most appropriate places on public lands and 
waters, consistent with other land management responsibilities 
and with an eye on federal actions that maximize economic 
opportunities and improve health and quality of life for areas 
facing climate disruption.
    The Insular Areas are especially vulnerable to climate 
change because of their small size, low elevation, remote 
geographical location, and concentration of infrastructure 
along coastlines. These islands are experiencing rising air 
temperatures and sea levels, and warmer, more acidic coastal 
waters, leading to stronger hurricanes and super typhoons. The 
Committee will conduct oversight to examine ways to mitigate 
the immediate catastrophic impacts of the changing climate on 
these frontline areas.
    National Environmental Policy Act: The Committee will 
closely examine the Trump administration's compliance with the 
National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) and work to hold the 
administration accountable for failing to comply with the 
requirements of NEPA. NEPA is one of our nation's most 
consequential laws because it gives American communities the 
right to know about federal actions in advance and have a say 
in government decisions that impact local communities and our 
nation's public resources. The Committee will pay particularly 
close attention to the White House Council on Environmental 
Quality's potential revisions to NEPA regulations and expected 
updated guidance on greenhouse gas accounting under NEPA.
    Insular Affairs Budget and Spending Review: The Committee 
will conduct oversight of the budget of the Office of Insular 
Affairs within the Department of the Interior (DOI).
    General Oversight of the Office of Insular Affairs: The 
Committee expects to review the fundamental issues facing each 
of the territories and freely associated states such as: 
support and development of self-government and self-
determination; economic development and self-sufficiency 
through the private sector; accountability of federal funds; 
implementation and enforcement of federal laws; implementation 
and funding for the Compacts of Free Association; and 
management of limited land and water resources.
    Puerto Rico: The Committee will conduct oversight over the 
implementation of P. L. 114-187, the Puerto Rico Oversight, 
Management, and Economic Stability Act (``PROMESA''), and 
anticipates reviewing activities of the Oversight Board 
established under that act. The Committee will also monitor the 
activities of the Puerto Rico Electric Power Authority as it 
relates to efforts to privatize the utility's electricity 
generation and the establishment of a concessionaire to operate 
and manage its transmission and distribution of power, and will 
monitor the use of federal funding to upgrade and replace the 
island's electric grid. The Committee will also conduct 
oversight of the response to Hurricane Maria and the ongoing 
efforts to assist in the recovery of the island.
    Compacts of Free Association: The Committee will exercise 
its oversight authority of funding and program assistance to 
the Republic of the Marshall Islands and the Federated States 
of Micronesia in accordance with the Compact of Free 
Association Amendments Act of 2003 (P.L. 108-188). The 
Committee will similarly exercise oversight over the recently 
enacted Republic of Palau amended funding agreement.
    Public Law 110-229: The committee shall continue to monitor 
and conduct oversight over this law that provided for the 
extension of U.S. immigration law to the Commonwealth of the 
Northern Mariana Islands.
Indigenous Peoples of the United States
    Budget Oversight: The Committee will review the budget 
requests for programs and activities related to the Bureau of 
Indian Affairs (BIA), Bureau of Indian Education (BIE), Indian 
Health Service (IHS), and Office of the Special Trustee for 
American Indians.
    Tribal Consultation: The federal government has a trust 
responsibility to ensure that meaningful tribal consultation is 
an integral part of the Federal decision-making process, yet 
Congress has never established broad-based standards for the 
behavior of the federal government in its interactions with 
tribes. Consultation with Indian tribes constitutes more than 
simply notifying an Indian tribe about a planned undertaking. 
Rather, consultation should be a collaborative process of 
seeking, discussing, and considering the views of participants, 
and, where feasible, seeking agreement with them regarding 
proposed activities and other matters. However, the mandate 
that federal agencies must engage in tribal consultation is 
merely the result of an executive order and can be rescinded at 
any time. Additionally, the current system has resulted in a 
myriad of consultation procedures that differ from agency to 
agency. To that end, the Committee will examine the shortfalls 
of the current consultation framework and propose solutions 
that establish agency-wide standards to guarantee that 
meaningful and effective tribal consultation occurs.
    Tribal Sovereignty: Partisan politics have led to attempted 
redefining of tribal sovereignty in ways that degrade native 
tribal rights. The concept of tribal sovereignty is part of 
American history and confirmed through Supreme Court decisions. 
The federal trust responsibility is a unique relationship 
between native peoples tribal governments and the federal 
government. The Committee will examine the importance of tribal 
sovereignty and the trust responsibility.
    Trust Land: Acquisition of trust land for the benefit of 
Indian tribes is essential to tribal self-determination and 
economic development and protects tribal lands for future 
generation. Tribes can establish trust land either through an 
act of Congress or through the ``Part 151'' process at DOI. 
Until 2009, DOI had consistently construed the Indian 
Reorganization Act (IRA) to authorize the Secretary of the 
Interior to place land into trust for any Tribe, so long as the 
Tribe was federally recognized at the time of the trust 
application. However, the Supreme Court held in Carcieri v. 
Salazar that the Secretary's authority to place land into trust 
under the IRA applies only to tribes that were ``under federal 
jurisdiction'' in 1934. This overturned 75 years of precedent 
and created dangerous legal ambiguities related to current 
land-into-trust requests and established trust lands. The 
uncertainty the Carcieri decision created is threatening tribal 
sovereignty, economic self-sufficiency, and self-determination. 
The Committee will examine the original intent of the IRA in 
regard to Indian trust lands in order to determine a solution 
to the situation created by the Carcieri decision.
    Economic Development: The Committee expects to examine what 
is needed to spur economic development on tribal lands. This 
endeavor will extend in several directions including the need 
for infrastructure conducive to development; established tribal 
plans, tribal laws, and regulations relating to business 
operations; incentives that would encourage businesses to 
locate on Indian reservations; and increased access for tribes 
to financial capital seed money. The Committee's goal with this 
examination will be to ensure strong, stable tribal government 
structures that are prepared to operate business development 
and foster relationships with outside enterprises for the 
betterment of all involved.
    Renewable Energy Development: Many of the best locations to 
develop renewable energy, such as wind and solar, exist on 
native lands. However, many barriers still exist that limit the 
ability of tribes to develop these resources. The Committee 
intends to hold a hearing on how best the federal government 
can assist Indian tribes, Alaskan Native Corporations, and 
Native Hawaiian organizations and incentivize the development 
of renewable and sustainable energy resources. In addition, the 
Committee will work to include native resources in any energy 
initiative proposed during the 116th Congress.
    Infrastructure: The BIA has responsibility for the 
maintenance of over 29,000 miles of roads and over 900 bridges 
in Indian Country, many of which are in dire need of repair or 
replacement. Roads and bridges are routinely washed out or made 
impassable due to weather, while others are simply not 
maintained due to lack of funding. In addition, the lack of 
basic infrastructure on Indian land impedes the health, safety, 
education, and economic development of Native peoples. The 
infrastructure needs of Indian Country have often been an 
afterthought when Congress proposes transportation funding 
bills. The Committee intends to conduct a hearing to collect 
needed information to ensure Indian lands and Indian tribes are 
included in any new infrastructure initiatives during the 116th 
Congress.
    Indian Child Welfare Act: In 1978, Congress worked with 
American Indian and Alaska Native elected officials, child 
welfare experts, and families whose children had been 
unnecessarily removed from their homes, to pass the Indian 
Child Welfare Act of 1978 (ICWA). The ICWA was carefully 
designed to protect Native children and families from 
unscrupulous and biased child welfare practices. It provides 
high standards and requires accountability in the child welfare 
system and encourages the use of culturally specific services 
that are more likely to help Native children stay safely at 
home. However, recent court rulings have thrown the future of 
ICWA in doubt and have led to increased attacks from anti-ICWA 
groups. The Committee will examine how these recent court 
decisions are undermining the intent and integrity of ICWA. 
This could lead to legislation that would strengthen and 
enhance the Act.
    Native Education: The BIE manages a school system with 169 
elementary and secondary schools and 14 dormitories, providing 
educational services to 48,000 individual students. However, 
these schools are broadly in poor condition. The BIA estimates 
that the cost to replace or repair the existing facilities in 
poor condition to be $1.3 billion. Additionally, the deferred 
maintenance backlog is estimated to be over $377 million. The 
Committee will look at the overall condition of the BIE school 
system, as well as ways to ensure that all native children are 
getting an equitable education in a safe and healthy 
environment.
    Native Healthcare: The federal government has a trust 
responsibility to provide healthcare to tribes and their 
members. However, the federal government has not lived up to 
this responsibility. As a result of chronic underfunding and 
historical trauma, indigenous peoples suffer from a wide array 
of health conditions at levels significantly higher than other 
Americans. The Committee will look at health disparities 
amongst American Indian, Alaska Native, and Native Hawaiian 
population in comparison to the general American population. 
Additionally, IHS faces substantial backlogs in health care 
facilities construction, as well as the maintenance of existing 
facilities. The Committee will examine how the current state of 
IHS is detrimental to the health and well-being of tribal 
people, and what can be done to reverse the trend. The 
Committee will also look at Native Hawaiian Health Centers to 
determine solutions that will improve Native Hawaiian health 
care.
    Sanitation and Clean Water: Over a half million people--
nearly 48% of tribal homes--in Native communities across the 
United States do not have access to reliable water sources, 
clean drinking water, or basic sanitation. Insufficient water 
and sanitation systems facilitate the spread of disease, impede 
economic development, and cause school closures on 
reservations. The Committee will look at the detrimental 
effects of the lack of basic sanitation and access to clean 
water, as well as solutions for providing native people with 
these basic services.
    Murdered and Indigenous Women/Tribal Law Enforcement: A 
nationwide crisis is occurring among American Indian, Alaska 
Native and Native Hawaiian women. The National Crime 
Information Center reported that in 2016 there were 5,712 
reports of missing American Indian and Alaska Native women and 
girls. However, the U.S. Department of Justice's federal 
missing person's database only accounted for 116 cases. The 
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported that murder 
is the third-leading cause of death among American Indian and 
Alaska Native women. Often times tribal judicial systems are at 
odds with state jurisdictions depending on their status as a 
``Public Law 280'' state, meaning legal authority is 
transferred from the federal government to state government. 
The layered governments add to the plethora of issues that 
occur when a Native woman is missing; this is especially true 
if the woman resides on the reservation. The Committee will 
gather information to develop a comprehensive bill that 
directly relates to direct funding for tribal survivor 
services, cultural competence training for law enforcement, and 
off-reservation or urban on-the-ground efforts.
    Voting Rights: In 1948, the Arizona Supreme court finally 
granted Native Americans the right to vote in state elections, 
and in federal elections with the passing of the Voting Rights 
Act of 1965. There are currently reports by the U.S. Commission 
on Civil Rights and the Native American Voting Rights Coalition 
that have identified barriers to Native voters in federal 
elections. The recent efforts on voter suppression highlight 
the need for a comprehensive oversight of voter issues Native 
Americans encounter at the polls. The Committee will examine 
the history and current state of native voting rights, and will 
seek to formulate specific language that would protect the 
rights of all indigenous peoples.

National Parks, Forests, and Public Lands

    In the 116th Congress the Subcommittee on National Parks, 
Forests, and Public Lands plans to focus on: fully 
understanding the impacts of climate change on public lands and 
assessing ways in which public lands can contribute to climate 
change defense; ensuring that public lands serve all Americans 
by increasing outreach and the representation of diverse 
communities; ensuring fair taxpayer returns; and assessing 
opportunities to protect public land and water for the 
enjoyment and benefit of all Americans.
    Budget Oversight: The Committee will review the budget 
requests for the National Park Service (NPS), Forest Service, 
and Bureau of Land Management (BLM) programs and activities.
    National Monuments and the Antiquities Act: The Antiquities 
Act has protected some of our nation's most iconic places, 
including the Grand Canyon, Devil's Tower, and the Statue of 
Liberty. Unfortunately, the Trump administration's illegal 
reduction of two previously established national monuments 
threatens this historic, bipartisan commitment. The Committee 
will hold hearings to review the public input process for the 
arbitrary review and subsequent report that informed the 
decision to rescind parts of Bears Ears and Grand Staircase-
Escalante National Monuments and will examine the current 
management planning process for the reconfigured monuments. The 
Committee will also consider ways to reinforce the original 
intent of the Antiquities Act and opportunities to designate 
new national monuments that serve the interests of ecological, 
cultural, and historical preservation, placing a special 
emphasis on lands under threat from climate change and human 
development.
    Wildfire and Forest Management: Managing wildfire continues 
to be the most serious challenge facing the Forest Service, 
with suppression activity accounting for over half of the 
agency's budget. Fortunately, Congress passed a funding fix to 
stabilize wildfire budgeting that will come into effect in 
FY2020. In addition to the fix, Congress authorized a series of 
tools, including new categorical exclusions from the planning 
requirements of the National Environmental Policy Act, to 
increase and accelerate forest management practices designed to 
reduce the risks of catastrophic wildfire. The Committee plans 
to evaluate the Forest Service's implementation of the recent 
budget fix and new management tools to ensure that the 
administration prioritizes locally appropriate and science-
based forest restoration that promotes resilient forests, 
effective ecological outcomes, decreased risks, and safe 
communities. The committee will also examine implementation of 
President Trump's wildfire and forest management Executive 
Order to ensure that it meets these goals.
    Enhancing Public Land Protections: Protected public places 
help build ecological resilience in the face of climate change, 
while preserving landscapes of cultural and natural 
significance for the benefit of future generations. These lands 
also serve as the backbone of a multi-billion-dollar outdoor 
recreation economy which has helped to revitalize rural 
communities. The Committee will examine opportunities to 
increase conservation across U.S. public lands. The Committee 
will also consider how ``energy dominance'' and other broad 
goals set forth by the administration pose a threat to the 
continued health of iconic American landscapes and local 
communities.
    Access and Acquisition: Public access to national parks, 
forests, and public lands is a bipartisan priority that the 
Committee will highlight by assessing the implementation of 
access-oriented programs, such as the Land and Water 
Conservation Fund. The Trump Administration has proposed broad 
cuts to federal land acquisition, which would leave federal 
agencies without the means to acquire crucial inholdings that 
enhance access and make land management more efficient. The 
Committee expects to highlight the need to acquire land to 
connect ecosystems through wildlife migration corridors, to 
promote access for outdoor recreation, and to mitigate the 
impacts of climate change.
    Protecting Federal Land Management and Fair Tax Payer 
Returns: In recent Congresses, under pressure from special 
interest groups, there have been numerous efforts to undermine 
Federal management of federal lands. Many of these efforts have 
come at the tax payers' expense, as federal lands are sold to 
industry interests for a fraction of their worth. The Committee 
will oversee the federal government's role as land manager, 
highlighting the unique and irreplaceable role the government 
plays. The Committee will also ensure that in the rare 
scenarios where federal land transfers are necessary, that 
adequate appraisal techniques are in place to ensure fair 
returns for the American taxpayer.
    Outreach and Representation: National parks, forests, and 
public lands belong to all Americans. NPS has published theme 
studies to analyze existing efforts and identify opportunities 
for increased representation of Asian American Pacific Islander 
Heritage, LGBTQ American, and American Latino Heritage among 
others. The Committee will examine how the Trump 
administration's policies influence efforts to diversify access 
and outreach to and representation of underserved communities. 
The Committee will also explore legislative opportunities to 
increase outreach and representation throughout America's 
public lands.
    Cultural Resources: National parks, forests, and public 
lands contain an array of valuable cultural resources, 
including many considered sacred by Native American 
communities. The Trump administration's singular pursuit of its 
``energy dominance'' agenda has led to detrimental outcomes for 
many Native American communities. To that end, the National 
Congress of American Indians passed a resolution requesting 
improved protections and restoration efforts for culturally 
significant sites on federal lands. The Committee will examine 
how this administration's approach towards land management 
impacts the livelihoods of tribal groups, especially those in 
the West. Additionally, the Committee will spotlight the need 
to inventory cultural and historic resources on public land and 
identify a legislative fix to create additional protections for 
cultural sites.
    Grand Canyon: Grand Canyon National Park celebrates its 
100th Anniversary in 2019, which is a perfect time to revisit 
securing the future of this iconic American landscape. Mining 
in and around the Grand Canyon watershed left a toxic legacy, 
including contaminated water supplies, which still impact many 
communities. Tribal communities in particular have suffered 
serious consequences. Following a rigorous, science-based 
analysis, and citing the toxic legacy of mines in the region, 
the DOI in 2012, approved a 20-year withdrawal on approximately 
1 million acres of public land surrounding the Grand Canyon. 
Unfortunately, a 2017 report by the Trump administration's U.S. 
Department of Agriculture recommended cancelling the 20-year 
moratorium on new mining claims. The Subcommittee will monitor 
the current administration's plans and conduct oversight to 
examine the benefits of making the withdrawal permanent. The 
oversight will include gathering information from impacted 
communities in the region.
    Extremism on Public Lands: Studies show that the majority 
of Americans support ongoing federal efforts to conserve and 
protect public lands, on which they find opportunities for 
recreation, cultural and historical appreciation, and aesthetic 
enjoyment. Unfortunately, citing misleading and misguided 
arguments, a small but vocal minority of anti-government 
extremists oppose these crucial protections. The Committee will 
examine instances of public lands extremism and the threat that 
these bad actors pose to public servants and the safety of 
American communities. This oversight will consider the spread 
of anti-public-lands rhetoric and its impact on agencies' 
ability to do their work; ways in which extremists have 
threatened, intimidated, or committed violence against public 
lands management officials; and how agencies can best protect 
employees and public resources from extremist groups and 
individuals. This oversight will be informed in part by a 
forthcoming Government Accountability Office (GAO) report on 
extremist threats to public lands and federal land managers.
    Urban Parks: The NPS's Urban Agenda seeks to connect the 
80% of Americans living in urban areas with the natural world. 
Urban parks afford opportunities for people from a variety of 
backgrounds to connect to nature and outdoor recreation, as 
well as arts, culture, and history. By expanding access to 
parks in urban areas, which encompass one third of all national 
park sites and generate nearly $5 billion in economic output, 
NPS will ensure these spaces continue to provide positive 
experiences for the many Americans who cannot frequently access 
more traditional NPS sites. The Committee will review NPS's 
implementation of this Urban Agenda, ensuring that parks remain 
relevant for all Americans.
    Roadless Rule: The U.S. Forest Service's 2001 Roadless Rule 
protects 58.5 million acres of undeveloped landscapes 
throughout the National Forest System. The Committee supports 
enhancing access to public lands in a bipartisan manner; 
however, some landscapes are too unique and fragile to be 
bisected with roads, which in addition to being extremely 
expensive, can increase erosion, pollution, and habitat 
fragmentation. In recognition of these concerns, the Committee 
plans to examine the Trump Administration's efforts to evade 
and undermine the Roadless Rule, including the recent proposal 
to provide an exemption for the State of Alaska. Oversight of 
the administrative process for state-specific rewrites will 
include input from stakeholders left out of the process.
    Fee Authority: After robust public opposition, the Trump 
administration scaled back plans to drastically increase 
entrance fees at national parks. Fees have become an important 
source of revenue that land management agencies use to enhance 
visitor experiences. The Committee expects to continue 
reviewing implementation of the Federal Lands Recreation 
Enhancement Act, which is set to expire on September 30, 2020, 
and the impacts of new and higher fees on visitors to parks, 
forests, and public lands.
    Wild Horses and Burros: BLM proposed to euthanize thousands 
of wild horses and burros currently living on public lands due 
to a lack of funding and a lack of acreage on which to manage 
them. The Committee will continue examining the management of 
these iconic animals to develop alternatives to slaughter.
    Concessions: The last significant changes to the National 
Park Service's concessions management policy were made more 
than twenty years ago. The Committee intends to examine 
implementation of the Concessions Management Improvement Act of 
1998 and the recently enacted authorities included in the 
National Park Service Centennial Act to identify continuing 
problems and possible strategies to encourage innovative bids 
and increase competition.
    U.S. Park Police (USPP): Despite perennial underfunding, 
under-staffing, and a lack of necessary equipment, the Trump 
administration deployed USPP personnel to the Southwest border 
to assist with federal border enforcement activities. The 
Committee intends to conduct hearings and oversight to 
determine how this deployment fits into the USPP mission and 
examine other law enforcement challenges across the NPS.
    Grazing: The fee for grazing on federal land is well below 
market rate and the BLM Grazing Program costs a significant 
amount to manage. According to a recent GAO investigation, 
agencies lack a comprehensive system to track and monitor 
unauthorized grazing on federal land. The Committee will 
explore opportunities to improve oversight and provide 
opportunities for voluntary permit retirement.

Water, Oceans, and Wildlife

    Budget Oversight: The Subcommittee will oversee the 
portions of the President's budget that relate to the programs 
and activities of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric 
Administration (NOAA), the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service 
(FWS), the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation (BOR), and the Water 
Resources Division of the U.S. Geological Survey.
    Endangered Species Act: The Trump administration is seeking 
to undermine the Endangered Species Act (ESA) and the 
protection it provides our nation's most imperiled species. 
High-ranking political appointees are suspected of using their 
positions and influence to meddle in scientific decisions under 
the ESA and alter policy outcomes, potentially harming species 
and certainly harming the integrity of the law, as well as the 
morale and reputation of the agencies charged with its 
implementation. The Committee will oversee NOAA and FWS to 
ensure transparency and accountability in the implementation of 
the ESA and that sound science is the basis for decision-making 
under the law.
    Border Wall Impacts to Wildlife: The Committee will conduct 
oversight hearings on the negative impact President Trump's 
border wall will have on communities, imperiled wildlife, and 
critical habitat.
    Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species 
(CITES): Roughly 169 countries are party to this international 
agreement that provides worldwide protection for endangered 
plants and animals by ensuring that trade does not threaten 
their survival. In 2019, member countries will assemble in Sri 
Lanka for their regular meeting where proposals for protecting 
new species under the Convention will be considered. The 
Committee intends to hold hearings on proposals by the United 
States and other countries and will examine the strategies that 
the United States plans to pursue to achieve and promote 
species conservation.
    Trophy Imports: The FWS changed its policy to consider all 
permits for importing elephant and lion trophies into the 
United States on a case-by-case basis. In doing so, FWS 
withdrew the ESA enhancement findings and CITES non-detriment 
findings for trophies of African elephants and lions killed in 
Zimbabwe, Tanzania, South Africa, Botswana, Namibia, and 
Zambia. In addition, the Department of the Interior created an 
International Wildlife Conservation Council to promote trophy 
hunting. The Committee will conduct oversight hearings to 
examine the Trump administration's misguided management of 
wildlife and trophy hunting.
    Advancing Bird Conservation in the 21st Century: The 
Committee remains concerned that many bird populations around 
the world, including some populations of popular waterfowl 
species that are protected under the Migratory Bird Treaty Act 
(MBTA), are depleted or in rapid decline due to factors related 
to climate change, habitat loss and fragmentation, disease, and 
incidental mortality. In addition, the Trump administration 
released a Solicitor's Opinion and a proposed rule to no longer 
cover the incidental take of migratory birds under the MBTA. 
The Committee will conduct oversight hearings on the Trump 
administration actions and will pursue a legislative fix.
    Invasive Species: Invasive, nonnative species can harm the 
economy, the environment, other animal species' health, and 
human health. However, in 2017, the D.C. Circuit Court of 
Appeals ruled that restrictions on interstate commerce of 
injurious species listed under the Lacey Act are not covered. 
The Committee will examine the impacts of invasive species and 
seek to pursue legislation to clarify that injurious species 
are, in fact, covered under the Lacey Act. In addition, there 
is controversy surrounding the amount of time it takes the FWS 
to list a species as injurious. Many species are not proposed 
for listing until after they are already well-established, 
making eradication difficult, if not impossible, and defeating 
the effectiveness of the Lacey Act. The Committee will pursue 
legislation to expedite the process of listing a species as 
injurious.
    Implementation of the Magnuson-Stevens Act: Among other 
changes to our federal fishery management system, the Magnuson-
Stevens Fishery Conservation and Management Reauthorization Act 
(MSA) of 2006 mandated the implementation of annual catch 
limits and accountability measures to end overfishing. The 
Committee will continue to conduct oversight regarding 
policies, rules, activities and operations of the Fishery 
Management Councils, and fishery management plan amendments 
designed to fulfill these and other mandates set out in MSA to 
ensure that the law is being implemented as Congress intended. 
The Committee will also examine the appropriate levels of 
funding needed for stock assessments and ways to bring 
fisheries management into the 21st Century with new innovative 
technologies.
    Colorado River Drought Planning: The Colorado River, which 
supplies water to 40 million people, is in its 19th year of 
drought. Dwindling Colorado River supplies have spurred the 
seven Colorado River Basin states and affected stakeholders to 
negotiate water-use reductions and conservation incentives to 
prevent reservoirs from rapidly draining further. The Committee 
will closely follow these ongoing drought planning efforts and 
the continued development of the Drought Contingency Plans, 
which will need to be authorized by Congress to take effect.
    Addressing Drought and Climate Change Impacts: The recent 
epidemic of drought has cost the nation's economy billions, and 
climate change is expected to make future droughts more 
frequent and severe. Many communities and numerous industries 
are harmed by drought, including fishing, agriculture, tourism, 
and outdoor recreation. The Committee will conduct oversight to 
ensure that the administration is taking appropriate steps to 
build climate resilience and safeguard the water supply for all 
stakeholders.
    California Water: The Committee will pay close attention to 
ongoing efforts by the Trump administration to update ESA 
protections for California water projects. The Committee will 
also monitor the administration's implementation of Public Law 
114-322, with a particular focus on implementation of the 
statute's operational provisions and spending on desalination, 
reuse, and water storage projects.
    Western Water Management: Water is the lifeblood of 
communities and economies throughout the West. In October 2018, 
the Trump administration released a ``Presidential Memorandum 
on Promoting the Reliable Supply and Delivery of Water in the 
West.'' The directive appears to prioritize water deliveries to 
narrow interests at the expense of the environment and other 
water stakeholders. The Committee intends to monitor the impact 
of this order on the West's millions of water users.
    Indian Water Rights Settlements: Many Native communities 
across the United States still do not have access to reliable 
water sources, safe drinking water, or basic sanitation even 
though the Supreme Court has ruled that the federal government 
is responsible for reserving water supplies for Indian country. 
This problem has historically been alleviated through the 
negotiation of Indian water rights settlements, which provide 
Native communities with water to which they are legally 
entitled. The Committee will closely follow Indian water rights 
settlement negotiations between the administration and tribes 
and will seek to expedite and advance ongoing water settlement 
negotiations.
    Columbia River Treaty Negotiations: The Columbia River 
Treaty is currently being renegotiated by the United States and 
Canada. The Treaty governs how water projects on the Columbia 
River are operated in both countries. Water project operations 
have an impact on numerous stakeholders and the environment and 
greatly affect tribal fisheries in the Pacific Northwest. The 
federal government is in the process of developing a framework 
for tribal participation; however, some tribal interests have 
expressed concern with the direction of the current 
negotiations. The Committee will closely track ongoing 
negotiations and seek to ensure that tribal interests are 
protected during the negotiation process.
    21st Century Water Infrastructure: Drought, coupled with 
crumbling and insufficient water infrastructure, can imperil 
our nation's ecosystems and dramatically reduce our nation's 
water supply in the years to come. Modern water technologies 
and infrastructure projects can help address these water supply 
issues. The Committee will examine the development and 
deployment of modern water infrastructure and technologies, 
including desalination and water recycling projects authorized 
by Congress under Public Law 114-322 and Public Law 102-575. 
Furthermore, much of the BOR's water infrastructure is aging 
and in need of repair and rehabilitation. There is bipartisan 
interest in ensuring that the Bureau of Reclamation properly 
tracks and discloses major repair and rehabilitation needs. The 
Committee will work to ensure that all major repair and 
rehabilitation needs are properly disclosed to Congress and the 
public.
    Coastal Management in the 21st Century: The nation's 
coastal communities are facing increased threats from climate 
change, sea level rise, ocean plastics, ocean pollution, and 
ocean acidification. Forty percent of the nation's population 
lives in coastal counties, making it even more critical for 
federal, state, and non-governmental stakeholders to manage the 
nation's coastal zone. In 1972, Congress passed the Coastal 
Zone Management Act to, ``preserve, protect, develop, and where 
possible, to restore or enhance the resources of the nation's 
coastal zone.'' The Committee plans to explore potential 
legislative amendments with NOAA, the coastal states, and other 
stakeholders to address renewable energy, coastal climate 
change adaptation, retention of working waterfronts, preserving 
coastal open space and wildlife habitat, and strengthening our 
system of National Estuarine Research Reserves.
    National Ocean Policy (NOP): In June 2018, President Trump 
issued an Executive Order to revoke parts of the NOP. The 
purpose of the original NOP was to enhance our nation's ability 
to maintain healthy, resilient, and sustainable ocean, coastal, 
and Great Lakes resources for present and future generations by 
developing a framework to address ways to deal with competing 
uses, ocean permitting, national security, and shipping. The 
Committee intends to hold hearings on how President Trump's 
Executive Order will overturn years of critical ocean planning 
and policy.
    Illegal, Unregulated, and Unreported (IUU) Fishing: Human 
Trafficking within the Seafood Supply Chain; and Seafood Fraud: 
IUU fishing, human trafficking within the seafood supply chain, 
and seafood fraud are serious threats to marine resource 
conservation, food health and security, and the economic 
livelihoods of U.S. fishermen. The Committee will monitor these 
activities and may advance legislation to strengthen 
enforcement mechanisms to discourage seafood entering the 
United States that was derived from human trafficking, IUU 
fishing, and seafood fraud.
    Marine Mammals: A number of discrete marine mammal issues 
merit the Committee's attention during the 116th Congress. 
These include increasing protections for North Atlantic Right 
Whales and Southern Resident Killer Whales and assessing the 
impacts of ocean noise associated with a wide range of 
activities. The Committee intends to conduct oversight hearings 
on these issues and consider legislative initiatives as 
appropriate.
    Marine Aquaculture in Federal Waters: Currently, there 
exists no comprehensive federal permitting and regulatory 
system for the siting of aquaculture facilities in the U.S. 
Exclusive Economic Zone, and NOAA has sought legislation to 
establish this authority. Such a system is needed to avoid the 
piecemeal approach to permitting that now poses threats to both 
the marine environment and public health. The Committee intends 
to hold hearings on permitting and site selection issues, and 
characterize, monitor, and mitigate the potential specific and 
cumulative ecological impacts of offshore aquaculture 
operations.
    Hydropower Licensing: The Committee will closely examine 
whether FWS and NOAA are carrying out their responsibilities 
under the Federal Power Act. Congress has provided both 
agencies with broad authority to develop requirements for 
hydropower licensees to ensure that public resources and the 
environment are protected. The Committee will review whether 
FWS and NOAA are fully meeting their responsibilities under the 
Federal Power Act.

Energy and Mineral Resources

    Budget Oversight: The Committee will examine the budgets 
and priorities of the USGS, the Office of Surface Mining 
Reclamation and Enforcement, the Bureau of Land Management 
(BLM), the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM), the Bureau 
of Safety and Environmental Enforcement (BSEE), and the 
Minerals and Geology program of the Forest Service.
    Offshore Drilling: The Committee will investigate the 
implementation of the offshore oil and gas program, including 
unnecessary efforts to develop a new 5-year National Outer 
Continental Shelf oil and gas leasing program opening 90% of 
U.S. waters to new leasing, the elimination of protections for 
U.S. Arctic waters, and the weakening of two critical offshore 
oil and gas safety rules created in response to the Deepwater 
Horizon disaster. The Committee will challenge any attempt to 
further weaken existing regulatory measures and agency 
structures that help safeguard marine ecosystems, offshore 
workers, and coastal tourism industries.
    Arctic National Wildlife Refuge: A provision inserted in 
the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act without a vote opened the Arctic 
National Wildlife Refuge (Arctic Refuge) to oil and gas 
activities, and the Department of the Interior (DOI) is moving 
at breakneck speed to ensure oil and gas leases are issued as 
soon as possible. The administration has curtailed the 
opportunity for the public to comment on oil and gas 
development in the Arctic Refuge, potentially ignored science 
and concerns from career staff, and sped through each of the 
steps required to produce an environmental impact statement and 
conduct seismic testing. The Committee will examine the impacts 
oil and gas activities will have on the land, wildlife, and 
local communities, and the shortcuts DOI is taking to lease 
areas of the Arctic Refuge.
    Fossil Fuel Development on Public Lands: The Committee is 
concerned that DOI is managing public lands to maximize revenue 
and support private interests rather than balance multiple uses 
and prioritize the public interest. The Committee will conduct 
oversight into the large-scale giveaway of public lands to the 
fossil fuel and mining industries, including DOI political 
appointees pushing lease sales near Chaco Culture National 
Historic Park, a recommendation to lift the moratorium on 
uranium mining near Grand Canyon National Park, the shrinking 
of the Bears Ears and Grand Staircase-Escalante National 
Monuments, and the reinstatement of mineral leases near the 
Boundary Waters Canoe Wilderness Area.
    The Committee will carry out oversight over all aspects of 
BLM's oil and gas programs and administrative policies, 
including: termination of leasing reforms that were designed to 
help minimize conflicts with other land uses, abbreviating NEPA 
analyses for oil and gas permitting, and shortening public 
review and comment periods. The Committee will work to restore 
a balance between energy extraction and conservation and will 
investigate actions taken by the current administration that 
threaten public health, exacerbate air and water pollution, and 
undermine the public's ability to participate in the oil and 
gas decision-making process.
    The federal coal program is an area of particular concern 
to the Committee. Coal consumption in the United States is 
plummeting. Despite President Trump's empty assurances to 
``bring coal back,'' and overly favorable leasing terms and 
practices by the federal government, coal is undercut by cheap 
natural gas and increasingly cheap renewable energy, and this 
trend is expected to continue. The Committee will conduct 
oversight on BLM's coal program and the Trump administration's 
continued actions to prop up the coal industry at the expense 
of human and environmental health. The Committee will 
investigate the cancellation of a Mountaintop Removal Mining 
Health Study by the National Academy of Sciences, Engineering, 
and Medicine; and the cancellation of a review of the Federal 
Coal Leasing Program initiated by the Obama administration in 
2015.
    Onshore and Offshore Renewable Energy Programs: Since 
January 2017, the administration has proposed drastic budget 
cuts to renewable energy programs while proposing increases to 
oil, gas, and coal programs. The Committee will conduct 
oversight of BLM's renewable energy program, BLM's Solar and 
Wind Energy Rule, transmission and infrastructure requirements, 
and the impacts of renewable energy development on public 
lands. The Committee will also examine BOEM's offshore wind 
regulatory framework, the agency's engagement with various wind 
stakeholders, environmental and marine impacts of offshore 
wind, and the best ways to encourage development of a domestic 
offshore wind workforce and supply chain.
    Fair Return for Taxpayers: Energy and mineral resources 
sourced from public lands belong to all Americans, and as such, 
taxpayers deserve fair compensation when these resources are 
removed from the public's possession. For years, archaic laws 
and outdated regulations have prevented taxpayers from 
receiving a fair return on coal, oil, natural gas, hardrock 
minerals, and other resources. Revenues from these resources 
are an important source of funds for both the federal 
government and state governments, and ensuring that companies 
pay their fair share will be a critical oversight issue for the 
Committee in the 116th Congress.
    Methane Emissions: Emissions of methane from oil and gas 
operations on public lands are a significant public health and 
environmental threat, a waste of a valuable natural resource, 
and a potent greenhouse gas with 80 times the short-term 
warming power of carbon dioxide. This administration's repeal 
of the 2016 BLM methane waste rule will lead to more emissions 
that threaten public health, warm the climate, and waste 
taxpayer resources. Examining methane emissions from oil and 
gas operations on public land and investigating BLM's recent 
rulemaking will be a priority for the Committee in the 116th 
Congress.
    Royalty Policy Committee: The Royalty Policy Committee 
(RPC) advises the Secretary of the Interior on revenue issues 
related to energy and mineral development on public lands. Many 
recommendations from the current committee touch issues far 
beyond the RPC's charter and primarily benefit extractive 
industries instead of taxpayers, such as lowering offshore oil 
and gas royalty rates, accelerating oil and gas development in 
the Arctic Refuge, reducing timelines for permit approvals, and 
changing how BLM handles land use planning and approvals under 
NEPA. In the 116th Congress, the Committee will dig into the 
outsized influence industry has on the RPC, investigate whether 
the RPC has exceeded its charter, and work to make sure public 
interest and environmental advocates receive a seat at the 
table.
    U.S. Geological Survey: In December 2017, USGS released an 
updated resource assessment for the National Petroleum 
Reserve--Alaska that greatly increased the estimate of oil and 
natural gas resources in the region. Such resource assessments 
have the potential to affect stock markets, so USGS policy 
states that these are not disclosed or shared, even internally, 
in advance of public release. At the apparent request of then-
Deputy Secretary Bernhardt, the final results of the energy 
assessment were provided to then-Secretary Zinke several days 
in advance of the public release, a breach of policy that led 
to the resignation of two top agency scientists in protest. In 
the 116th Congress, the Committee will investigate this matter 
and will seek to discover the extent to which DOI officials are 
violating science integrity policies and encouraging Department 
of the Interior staff to do the same.
    Abandoned Mine Lands: The Abandoned Mine Land (AML) program 
should be extended for coal while being replicated by the 
hardrock mining industry. Abandoned Mine Land remediation 
projects improve the environment, protect public health and 
safety, and provide jobs and economic development opportunities 
across the nation. The Committee will conduct oversight into 
the functionality and future of the AML Program, and how the 
cleanup of mines may be accelerated and tied to economic 
development opportunities.
    Critical Minerals: Minerals are considered ``critical'' if 
they satisfy two conditions: they are at high risk of a 
potential supply disruption, and they perform essential 
functions for which there are few if any satisfactory 
substitutes. The Committee will examine the need for critical 
minerals in advanced energy technologies and will conduct 
oversight on the potential to enhance critical mineral 
substitution and secondary recovery. The Committee will also 
conduct oversight on DOI's dubious inclusion of uranium on its 
recently issued Critical Minerals List.
    1872 Mining Law: The Committee will again consider 
legislation to reform the nation's antiquated mining law and 
examine ways to bring the nation's hardrock minerals policy 
into the 21st century. Unlike nearly every other country in the 
world, the United States operates on an open-access policy for 
hardrock minerals on public lands, rather than a leasing 
system, and development occurs without any royalty being paid 
to the American taxpayers. The Committee intends to closely 
investigate hardrock mining operations on public lands and the 
operation of federal hardrock mining programs to determine how 
the public interest can be better protected.
    Power Marketing Administrations: The Committee will conduct 
oversight of the four Power Marketing Administrations that sell 
hydroelectricity used by millions of retail electricity 
customers. The Committee will pay particular attention to 
environmental mitigation programs, physical and cyber security 
planning, and ongoing efforts to update hydropower operations 
to ensure compliance with our nation's bedrock environmental 
laws, including NEPA and the ESA.

Oversight & Investigations

    The Committee will conduct oversight of and investigations 
into operations at the Department of the Interior, the National 
Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, and the Forest Service. 
The Committee will work to ensure transparency and 
accountability by rooting out corruption, waste, fraud, and 
abuse.
    Conflicts of Interest: Public officials and federal 
employees have an obligation to serve the public free from 
financial or corporate influence. The Committee will oversee 
agency decision-making to ensure independence from improper 
influence. Those who violate ethics principles or the law will 
be held accountable. The Committee will also conduct oversight 
of agencies' ethical operations to ensure they are fully 
staffed, resourced, and supported by leadership.
    Obstruction of Justice: In addition to the efforts of the 
Committee, oversight by independent investigative agencies is 
essential. Investigators must be able to conduct inquiries 
promptly, thoroughly, and independently to ensure government 
transparency and accountability. An agency's obstruction of or 
refusal to fully comply with investigative requests may 
constitute a violation of law. The Committee will investigate 
instances of obstruction to ensure investigative bodies are 
able to complete their work.
    Scientific Integrity: Sound, objective science is the 
backbone of decision-making in the agencies and bureaus under 
the Committee's jurisdiction. The Committee will work to ensure 
that scientific research and programs, including those related 
to the effects of human-induced climate change, are not unduly 
influenced by political or financial pressure. The Committee 
will also work to ensure that violations of scientific 
integrity are investigated promptly, thoroughly, and without 
improper influence. If violations occur, the Committee will 
ensure that those responsible are held accountable.
    Sexual Harassment and Other Forms of Harassment: The 
agencies and bureaus within the Committee's jurisdiction have a 
number of organizational risk factors that put their employees 
at increased risk for harassment, including sexual harassment. 
These risk factors include geographically isolated workplaces, 
homogenous workforces, and gendered power disparities, among 
others. Addressing the cultural issues that underpin persistent 
organizational harassment problems requires a major commitment 
of resources and leadership over a period of years. The 
Committee will work to ensure that employees within these 
agencies and bureaus have access to effective policies, 
procedures, and resources that help protect them in the 
workplace. The Committee will also work to ensure that agencies 
are making rapid, meaningful progress toward changing agency 
culture in ways that address harassment issues.
    Departmental Reorganization and Employee Reassignments: The 
Committee will oversee the Department of the Interior's 
reorganization efforts, including any significant changes to 
interagency reporting structures and agency headquarters 
locations. In addition, the Committee will oversee staff 
reassignments, particularly those with potentially retaliatory 
or political motivations.
    The Border Wall and Other Barriers: The Secretary of 
Homeland Security has unprecedented, sweeping, and possibly 
unconstitutional authority to waive ``all legal requirements''' 
in order to construct barriers and roads along the U.S.-Mexico 
border, including on public lands. The Secretary has exercised 
this authority ten times since 2005. As a result, the existing 
border barriers have had significant environmental, economic, 
and social consequences on border lands and communities, which 
disproportionately affect communities of color. The Committee 
will conduct oversight of the existing barriers as well as use 
of the waiver authority to construct any new barriers or walls, 
particularly on public lands.

                            ADDITIONAL VIEWS

    Tribal Infrastructure and Economic Development: In prior 
Congresses, the Committee explored a number of avenues to 
improve Indian health care facilities. The Committee can be 
supportive of projects that improve roads and bridges; however, 
these are not under the jurisdiction of the Committee.
    Native Healthcare: In prior Congresses, the Committee spent 
a considerable amount of time analyzing the state of the Indian 
health care delivery system after record funding increases to 
the Indian Health Service (IHS). The Committee determined that 
despite these increases, the health care system is in dire need 
of reform. Legislation was reported by the Committee in the 
115th Congress which should move through the Committee again. 
Massive funding increases or moving the IHS budget into 
mandatory spending will not address the problems plaguing the 
agency.
    Tribal Consultation: Under the Obama Administration, the 
Department of the Interior paid lip service to tribal 
consultation. On the other hand, their policies related to 
energy development were imposed upon tribes without meaningful 
consultation. On the Obama Administration's Venting and Flaring 
rule, the Mandan, Hidatsa and Arikara Nation stated, 
``Consultation to date has not been meaningful.'' Similarly, 
the Ute Tribe stated, ``This kind of paternalism is not the 
modern role of the federal trustee.'' On the Obama 
Administration's Hydraulic Fracturing rule, the Navajo Nation 
stated, ``The breadth and depth of [Bureau of Land Management] 
outreach and consultation with Indian Country has been 
insufficient given the potential impact the rule could have on 
tribal energy resources and economic development.'' The 
Chairman's commitment to make tribal consultation a priority, 
and not subject to the whims of the executive branch, should be 
commended.
    Tribal Sovereignty: It is unfortunate that some in Congress 
have used partisan politics to undermine tribal rights. I 
applaud the Chairman for promising to address tribal 
sovereignty. Many Democrats in Congress have continuously voted 
against policies that promote sovereignty, especially when it 
comes to a tribe's labor force.
    National Monuments and the Antiquities Act: The Committee 
in prior Congresses established an oversight record of prior 
abuses by Presidents of the Antiquities Act in unilaterally 
declaring vast stretches of the western U.S. national monuments 
with little to no input by local, State, or federal delegation 
officials. One such example was the 1996 establishment of the 
Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument by President 
Clinton under the Antiquities Act without having informed the 
Utah Governor or the Utah Congressional delegation. The 
Committee should continue to examine responsible modifications 
to the Antiquities Act to ensure greater public and stakeholder 
input, particularly by elected local and State officials. 
Recent executive actions by the Trump Administration to include 
common-sense local inputs in modifying the boundaries of the 
Grand-Staircase and Bears' Ears National Monuments should serve 
as a model to guide responsible future permanent legislative 
modifications of the Act.
    Wildfire and Forest Management: Effective, scientifically-
based management of U.S. forests continues to be hampered by 
excessive litigation by national special interest groups and 
cumbersome agency regulations, which combine to impede efforts 
to eradicate devastating insect infestations, and delay or stop 
the harvesting of timber. Prior oversight hearings on effective 
forest management have clearly demonstrated the wisdom of 
facilitating the environmentally-responsible harvesting and re-
planting of forest lands, which not only produce useful timber 
products, but continuously improve forest soils and its 
carrying capacity, preserve watersheds, maximize carbon 
capture, and reduce the build-up of fuel loads which lead to 
massive forest mega-fires. The Committee should examine ways to 
streamline the environmental permitting process to facilitate 
these scientifically-responsible forest management practices.
    Federal Law Enforcement: The Committee should carefully 
examine the proper uses of law enforcement power and procedures 
by the Interior Department agencies to ensure that prior abuses 
by rogue Interior law enforcement personnel, particularly in 
the Bureau of Land Management, do not recur, and that 
notification and cooperation by the federal government with 
State and local law enforcement officials is made mandatory.
    Grazing: When managed properly, grazing of federal lands 
can enhance the health of rangelands and reduce the fuel-build 
up which contribute to extreme wildfires. As one of the most 
effective wildfire-reduction tools, grazing can also help 
preserve the habitat for such wildlife species as the Greater 
Sage Grouse. The Committee should examine ways in which grazing 
can be used to benefit the economy and the health of federal 
range lands, and to preserve the practice against frivolous 
litigation and unnecessary regulation.
    Endangered Species Act: The original intent of the 
Endangered Species Act of 1973 (ESA) was not only to designate 
species as endangered or threatened, but to create federal 
policies and actions to recover these listed species. In the 
prior Congress, this Committee has proven to be champions for 
the ESA, passing 13 bills out of Committee in the 115th 
Congress. Acting as strong proponents of transparency and 
accountability, this Committee supported legislation that 
focused on State-led science-based recovery strategies while 
building a framework for future discussions with all 
stakeholders. The Majority's plan proposes overseeing the 
implementation of the ESA. The Committee needs to continue to 
support past legislation that modernized this landmark statute 
to alter the fatal design flaws that inhibit greater success 
for species recovery, environmental protection and economic 
prosperity.
    Marine Mammals: While the Majority focuses the Committee's 
attention on two specific species--the North Atlantic Right 
Whale and the Southern Resident Killer Whale--and the impact 
ocean noises may have on these two species, the Committee loses 
perspective. Instead of considering legislative initiatives 
that will protect our ocean species while ensuring ``healthy 
oceans and healthy economies,'' the Majority intends to 
conserve hand-chosen species with no regard to coastal 
economies. The Majority's focus on the impact of ocean noises 
deters offshore renewable energy projects, despite their 
promotion of these same renewable energy sources under the 
``Green New Deal.'' Instead of limiting marine mammal 
conservation efforts to charismatic megafauna and villainizing 
seismic activity, which is critical for multiple offshore 
purposes, the Committee should explore ways to ensure species 
conservation while supporting a healthy blue economy.
    Arctic National Wildlife Refuge: The Committee's desire to 
discuss the Department of the Interior's opening of less than 
ten percent of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge to 
development at ``breakneck speed'' is exciting, as it will 
provide an opportunity to examine the bountiful resources that 
exist in this region and highlight the economic benefits the 
oil and gas industry has brought to Alaska's native population. 
After all, the Majority has acknowledged the need to discuss 
tribal sovereignty and economic development, and what better 
way to do so than to highlight the Arctic Slope Regional 
Corporation, which has maximized the economic benefits of the 
resources provided to them, while maintaining their cultural 
and ethnic heritage. Furthermore, an examination of this region 
will allow the Committee to discuss new drilling techniques, 
such as those that allow a single, 12-acre well pad to reach 
154 square miles, whereas in 1970 a similarly sized well pad 
could only reach 3 square miles.
    Critical Minerals: The Majority correctly defines a 
critical mineral as one that: 1) is at high risk of a potential 
supply disruption; and 2) performs essential functions for 
which there are few if any satisfactory substitutes. With the 
desire to examine the ``need for critical minerals in advanced 
energy technologies,'' presumably including those critical 
minerals such as bauxite, cobalt, gallium and tellurium needed 
for the production of wind turbines and solar panels, the 
Committee should focus on lessening the nation's dependence on 
foreign sources for these materials. In doing so, the Committee 
could develop legislation that would promote the rapid 
development of domestic mines, thereby safeguarding our 
nation's renewable energy transition.
    Fair Return for Taxpayers: The Majority's acknowledgement 
that our federal energy and mineral resources provide ``an 
important source of funds for both the federal government and 
state governments''' is refreshing. Certainly then, the 
Committee should commend and favorably highlight the current 
Administration's efforts to reverse the handicapping 
regulations and policies that limited development of these 
federal resources, in turn diminishing revenues. For example, 
in 2018 the Department of the Interior tripled the previous 
record set in 2008 for revenues raised from onshore oil and gas 
lease sales alone to an astounding $1.1 billion, of which $550 
million will be used by States to fund education and public 
services. The Committee should continue holding legislative 
hearings on bills that would codify the efforts of the 
Department that have reduced red tape, maximized revenues 
returned to the federal and State governments, and ensured our 
federal lands are being used in the most efficient and 
productive ways possible.
    Offshore Drilling: As the Majority investigates the 
implementation of the offshore oil and gas program and 
disparages the ``unnecessary efforts''' to develop a new 5-year 
plan, the Committee will discover the overwhelming economic and 
conservation benefits the offshore industry provides to this 
country. Without offshore drilling, bipartisan programs such as 
the Land and Water Conservation Fund would be underfunded, and 
the nation's Gulf states would have less funding to protect 
against the threats of climate change. The Committee should 
examine the expansion of offshore drilling and revenue sharing 
programs and the economic benefits and accompanying coastal 
resiliency that would occur because of such expansion.
    Regulatory Review of Natural Resources Laws: Committee 
oversight activities should collect relevant information to 
support the Committee's ability to develop legislation, monitor 
the implementation of public policy, and transparently ensure 
the government's performance in subject matters within the 
Committee's jurisdiction. Accordingly, the Committee should 
conduct oversight on the effectiveness of major natural 
resources laws within the Committee's jurisdiction. Focus 
should be provided on how laws such as the National 
Environmental Policy Act of 1969, the Wilderness Act, the 
Federal Land Policy and Management Act of 1976, the Marine 
Mammal Protection Act of 1972 and the National Historic 
Preservation Act of 1966 may exceed their regulatory purposes 
resulting in costly litigation and other adverse consequences 
for the environment, proper management of federal natural 
resources, and to American taxpayers.
    Sexual Harassment and Other Forms of Harassment: The 
Committee should continue the oversight initiatives examining 
hiring practices and policies and instances of employee 
misconduct at the agencies and bureaus within the Committee's 
jurisdiction. Bipartisan review during the 115th Congress of 
the personnel management reforms being implemented by the Trump 
Administration should continue.
    Scientific Integrity and Grant Accountability: The need to 
ensure scientific integrity at the agencies and bureaus within 
the Committee's jurisdiction should include the oversight of 
various government funding recipients. The Committee should 
also conduct oversight of federal grants awarded by the 
agencies and bureaus within the Committee's jurisdiction to 
ensure efficiency, fairness, and transparency of the 
grantmaking process.
    Federal Lands and Border Protection: In prior congresses, 
the Committee investigated challenges faced by Border Patrol 
agents on federal borderlands and the environmental impact of 
illegal border crossings and drug smuggling. The remote 
location of large portions of federally-owned borderland make 
them a popular location for cross-border violators (CBVs), such 
as drug and human smugglers. Moreover, stakeholders reported 
that bureaucratic regulations and policies related to federal 
natural resources laws slow or impede Border Patrol operations 
on federally-owned land. The violence associated with high 
levels of CBVs deprives the public of access to federally-owned 
lands and causes significant damage to local environments. The 
Committee should continue to examine the significant 
environmental, economic, and social consequences on federal 
borderlands by CBVs and promote appropriate solutions.

                   COMMITTEE ON OVERSIGHT AND REFORM

                             OVERSIGHT PLAN

                   Committee on Oversight and Reform

                     U.S. House of Representatives

                             116th Congress

               The Honorable Elijah E. Cummings, Chairman

    Rule X, Clause 2(d) of the Rules of the House of 
Representatives requires each committee of the House to submit 
an oversight plan to the Committee on Oversight and Reform and 
the Committee on House Administration by March 1 of the first 
session of Congress.
    The following is the oversight plan for the Committee on 
Oversight and Reform for the 116th Congress. This plan consists 
of topics designated for investigation, evaluation, and review 
by Chairman Elijah E. Cummings, in consultation with Ranking 
Member Jim Jordan, other Committee Members, and other 
Committees.
    Before the end of March, the Government Accountability 
Office (GAO) is expected to issue its biannual ``High Risk'' 
report, which identifies government programs that are 
particularly vulnerable to waste, fraud, or abuse.\3\ In 
addition, the Inspectors General from various agencies have 
submitted audit plans to the Committee.\4\ The Committee will 
review GAO's report and the Inspector General plans and 
investigate areas of concern as appropriate.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    \3\See, e.g., Government Accountability Office, High Risk Series: 
Progress on Many High-Risk Areas, While Substantial Efforts Needed on 
Others (GAO-17-317) (Feb. 15, 2017).
    \4\See, e.g., Office of Inspector General, Department of Labor, 
Office of Audit Workplan Fiscal Year 2019 (November 2018).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    The Committee has received, and will continue to receive, 
information from whistleblowers regarding waste, fraud, and 
abuse. Whistleblowers perform an essential service to the 
Committee, flagging critical issues that otherwise might go 
unnoticed and unaddressed.
    Below are descriptions of some of the issues the Committee 
intends to investigate during the 116th Congress. This list is 
not exhaustive but highlights significant areas for Committee 
oversight. The Committee will retain the flexibility to 
investigate emerging abuses and other issues as appropriate.

                 HEALTH CARE AND INCREASING DRUG PRICES

    The Committee's most important health care priority for the 
116th Congress is investigating the actions of drug companies 
in raising prescription drug prices in the United States, as 
well as the effects of these actions on federal and state 
budgets and on American families. This was the subject of the 
Committee's first investigation and first hearing. The 
Committee recognizes the complex nature of the prescription 
drug industry and the need to examine the role of all pertinent 
actors.
    For years, drug companies have been aggressively increasing 
prices on existing drugs and setting higher launch prices for 
new drugs while recording windfall profits. The goals of this 
investigation are to determine why drug companies are 
increasing prices so dramatically, how drug companies are using 
the proceeds, and what steps can be taken to reduce 
prescription drug prices.
    Research and development efforts on groundbreaking 
medications have made immeasurable contributions to the health 
of Americans, including new treatments and cures for diseases 
that have affected people for centuries. But the ongoing 
escalation of prices by drug companies is unsustainable. As 
President Trump has said, drug companies are ``getting away 
with murder.''\5\
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    \5\Trump on Drug Prices: Pharma Companies Are ``Getting Away with 
Murder,'' Washington Post (Jan. 11, 2017) (online at 
www.washingtonpost.com/news/wonk/wp/2017/01/11/trump-on-drug-prices-
pharma-companies-are-getting-away-with-murder/
?noredirect=on&utm_term=.bf515b3ac693).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    In addition, the Committee will examine the opioid crisis 
and the urgent need for more resources to expand access to 
treatment and support services for those with substance use 
disorders. The Committee will examine the role of drug 
companies in aggressively marketing opioids while knowing their 
addictive dangers, as well as the profits these companies made 
as a result of their actions. The Committee will review the 
federal government's actions to address the opioid epidemic, 
including those of the Office of National Drug Control Policy, 
which was reauthorized in the 115th Congress.
    The Committee will examine actions that inhibit access to 
high-quality, affordable health care in the United States, 
including the Executive Branch's implementation of the 
Affordable Care Act and the Medicaid program.
    The Committee will continue to examine efforts by the 
Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services to improve program 
integrity and beneficiary outcomes.
    The Committee will evaluate the extent to which communities 
of color, women, and the LGBTQ population are able to access 
the full continuum of health care services, including federal 
policies and programs related to reproductive health.

       EXECUTIVE BRANCH ETHICS, TRANSPARENCY, AND ACCOUNTABILITY

    Another top priority for the Committee in the 116th 
Congress is conducting robust oversight of a wide range of laws 
and regulations regarding Executive Branch ethics.
    The Committee's second hearing of the year was a review of 
H.R. 1, the For the People Act, which is one of the boldest 
reform packages to be considered in the history of the House of 
Representatives.\6\ This sweeping legislation, which was based 
on multiple abuses over the past several years, is intended to 
clean up corruption in government, fight secret money in 
politics, and make it easier for American citizens across this 
country to vote.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    \6\House Democrats' Big Democracy Reform Package is Good Policy, 
and Smart Politics, Vox (Dec. 10, 2018) (online at www.vox.com/
polyarchy/2018/12/10/18134994/house-democrats-democracy-reform-
package); Democracy Task Force, Leading Grassroots Advocacy 
Organizations Endorse House Democrats' Once-In-A-Generation Reform 
Package (Jan. 9, 2019) (online at democracyreform-sarbanes.house.gov/
newsroom/press-releases/leading-grassroots-advocacy-
organizations-endorse-house-democrats-once-in-a).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    As part of this broad effort, the Committee will 
investigate specific allegations that Executive Branch 
officials are not acting in the best interest of American 
taxpayers, including by taking actions to benefit themselves, 
former employers, or former clients.\7\
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    \7\See, e.g., E.P.A. Chief Scott Pruitt Resigns Under a Cloud of 
Ethics Scandals, New York Times (July 5, 2018) (online at 
www.nytimes.com/2018/07/05/climate/scott-pruitt-epa-trump.html); See 
e.g., Trump Team's Conflicts and Scandals: An Interactive Guide, 
Bloomberg (Jan. 25, 2019) (online at www.bloomberg.com/graphics/trump-
administration-conflicts/).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    The Committee will examine allegations that Executive 
Branch employees, including White House employees, are 
violating the Ethics in Government Act, regulations issued by 
the Office of Government Ethics, Executive Order 13770, and 
other laws, regulations, and guidance.\8\
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    \8\See, e.g., Wilbur Ross Scheduled Meetings with Chevron, Boeing 
Despite Conflicts of Interest, Forbes (Oct. 25, 2018) (online at 
www.forbes.com/sites/danalexander/2018/10/25/wilbur-ross-scheduled-
meetings-with-chevron-boeing-despite-conflicts-of-interest/
#30c51af94d0e).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    The Committee will investigate allegations that White House 
and agency employees have violated the Hatch Act.\9\ The 
Committee will conduct oversight of efforts to implement and 
enforce the Hatch Act by the Office of Special Counsel.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    \9\See e.g., Office of Special Counsel, OSC Concludes Hatch Act 
Investigation of Kellyanne Conway, Finds Two Violations, and Refers 
Findings to President for Appropriate Disciplinary Action (Mar. 6, 
2018) (online at https://osc.gov/News/pr-18-24.pdf); See, e.g., Six 
White House Officials Reprimanded for Violating the Hatch Act, 
Washington Post (Nov. 30, 2018) (online at www.washingtonpost.com/
politics/six-white-house-officials-reprimanded-for-violating-the-hatch-
act/2018/11/30/e4a12cb8-f4bf-11e8-aeea-
b85fd44449f5_story.html?utm_term=.6504cfaf022c).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    The Committee will investigate reports that White House and 
other Administration officials are obstructing GAO audits, 
evaluations, and investigations and refusing to cooperate with 
agency Inspectors General.\10\ The Committee will work with the 
Inspector General community to ensure they have the necessary 
tools and are performing their oversight fairly and 
responsibly.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    \10\See, e.g., Letter from Thomas H. Armstrong, General Counsel, 
Government Accountability Office, to Donald F. McGahn II, Counsel to 
the President, The White House (May 9, 2018) (online at https://
oversight.house.gov/sites/democrats.oversight.house.gov/files/
documents/McGahn
%20Letter.pdf).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    The Committee will investigate allegations that White House 
officials are not complying with the Presidential Records 
Act.\11\ The Committee will investigate allegations that White 
House officials are using personal email accounts, text 
messages, phone-based message applications, or encryption 
software to conduct official business.\12\
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    \11\Trump's Argument in Record-Keeping Case: `Courts Cannot Review 
the President's Compliance with the Presidential Records Act, 
Washington Post (Jan. 17, 2018) (online at www.washingtonpost.com/
local/public-safety/trumps-argument-in-record-keeping-case-courts-
cannot-review-the-presidents-compliance-with-the-presidential-records-
act/2018/01/17/fb1eb520-fba8-11e7-ad8c-
ecbb62019393_story.html?utm_term=.c55089c449ce).
    \12\Id. See, e.g., Letter from Chairman Jason Chaffetz, Ranking 
Member Elijah E. Cummings, House Committee on Oversight and Government 
Reform, to Donald F. McGahn, II, Counsel to the President, The White 
House (Mar. 8, 2017); Letter from Chairman Trey Gowdy, Ranking Member 
Elijah E. Cummings, House Committee on Oversight and Government Reform, 
to Donald F. McGahn, II, Counsel to the President, The White House 
(Sept. 25, 2017).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    The Committee will examine the implementation of open 
government laws, such as the Federal Records Act, the Freedom 
of Information Act, the Federal Advisory Committee Act, and 
other transparency laws.
    The Committee will continue to investigate allegations of 
retaliation against whistleblowers. The Committee's oversight 
efforts will include investigating the Administration's use of 
nondisclosure agreements that violate the Whistleblower 
Protection Act.

    THE PRESIDENT'S BUSINESS INTERESTS, CONFLICTS OF INTEREST, AND 
                               EMOLUMENTS

    After Donald Trump was elected President in 2016--but 
before he was sworn in--both Republican and Democratic ethics 
experts warned that he should completely divest himself of his 
myriad business interests and place the proceeds into a truly 
independent blind trust. They explained that if the President 
decided not to follow decades of precedent set by previous 
Presidents, he would bring upon himself criticism that his 
decisions are not based on the best interests of the nation but 
on the financial interests of himself and his family.\13\
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    \13\See, e.g., House Committee on Oversight and Government Reform 
Democrats, Minority Forum with Bipartisan Ethics Experts on Trump's 
Conflicts of Interest (Dec. 14, 2016).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    President Trump chose to disregard this advice. As a 
result, he continues to have financial interests in businesses 
across the United States and around the world that pose both 
perceived and actual conflicts of interest. They also raise 
grave questions about whether President Trump is receiving 
emoluments that are prohibited by the U.S. Constitution 
``without the consent of Congress.''
    Related to these decisions, President Trump also chose to 
defy decades of precedent by concealing his tax returns from 
the public, so Congress and the American people cannot fully 
evaluate his global financial interests.
    Based on President Trump's decisions, the Committee is now 
charged with conducting robust and independent oversight of the 
President and his family's multiple business interests in order 
to guard against financial conflicts and unconstitutional 
emoluments.
    Recognizing the unprecedented nature of President Trump's 
actions, the House of Representatives voted at the beginning of 
the 116th Congress to take several steps.
    First, the House changed the name of the Committee from the 
``Committee on Oversight and Government Reform (OGR)'' to the 
``Committee on Oversight and Reform (COR),'' recognizing that 
the Committee has been conducting, and will continue to 
conduct, oversight of both governmental and private sector 
entities and individuals.
    Second, the House made clearer in its Rules that the 
Committee has jurisdiction over the White House. For decades, 
the Committee has been the principal oversight committee of the 
House of Representatives, and it has had broad authority to 
investigate ``any matter'' at ``any time'' under House Rule X. 
House Rule X now makes clearer that the Committee on Oversight 
and Reform has jurisdiction to ``study on a continuing basis 
the operation of Government activities at all levels, including 
the Executive Office of the President.''
    For example, the Committee is investigating President 
Trump's failure to report on his annual Financial Disclosure 
form hundreds of thousands of dollars in payments and 
liabilities to his former attorney, Michael Cohen, to silence 
women alleging extramarital affairs during the 2016 
presidential campaign. The Committee is also investigating 
campaign finance violations by the President and others 
relating to these payments.
    The Committee is conducting oversight of the General 
Services Administration's management of its lease of the Old 
Post Office Building to the President's company for the Trump 
International Hotel in Washington, D.C. As part of this review, 
the Committee is examining whether the President's company is 
in breach of Article 37.19 of the lease, which provides: ``No 
member or delegate to Congress, or elected official of the 
Government of the United States or the Government of the 
District of Columbia, shall be admitted to any share or part of 
this Lease, or to any benefit that may arise therefrom.''
    The Committee is conducting oversight of the General 
Services Administration's management of a decade-long 
procurement for a new headquarters building for the Federal 
Bureau of Investigation to replace the J. Edgar Hoover Building 
in Washington, D.C. The Committee is examining whether 
proposals for the expenditure of taxpayer funds protect against 
waste, fraud, and abuse, and whether any officials 
inappropriately interfered in the decision to cancel the 
procurement in favor of a costlier option.
    The Committee is investigating the Administration's travel 
spending, including the President's spending on trips to Mar-a-
Lago. GAO found that the Trump Administration spent 
approximately $13.6 million in taxpayer funds for just four of 
the trips President Trump has taken to Mar-a-Lago.\14\
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    \14\Government Accountability Office, Presidential Travel: Secret 
Service and DOD Need to Ensure that Expenditure Reports are Prepared 
and Submitted to Congress (Jan. 2019) (online at www.gao.gov/assets/
700/696512.pdf).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

                          SECURITY CLEARANCES

    One of the Committee's most critical national security 
investigations in the 116th Congress is its in-depth review of 
the security clearance process at the White House and the Trump 
Transition Team in response to grave breaches of national 
security at the highest levels of the Administration, including 
by former National Security Advisor Michael Flynn and others.
    The goals of this investigation are to determine why the 
White House and Transition Team appear to have disregarded 
established procedures for safeguarding classified information, 
evaluate the extent to which the nation's most highly guarded 
secrets were provided to officials who should not have had 
access to them, and develop reforms to remedy the flaws in 
current White House systems and practices.
    In addition, the investigation will seek to determine why 
the White House is currently defying federal law by failing to 
provide to Congress information about its security clearance 
process required by the SECRET Act, a bipartisan bill that 
passed out of the Committee, passed both Houses of Congress, 
and was signed into law by President Trump on May 22, 2018.
    The Committee will continue its oversight of efforts to 
reform the government-wide security clearance process, 
including the reduction of the background investigation backlog 
and impending transition of all investigation functions from 
the National Background Investigations Bureau to the Defense 
Department.

        VOTING RIGHTS, VOTER SUPPRESSION, AND ELECTION SECURITY

    The right to vote is fundamental to our democracy. Yet in 
recent elections, there have been numerous reports of attempted 
or actual voter suppression, and federal courts have struck 
down several state laws that disproportionately impacted 
minority voters. The Committee will investigate the development 
and impact of laws and policies that have hindered eligible 
individuals from registering to vote and casting their ballots. 
The Committee will examine the effectiveness of federal, state, 
and local efforts to increase voter registration and turnout. 
The Committee will conduct robust oversight to support the 
Voting Rights Act and other laws aimed at preventing barriers 
to those seeking to exercise their right to vote.
    The Committee will conduct oversight of the security of 
election infrastructure and efforts by federal, state, and 
local governments to ensure elections and election systems are 
resilient against intrusion or interference.

                     ENVIRONMENT AND PUBLIC HEALTH

    The Committee intends to examine government and private 
sector policies and actions related to the environment, natural 
resources, and public health. The Committee will review the 
extent to which federal agencies responsible for environmental 
and public health protection are fulfilling their statutory 
missions.
    For example, the Committee will examine climate change. The 
earth is warming, humans are causing it, and action is needed 
now to stop it. The United States must lead the way in reducing 
emissions and seeking other ways to combat climate change, 
while also adapting to the impacts that Americans are already 
experiencing, including rising sea levels and more extreme 
weather. The Committee intends to conduct oversight of 
government and nongovernment activities related to these 
issues.
    The Committee will continue its investigation of the Flint 
water crisis. Thousands of Americans in Flint, Michigan have 
been poisoned by their water, and many questions remain about 
the decision to switch the source of drinking water in Flint 
and about state government officials' response to this crisis.
    The Committee will continue its investigation of the 
federal government's response to Hurricanes Irma and Maria in 
Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands in 2017. In the weeks 
and months that followed, critical aid failed to reach millions 
of hurricane survivors. The Committee will examine who was 
responsible for the federal government's inadequate response, 
why the Trump Administration failed to heed the lessons learned 
after Hurricane Katrina, and whether recovery efforts remain 
insufficient.

                              IMMIGRATION

    The Committee intends to conduct oversight of the 
Department of Homeland Security, the Department of Justice, the 
Department of Health and Human Services, and other agencies 
tasked with developing and implementing federal immigration 
policies.
    The Committee will investigate Trump Administration 
policies that have separated thousands of children from their 
families at the southern border. This investigation will 
include accounting for the separated children, as well as 
examining the planning, implementation, and impact of these 
policies.
    The Committee also intends to examine the development and 
impact of Administration policies relating to the immigration 
detention system, visa and asylum applications, and other 
issues administered by Immigration and Customs Enforcement, 
Customs and Border Protection, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration 
Services, and other relevant agencies.

                    WORKERS' RIGHTS AND PROTECTIONS

    The Committee will examine issues related to the protection 
of workers' rights, including issues relating to wages and 
benefits, employment agreements, working conditions, and the 
right to organize and bargain collectively.
    Since 2011, federal employees have contributed nearly $200 
billion to deficit reduction and other government programs. 
Federal workers have endured pay freezes, hiring freezes, 
higher pension contributions, and furloughs as a result of 
sequestration and government shutdowns, including the longest 
shutdown in our nation's history.
    The Committee will conduct oversight of the 
Administration's efforts to weaken collective bargaining rights 
and employee protections affecting federal workers. The 
Committee's oversight will seek to ensure that such efforts do 
not undermine the statutory right to bargain, the ability of 
employee unions to represent federal workers, or employee due 
process rights. The Committee will work to prevent the return 
of the current merit-based civil service to a patronage system.
    The Committee will examine the impact of federal agency 
vacancies at all levels, staffing reductions, and a lack of 
diversity and inclusion in the federal workforce on employee 
engagement, morale, productivity, and agency mission.
    Federal employees have the right to work in an environment 
free from any form of sexual harassment, and they have the 
right to report allegations of harassment or bullying without 
fear of retaliation. The Committee will examine how allegations 
of sexual harassment and sexual misconduct are handled at 
federal agencies, including the need for legislation to 
strengthen standards for agency processes used to receive and 
investigate allegations of harassment and bullying. The 
Committee will examine ways to improve agency processes for 
disciplining employees found to have committed sexual 
misconduct.

                     HOMELAND AND NATIONAL SECURITY

    The Committee intends to conduct oversight of multiple 
agencies charged with securing the homeland, enhancing national 
security, and promoting American interests overseas.
    For example, the Committee is investigating alleged efforts 
by former National Security Advisor Michael Flynn and others 
within the White House to rush the transfer of highly sensitive 
U.S. nuclear technology to Saudi Arabia in potential violation 
of the Atomic Energy Act and without review by Congress as 
required by law.
    The Committee will examine management at the Transportation 
Security Administration (TSA), with a focus on implementation 
of unfulfilled security recommendations made by the Inspector 
General, GAO, and TSA's own internal testing teams. The 
Committee will continue the work of previous congresses and 
examine the agency's transparency, the agency's response to 
whistleblower claims, and the agency's use of non-disclosure 
agreements.
    The Committee will examine management of the Coast Guard, 
including the Coast Guard's response to allegations and 
findings of harassment, bullying, and retaliation at the Coast 
Guard Academy.
    The Committee will investigate reports that senior 
political appointees at the State Department and White House 
have engaged in prohibited personnel practices against career 
State Department employees, including by vetting career 
officials to determine whether they are sufficiently loyal to 
President Trump.
    The Committee will continue its oversight of the Secret 
Service's efforts to reduce attrition and improve morale, 
especially in anticipation of the highly demanding 2020 
presidential campaign. The Committee will examine the 
President's and his family's frequent travel and any impact on 
the agency's ability to fulfill its critical mission.

                        CRIMINAL JUSTICE REFORM

    The United States has the highest rate of incarceration of 
any nation on earth, and many observers have raised concerns 
about bias and unequal treatment throughout our nation's 
criminal justice system. Although Congress passed, and 
President Trump signed into law, limited reforms to federal 
sentencing laws last year, more remains to be done to improve 
the criminal justice system while continuing to prevent and 
deter crime.
    The Committee intends to conduct oversight of the federal 
departments and agencies responsible for administering the 
criminal justice system and to explore policy solutions at the 
federal, state, and local levels to address bias, eliminate 
excessive sentencing, help incarcerated people transition back 
into society, and reduce recidivism.
    The Committee will also continue to examine staffing, 
resources, and facilities management challenges at the Justice 
Department's Bureau of Prisons.

                                 CENSUS

    The Committee will conduct oversight of the Census Bureau 
and preparations for the Decennial Census in 2020. The Census 
is mandated by the Constitution and requires the Administration 
to count every person in the United States. Due to the 
complexity and importance of the Census, robust oversight is 
critical to ensure that the Census Bureau is ready and able to 
conduct an accurate and fair count. The Committee will examine 
Census planning, preparations, and readiness; technology and 
cybersecurity; communications; and other issues.
    The Committee will also examine the Trump Administration's 
efforts to add a citizenship question to the Census after the 
deadline to notify of Congress of new census topics. The 
Committee will examine inaccurate testimony to Congress by 
multiple Trump Administration officials regarding the 
origination and the purported need for the citizenship 
question.

                             POSTAL SERVICE

    The Committee will oversee the operations of the United 
States Postal Service, over which the Committee exercises 
legislative and oversight jurisdiction. The Postal Service is 
an essential public institution that connects every family, 
business, and community in this nation by providing service to 
more than 157 million delivery points across the United States. 
The Committee will examine the urgent need for comprehensive 
reform legislation that can address the Postal Service's 
deepening financial challenges while guaranteeing universal 
service.
    In addition, following an individual's attempt last year to 
send more than a dozen explosive devices through the U.S. mail 
to elected officials and media organizations, the Committee 
will conduct oversight of efforts by the Postal Service to 
protect its customers and prevent the shipment of explosives 
and other dangerous items.

                       CYBERSECURITY AND PRIVACY

    The Committee will continue its oversight of the Federal 
Information Security Management Act of 2002 (FISMA), which 
requires federal agencies to implement a number of security 
controls on their information systems. The Committee will 
examine compliance with FISMA throughout the Executive Branch.
    The Committee will conduct oversight of the increasing 
number of cyberattacks affecting federal agencies and the 
private sector, including companies in the retail, financial 
services, healthcare, and technology sectors. In recent years, 
millions of Americans have had their privacy compromised and 
personal data exposed due to data breaches. The Committee 
intends to explore ways to ensure that agencies and corporate 
entities take appropriate steps to protect American consumers' 
privacy and their personal information.
    The Committee will also continue its oversight of 
government-wide cybersecurity tools and support provided to 
federal agencies by the administration, including but not 
limited to the Continuous Diagnostics and Mitigation (CDM) 
program. The Committee will examine whether existing 
cybersecurity programs are adequately protecting federal 
networks from cyber threats.

                          CONSUMER PROTECTION

    Federal consumer watchdogs, including the Consumer 
Financial Protection Bureau, the Federal Trade Commission, and 
other agencies, work to stop unfair and deceptive business 
practices related to credit cards, student loans, mortgages, 
and other services and products. The Committee intends to 
conduct oversight to ensure these agencies are meeting their 
statutory responsibilities to protect consumers.
    The Committee intends to conduct oversight of the 
management of the Department of Housing and Urban Development, 
including examining the Department's rollback of regulations 
intended to combat housing discrimination.

                 STUDENT LOANS AND FOR-PROFIT COLLEGES

    Nearly 43 million Americans are paying off student loans, 
with approximately $1.4 trillion in student debt 
outstanding.\15\ The Committee plans to examine the Department 
of Education's oversight of the student loan and for-profit 
college industries.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    \15\Congressional Research Service, A Snapshot of Federal Student 
Loan Debt (Feb.4, 2019).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

                   TITLE IX AND CAMPUS SEXUAL ASSAULT

    The Committee intends to conduct oversight of the 
Department of Education's enforcement of Title IX of the 
Education Amendments Act of 1972, which protects people from 
sex discrimination in federally-funded education programs. One 
area of focus will be the Department's proposed regulation 
related to campus sexual harassment and sexual assault.

                         GOVERNMENT CONTRACTING

    The federal government buys a wide variety of goods and 
services, from sophisticated weapons systems to cybersecurity 
tools and services. The Committee will investigate waste, 
fraud, abuse, and mismanagement and conduct oversight of recent 
acquisition reforms, including on-line procurement. The 
Committee will conduct oversight of agency contracting, 
especially those agencies identified by GAO as ``high risks,'' 
to ensure there is appropriate management of taxpayer funds and 
agencies are effectively using acquisition strategies to 
achieve policy goals. The Committee will examine how to lower 
the barriers to entry for small and disadvantaged businesses.

                   Subcommittee on National Security

    The Subcommittee on National Security intends to conduct 
robust oversight of national security and foreign affairs 
policies, including but not limited to:
           U.S. military, intelligence, and 
        counterterrorism strategies and operations in 
        Afghanistan, Syria, Iraq, Sub-Saharan Africa, and other 
        conflict areas;
           U.S. national security and defense 
        strategies and foreign policy regarding Russia, China, 
        North Korea, Iran, Pakistan, Saudi Arabia, Yemen, 
        Venezuela, and other countries critical to U.S. 
        national security priorities;
           U.S. reconstruction activities in 
        Afghanistan and Iraq;
           The preparedness of the diplomatic corps to 
        represent U.S. interests abroad, and oversight of how 
        the Defense Department and State Department protect 
        embassy construction personnel and property, including 
        an update on U.S. Embassy construction efforts;
           The role of the U.S. Agency for 
        International Development and United Nations 
        Peacekeeping operations in the U.S. national security 
        framework;
           State-sponsored and terrorist cyber threats 
        to national security;
           Homeland security policies, including 
        immigration, efforts to prevent human and drug 
        trafficking, and how federal agencies address the 
        national security threat posed by transnational 
        criminal organizations and drug cartels;
           Efforts of the federal government to promote 
        human rights and protect religious freedom throughout 
        the world;
           The efforts of the Defense Department and 
        State Department to return U.S. servicemember remains 
        from North Korea and elsewhere;
           The treatment of veterans, including 
        oversight of how the Defense Department and VA address 
        suicides by active-duty, reservists, and veterans; and
           Federal acquisition policy related to 
        national security.
    The Subcommittee will conduct oversight of the Department 
of Defense, Department of State, Department of Homeland 
Security, Department of Veterans Affairs, Intelligence 
Community, U.S. Mission to the United Nations, U.S. Agency for 
International Development, and other entities within its 
jurisdiction.

                 Subcommittee on Government Operations

    The Subcommittee on Government Operations intends to 
conduct robust oversight of many aspects of the Executive 
Branch, including but not limited to:
           Federal information technology and 
        cybersecurity policy, including compliance with the 
        requirements of the Federal Information Technology 
        Acquisition Reform Act and the Federal Information 
        Security Management Act;
           Agency compliance with and enforcement of 
        federal labor law;
           The transparency of the Administration's 
        reorganization plans and their effects on the missions 
        of federal agencies;
           Protections for whistleblowers and the 
        performance of the Merit Systems Protection Board and 
        the Office of Special Counsel;
           The financial management and reform of the 
        U.S. Postal Service;
           The safety, infrastructure, finances and 
        performance of the Washington Metropolitan Area Transit 
        Authority;
           Intergovernmental affairs, including state 
        and local governments; and
           The management and procurement of federal 
        property.
    The Subcommittee will conduct oversight of the Office of 
Personnel Management, the Office of Management and Budget, the 
General Services Administration, and other entities within its 
jurisdiction.

              Subcommittee on Economic and Consumer Policy

    The Subcommittee on Economic and Consumer Policy intends to 
conduct robust oversight of the role that public policy plays 
in the lives of the American people, including but not limited 
to:
           Free market and commerce regulations that 
        impact Americans' safety and well-being;
           The causes of income inequality and the 
        policies required to promote the growth and prosperity 
        of the middle class;
           Consumer protection in the areas of finance, 
        education, housing, and telecommunications, among 
        others;
           The economic and social impact of federal 
        policies relating to labor, intellectual property, 
        taxes, trade, small business and investor protections;
           Cybersecurity and digital privacy in the 
        private sector; and
           Federal acquisition policy unrelated to 
        national security and information technology.
    The Subcommittee will conduct oversight of the Department 
of the Treasury, Department of Education, Small Business 
Administration, Department of Labor, Consumer Financial 
Protection Bureau, Department of Health and Human Services, and 
other entities within its jurisdiction.

                      Subcommittee on Environment

    The Subcommittee on Environment intends to conduct robust 
oversight of our nation's environmental protection policies, 
with a focus on climate change and its growing threat to our 
society, actions to promote the development of sustainable 
energy, and market conditions to promote robust competition in 
the energy sector, including but not limited to:
           Regulatory reform efforts by federal 
        agencies and their impacts;
           Examining current challenges and potential 
        solutions regarding the storage of nuclear waste;
           Examining the federal government's 
        preparation for, and response to, natural disasters, 
        particularly as it relates to federal agencies serving 
        all citizens in U.S. jurisdictions;
           Requiring transparency in the Executive 
        Branch in relation to its actions and policy-making 
        processes;
           Examining the Executive Branch's 
        effectiveness in addressing climate change and its 
        impacts;
           Exploring the Executive Branch's role in 
        global climate change mitigation efforts and examining 
        the decision-making processes related to international 
        agreements;
           Examining the practices of the private 
        sector in addressing the anthropogenic causes of 
        climate change as well as mitigating its current and 
        future effects;
           Examining the public health implications of 
        government actions and policies; and
           Exploring opportunities for government 
        agencies and the private sector to develop alternative 
        energy sources.
    The Subcommittee will conduct oversight of the 
Environmental Protection Agency, Department of the Interior, 
Department of Energy, and other entities within its 
jurisdiction.

            Subcommittee on Civil Rights and Civil Liberties

    The Subcommittee on Civil Rights and Civil Liberties 
intends to conduct robust oversight of the enforcement of civil 
rights and civil liberties, including but not limited to:
           Recent efforts to suppress voting;
           The status of freedom of religion, speech, 
        press, and assembly;
           The status of Equal Protection and respect 
        for equal rights throughout government and society;
           Respect for due process in the immigration 
        system and the treatment of undocumented immigrants and 
        refugee asylum seekers and their families;
           The enforcement of laws ensuring equal 
        employment and the use of non-disclosure agreements in 
        employment and other contexts;
           Criminal justice reform policies; and
           The Census.
    The Subcommittee will conduct oversight of the Census 
Bureau, Department of Justice, Equal Employment Opportunity 
Commission, federal and state voting authorities, and other 
entities within its jurisdiction.

                            REPUBLICAN VIEWS

                   Committee on Oversight and Reform

                     U.S. House of Representatives

                     116th Congress Oversight Plan

    The Republican Members of the House Committee on Oversight 
and Reform intend to conduct objective, fact-based oversight of 
the Executive Branch. The Members will continue to work closely 
with the Government Accountability Office, the community of 
Inspectors General (IG), good-government groups, 
whistleblowers, and others to improve the efficiency and 
transparency of the federal government. While the Democrat 
majority seems intent on investigating the Trump Administration 
for partisan gain, the Republican Members will conduct 
responsible oversight to make the federal government more 
effective and more accountable to the American people.

                      DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE ABUSES

    The Republican Members will continue their oversight into 
wrongdoing at the Department of Justice (DOJ) and Federal 
Bureau of Investigation (FBI). In the 115th Congress, the 
Committee began a wide-ranging investigation into actions taken 
by the DOJ and FBI in 2016 and 2017. The Members will continue 
to examine the conduct of the DOJ and FBI personnel in 
departing from the norms of impartial justice and fairness, the 
political bias of DOJ and FBI personnel, departures from 
traditional investigative and prosecutorial practices, and 
insufficient adherence to the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance 
Act.
    In addition, the Republican Members will examine reports 
that Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein discussed removing 
the President from power and recording his conversations with 
the President. The Members will seek Deputy Attorney General 
Rosenstein's testimony about these allegations at a public 
hearing.

                    OBAMACARE AND HEALTH CARE REFORM

    The Republican Members will continue to examine the 
consequences of Obamacare to America's healthcare system. The 
Members will seek to bringing transparency to the federal 
government's increased role in health care markets, with an 
emphasis on assessing Obamacare's effect on consumer choice and 
insurance premiums.
    The Members will continue to examine efforts by the Centers 
for Medicare and Medicaid Services to reduce waste, fraud, and 
abuse in the Medicaid program. The GAO has consistently 
classified Medicaid as a ``high risk'' program due to its 
increasing size and expense, stressing the need for enhanced 
oversight and data quality. The Members will also assess the 
incentives created by the Affordable Care Act's Medicaid 
expansion for states to obtain more federal funding by 
artificially changing their state share.
    The Republican Members will also examine the opioid crisis, 
its effects on states and localities, and how the federal 
government can best assist state and local jurisdictions. The 
Members will review the ongoing multi-district opioid 
litigation, in which trial lawyers are aggressively targeting 
pharmaceutical companies in the hopes of a multi-billion-dollar 
settlement.
    The Republican Members will also conduct oversight of the 
Food and Drug Administration's implementation of Right to Try 
and its enforcement actions relating to e-cigarettes.

              BORDER SECURITY AND IMMIGRATION ENFORCEMENT

    The Republican Members will continue to oversee the 
Executive Branch's enforcement of border security and 
immigration laws. The Southern border should be secured, and 
the issues of illegal entry and crime should be addressed. The 
Members will assess the laws, regulations, and policies that 
incentivize caravans of migrants from Central America to make 
the long and dangerous journey to our Southern Border. The 
Members will examine how violent transnational criminal 
organizations exploit loopholes in our immigration laws for 
drug smuggling and human trafficking. Finally, the Republican 
Members will conduct oversight of the 1997 Flores Settlement 
Agreement.

              FREEDOM OF SPEECH AND FREEDOM OF ASSOCIATION

    The Republican Members will continue to conduct oversight 
of attempts to restrict Americans' freedoms of speech and 
assembly by compelling the disclosure of the organizations to 
which they donate. In NAACP v. Alabama the Supreme Court 
explained that ``[i]nviolability of privacy in group 
association may in many circumstances be indispensable to 
preservation of freedom of association'' and that there is ``a 
vital relationship between freedom to associate and privacy in 
one's associations.''\16\ The Members will continue their 
oversight of the Internal Revenue Service's efforts to 
eliminate the proactive collection of sensitive donor 
information.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    \16\NAACP v. Alabama, 357 U.S. 449, 462 (1958).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    The Republican Members will also continue to conduct 
oversight of allegations that social media companies reduced 
the visibility of conservative social media accounts, 
effectively silencing those individuals' right to free speech.

                           REGULATORY REFORM

    The Republican Members will continue to examine the effect 
of burdensome regulations on small businesses and job creators. 
According to one analysis, the growth of regulation since 1980 
had resulted in a loss of $4 trillion in potential gross 
domestic product for 2012.\17\ The Members will assess the 
effects of the Trump Administration's attempts to eliminate 
overly burdensome, outdated, or duplicative regulations. The 
Members will also evaluate rulemakings to ensure that they do 
not exceed their statutory authority and adhere to the 
requirements specified in federal law. The Members will examine 
rulemaking practices that do not adhere to typical rulemaking 
requirements, such as the issuance of guidance documents, 
interim final rulemakings, and settlement agreements.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    \17\Bentley Coffey, Patrick A. McLaughlin, and Pietro Peretto, 
Mercatus Center, George Mason University, The Cumulative Cost of 
Regulations 8 (2016), available at https://www.mercatus.org/system/
files/Coffey-Cumulative-Cost-Regs-v3.pdf.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

             AN EFFECTIVE AND ACCOUNTABLE FEDERAL WORKFORCE

    The Republican Members will continue to encourage a federal 
workforce that is efficient, effective, and accountable to the 
American taxpayers. The Members will assess the 
Administration's efforts to make federal workers more 
accountable for poor performance or misconduct, including 
sexual misconduct. The Members will assess the use of taxpayer-
funded official time by federal workers, some of whom perform 
exclusively union business during work hours.
    In addition, the Members will support the work of the 
Office of Special Counsel and will examine findings of systemic 
Hatch Act violations in the United States Postal Service. The 
Members will support the work of the IG community, and strive 
that IGs have the resources they need to carry out their duties 
responsibly.

                         2020 DECENNIAL CENSUS

    The cost of the decennial census is rising--the total cost 
for the 2000 census was $9.4 billion; the total cost for the 
2010 census was $12.3 billion. The Census Bureau estimates a 
cost of more than $15 billion for the 2020 Census.\18\ The 
Republican Members will continue to monitor the development of 
the Census.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    \18\2020 Census Life-cycle Cost Estimate (Dec. 21, 2017).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

                               EDUCATION

    The Republican Members will support oversight to improve 
educational opportunities for all Americans. For example, the 
D.C. Opportunity Scholarship Program is a successful program 
that is making a meaningful difference in the lives of D.C. 
families. The Members will examine school choice in the 
District of Columbia and its potential to improve educational 
opportunities for students nationwide.

                             CYBERSECURITY

    The Republican Members will continue to examine 
implementation of federal laws to enhance cybersecurity at 
federal agencies, including the Federal Information Management 
Act of 2002 and the Federal Cybersecurity Enhancement Act of 
2015. The Members will focus on the state of cybersecurity 
practices at federal agencies, as well as federal agencies' 
policies and regulations affecting cybersecurity technology.

              COMMITTEE ON SCIENCE, SPACE, AND TECHNOLOGY

                     116th Congress Oversight Plan

                     U.S. House of Representatives

                     One Hundred Sixteenth Congress

                    Chairwoman Eddie Bernice Johnson

                           February 21, 2019

                 OVERSIGHT AUTHORITY & OVERSIGHT THEMES

    The Committee on Science, Space, and Technology was first 
established as the Committee on Science and Astronautics on 
July 21, 1958 in a direct response to the Soviet Union's 1957 
launch of Sputnik 1, the world's first satellite. The Science 
Committee was created to help the United States foster 
innovation and stay globally competitive in the science and 
technology domains. House Rule X, clause 1 (p) sets forth the 
legislative jurisdiction of the Committee. However, Rule X, 
clause 3 (k) grants the Committee ``special oversight 
functions'' that stretches beyond its legislative jurisdiction. 
As this clause sets out: ``The Committee on Science, Space, and 
Technology shall review and study on a continuing basis laws, 
programs, and Government activities relating to nonmilitary 
research and development.''\19\ This provides the Committee 
with wide-ranging oversight authority over science and 
technology issues throughout the government.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    \19\House Rule X, clause 3, (k)--attached as Appendix A.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Each of the Committee's five subcommittees, as well as the 
full Committee, engage in oversight work as authorized by House 
rules. These five subcommittees include the Subcommittee on 
Energy, Subcommittee on Environment, Subcommittee on Research 
and Technology, Subcommittee on Space and Aeronautics, and the 
Subcommittee on Investigations and Oversight. Because of its 
far-reaching oversight authority the Committee intends to 
investigate a wide-array of issues highlighted by Subcommittees 
listed below. Many of these topics may be investigated by one 
or more of the Committee's subcommittees or by the full 
Committee. Although each subcommittee engages in oversight 
efforts, many of the Committee's investigations are carried out 
by, or in coordination with, the Investigations & Oversight 
(I&O) Subcommittee.
    New, unforeseen issues often emerge that drive 
Congressional investigations not previously planned or 
anticipated. The emergence of new oversight related issues may 
impact the Committee's oversight agenda. However, thematically 
there are several general lines of inquiry that the Committee 
intends to focus its oversight resources on during the 116th 
Congress.
           Scientific Integrity: Ensure federal 
        science activities, including environmental and climate 
        sciences, are free from political or industry 
        interference and undue influence.
           Public Accountability: Hold public 
        officials accountable for proper, effective, and valid 
        program management.
           Safety & Security: Consistently review 
        science and technology activities that can have an 
        impact on the safety and security of the American 
        public and the nation.
           Emerging Technology: Examine potential 
        safety, security, privacy, and other potential 
        consequences of emerging technologies.

               SUBCOMMITTEE ON INVESTIGATIONS & OVERSIGHT

    Whistleblowers. The Committee maintains an open door policy 
for any whistleblower who would like to alert Congress to 
issues of waste, fraud, abuse, or mismanagement at agencies 
under the Committee's jurisdiction or within other activities 
within the Committee's broad oversight authority. The Committee 
takes confidentiality issues seriously and will help to protect 
the identity of any individual who approaches the Committee 
with issues of concern.
    GAO & OIGs. The Committee will coordinate with the 
Government Accountability Office (GAO) and the various Offices 
of Inspectors General (OIGs) within agencies under the 
Committee's legislative jurisdiction to ensure Departments, 
programs, and agencies are being transparent and implementing 
GAO and OIG recommendations. The Committee will also utilize 
the resources of the GAO and IG community to steer them towards 
oversight issues of concern to the Committee. In addition, the 
Committee will ensure the IG offices within the agencies under 
the Committee's jurisdiction are being managed appropriately 
and effectively.
    Cybersecurity. The Committee will continue its work to help 
ensure federal agencies are complying with adequate 
cybersecurity standards across the government. The Committee 
will also investigate reported breaches of government and 
private sector computer systems when they endanger the public's 
privacy, safety, or security. These oversight efforts will 
examine any shortcomings and determine how these might inform 
cybersecurity standards and best practices.
    Voting system design and integrity. A multitude of election 
system vulnerabilities were made clear following the 2016 and 
2018 elections. The diffuse and often outdated voting 
infrastructure within the United States creates many points of 
entry for potential bad actors and the opportunity for 
deficient software or unsecure tools and technology to lead to 
problems in our election infrastructure. This is a critical 
area for enhanced bipartisan oversight and review of the 
cybersecurity standards used by voting system vendors and to 
explore methods to help make our election infrastructure more 
secure, robust, and resilient to potential software defects and 
intentional attack. The I&O Subcommittee will explore these 
issues jointly with the Subcommittee on Research and 
Technology.
    Identifying and mitigating influence operations. The use of 
social media platforms for influence operations against the 
American public has become an area of intense interest. The 
Committee will examine what tools and technologies are being 
developed by the scientific and technical community to help 
identify these threats to mitigate their impact.
    Unauthorized use of private data. The unauthorized use of 
private data for commercial or political purposes is a growing 
concern. The Committee will investigate such cases wherein 
public trust is breached, whether the perpetrator be a 
government or commercial entity and whether the intended use of 
the data is for financial, political, or other purposes. In an 
increasingly digital world, the Committee has a responsibility 
to expose Internet privacy failures and deliberate on potential 
solutions.
    Science integrity issues. The Committee will examine 
scientific integrity issues throughout the federal government, 
including efforts to silence scientists and sideline specific 
scientific activities for political or other purposes whenever 
they occur.
    DHS S&T Directorate. The Committee intends to reassert its 
oversight of the Department of Homeland Security's (DHS's) 
Science & Technology (S&T) Directorate in the 116th Congress. 
The S&T Directorate provides a vital function to help develop 
tools and technologies to keep America safe. The Committee will 
examine the S&T Directorate's programs and activities to ensure 
they are being managed efficiently and effectively.
    Protecting the public's health & safety. The I&O 
Subcommittee will work in coordination with the Environment 
Subcommittee to try to ensure the public is being protected 
from the release of toxic chemicals and will work to ensure 
there is no undue influence over the Environmental Protection 
Agency (EPA) by the industries it is legally mandated to 
regulate.

                         SUBCOMMITTEE ON ENERGY

    ARPA-E. The Committee will review the management of the 
U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Advanced Research Projects 
Agency-Energy (ARPA-E), which the Trump Administration 
unsuccessfully proposed to terminate each of the past two 
years. ARPA-E is tasked with promoting and funding high-risk, 
high-reward research and development of advanced energy 
technologies. The Committee will ensure that the agency is 
being adequately supported and that its core mission is being 
pursued.
    Natural gas pipeline/storage safety. The Committee is 
concerned about the state of natural gas storage sites around 
the country and the sufficiency of state and federal safety 
standards. The Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety 
Administration (PHMSA) appears to lack sufficient resources to 
effectively enforce existing standards. The Committee will 
continue its work with GAO to determine whether current 
standards and resources are sufficient to protect public health 
and safety, the environment, and our nation's energy 
infrastructure.
    Critical infrastructure and electricity grid security. The 
Committee will continue to conduct oversight over the state of 
the nation's critical infrastructure to ensure that 
vulnerabilities to cyberattacks, physical attacks, and natural 
hazards are identified and remedied to the extent possible, and 
to ensure the government has the capability to respond to such 
threats efficiently and effectively.
    Clean energy technologies in general. The Committee will 
examine whether the Department's applied energy technology 
offices are supporting the full range of high value research, 
development, demonstration, and commercial application 
activities that the private sector is unable or unwilling to 
support on its own, rather than attempting to confine the 
Department's support to ill-defined ``early-stage'' or 
``basic'' research areas. The Committee will also evaluate 
potentially transformational clean energy technologies that 
currently receive little to no federal funding.
    DOE Laboratory Complex. The management, upkeep and security 
of the Department's aging facilities remains a continuing 
concern of the Committee. Efforts will continue to assure that 
the Department meets its responsibilities to control risks in 
and around these facilities.
    DOE Loan Programs Office. The Committee will continue to 
provide oversight of the Department of Energy's Loan Programs 
Office, which the Trump Administration unsuccessfully proposed 
to terminate for the past two years, to ensure that the Office 
is diligently carrying out its statutory mission.
    Fusion research. The Committee will provide oversight of 
the Department's fusion energy research activities to ensure 
that direction provided in the Department of Energy Research 
and Innovation Act, P.L. 115-246, is being faithfully executed, 
including the establishment of programs to advance inertial 
fusion for energy applications and to advance other innovative 
fusion energy concepts. In addition, the Committee will oversee 
the U.S. contribution to the ITER international fusion project 
to ensure that the Department is actually providing the 
resources that it has projected are required to minimize the 
project's schedule and total cost.

                      SUBCOMMITTEE ON ENVIRONMENT

    Scientific advisory boards. The Environmental Protection 
Agency's mission to protect human health and the environment is 
dependent upon the integrity of the scientific advice it 
receives from its various advisory committees, including the 
Board of Scientific Counselors, the Clean Air Scientific 
Advisory Committee, and the Scientific Advisory Board. The 
Committee will examine appointments to these entities and any 
proposed restructuring thereof to ensure the Agency is 
utilizing appropriate and sound expertise that is not unduly 
influenced by the industries the EPA is entrusted to oversee in 
its rulemaking.
    Science Integrity Issues. The Committee will continue to 
collect and examine allegations of intimidation of scientists 
in federal agencies or suppression or revisions of scientific 
findings because of political or other pressures.
    Censorship of climate science. The Committee is concerned 
about the scrubbing of references to climate change--including 
information about federally funded climate science and climate 
change programs--from federal agency websites. This hinders the 
ability of the public and of state and local entities to access 
resources that keep them apprised of the state of climate 
science.
    Climate science. The Committee will aggressively track 
emerging issues and scientific studies regarding global warming 
and climate science and eliciting thoughtful science-based 
discussions on potential solutions and remedies to reduce 
Greenhouse Gas Emissions. This includes the role of federally 
funded research and innovative technology demonstration and 
development related to cutting-edge mitigation and adaptation 
strategies.
    Extreme weather hazards. The severity of storms, floods, 
fires, and hurricanes has increased tremendously over the past 
few years leaving a path of death and multi-billion dollar 
destruction in their wake. The Committee will examine various 
issues surrounding these extreme weather events, including the 
science behind these hazards and how climate change has 
increased the frequency and severity of these events, 
improvements to forecasting and warning, and proposed methods 
to reduce their impact.
    IRIS Program Oversight. The Committee will continue its 
long-standing oversight of the EPA's Integrated Risk 
Information System (IRIS). IRIS develops critical toxicological 
assessments of environmental contaminants, providing the 
science that underpins regulations of toxic chemicals. Since a 
2011 National Academies of Sciences (NAS) report on process 
issues at IRIS, the program has come a long way, and has 
received praise from NAS and EPA's Science Advisory Board (SAB) 
on its progress. The Committee is concerned that limited 
resources and political interference are restricting the IRIS 
program's productivity, and that critical assessments are being 
held up.
    Deregulatory actions at EPA. The Trump administration has 
made deregulation a hallmark of its policy agenda across the 
federal government. At EPA, this has resulted in the rollback 
of many critical health-based regulations. The EPA's mandate is 
to protect human health and the environment. The Committee will 
examine whether the agency is following its mission statement 
in deregulating pollutants that by the EPA's own admission is 
endangering the health and safety of the public.
    Earth observations satellite oversight. The Committee will 
continue to review the federal government's development, 
management, and operation of its earth observations satellites 
at both the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration 
(NOAA) and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration 
(NASA). These satellites provide critical data that feed into 
weather forecasting and climate models. The current and future 
planning of the satellite architecture is crucial to ensuring 
continuity of data collection.
    NOAA/NWS workforce issues. The Committee has been concerned 
with workforce issues at NOAA and the National Weather Service 
(NWS), which the GAO is currently investigating. The Committee 
will continue to monitor these issues and work with the GAO to 
ensure workforce issues are handled effectively and efficiently 
in a manner that does not jeopardize the ability of NWS or NOAA 
to perform their crucial life-saving missions.

                 SUBCOMMITTEE ON SPACE AND AERONAUTICS

    Access to the International Space Station (ISS). The 
Committee will conduct oversight into NASA's certification 
process with its commercial crew service providers to ensure 
U.S. access to the ISS will continue safely and without a gap, 
as well as NASA's contingency plan should the availability of 
commercial crew services continue to be delayed.
    ISS research priorities. The International Space Station, 
and its crew and facilities, are precious and limited resources 
and must be treated as such. The Committee will conduct 
oversight of the use of the ISS and the prioritization of ISS 
resources to meet and enable key objectives.
    Oversight of NASA's flagship missions. The Committee will 
oversee the management of major flagship science mission 
development projects, including the James Webb Space Telescope, 
the Wide-field Infrared Survey Telescope, Mars2020, and the 
Europa Clipper spacecraft.
    NASA Earth Science programs. NASA's Earth science programs 
offer valuable insights into Earth systems, climate change, 
severe weather, land change, and more. The Committee will 
conduct oversight of NASA's Earth science program and its plans 
for meeting the priorities set forth in the National Academies' 
Earth science decadal survey.
    Human spaceflight schedule pressure. Following the Space 
Shuttle Challenger accident, it became clear that launch 
pressure can lead to catastrophic consequences. In all 
expeditions, but particularly human space flight, oversight 
must be conducted to ensure that safety remains the priority 
and that schedule pressures do not influence decisions that 
have implications for the overall safety of human spaceflight 
systems and operations.
    Lunar Campaign. The beginning of this administration 
ushered in a pivot back to lunar expeditions. Proposed lunar 
missions could ostensibly contribute to the mission of getting 
humans to Mars. However, without clear objectives as part of a 
human exploration roadmap, significant investments in a lunar 
campaign could delay the U.S.'s ability to send humans to the 
surface of Mars by the 2030s. The Committee will examine 
proposed lunar missions and how they would contribute toward 
the ultimate goal of a human mission to Mars.
    Civil Aeronautics Research and Development. The Committee 
will carry out oversight research and development activities at 
the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) and NASA's 
aeronautics research, including the next generation air 
transportation system (NextGen), the integration of unmanned 
aviation systems into the national airspace system, research 
related to the safety of civil aviation and aeronautics, and 
efforts to mitigate the environmental impacts of civil 
aviation.
    FAA Commercial Space Transportation. FAA's Office of 
Commercial Space Transportation (AST) licenses commercial 
launch and reentry vehicles. In addition to its oversight of 
the FAA's AST, the Committee will examine the growing 
commercial launch industry, including the emerging commercial 
human space flight industry as well as the challenges facing 
it.

                 SUBCOMMITTEE ON RESEARCH & TECHNOLOGY

    Sexual harassment in the sciences. The nation is reckoning 
with the pervasiveness of sexual harassment and its impact on 
the lives and careers of women. The academic workplace has the 
second-highest rate of sexual harassment. This drives talented 
scientists out of the field, as perpetrators continue to hold 
high-status positions and receive federal grant money. The 
Committee will continue its bipartisan oversight of federal 
science agencies to ensure they have clear policies and are 
handling reports of sexual harassment effectively and 
efficiently.
    Academic espionage. The Committee will continue to conduct 
bipartisan oversight into the coordination and collaboration 
between law enforcement, the intelligence community, and 
institutions of higher education regarding the exfiltration of 
sensitive, often government-funded research by nontraditional 
collectors. Following the February 2018 disbandment of the 
Federal Bureau of Investigation's (FBI's) National Security 
Higher Education Advisory Board (NSHEAB), no formal body exists 
to facilitate the communication of security risks and best 
practices to the higher education community. The Committee is 
interested in protecting the research that makes the United 
States a global science leader while respecting the 
international collaboration inherent to the research enterprise 
that often helps foster U.S. innovation.
    STEM Education. The Committee will continue to review 
Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) 
education related subjects, particularly the need to increase 
the diversity of individuals who have access to STEM education. 
The Committee will examine the effectiveness of federal 
programs in improving the recruitment and retention of a 
diverse pool of individuals pursuing STEM-related degrees and 
careers.
    Arctic Research. The Committee will examine the scientific 
issues related to the warming of the Arctic and the 
environmental, social, public health, and safety and security 
implications that represents for the United States and the 
world.
    Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP). The Science 
Committee has been deeply concerned that the Trump 
Administration went without a Director of OSTP for two years. 
The Committee will ensure that OSTP is being managed 
effectively and is fulfilling its statutorily mandated 
responsibilities.
    Emerging technologies. The Committee will examine emerging 
technologies, including autonomous vehicles, artificial 
intelligence (AI), commercial use of facial recognition 
technologies, deep fakes, medical devices, and gene editing. 
Each of these technologies has had high-profile media coverage 
of significant failures, misapplications, or other 
implementation issues that should be investigated as the 
technologies evolve faster than the technical and cybersecurity 
standards or policy can keep up. Emerging technologies may 
affect the safety, security and privacy of all Americans and 
individuals around the world. The Committee intends to examine 
the potential unintended social, public health, economic, 
security, and other consequences of emerging technologies.

                               Appendix A

                              HOUSE RULE X

                       ORGANIZATION OF COMMITTEES

Committees and their legislative jurisdictions
     1. There shall be in the House the following standing 
committees, each of which shall have the jurisdiction and 
related functions assigned by this clause and clauses 2, 3, and 
4. All bills, resolutions, and other matters relating to 
subjects within the jurisdiction of the standing committees 
listed in this clause shall be referred to those committees, in 
accordance with clause 2 of rule XII, as follows:
    (p) Committee on Science, Space, and Technology.
    (1) All energy research, development, and demonstration, 
and projects therefor, and all federally owned or operated 
nonmilitary energy laboratories.
    (2) Astronautical research and development, including 
resources, personnel, equipment, and facilities.
    (3) Civil aviation research and development.
    (4) Environmental research and development.
    (5) Marine research.
    (6) Commercial application of energy technology.
    (7) National Institute of Standards and Technology, 
standardization of weights and measures, and the metric system.
    (8) National Aeronautics and Space Administration.
    (9) National Space Council.
    (10) National Science Foundation.
    (11) National Weather Service.
    (12) Outer space, including exploration and control 
thereof.
    (13) Science scholarships.
    (14) Scientific research, development, and demonstration, 
and projects therefor.
Special oversight functions
    3(k) The Committee on Science, Space, and Technology shall 
review and study on a continuing basis laws, programs, and 
Government activities relating to nonmilitary research and 
development.

                      COMMITTEE ON SMALL BUSINESS

 Oversight Plan of the Committee on Small Business for the One Hundred 
                           Sixteenth Congress

    Ms. Velazquez, from the Committee on Small Business, 
submitted to the Committee on Oversight and Reform and the 
Committee on House Administration the following

                                 REPORT

    Rule X, cl. 2(d)(1) of the Rules of the House requires each 
standing Committee to adopt an oversight plan for the two-year 
period of the Congress and to submit the plan to the Committees 
on Oversight and Reform and House Administration not later than 
March 1 of the first session of the Congress. Under Rule X, the 
Committee has oversight authority to investigate and examine 
any matter affecting small business. This Report reflects that 
broad oversight jurisdiction.

              OVERSIGHT OF FEDERAL CAPITAL ACCESS PROGRAMS

    The Committee will conduct hearings and investigations into 
Small Business Administration (SBA) and other federal agencies 
that provide capital to America's entrepreneurs that may 
include any or all of the following, as well as matters brought 
to the attention of the Committee subsequent to the filing of 
this Report:
           Effectiveness of the capital access programs 
        to generate jobs in the fastest growing small 
        businesses.
           Whether lenders are meeting their goals to 
        lend to small businesses and create jobs.
           Adequacy of SBA oversight of its lending 
        partners to ensure that federal taxpayers are properly 
        protected.
           Capabilities of the SBA information 
        technology to manage the loan portfolio.
           Whether SBA rules, regulations, and guidance 
        result in transparent and reasoned decision making with 
        respect to capital access programs.
           Assessment of credit-scoring algorithms as a 
        replacement for individual credit assessment by SBA and 
        its lending partners.
           The exercise of discretion by SBA to create 
        pilot programs and the risk they pose to the taxpayer 
        and whether such authority should be curtailed or 
        eliminated.
           Whether SBA disaster loan program and its 
        oversight ensures that small businesses are able to 
        revive and rebuild communities.
           Review the recent change by SBA for fee 
        waivers and the impact moving from a dollar limitation 
        to a geographic determination will have on small 
        businesses.
           Efficacy and duplication of federal capital 
        access programs offered by the Department of 
        Agriculture to small businesses in rural areas.
           Utilization by small businesses of export 
        capital programs at the Export-Import Bank and the 
        Overseas Private Investment Corporation.
           Study the need to enhance the 7(a) and 
        Certified Development Company programs so that they are 
        more effective in reaching borrowers unable to secure 
        conventional loans.
           Analyze the Microloan program with the 
        intent of making it more affordable for borrowers and 
        reducing barriers to its growth.
           Examine methods to enhance equity financing 
        to meet the needs of small business borrowers wherein 
        debt financing is not appropriate and how SBA programs 
        may be used to increase equity financing.
           Continued examination of the Small Business 
        Lending Fund and State Small Business Credit Initiative 
        established by Pub. L. No. 111-240, the Small Business 
        Jobs Act of 2010, in creating jobs and providing 
        capital to small businesses.
           Implementation of crowdfunding and other 
        provisions of the Jumpstart Our Business Startups Act, 
        Pub. L. No. 112-106.
           Continued oversight and analysis of the role 
        that the SBA secondary market plays in small business 
        finance and the effectiveness of changes made by SBA to 
        the pooling program established in the Federal Register 
        Notice of October 16, 2017.
           Review and oversight into the Master Reserve 
        Fund at SBA.
           Implementation of program clarifications 
        made to encourage more cooperative and employee stock 
        ownership plan lending through SBA programs established 
        by the Main Street Employee Ownership Act of 2018, 
        passed into law by the John S. McCain National Defense 
        Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2019, Pub. L. No. 
        115-232.
           Implementation of changes made to increase 
        oversight of the 7(a) loan program established by Pub. 
        L. No. 115-189, the Small Business 7(a) Lending 
        Oversight Reform Act of 2018.
           Examination of the Express Bridge Loan Pilot 
        Program for disaster recovery lending for small 
        businesses and its performance after recent disasters, 
        such as Hurricanes Harvey, Irma, and Maria and numerous 
        wildfires.
           Investigate franchising contracts to learn 
        how SBA loans are being utilized, default rates, and 
        whether small business owners are being harmed in case 
        improvements in the SBA franchise directory can be 
        made.
           The effectiveness of SBA in minimizing risk 
        to the taxpayer in the SBA capital access programs.
    In performing oversight, the Committee will focus on 
particularly risky aspects of financial assistance programs 
including, but not limited to, commercial real estate 
refinancing, premier certified lenders, participating security 
small business investment companies, small business lending 
companies, express lenders, and loan programs utilizing 
simplified lending applications.

OVERSIGHT OF SBA AND OTHER FEDERAL ENTREPRENEURIAL DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMS

    The Committee will conduct hearings and investigations into 
the SBA programs that provide training and advice to small 
businesses that may include any or all of the following, as 
well as matters brought to the attention of the Committee 
subsequent to the filing of this Report:
           Examining effectiveness of SBA 
        entrepreneurial development programs in creating jobs 
        at startups and traditional firms.
           Suggesting methods for enhancing 
        coordination among federal agencies in aiding 
        entrepreneurs, including, but not limited to, 
        businesses located in underserved areas, such as rural 
        and low-income communities and those seeking to provide 
        goods and services in the federal procurement 
        marketplace.
           Enhancing the efficacy and utilization of 
        the Manufacturing Extension Partnership at the 
        Department of Commerce, including developments in 
        renewable energy.

          OVERSIGHT OF FEDERAL GOVERNMENT CONTRACTING MATTERS

    The Committee will conduct hearings and investigations into 
the federal procurement system that may include any or all of 
the following, as well as matters brought to the attention of 
the Committee subsequent to the filing of this Report:
           Whether fraud or other problems exist in the 
        federal government contracting programs overseen by the 
        SBA including the 8(a), HUBZone, service-disabled 
        veteran, women-owned contracting, and Small Business 
        Innovation Research programs.
           Effectiveness of SBA contracting programs to 
        increase participation by small businesses in federal 
        procurement.
           Effectiveness of federal agency protections 
        against contract bundling and consolidation.
           The accuracy and utility of SBA size 
        standards and federal procurement databases.
           Operation and effectiveness of federal 
        agency assistance provided to small businesses 
        interested in federal procurement, including that 
        provided by the SBA, Offices of Small and Disadvantaged 
        Business Utilization and Procurement Technical 
        Assistance Centers.
           Development of federal acquisition policies 
        and whether small businesses have sufficiently 
        effective voice in development of such policies.
           Cost-effectiveness of outsourcing government 
        work to private enterprise rather than expanding the 
        government to do provide the good or service internally 
        (i.e., government insourcing).
           Implementation and efficacy of changes made 
        in small business federal procurement programs arising 
        from the enactment of the National Defense 
        Authorization Acts for FYs 2012-2019.
           Examination of the Small Business Innovation 
        Research Program as modified by the National Defense 
        Authorization Act for FY 2012, Pub. L. No. 112-81, 
        including, but not limited to, increased efforts at 
        commercializing federally-funded technology.
           Implementation and efficacy of changes made 
        to the Small Business Innovation Research Program 
        arising from the enactment of the John S. McCain 
        National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 
        2019, Pub.L. No. 115-232.
           Implementation and efficacy of changes made 
        to the HUBZone program arising from the enactment of 
        the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 
        2018, Pub.L. No. 115-91.
    In performing oversight, the Committee will focus its 
efforts on uncovering abuse and misuse of the small business 
designation to obtain federal government contracts.

                      OVERSIGHT OF SBA MANAGEMENT

    The Committee will conduct the hearings and investigations 
into the management of the SBA that may include any or all of 
the following, as well as matters brought to the attention of 
the Committee subsequent to the filing of this Report:
           The appropriate mission of the SBA.
           Whether agency employees in the field are 
        empowered to assist small businesses.
           Duplication of offices and missions at SBA 
        headquarters.
           Effectiveness of personnel management to 
        ensure that employees are rewarded for assisting small 
        businesses.
           Capabilities of SBA employees to provide 
        proper assistance to small business owners.
           Review the agency's cooperative agreements, 
        partnerships and co-sponsorships.
           Continue to assess the adequacy of the 
        agency's budgetary requests, financial management, and 
        reporting goals.
           Agency personnel capabilities to properly 
        manage loan defaults to maximize recovery of 
        collateral.
           Whether SBA improperly utilizes statutory 
        authority to create untested initiatives and the 
        procedures by which the agency develops such programs.
    In carrying out this oversight, the Committee will focus 
particularly on streamlining and reorganizing of the agency's 
operations to provide maximum assistance to small business 
owners. Offices that primarily provide assistance or advice to 
headquarters staff that do not promote the interests of small 
businesses or protect the federal government as a guarantor of 
loans will be recommended for cuts or elimination.

         OVERSIGHT OF FEDERAL REGULATORY AND PAPERWORK BURDENS

    The Committee will conduct hearings and investigations into 
burdensome federal rules, reporting and recordkeeping 
requirements affecting small businesses that may include any or 
all of the following, as well as matters brought to the 
attention of the Committee subsequent to the filing of this 
Report:
           Identify specific rules and regulations 
        already issued or at the proposed rule stage to assess 
        the impact on small businesses.
           Examine agency compliance with the 
        Regulatory Flexibility Act and Paperwork Reduction Act.
           Oversee, to the extent relevant, the work of 
        the Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs at the 
        Office of Management and Budget and the Chief Counsel 
        for Advocacy at the Small Business Administration to 
        ensure that they are fulfilling their mission to 
        advocate vigorously on behalf of America's small 
        business owners in regulatory matters at federal 
        agencies.
           Identify regulations that impose unnecessary 
        barriers to competitive market entry by small 
        businesses and place small businesses at a competitive 
        disadvantage with respect to larger competitors.
           Identify regulations that fail to minimize 
        recordkeeping and reporting requirements, including the 
        elimination of duplicative requirements as required by 
        the Paperwork Reduction Act.
           Assess whether small businesses are provided 
        sufficient compliance assistance, including small 
        entity compliance guides issued by agencies as mandated 
        by the Small Business Regulatory Enforcement Fairness 
        Act.
           Evaluate the need to amend and further 
        strengthen the Regulatory Flexibility Act and the 
        Paperwork Reduction Act to improve agency compliance 
        with the laws and ensure that small businesses are not 
        unnecessarily burdened by regulations.

                    OVERSIGHT OF FEDERAL TAX POLICY

    The Committee will conduct hearings and investigations into 
the federal tax code, its impact on small business, and 
Internal Revenue Service's (IRS) collection of taxes that may 
include any or all of the following, as well as matters brought 
to the attention of the Committee subsequent to the filing of 
this Report:
           Identification of tax code provisions and 
        proposed rules that hinder the ability of small 
        businesses to create jobs and recommendations for 
        modifying those provisions to boost small business job 
        growth.
           Examination of the structure of the tax code 
        in order to simplify compliance for small businesses.
           Assessment of the recordkeeping and 
        reporting requirements associated with tax compliance 
        and suggestions for reducing such burdens on small 
        businesses.
           Impact of the tax reform law, Pub. L. No. 
        115-97, on small business tax liabilities and 
        compliance and its harm to economic growth and job 
        creation.
           Efficiencies at the IRS that improve the 
        interaction between the government and small business 
        owners.
           Inefficiencies at the IRS that force small 
        businesses to divert capital from job growth to tax 
        compliance.
           Investigate incentives that may be used to 
        support the growth of the micro-entrepreneur.
           Analyze tax code restructuring to enhance 
        the ability of small businesses to offer retirement 
        benefits through lowering their costs.

                    OVERSIGHT OF HEALTH CARE POLICY

    The Committee will conduct hearings and investigations into 
federal health care policy (such as Medicare and Medicaid), as 
well as matters brought to the attention of the Committee 
subsequent to the filing of this Report:
           The availability of health insurance in the 
        federal marketplaces established by the Patient 
        Protection and Affordable Care Act.
           Implementation and efficacy of changes made 
        to health care policy through various laws enacted 
        throughout the 115th Congress, including but not 
        limited to the tax reform law, Pub. L. No. 115-97.
           The impact of the Patient Protection and 
        Affordable Care Act, Medicare and Medicaid on the 
        ability of physicians, pharmacists, and allied health 
        care providers to offer the best care possible to 
        patients.
           Examination of increases in efficiencies 
        that will improve the provision of health care while 
        reducing costs to small businesses that offer their 
        workers' health insurance.

                       OVERSIGHT OF ENERGY POLICY

    The Committee will conduct hearings and investigations into 
energy policy to reduce the cost of energy and increase 
renewable energy that may include any or all of the following, 
as well as matters brought to the attention of the Committee 
subsequent to the filing of this Report:
           Innovations developed by small businesses 
        that create greater reliance on renewable energy.
           Federal regulatory policies that increase 
        dependence on renewable energy and decrease energy 
        costs.
           Policies needed to incentivize production of 
        renewable energy in the United States.
           Examination of commercialization of research 
        in renewable energy.
           Federal regulations or policies that affect 
        energy costs for small businesses.
           Investigate methods to increase energy 
        efficiency and improve resource conservation practices 
        for small businesses.
           Federal initiatives to streamline business 
        operations and reduce energy costs for small firms.
    The primary thrust of the Committee's efforts will focus on 
efforts to use the innovation of America's entrepreneurs to 
fuel the drive for greater energy independence, including the 
development of renewable energy products.

          OVERSIGHT OF TRADE AND INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY POLICY

    The Committee will conduct hearings and investigations into 
international trade and intellectual property policies of 
America and its trading partners that may include any or all of 
the following, as well as matters brought to the attention of 
the Committee subsequent to the filing of this Report:
           Impact of free trade agreements to increase 
        exports by American small businesses.
           Oversight of SBA's Office of International 
        Trade and the agency's efforts to promote small 
        business exports.
           Examination of the impact of illicit actions 
        by foreign entities on small businesses and whether the 
        federal government is doing enough to protect their 
        interests.
           Whether the federal government is doing 
        enough to protect the intellectual property rights of 
        small businesses by foreign competitors.
           The impact of federal intellectual property 
        policies, particularly patents and copyrights, to 
        protect the innovations of American entrepreneurs.
           Efforts to increase exports by small 
        businesses.
           Whether the United States Trade 
        Representative and Department of Commerce sufficiently 
        protect the interests of small businesses in the 
        negotiation of free trade agreements.
           Whether the United States Trade 
        Representative takes positions at the World Trade 
        Organization that sufficiently promote the interests of 
        American small businesses.
           Measure the performance of federal trade 
        programs, which seek to reduce small firms' costs of 
        expanding into international markets, including those 
        administered by the SBA, Departments of Commerce and 
        Agriculture, the Export-Import Bank, and the Overseas 
        Private Investment Corporation.
           Evaluate the implementation of the National 
        Export Promotion Strategy, particularly its focus on 
        small businesses.
           Examine efforts methods to increase the 
        representation of small business interests in the 
        negotiation of new trade agreements and enforcement of 
        existing agreements and treaties.
           Evaluate the availability and quality of 
        data measuring the contributions to the nation's trade 
        performance by small businesses, including information 
        gathered by the Department of Commerce and the United 
        States Trade Representative.
           Assess current trade duties and tariffs, 
        both domestic and foreign, to evaluate their impact on 
        American small businesses, economic growth, and job 
        creation.
           Conduct analysis on the importance of 
        intellectual property rights to underserved 
        entrepreneurs and how best to increase their 
        representation of such rights.

                    OVERSIGHT OF AGRICULTURE POLICY

    The Committee will conduct hearings and investigations into 
agriculture policies that may include any or all of the 
following, as well as matters brought to the attention of the 
Committee subsequent to the filing of this Report:
           Examine the impact of federal policies on 
        family farms, ranchers, and rural small businesses, 
        including changes made by the 2018 Farm Bill.
           Evaluate the impact of access to capital 
        issues facing rural areas, farmers and agribusinesses.
           Analyze the extent to which SBA programs and 
        United States Department of Agriculture programs 
        overlap and how they can better coordinate to provide 
        better services and streamlines assistance to the 
        agriculture community.
           Oversee federal activities to spur economic 
        development in rural communities.
           Examine ways in which the federal government 
        can enhance the use of next-generation technologies in 
        small agriculture businesses.

             OVERSIGHT OF TECHNOLOGY AND INNOVATION POLICY

    The Committee will conduct hearings and investigations into 
technology and telecommunications policies that may include any 
or all of the following, as well as matters brought to the 
attention of the Committee subsequent to the filing of this 
Report:
           Examine the impact of federal policies on 
        broadband deployment, particularly in underserved 
        areas.
           Investigate the economic benefits of 
        increasing the speed of broadband and proposals for 
        funding the Universal Service Fund.
           Examine the cost and benefits of proposed 
        reforms to the United States patent system and their 
        impact on small innovators.
           Evaluate the need to increase IP education 
        and services to underserved innovators.
           Monitor efforts to assist small businesses 
        in cybersecurity hygiene and evaluate the role the SBA 
        has in the process to collect and disseminate 
        information and educate small businesses.
           Assess the current government-wide 
        initiative to ensure small technology firms have 
        adequate contracting opportunities while also 
        protecting government systems through rigorous 
        cybersecurity requirements.
           Examine ways in which the federal government 
        can enhance the use of next-generation technologies in 
        small agriculture businesses.

             OVERSIGHT OF VETERANS' ENTREPRENEURSHIP POLICY

    The Committee will conduct hearings and investigations into 
veterans' policies that may include any or all of the 
following, as well as matters brought to the attention of the 
Committee subsequent to the filing of this Report:
           Examine how current entrepreneurial and 
        capital assistance programs are accommodating the 
        growing veteran population.
           Review federal actions to assist veteran 
        entrepreneurs and ensure they are consistent with 
        federal small business policy.
           Evaluate the effectiveness of federal 
        programs that seek to improve veterans' access to 
        markets and training by implementing and monitoring 
        enhanced programmatic data collection.
           Assess whether the federal government is 
        sufficiently coordinating activities and allocating 
        resources appropriately with regard to veteran 
        entrepreneurship activities and initiatives.
           Monitor the transition of federal 
        entrepreneurial programs from the Department of 
        Veterans' Affairs to the SBA.

                OVERSIGHT OF LABOR AND WORKFORCE POLICY

    The Committee will conduct hearings and investigations into 
labor and workforce policies that may include any or all of the 
following, as well as matters brought to the attention of the 
Committee subsequent to the filing of this Report:
           Review federal actions to assist employers 
        in workforce training and analyze ways to meet the 
        growing need for more skilled workers.
           Study the effectiveness of efforts to 
        encourage more underserved workers to enter fields 
        where skilled labor is needed.
           Evaluate the role immigration policy plays 
        in assisting small businesses meet their workforce 
        needs and whether the existing visa system should be 
        reformed.
           Investigate policies to encourage more 
        participation in labor market through initiatives that 
        can be offered by small businesses, such as increased 
        minimum wages, paid sick leave, paid parental leave, 
        and flexible work arrangements.
           Study the role student loan debt plays in 
        entrepreneurship and methods to address the crisis.

             COMMITTEE ON TRANSPORTATION AND INFRASTRUCTURE

                             OVERSIGHT PLAN

     COMMITTEE ON TRANSPORTATION AND INFRASTRUCTURE 116th CONGRESS

    In accordance with Rule X of the House of Representatives, 
the Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure is 
responsible for determining whether laws and programs within 
its jurisdiction are being implemented according to 
Congressional intent and whether they should be continued, 
changed, or eliminated. In the 116th Congress, the Committee 
will review the activities of government agencies and entities 
within its jurisdiction and the public and private interests 
they affect or regulate. As appropriate, the Committee will 
investigate options to improve the overall performance and 
operation of the agencies and entities it oversees, promote 
reform and cost savings, and eliminate fraud, wasteful 
spending, abuse and mismanagement where possible. The Committee 
will also evaluate the administration's yearly budget requests 
with respect to programs and activities within the Committee's 
jurisdiction. In all of its oversight activities, the Committee 
will be guided by reference to the public interest and will 
ensure that the agencies under its jurisdiction remain 
accountable to the people of the United States.
    The oversight and investigation functions are vested at the 
Full Committee level. Oversight and investigation activities 
will be coordinated between the Full Committee and the 
Subcommittees. This structure will facilitate oversight of 
issues that cut across the jurisdiction of several 
Subcommittees. The Committee will continue to exercise its 
oversight duties through its own staff, as well as through work 
performed at the Committee's request by the Government 
Accountability Office (GAO) and the various Inspectors General 
(IG) within their respective agencies and departments. 
Oversight activities will include hearings, briefings, 
correspondence, reports, media releases, and public statements.
    The GAO provides Congress a biennial update on high-risk 
programs, which are Federal programs and operations that the 
GAO considers to be at high risk for waste, fraud, abuse, 
mismanagement, or in need of broad reform. Consistent with the 
Rules of the House of Representatives, the Committee will hold 
hearings on the programs within the Committee's jurisdiction on 
GAO's ``high-risk'' list. The rules also require the Committee 
to hold at least one hearing every 120 days on ``waste, fraud, 
abuse, or mismanagement in Government programs which that 
committee may authorize.'' These hearings will focus on ``the 
most egregious instances of waste, fraud, abuse, or 
mismanagement,'' as documented by any report that the Committee 
has received from an IG or GAO. Finally, the Committee will 
hold hearings if any agency has received disclaimers on its 
agency financial statements.

                        SUBCOMMITTEE ON AVIATION

    1. Implementation of the FAA Reauthorization Act of 2018. 
The FAA Reauthorization Act of 2018 (P.L. 115-254; FAARA) was 
signed into law on October 5, 2018. This Act authorizes funding 
for the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) through fiscal 
year 2023, and contains numerous provisions to enhance aviation 
safety; strengthen consumer protections for airline passengers; 
support U.S. aviation manufacturing; improve airport 
infrastructure; increase and develop the U.S. aviation 
workforce; and advance the safe and efficient integration of 
unmanned aircraft systems (UAS) into the National Airspace 
System, among other things. The Subcommittee will closely 
oversee the efforts of the FAA and the DOT to implement the 
provisions of FAARA.
    2. Implementation of the FAA Extension, Safety, and 
Security Act of 2016. The FAA Extension, Safety, and Security 
Act of 2016 (P.L. 114-190) was signed into law on July 15, 
2016. This short-term extension of FAA programs contained a 
number of safety-critical and time-sensitive reforms, several 
of which the FAA has yet to implement. The Subcommittee will 
continue to closely oversee the FAA's efforts to implement the 
remaining mandates contained in the Act.
    3. Implementation of the FAA Modernization and Reform Act 
of 2012. The FAA Modernization and Reform Act of 2012 (P.L. 
112-95; FMRA) was signed into law on February 14, 2012. This 
Act reformed and revised FAA safety programs, air traffic 
control modernization efforts, and operations of the FAA. The 
Subcommittee will continue to closely oversee the FAA's efforts 
to implement the remaining mandates contained in the FMRA.
    4. Safety Programs. During the last several Congresses, the 
Subcommittee held numerous safety hearings and will continue 
its oversight in the 116th Congress. Maintaining a safe and 
efficient aviation system is critical to the aviation industry, 
passengers, and the U.S. economy, including job creation and 
U.S. competitiveness in the global marketplace. Issues to be 
addressed include: commercial airline safety, general aviation 
safety, repair stations, the FAA's drug and alcohol and medical 
testing programs, key safety agreements, the safe integration 
of UAS and urban air mobility concepts, commercial space 
transportation safety, pilot and controller training, airport 
and runway safety, losses of separation between aircraft, the 
FAA's enforcement and certification activities, the 
transportation of hazardous materials and dangerous goods, and 
the FAA's voluntary reporting and data-sharing and assessment 
programs.
    5. Investment in Aviation Infrastructure. America's 
airports are part of a global aviation system, and as such they 
must remain safe and efficient in order to compete as global 
hubs of air commerce. Over the next five years, the FAA 
estimates a need for $35.1 billion in projects eligible for 
Airport Improvement Program (AIP) grants--an increase of seven 
percent (or $2.4 billion) since the agency's 2016 estimate. 
Congress has authorized $3.35 billion in annual AIP funding 
since fiscal year 2012. The FAARA extended that same 
authorization level through fiscal year 2023, meaning the 
program will not have received additional funding for 12 years. 
AIP grants meet approximately half of the FAA's identified 
airport development needs. The statutorily-authorized passenger 
facility charge (PFC) is a user fee that an airport sponsor, 
subject to FAA-approval, may choose to levy on most enplaned 
passengers. PFCs generated an additional $3.28 billion for 
airport development in 2017. The PFC has been capped at $4.50 
per segment and $18 per round trip since 2000. Given that 
airports have capital needs and debt servicing costs beyond 
those identified by the FAA, airports must supplement their AIP 
grants and PFC receipts through other sources of revenue or 
financing. The Subcommittee will conduct oversight regarding 
airport financing and the FAA's administration of the AIP, and 
will explore legislative options for increasing financial 
investment in U.S. airport infrastructure, including possible 
adjustments to the PFC.
    6. Airline Competition, Financial Position, and Customer 
Service. The aviation marketplace has gone through many 
changes, including a period of consolidation resulting in the 
four largest U.S. carriers representing more than two-thirds of 
the total U.S. domestic market. The Office of the Secretary 
within the DOT is responsible for economic oversight of the 
airline industry, including ensuring that air carriers do not 
engage in unfair and deceptive practices and that certain 
business agreements among air carriers do not result in harmful 
effects. The Subcommittee will continue to examine 
opportunities to improve the airline industry's 
competitiveness, review recently established regulations to 
ensure the aviation system remains safe and accessible to the 
traveling public, and provide oversight of Congressionally-
mandated consumer protections for airline passengers.
    7. U.S. Aviation Workforce. The U.S. aviation industry has 
identified projected workforce shortages and experienced 
difficulties in recruiting the next generation of aviation 
workers, including pilots, flight attendants, maintenance 
technicians, and other aviation professions. To ensure the U.S. 
remains competitive globally, the Subcommittee will monitor the 
levels and anticipated levels of employment in the aviation 
sector and explore ways to encourage or facilitate the 
recruitment, development, maintenance, and diversification of 
the U.S. aviation workforce, while maintaining or improving 
aviation safety.
    8. Oversight of the Commercial Space Industry. The mission 
of the FAA's Office of Commercial Space Transportation is to 
ensure protection of the public, property, and the national 
security and foreign policy interests of the U.S. during 
commercial launch or reentry activities, and to encourage, 
facilitate, and promote U.S. commercial space transportation. 
The Subcommittee will continue to monitor the status and future 
of the U.S. commercial space transportation industry, efforts 
by the National Space Council to streamline and reform current 
commercial space regulations, and the role of the FAA in 
providing safety oversight of the industry.
    9. Evaluation of FAA's NextGen Air Traffic Control 
Modernization. The FAA is working to modernize the air traffic 
control system through implementation of the Next Generation 
Air Transportation System (NextGen). NextGen is intended to 
increase airspace system efficiency; reduce noise exposure, 
emissions, and fuel burn; improve safety; increase accuracy and 
reliability in equipment and software used for navigation and 
air traffic control; and maintain the capacity for future 
technology enhancements. As the FAA works to implement NextGen, 
the Subcommittee will continue to closely monitor and examine 
the FAA's efforts to implement NextGen, including efforts to 
establish performance metrics, meet deadlines, stay within 
budget, ensure an appropriate level of aircraft equipage with 
NextGen avionics, and pursue solutions to identified 
challenges.
    10. Cybersecurity of the National Airspace System. The 
FAA's modernization of air traffic control technology and the 
aviation industry's increasing use of innovative new 
technologies in its aircraft fleet necessitates robust aviation 
cybersecurity efforts. Ensuring the cybersecurity of aviation 
systems is of critical importance to the safety of aircraft. 
The FAA Extension, Safety, and Security Act of 2016 directed 
the FAA to implement a strategic framework for cybersecurity 
and the FAARA requires the FAA to review and assess, and update 
as appropriate, this strategic framework. The Subcommittee will 
continue its oversight of the cybersecurity activities of the 
FAA and other relevant stakeholders to ensure appropriate steps 
are being taken to address cyber-threats, to confirm the FAA's 
strategic framework for cybersecurity is effectively employed, 
and to ensure that the supremacy of the FAA in aviation safety 
matters is maintained.
    11. Oversight of Implementation and Deployment of Counter-
UAS Authority. Congress authorized the Department of Defense 
and Department of Energy to operate counter-UAS equipment to 
detect, interdict, or neutralize UAS that pose a threat to the 
safety or security of certain facilities and assets in the U.S. 
in the National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA) for Fiscal 
Year 2017 (P.L. 114-328) and the NDAA for Fiscal Year 2018 
(P.L. 115-91). The FAARA granted similar authority to the 
Department of Justice, Department of Homeland Security, and 
U.S. Coast Guard to deploy counter-UAS equipment to protect 
critical assets and facilities within the agencies' purview. 
The introduction of systems originally designed for use in 
combat areas into the National Airspace System poses unique 
safety challenges, particularly in complex or crowded airspace. 
The Subcommittee will closely oversee the agencies' 
implementation of their respective counter-UAS authorities to 
ensure close and continued coordination with the FAA to reduce 
impacts on U.S. airspace and to ensure the safety of civil 
aviation.
    12. National Transportation Safety Board. The FAARA also 
authorizes National Transportation Safety Board programs 
through fiscal year 2022. The bill includes, among other 
things, provisions aimed at improving transparency of the 
Board's investigations and enhancing public understanding of 
the Board's safety recommendations. The Subcommittee will 
closely oversee the Board's efforts to implement the provisions 
of the FAARA and evaluate whether the changes to the Board's 
programs and practices achieve their intended objectives.

        SUBCOMMITTEE ON COAST GUARD AND MARITIME TRANSPORTATION

    1. Maritime Budget Oversight. The Subcommittee has broad 
authority over the programs and activities of the U.S. Coast 
Guard codified under titles 14 and 46 United States Code, and 
other statutes. The Frank LoBiondo Coast Guard Authorization 
Act of 2018 (P.L. 115-282) authorized discretionary Coast Guard 
funding levels of $10.06 billion in fiscal year 2018 and $10.64 
billion in fiscal year 2019. For fiscal year 2019, funding for 
the Coast Guard Reserve and the Coast Guard's environmental 
compliance and restoration activities were consolidated within 
the overall operations account to conform to the Department of 
Homeland Security (DHS) budget requirements.
    The Subcommittee also has jurisdiction also over the 
Federal Maritime Commission (FMC) and the non-defense programs 
of the Maritime Administration (MARAD). The FMC is responsible 
for the economic regulation of U.S. waterborne foreign commerce 
and unfair shipping practices. The MARAD oversees several 
programs related to defense readiness, as well as programs 
designed to promote and develop the domestic merchant marine 
and shipbuilding industries. Title VII of P.L. 115-282 
authorized funding for the FMC of $28.01 million in fiscal year 
2018 and $28.54 million in fiscal year 2019. Regarding 
authorized funding for the MARAD, subtitle A of title XXXV of 
the John S. McCain National Defense Authorization Act for 
Fiscal Year 2019 (P.L. 115-232) provided $840.2 million for 
fiscal year 2019 to support all the MARAD's activities, 
including $300 million for the program to recapitalize the 
fleet of state maritime academy training vessels.
    In the 116th Congress, the Subcommittee will hold hearings 
on the President's fiscal year 2020 and 2021 budget requests 
and consider legislation to authorize the Coast Guard for 
fiscal years 2020 and 2021. The Subcommittee will continue its 
efforts to explore options to improve Coast Guard operations, 
to address the estimated $2.6 billion backlog in Coast Guard 
unmet needs for shore side infrastructure and deferred 
maintenance, and make improvements to laws governing maritime 
transportation and the U.S. merchant marine. In addition, the 
Subcommittee will continue to conduct oversight of the 
functions and activities of the FMC and the MARAD, especially 
the FMC's implementation of amendments to the Shipping Act 
contained in title VII of P.L. 115-282, and the MARAD's 
activities to promote job growth in the maritime and 
shipbuilding sectors and expansion in the U.S. flag fleet.
    2. Coast Guard Acquisitions. The Coast Guard is currently 
undergoing a major recapitalization of its oceangoing assets. 
The recapitalization will replace or modernize more than 90 
ships and 200 aircraft used to carry out the Service's missions 
beyond near coastal waters. It will also replace antiquated 
command, control, and communications systems. The program 
continues to face serious challenges related to schedule and 
budget, although recent appropriations bills have provided 
additional resources. The longer these acquisition programs 
drag out, the longer existing legacy assets must remain in 
service. In many cases, these assets are at or well beyond 
their projected service lives and are increasingly more 
difficult and expensive to maintain. The Subcommittee is 
concerned that delays in new asset acquisition, competing 
demands from shore side infrastructure and other Coast Guard 
cutter capital needs--including recapitalization of the 
Service's polar icebreaker fleet, and the cost of legacy asset 
maintenance--threaten the ability of the Service to complete 
this recapitalization and avoid serious gaps in readiness and 
operational capability.
    In the 116th Congress, the Subcommittee will continue to 
review closely the ongoing programs of record, especially the 
status of the $12.1 billion Offshore Patrol Cutter 
acquisition--the most expensive segment. Notably, the 
Subcommittee will examine what, if any, impact the substantial 
damage to facilities at Eastern Shipbuilding caused by 
Hurricane Michael when it made landfall at Panama City, 
Florida, in October 2018, might have on the planned delivery 
schedule of the lead ship. In addition, the Subcommittee will 
consider what changes to these programs may be needed to ensure 
that the men and women of the Coast Guard have the best 
equipment possible at the best value for the taxpayer.
    The Subcommittee will also examine how to meet the Coast 
Guard's operating needs for which no program of record yet 
exists.
    3. Arctic. The U.S. Arctic, as defined in statute, include 
the U.S. Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ) north of the Aleutian 
Islands. Three Arctic seas--the Bering, the Chukchi, and the 
Beaufort--border Alaska. Historically, these seas have been 
frozen and non-navigable for more than half the year. The U.S. 
Arctic contains 568,000 square nautical miles (SNM) for which 
less than half is considered ``navigationally significant.'' 
Vessel traffic between the North Atlantic and the North Pacific 
through the Arctic requires transit through the Bering Strait, 
located along the U.S. boundary with Russia. The Coast Guard 
has been gathering data on vessel transits in the U.S. Arctic 
since 2008, and the Service uses the annual transit count as a 
general indicator of Arctic vessel activity. In the past 
decade, the overall trend is towards increasing maritime 
activity. While all areas of the Arctic are seeing increased 
vessel activity, the Northern Sea Route along the Eurasian 
Arctic coast continues to account for the bulk of Arctic 
shipping activity.
    While U.S. agencies have a physical presence and 
substantial interests in the Arctic, the Coast Guard's 
experience, material assets, and installations located 
throughout Alaska, establish it as a key maritime operational 
presence in the U.S. Arctic. However, with no assets 
permanently stationed in the Arctic, the Service must operate 
seasonally, usually by employing mobile command and control 
platforms and establishing seasonal air and communications 
capabilities by deploying and/or leasing assets and facilities. 
The Homeland Security Operational Analysis Center views this 
strategy as inadequate. The Center identified four major gaps 
in Coast Guard Arctic Capabilities, including unreliable 
communications, lack of adequate maritime domain awareness, 
scarcity of available assets and supporting infrastructure, and 
institutional difficulty to identify, articulate, and close 
capability gaps.
    The Subcommittee remains concerned that the Coast Guard is 
ill prepared to cope with current operational demands in the 
Arctic, let alone react quickly should operational activities 
in the region need to surge suddenly or if warming accelerates 
at a rate more rapid than climate model projections. In the 
116th Congress, the Subcommittee will continue its oversight of 
maritime transportation related activities and challenges in 
the evolving Arctic maritime environment; assess the practical 
implications for U.S. security, maritime, and geopolitical 
interests; and review the Coast Guard's 2018-2022 Strategic 
Plan, and the Service's Arctic Strategy, to determine if the 
potential for greater Arctic activity has been given 
appropriate consideration.
    4. Coast Guard Mission Balance/Performance. The 
Subcommittee continues to have concerns regarding the Coast 
Guard's ability to carry out its traditional transportation-
related missions, including marine safety; search and rescue; 
aids to navigation; living marine resources; marine 
environmental protection; and ice operations. Since September 
11, 2001, significant additional resources have gone to the 
Service's homeland security activities, including ports, 
waterways, and coastal security; drug interdiction; migrant 
interdiction; defense readiness; and other law enforcement. 
Traditional transportation related missions, though they have 
grown as maritime commerce has grown, have not fared as well 
and have been under-resourced. Resources and man-hours devoted 
to these missions remain well below pre-September 11, 2001, 
funding levels, and in the case of marine safety, lack of 
funding has substantially reduced the Service's core 
competence.
    In the 116th Congress, the Subcommittee will continue its 
oversight of Coast Guard mission balance to ensure the Service 
qualitatively and quantitatively reviews its many missions; 
establishes and justifies performance measures; identifies and 
responds to exigencies that divert resources among missions; 
and plans how best to allocate limited resources appropriately 
among its many missions.
    5. Maritime Domain Awareness. The effort to know what is 
happening at all times on the ocean, coastal and interior 
waters of the United States, and aboard the vessels that 
transit in or through waters under U.S. jurisdiction, is 
referred to as Maritime Domain Awareness (MDA). The successful 
gathering, interpretation, and distribution of MDA data is 
critical to promote and ensure maritime safety, homeland 
security, and the efficiency and reliability of the U.S. 
maritime supply chain.
    The Coast Guard relies on several new and developing 
technologies to acquire, manage, and disseminate interoperable 
MDA information. The Subcommittee remains concerned with the 
Coast Guard's apparent inability to assess, or disinterest in, 
new technologies, such as unmanned autonomous aerial and 
underwater vehicles, in order to acquire MDA information in a 
more cost-effective manner with greater accuracy and 
efficiency. As such, in the 115th Congress the Subcommittee 
passed legislation directing the Coast Guard to establish a 
Blue Technology Center of Expertise (title III of P.L. 115-265) 
to promote awareness within the Coast Guard of the range and 
diversity of Blue Technologies and their potential to enhance 
Coast Guard mission readiness, operational performance, and 
regulation of such technologies. Additionally, Congress 
directed the Coast Guard in the Frank LoBiondo Coast Guard 
Authorization Act of 2018 (section 812, P.L. 115-282) to enter 
into an agreement with the National Academy of Sciences to 
complete an assessment of available unmanned, autonomous, or 
remotely controlled maritime domain awareness technologies for 
use by the Coast Guard.
    In the 116th Congress, the Subcommittee will continue its 
oversight of the Service's ongoing efforts to assess, develop, 
and implement new MDA technologies, including the Service's 
progress in implementing the two new MDA initiatives passed by 
the 115th Congress. The Subcommittee will continue its 
oversight to ensure that Coast Guard operations utilize the 
best available MDA information, and that MDA data are gathered 
in a timely, reliable manner, to provide a high return on 
investment for the taxpayer and maritime stakeholders.
    6. Coast Guard Prevention and Response Activities. The 
Coast Guard plays major roles in response to oil spills and 
natural disasters such as hurricanes and flood events. The 
Service was the federal On-Scene Coordinator and National 
Incident Commander for the 2010 DEEPWATER HORIZON spill in the 
Gulf of Mexico. The Coast Guard was a first responder to 
Hurricanes Katrina and Rita, which devastated New Orleans and 
the Mississippi River Delta in 2005. In addition, in 2016 the 
Coast Guard responded to severe flood events in Louisiana and 
North Carolina, and more recently in 2017 the Coast Guard 
responded to a series of three devastating hurricanes (Harvey, 
Irma, and Maria) that ravaged portions of the Southeast United 
States, Puerto Rico, and the U.S. Virgin Islands.
    In addition, the Coast Guard enforces domestically the 
implementation of the National Invasive Species Act, and 
internationally, U.S. compliance with a convention to prevent 
vessels from dumping invasive species inadvertently into U.S. 
waters through the discharge of ballast water. Due to a 2008 
federal court decision, discharge of ballast water and other 
``discharges incidental to the normal operation of vessels'' 
such as bilge water, deck wash, and air conditioning 
condensate, are now regulated under the Clean Water Act (CWA) 
by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Title IX of P.L. 
115-282 amended the CWA to establish a new comprehensive 
authority to allow both the EPA and the Coast Guard to regulate 
vessel discharges, finally providing a uniform national 
standard for ballast water discharges in U.S. waters, including 
the Great Lakes.
    In the 116th Congress, the Subcommittee will conduct 
oversight on the Coast Guard's crisis prevention and response 
capabilities. Oil spills, natural disasters, and mass migration 
events each can over-extend the Coast Guard's prevention and 
response capabilities. The Subcommittee will conduct oversight 
on Coast Guard prevention and response programs, including its 
existing regulations authorizing the use of Alternative 
Planning Criteria and adequacy and availability of response 
assets identified in vessel response plans. The Subcommittee 
also will work with the Water Resources and Environment 
Subcommittee to conduct oversight of the EPA's and the Coast 
Guard's implementation of the new vessel discharge authority. 
Moreover, the Subcommittee will work to determine if existing 
response vessel requirements included in vessel response plans 
are sufficient to meet all contingencies, or whether there is a 
need for further revisions to tighten requirements to protect 
the marine environment.
    7. Short Sea Shipping. Short sea shipping is the waterborne 
movement of commercial freight between two ports in the U.S. or 
between ports in the U.S. and Canada. At present, the most 
highly developed water freight transportation systems in the 
U.S. operate on the Mississippi River, the Great Lakes, and 
along the international St. Lawrence Seaway, most often 
carrying agricultural products and other raw bulk materials. 
However, the MARAD has found these routes are under-utilized 
and carry approximately 13 percent of total freight tonnage in 
the U.S. By comparison, nearly 70 percent of freight tonnage 
transported in the U.S. travels across roadways. To promote 
short sea shipping in the U.S., the Congress established the 
Marine Highway Program, Chapter 556 of title 46, United States 
Code.
    The Subcommittee continues to recognize that revitalization 
of our marine highways has the potential to reduce congestion 
on our highways, improve air quality, and create new maritime 
industry jobs for Americans. Section 405 of the Coast Guard and 
Maritime Transportation Act of 2012 (P.L. 112-213) expanded the 
scope of the program beyond reducing landside congestion to 
efforts that generate public benefits by increasing the 
utilization or efficiency of domestic freight or passenger 
transportation on Marine Highway Routes between U.S. ports. The 
National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2016 (P.L. 
114-92) expanded the definition of short sea shipping to 
include additional discrete cargo types or freight vehicles 
carried aboard commuter ferries.
    The Subcommittee in the 116th Congress will examine 
potential options for addressing factors inhibiting the cost-
competitiveness and expanded use of short sea shipping in the 
United States. Further, the Subcommittee will evaluate how 
marine highways could stimulate job creation for maritime 
workers, both those who work on vessels or labor on the 
waterfront.
    8. Coast Guard Marine Safety Activities. The Coast Guard's 
Marine Board of Inquiry report detailing the circumstances 
surrounding the October 1, 2015, sinking of the U.S. flag 
commercial vessel EL FARO was scathing in its criticism of the 
Coast Guard's failure to sustain its marine safety 
proficiencies and policy framework to guarantee the 
effectiveness of vessel inspections and surveys. Additionally, 
the report documented problems with the Alternative Compliance 
Program and the Service's growing reliance on the use of 
classification societies to maintain surveys and inspections of 
U.S. flag vessels. Congress enacted title II of S. 3508, the 
Hamm Alert Maritime Safety Act of 2018 (P.L. 115-265), to make 
several important maritime safety improvements. Provisions in 
the bill drew from three principal sources: recommendations 
contained in the Marine Board's report; recommendations 
contained in a separate corollary report prepared by the 
National Transportation Safety Board; and recommendations 
contained in the Final Action Memorandum (FAM) issued by then-
Commandant, Admiral Paul F. Zukunft.
    During the 116th Congress, the Subcommittee will conduct 
oversight of the Coast Guard to determine the progress made in 
implementing the Hamm Act and the recommendations contained in 
the FAM. Additionally, the Subcommittee will want to assess the 
Coast Guard's oversight of recognized organizations operating 
on behalf of the Coast Guard under the Alternate Compliance 
Program to determine if changes are required to ensure 
accountability, transparency, and effectiveness in the 
implementation and oversight of this delegated marine safety 
function.
    9. National Maritime Strategy. Section 603 of the Howard 
Coble Coast Guard and Maritime Transportation Act of 2014 (P.L. 
114-120) directed the Secretary of Transportation, in 
consultation with the Commandant of the Coast Guard, to develop 
and transmit to Congress a National Maritime Strategy 
(Strategy) no later than 60 days after the date of enactment. 
The law directed this comprehensive strategy to include 
recommendations to increase the competitiveness and use of 
U.S.-flag vessels in the U.S. foreign trade; enhance 
shipbuilding; ensure federal agency compliance with cargo 
preference requirements; and increase the use of short sea 
shipping in the United States. Congress is still waiting to 
receive the Strategy. Per section 3513 of subtitle A of title 
XXXV of P.L. 115-232, February 13, 2020, is now the new 
deadline to submit a Strategy to Congress.
    The Subcommittee in the 116th Congress will continue its 
oversight of the MARAD and other agencies within the Committee 
on the Marine Transportation System (established under 46 
U.S.C. chapter 555), to ascertain the status of the 
administration's development of a National Maritime Strategy. 
In addition, the Subcommittee will seek to determine the 
administration's timeline for completion. Moreover, the 
Subcommittee will assess whether this strategy will promote and 
expand economic opportunities for U.S.-flag carriers and 
related marine industries and sustain a stable pool of U.S. 
merchant mariners.
    10. Status of the U.S. Merchant Marine. The Subcommittee 
remains concerned with the downward trend in the number of 
licensed and unlicensed U.S. mariners and a potential spike in 
attrition when many seafarers soon reach retirement age. The 
recruitment, training, and retention of credentialed U.S. 
mariners is necessary to not only maintain a U.S. flag presence 
on the high seas and in the U.S. domestic coastwise trade, but 
also to maintain a sufficient number of seafarers to operate 
vessels deployed for military sealift during times of national 
emergency.
    In the 116th Congress, the Subcommittee will continue its 
oversight of the issues involved in the current estimated 
deficit of 1,800 licensed merchant mariners and explore 
potential options to expand the U.S. maritime workforce. The 
Subcommittee will also look at credentialing requirements for 
U.S. seafarers, including recent Coast Guard enforcement of 
mariner credential requirements for non-maritime, industrial 
workers on vessels. Furthermore, the Subcommittee will continue 
its oversight of the Administration's Military to Mariner 
initiative to assess progress in building viable pathways for 
separating service members within the commercial maritime 
industry.

 SUBCOMMITTEE ON ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT, PUBLIC BUILDINGS, AND EMERGENCY 
                               MANAGEMENT

    1. Emergency Management. The Subcommittee will continue to 
examine and evaluate the Nation's ability to prevent, prepare 
for, mitigate against, respond to, and recover from disasters 
and emergencies of all types including terrorism. In the 116th 
Congress, continued oversight will be needed as states continue 
to be affected by and recover from prior disasters. In 
addition, the Subcommittee will continue its oversight of the 
Federal Emergency Management Agency's (FEMA's) implementation 
of reforms and additional authorities under the Disaster 
Recovery Reform Act (Division D of P.L. 115-254), the Sandy 
Recovery Improvement Act of 2013 (P.L. 113-2), and the Post-
Katrina Emergency Management Reform Act of 2006 (P.L. 109-295).
    The Subcommittee intends to continue its comprehensive 
review and assessment of how federal disaster assistance has 
evolved over the past several decades and its continued 
effectiveness. The purpose is to examine how to make the U.S. 
more resilient to future disasters in consideration of the 
changing climate, which agencies provide assistance and how 
that money is spent, what guidance or controls are in place for 
the effective use of assistance, and the appropriate role for 
federal, state, tribal, and local governments. The Subcommittee 
will also examine FEMA's roles and authorities related to 
earthquake hazards to ensure that the U.S. is prepared for the 
risks that it faces.
    2. Border Security. During the 114th Congress, the 
Subcommittee conducted oversight of land ports of entry (LPOEs) 
construction and the implementation of a Public Private 
Partnership program created as part of the Fiscal Year 2014 
Consolidated Appropriations Act (P.L. 113-76). Additional 
legislation was moved to make changes and modifications of that 
program in the 114th Congress. The Subcommittee will continue 
its oversight of LPOE construction projects, the implementation 
of the Public Private Partnership program and examine 
additional ways in which private dollars could be leveraged.
    3. Leasing. During the 114th and 115th Congresses, the 
Subcommittee held hearings and roundtables identifying the 
large number of General Services Administration (GSA) leases 
expiring in the next five years and examining the GSA's process 
for addressing them. The GSA currently leases 195 million 
rentable square feet--more than half of the GSA's total space 
inventory. The cost of leasing space accounts for more than 
half of the GSA's Federal Buildings Fund (FBF) annual expenses, 
totaling more than $5.4 billion annually. Over the next five 
years, more than 50% of the GSA's leased space will expire, 
creating an opportunity to significantly reduce leasing costs 
to the taxpayer. The Subcommittee will continue its oversight 
of GSA leasing and how it manages the replacement of expiring 
leases with good deals for the taxpayer.
    In the 114th Congress, the Subcommittee conducted oversight 
by requesting a GAO review of agencies with independent leasing 
authorities and holding a hearing focusing on how agencies with 
such authorities were managing them. In addition, questions 
about how the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) has used its 
leasing authority resulted in the VA procurement of leases for 
its outpatient clinics and centers through the GSA's leasing 
authorities. In addition, other agencies with independent 
leasing authorities have been found to have exceeded the 
limitations of such authorities resulting in potential 
violations of the Anti-Deficiency Act (ADA). Because of these 
ongoing issues surrounding independent leasing authorities, the 
Subcommittee will continue its oversight of leases and the use 
of leasing authorities outside of the GSA.
    4. Real Property Management. The management of federal real 
property has been on the GAO's ``High Risk'' list since 2003 
due to a number of mismanagement issues including the 
overreliance on costly leasing to meet long-term space needs 
and underused or vacant space. In addition, with nearly half of 
the GSA's assets over 50 years old, the GSA has faced 
challenges maintaining a balanced inventory, draining federal 
resources and costing more to maintain old buildings that are 
often inefficient. While commercial leasing may be advisable in 
many cases, the GSA is often driven to costly operating leases 
when ownership may be less costly to the taxpayer. The Office 
of Management and Budget's (OMB's) budget scorekeeping rules 
are key drivers on ``own versus lease'' asset decision-making. 
Current budget scorekeeping rules generally leave the GSA with 
only two options for meeting the federal government's general 
purpose space needs: direct appropriations for new construction 
or long-term leases.
    During the 114th and 115th Congresses, the Subcommittee 
held roundtables and hearings on how public-private 
partnerships could be used as alternative methods of financing 
space. In addition, the Committee established a public private 
partnership (P3) panel that explored the use of P3s across 
various types of infrastructure, including public buildings. 
The P3 Panel recommended, among other things: (1) review and 
modify budgetary scoring rules for commercially leased office 
space to enable operating lease treatment of long-term leases 
and fixed-priced, below market purchase options; and (2) fully 
utilize existing lease authorities and the OMB budgetary 
scoring procedures to proceed with long-term ground lease and 
lease back arrangements where the federal government retains 
ownership of leasehold improvements at the end of the ground-
lease term. P3s can be one of the tools used to improve the 
management of the Public Building Service real estate 
portfolio.
    In 2013, the OMB issued a directive to agencies called 
``Freeze the Footprint'' and later modified the directive in 
2015 to shrink the space footprint. That directive requires 
agencies to reduce their amount of office and warehouse space 
to FY2012 levels. The Subcommittee will continue to conduct 
investigations and oversight of the GSA's management of its 
real property portfolio and examine ways to ensure cost-
effective choices continue to be made. In addition, the 
Subcommittee will work to ensure the GSA maximizes the 
utilization of existing space, renegotiates existing leases to 
reduce costs, and sells under-used or vacant properties, which 
will generate revenue. Finally, the 114th Congress passed the 
Federal Assets Sale and Transfer Act of 2016 (FASTA; P.L. 114-
287) which established a new, centralized process for disposing 
of unneeded space in the federal real estate portfolio. The 
Subcommittee will work to ensure the GSA works closely with the 
Public Buildings Reform Board created by FASTA to help all 
other federal agencies develop a list of disposal 
recommendations, which could include the sale, transfer, 
conveyance, consolidation, or outlease of any unneeded space. 
The Subcommittee will also work to ensure other requirements 
included in FASTA are appropriately implemented.
    5. Capital Investment and Leasing Program (CILP). As part 
of the Committee's annual work to review and authorize the 
GSA's requests for authority to repair, alter, construct, and 
lease property for use by federal agencies, the Subcommittee 
will review each prospectus presented to the Committee and 
recommend approval only after the Subcommittee is satisfied 
that the requests are cost-effective and in the best interest 
of the federal government. The Subcommittee will work 
aggressively with the GSA and tenant agencies to shrink the 
space footprint where appropriate.
    6. Federal Courthouses. In June of 2010, the GAO issued a 
report on the federal courthouse program and found that of the 
33 courthouses built since 2000, there was 3.56 million square 
feet of extra space, costing the taxpayer $835 million plus $51 
million annually to operate and maintain. Since that time, the 
Judiciary has developed a new review process to identify the 
need for new courthouses. In 2013, the Committee requested the 
Judiciary apply the new process to the courthouses on its 5-
Year Courthouse Plan. The Judiciary completed the process in 
late 2014 and issued an updated Plan in 2015. The Judiciary 
received funding for courthouse construction for several 
projects in fiscal years 2018 and 2019. The Judiciary is also 
in the process of updating its Design Guide for courthouses 
which could impact the cost and size of courthouses. The 
Subcommittee will engage with the Judiciary during this process 
to ensure such updates are appropriate. The Subcommittee will 
also closely oversee the progress made on authorized 
courthouses to ensure they are constructed within the 
limitations placed upon them by the Committee, including 
courtroom sharing by judges and staying below or within budget.
    7. Federal Protective Service (FPS). As a part of the 
Homeland Security Act of 2002 (P.L. 107-296), the Federal 
Protective Service was transferred from the Public Buildings 
Service of the GSA to the Department of Homeland Security 
(DHS). However, responsibility for the protection of federal 
buildings generally remains with the FPS within the DHS. The 
Subcommittee will continue to monitor and review the policies, 
procedures, and requirements of security at public buildings. 
The Subcommittee will also continue to monitor the use of the 
FPS's law enforcement authority, including delegations of such 
authority to other agencies, to ensure resources are 
appropriately focused on securing federal buildings.
    8. Major Development Projects. The Federal Bureau of 
Investigation (FBI) headquarters consolidation project was 
authorized in the 114th Congress. The Committee refused to 
provide the GSA and the FBI a blank check, but set clear 
limitations on costs and other parameters to ensure the project 
would meet the needs of the FBI, shrink its space by 33 
percent, and minimize costs to the taxpayer. The project did 
not receive funding in the 115th Congress. Subsequently, a new 
strategy to demolish and rebuild the building at its current 
location in downtown Washington, D.C. was provided to the 
Senate Committee on Environment and Public Works, which was a 
departure from the original plan to locate the FBI headquarters 
in the Washington, D.C. suburbs. The Subcommittee plans to 
conduct oversight of the project to ensure it remains as cost 
efficient as possible, is located in a secure location, and 
results in a full consolidation of the FBI headquarters.
    The Subcommittee also plans to conduct close review and 
oversight of several other major development projects, 
including: (1) the development of the headquarters for the 
Department of Homeland Security on the St. Elizabeths campus; 
(2) redevelopment of the Department of Labor headquarters 
building, particularly examining how the GSA is utilizing its 
exchange authority in this context; and (3) the purchase of the 
Department of Transportation Headquarters building.
    9. Architect of the Capitol. The subcommittee will continue 
ongoing oversight of projects being undertaken by the Architect 
of the Capitol pursuant to the Master Plan for the Capitol 
Complex, including renovation of the Cannon House Office 
building. Consistent oversight will ensure proper 
prioritization and cost savings.
    10. Smithsonian Institution Facilities. The Subcommittee 
will continue its oversight of projects undertaken by the 
Smithsonian Institution, including the renovation, acquisition, 
construction, and use of local and remote museums, research, 
and storage facilities of the Institution. The Subcommittee 
will continue to oversee cost-effective solutions to the 
Smithsonian's space needs such as leveraging private dollars 
and disposal or effective reuse of underused assets.
    11. John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts. As a 
part of its ongoing oversight of the Kennedy Center's programs, 
the Subcommittee will regularly review the construction, 
alteration, and modernization activities of the Kennedy Center 
that are conducted using federal funds to ensure appropriate 
management and cost savings.
    12. Economic Development. In the 115th Congress, the 
Subcommittee worked to reauthorize several of the economic 
development programs under its jurisdiction. For the 116th 
Congress, the Subcommittee will continue to work to reauthorize 
and enhance additional programs to ensure these programs are 
targeted, effective, and remain focused on their core missions. 
In addition, the Subcommittee will continue its oversight of 
the disaster relief funds appropriated for the Economic 
Development Administration programs to assist communities 
impacted by disasters recover.
    13. Old Post Office Building. The Subcommittee will examine 
how the GSA is addressing the management and administration of 
the Old Post Office (OPO) lease agreement with the Trump Old 
Post Office LLC in light of the 2016 presidential election. The 
lease agreement contains a clause that bars elected officials 
from being ``admitted to any share or part of this Lease, or to 
any benefit that may arise therefrom. . .''
    For the past two years, the Subcommittee has engaged with 
the GSA regarding how the agency addressed any potential 
conflicts of interest associated with the lease agreement given 
the election. These engagements with the GSA are ongoing and 
the Subcommittee will continue to seek substantive information 
regarding the lease agreement. The Subcommittee also plans to 
continue to investigate and report on the GSA's management and 
administration of the OPO lease agreement since the 
presidential election.

                  SUBCOMMITTEE ON HIGHWAYS AND TRANSIT

    1. Surface Transportation Investment--Current and Future 
Needs. Bringing the Nation's crumbling transportation 
infrastructure to a state of good repair, upgrading bridges, 
improving road quality, addressing capacity needs, and ensuring 
access to reliable transit options will require substantial 
investment. According to the Department of Transportation 
(DOT), we need to invest $1.7 trillion at all levels of 
government over the next 10 years to bring roads, bridges, and 
transit systems to a state of good repair and to expand 
capacity. At the same time, transportation investments made 
today must meet the needs of the future. This includes 
utilizing new technologies and incorporating innovative 
mobility solutions to move people and goods more safely and 
efficiently. This also includes building stronger, more 
resilient transportation networks to withstand rising sea 
levels, the changing climate, and seismic events; and reducing 
transportation greenhouse gas emissions. The Subcommittee will 
probe surface transportation investment needs and emerging 
policy areas in preparation for a long-term reauthorization 
bill.
    2. Sustainability of Surface Transportation Funding. 
Federal highway, highway safety, and public transportation 
programs are funded through federal excise taxes levied on 
motor fuels and on various highway-related products such as 
tires and heavy trucks. Revenues from these user fees are 
deposited into the Highway Trust Fund (HTF) and may be used 
only for eligible transportation projects and activities. By 
fiscal year 2021, revenues credited to the Highway Account and 
Mass Transit Account of the HTF will be insufficient to meet 
its obligations, according to projections by the Congressional 
Budget Office. Congress has not raised the federal fuel tax in 
25 years, and improved vehicle fuel efficiency has further 
eroded federal revenues. Beginning in fiscal year 2008, this 
combination has led to a gap in the HTF between revenues and 
expenditures. As a result, Congress has transferred 
approximately $144 billion from the general fund of the 
Treasury and other sources into the HTF to maintain the 
solvency of the HTF. The Subcommittee will continue to monitor 
the status and solvency of the HTF, its ability to fund 
currently authorized programs and to meet future surface 
transportation investment needs, and examine other options to 
provide robust funding to meet future needs.
    3. Ensuring a Qualified Transportation Workforce. The 
Subcommittee will examine workforce trends in the 
transportation and construction industries, as well as evaluate 
policies to invest in human capital through worker training and 
other programs within its jurisdiction to prepare the next 
generation of transportation workers. As more automation occurs 
in transportation, the Subcommittee will also monitor the 
potential impact on workers that will be affected.
    4. Restoring the Congressional Intent of the Capital 
Investment Grant program. The Fixing America's Surface 
Transportation Act (FAST Act; P.L. 114-94) authorized $2.3 
billion for each of fiscal years 2016-2020 for the Capital 
Investment Grant (CIG) program. Recent presidential budget 
requests propose phasing out the CIG program. Congress has 
rejected these proposals by continuing to appropriate funding 
for the CIG program above the $2.3 billion authorized amount. 
In addition, concerns have been raised about the Federal 
Transit Administration's (FTA) implementation of the CIG 
program. The Subcommittee will examine the FTA's implementation 
of the CIG program to ensure that it adheres to Congressional 
intent and examine concerns raised about that implementation, 
including administrative delays and related cost escalations.
    5. Motor Carrier Oversight. The Subcommittee will monitor 
prominent motor carrier issues including assessing the safety 
fitness of truck and bus companies, compliance with hours of 
service regulations, and will consider options to improve 
safety of commercial motor vehicles. The Subcommittee will also 
examine issues related to or affecting commercial motor vehicle 
drivers including attracting and retaining qualified drivers, 
the impact of congestion and detention time, and training 
requirements for new drivers entering the industry.
    6. Rolling Stock Procurement Reform. The Subcommittee will 
examine ways to improve the procurement process for rolling 
stock with the goal of reducing costs to enable taxpayer 
dollars to go further and expanding the public benefits of the 
procurement process. Specifically, the Subcommittee will 
examine Buy America requirements, explore ways to assist small 
transit agencies with the procurement process, and streamline 
the No/Low bus procurement process, among other areas.
    7. Improving the Safety of U.S. Roadways which Endure 
37,000 Fatalities a Year. The National Priority Safety Programs 
provide grants to eligible states in order to address specific 
highway safety challenges such as impaired driving, pedestrian 
and bicycling fatalities, and distracted driving and younger 
drivers. The Subcommittee will examine the performance of each 
program and consider changes to the programs to boost their 
effectiveness at reducing fatalities.
    8. FAST Act Implementation. The FAST Act, enacted on 
December 4, 2015, reauthorized federal surface transportation 
programs through fiscal year 2020. In the 116th Congress, the 
Subcommittee will continue to oversee implementation of the 
FAST Act by the DOT.

     SUBCOMMITTEE ON RAILROADS, PIPELINES, AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS

    1. Rail Infrastructure and Safety Programs. The Passenger 
Rail Reform and Investment Act of 2015 (PRRIA), enacted as 
title XI of the FAST Act (P.L. 114-94), reauthorized Amtrak and 
programs administered by the Federal Railroad Administration 
(FRA). PRRIA restructured and consolidated the grant programs 
administered by the FRA to include Consolidated Rail 
Infrastructure and Safety Improvement Grants for passenger and 
freight rail projects that improve safety, reliability or 
efficiency; Federal Partnership for State of Good Repair Grants 
for capital grants to reduce the state-of-good-repair backlog 
for assets used to provide intercity passenger rail service; 
and Restoration and Enhancement Grants for operating assistance 
grants to initiate, restore, or enhance intercity passenger 
rail service. PRRIA authorized a total of $2.2 billion for 
these programs for fiscal years 2016 through 2020. PRRIA also 
made several improvements to the Railroad Rehabilitation and 
Improvement Financing (RRIF) program, which provides long-term, 
low-interest loans and loan guarantees for railroad-related 
improvements. While this program is authorized to provide up to 
$35 billion in lending, the FRA has executed only about $5.4 
billion in loans; $29.6 billion is currently available in 
credit authority. The Subcommittee will conduct oversight of 
the grant and loan programs and the ongoing construction of 
projects throughout the country as grantees build-out their 
projects.
    PRRIA also addressed the safety, efficiency, and 
reliability of the rail industry. The Act included several 
provisions to improve safety at highway-rail grade crossings, 
including a requirement that all states develop highway-rail 
grade crossing safety action plans. The Act emphasized the 
safety of intercity passenger and commuter rail operations, 
with requirements that carriers develop action plans to ensure 
compliance with speed limits on curves and in bridges and 
tunnels; that the Secretary of Transportation evaluate track 
inspection regulations on high-density commuter railroad lines; 
and that audio and image recording devices be installed in 
passenger train locomotives. The Subcommittee will conduct 
oversight of the FRA's safety programs and the changes enacted 
as part of the Act.
    The work at the FRA to implement the Rail Safety 
Improvement Act of 2008 (P.L. 110-432) continues, in particular 
the Act's requirement for the installation of positive train 
control (PTC) systems by December 31, 2015, on rail routes 
carrying passengers or poisonous or toxic-by-inhalation 
hazardous materials.
    In October 2015, the Positive Train Control Enforcement and 
Implementation Act of 2015, enacted as part of the Surface 
Transportation Extension Act of 2015 (P.L. 114-73), extended 
the deadline for installation of PTC to December 31, 2018. At 
the discretion of the Secretary of Transportation, the deadline 
may be extended for individual railroads for up to two 
additional years. The Act requires each rail carrier to report 
annually to the DOT on its progress toward implementing PTC 
systems. PRRIA also made available $199 million from the Mass 
Transit Account of the Highway Trust Fund for discretionary 
grants to public transit agencies and state and local 
governments to assist them with the costs of installing PTC.
    The Subcommittee will conduct oversight of the FRA's safety 
programs, including the FRA's progress toward implementing the 
requirements of the Rail Safety Improvement Act of 2008, grants 
issued for implementation of PTC, and railroad progress toward 
meeting the final deadline for implementation of PTC.
    2. Amtrak. PRRIA reauthorized Amtrak, Amtrak's Office of 
the Inspector General, and the Northeast Corridor Commission 
through fiscal year 2020. The Act changed the authorization 
structure of Amtrak by providing funding by ``lines of 
business'' (specifically the Northeast Corridor and the 
National Network) rather than providing separate grants for 
operating and capital/debt service activities. The Act also 
reformed Amtrak's operations, budgeting, and planning processes 
to reflect the lines-of-business approach. PRRIA also 
established a State-Supported Route Advisory Committee to help 
remedy issues pertaining to cost allocation on state-supported 
routes. The Subcommittee will conduct oversight of Amtrak, 
Amtrak's Office of the Inspector General, the Northeast 
Corridor Commission, and the State-Supported Route Advisory 
Committee as well as implementation of the 2008 and 2015 Acts.
    3. Surface Transportation Board (STB). The Surface 
Transportation Board Reauthorization Act of 2015 (P.L. 110-114) 
reauthorized the STB for the first time since the agency was 
created in 1995. The Act expanded the Board from three to five 
members; set expedited timetables for consideration of rate 
complaints; authorized the STB to initiate investigations on 
its own initiative; modified the voluntary arbitration process 
for small rate disputes; and made other changes to improve the 
STB's efficiency and responsiveness. The Subcommittee will 
conduct oversight of the STB and its implementation of the 
reauthorization Act.
    4. Pipeline Safety Programs. Congress reauthorized the 
Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration's 
(PHMSA) pipeline safety program through fiscal year 2019 in the 
Protecting our Infrastructure of Pipelines and Enhancing Safety 
Act of 2016 (PIPES Act; P.L. 114-183). The PIPES Act will 
ensure the agency completes its responsibilities under the 
Pipeline Safety, Regulatory Certainty, and Job Creation Act of 
2011; provided for a number of assessments of the current 
safety program; included the establishment of minimum standards 
for underground natural gas storage systems and liquefied 
natural gas facilities; provided the PHMSA with emergency order 
authority to impose emergency restrictions, prohibitions, and 
safety measures on owners and operators of pipeline facilities 
to abate imminent hazards; and reformed the PHMSA to be a more 
dynamic, data-driven regulator. The Subcommittee will conduct 
oversight of the Office of Pipeline Safety at the PHMSA and its 
implementation of the 2016 and 2011 Acts.
    5. Hazardous Materials Safety Programs. The Hazardous 
Material Transportation Safety Improvement Act of 2015, enacted 
as Title VII of the FAST Act (P.L. 114-94), reauthorized the 
hazardous materials safety program administered by the PHMSA. 
The Act included a number of provisions to enhance the safety 
of hazardous materials transportation, with a significant focus 
on the transportation of flammable liquids, including crude oil 
and ethanol, by rail. The Act requires all new tank cars to be 
equipped with thermal blankets and protection for top fittings; 
mandates that all DOT-111 tank cars in flammable liquids 
service be retrofitted in accordance with new DOT standards; 
requires railroads to provide States and local responders with 
advanced notification and information on high-hazard flammable 
trains; and authorizes grant funding to assist communities in 
preparing for and responding to hazardous materials accidents. 
The Subcommittee will continue oversight of the PHMSA's 
hazardous materials safety program.

            SUBCOMMITTEE ON WATER RESOURCES AND ENVIRONMENT

    1. Clean Water Act and Water Infrastructure Programs. The 
Clean Water Act (CWA) was enacted in 1972 to ``restore and 
maintain the chemical, physical, and biological integrity of 
the Nation's waters.'' The CWA established the basic structure 
for regulating the discharge of pollutants into the waters of 
the U.S., provided the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) 
with authority to establish nationwide standards for water 
pollution control programs that are implemented either by the 
EPA or approved states, funded the construction of wastewater 
treatment projects, and recognized the need to address nonpoint 
sources of pollution.
    While the CWA has made significant progress in addressing 
water quality impairments, continued improvement of water 
quality will likely require a combination of regulatory and 
non-regulatory approaches, as well as continued investment in 
the implementation of water quality-related and water 
infrastructure programs. The Subcommittee's oversight will 
focus on issues related to implementation of the CWA, both by 
federal agencies and approved states, as well as the need for 
additional water infrastructure investment.
    The Subcommittee will conduct oversight of the 
implementation of various regulatory and non-regulatory 
programs under the CWA, including how the EPA and the Army 
Corps of Engineers (Corps) implement and enforce these programs 
in conjunction with approved states, and trends on the 
effectiveness of the CWA to improve local water quality. This 
includes oversight of issues involving the establishment and 
implementation of water quality standards and total maximum 
daily loads; the development and application of new or revised 
effluent limitations; compliance with and enforcement of the 
permitting programs of the CWA under section 402 (point source 
discharges of pollutants under the National Pollutant Discharge 
Elimination System (NPDES) permit program) and section 404 
(permitting of discharges of dredged or fill materials); and 
how the EPA and the Corps assert federal jurisdiction and make 
jurisdictional determinations under the CWA. Oversight also 
will include an examination of federal and state policies and 
efforts to address the presence of nutrients, harmful algal 
blooms, and other contaminants in waters under the CWA and 
other federal statutes, the impact of CWA-associated releases 
on waters that may be used as a source of drinking water as 
well as combined and sanitary sewer overflows, stormwater, 
certain agricultural activities, and nonpoint sources of 
pollution.
    Continued investments in U.S. water-related infrastructure 
should: (1) prioritize the creation of American jobs and the 
utilization of American-made products; (2) support a healthy 
and sustainable economy and environment; and (3) protect public 
health and safety. In furtherance of these points, the 
Subcommittee will conduct oversight of wastewater treatment and 
water pollution control funding issues, including levels and 
sources of funding and management of grant and loan programs; 
opportunities for utilities to increase their overall 
efficiency and resiliency; wastewater security; and 
infrastructure needs. The Subcommittee will also examine local 
affordability concerns, including whether and how existing CWA 
infrastructure financing authorities are utilized by different 
types of communities, and whether additional federal resources 
can and should be targeted to address local affordability 
concerns. The Subcommittee may also examine how existing CWA 
financing authorities serve to address the water infrastructure 
needs of small, rural, tribal, and low-income communities.
    Further, the Subcommittee will continue to review the EPA's 
implementation of integrated approaches to municipal stormwater 
and wastewater management through the EPA's integrated planning 
approach framework, as well as on the utilization of green 
infrastructure and nature-based approaches to addressing local 
water quality concerns as well as other local quality-of-life 
benefits. The Subcommittee may investigate whether non-
regulatory approaches, such as water quality trading and other 
market-based approaches, and other innovative approaches 
undertaken by state and local governments, could result in 
improvements to the environment.
    2. Army Corps of Engineers Water Resources Program. The 
Subcommittee will review efforts to improve the efficiency and 
effectiveness of the civil works program of the Corps, 
including the planning, authorization, and implementation of 
water resources development projects, and the Corps' efforts to 
improve the resiliency and sustainability of civil works 
projects in the short- and long-term. The Subcommittee will 
also examine the financing and maintenance of harbor and inland 
waterways infrastructure and efforts towards full-utilization 
of annual harbor maintenance trust fund collections for the 
maintenance of large, medium, and small (emerging) harbors; the 
backlog of uninitiated Corps construction projects or deferred 
Corps maintenance projects; and asset management of projects in 
the Corps' operation and maintenance account, including 
existing and future levels of service. The Subcommittee may 
review the effect of recent changes in the process for funding 
the Corps' civil works projects, including increased usage of 
non-federal sponsor funds through advanced or contributed 
funds, or through use of sections 203 and 204 of the Water 
Resources Development Act of 1986 (P.L. 99-662), on the Corps' 
civil works missions. The Subcommittee will also review the 
Corps implementation of provisions of recently enacted water 
resources development acts, including the Water Resources 
Development Act of 2018 (P.L. 115-270).
    Continued investments in U.S. water-related infrastructure 
should: (1) prioritize the creation of American jobs and the 
utilization of American-made products; (2) support a healthy 
and sustainable economy and environment; and (3) protect public 
health and safety. The Subcommittee will focus on getting 
projects built efficiently, cost effectively, and in a 
resilient and sustainable manner, delivering long-term project 
benefits to the public while also ensuring compliance with 
existing planning and environmental laws.
    3. EPA--Superfund/Comprehensive Environmental Response, 
Compensation, and Liability Act and Brownfields. The Superfund 
program under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, 
Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA; P.L. 96-510) is aimed 
at cleaning up land in the U.S. that has been contaminated by 
hazardous waste and poses a risk to human health and/or the 
environment. The Brownfields program was authorized under the 
Brownfields Revitalization and Environmental Restoration Act 
(title II of P.L. 107-118, which amended CERCLA). The 
Brownfields program is aimed at enhancing state, local, and 
private-sector cleanups of properties, the redevelopment or 
reuse of which may be complicated by the presence or potential 
presence of a contaminant. Unaddressed brownfields and 
Superfund sites drive down property values and tax revenues, 
pose potential human health concerns, and can deter 
reinvestment in cities and towns. The Brownfields program 
protects from Superfund liability many parties engaged in 
voluntary brownfields cleanups, and supports state and local 
brownfields assessment and cleanup activities, and state 
voluntary cleanup programs. The Subcommittee's oversight will 
focus on issues related to implementation of the Superfund and 
Brownfields programs.
    The Subcommittee will also review efforts to improve the 
efficiency and effectiveness of the contaminated site cleanup 
process, the process of assessing natural resources damages, 
and the efforts to hold responsible parties accountable, 
consistent with federal law. In addition, the Subcommittee will 
review the liability, financing, and settlement mechanisms and 
procedures under the current Superfund program, including the 
relation of funding sources and levels for the Superfund and 
Brownfields programs to current demands and needs. The 
Subcommittee will continue reviewing implementation of the 
EPA's brownfields program, including changes to the program 
enacted in the BUILD Act (P.L. 115-141).
    The Subcommittee also will review the role of the states in 
conducting and financing cleanups, and review the relationships 
among the states, the EPA, and other federal entities in 
implementing the Superfund and Brownfields programs.
    In addition, the GAO in 2017 added to its high-risk list 
the U.S. Government's environmental liabilities for cleaning up 
areas where Federal activities have contaminated the 
environment.\20\ Various Federal laws, including the Superfund 
law, agreements with States, and court decisions require the 
Federal government to clean up environmental hazards at Federal 
sites and facilities. According to GAO, in fiscal year 2016, 
the Federal government's estimated environmental liability was 
$447 billion; however, this estimate does not reflect all of 
the future cleanup responsibilities Federal agencies may 
face.\21\ The Committee will conduct oversight of the Federal 
government's actions to assess, quantify, and address its 
environmental liabilities as they relate to those Federal 
agencies and laws under the jurisdiction of the Committee.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    \20\U.S. Government Accountability Office, Report to Congressional 
Committees, High Risk Series: Progress on Many High-Risk Areas, While 
Substantial Efforts Needed on Others (GAO-17-317, February 2017) 
(available at https://www.gao.gov/products/GAO-17-317 and https://
www.gao.gov/assets/690/682765.pdf).
    \21\Id.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    4. Tennessee Valley Authority. The Subcommittee will review 
the management of the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) and its 
programs, including its energy program, operations in the 
current marketplace, its long-term management of the TVA 
assets, properties, and byproducts of energy generation, and 
the impact of the TVA debt on its long-term goals. The 
Subcommittee may also examine issues related to its management 
of the TVA workforce and the TVA's responsibilities in meeting 
its employee pension and retirement obligations.
    5. Saint Lawrence Seaway Development Corporation. The Saint 
Lawrence Seaway Development Corporation (SLSDC) is a wholly-
owned government enterprise created in 1954 to construct, 
operate, and develop jointly with Canada a seaway between 
Montreal and Lake Erie. The SLSDC is operated under the 
Secretary of Transportation's general direction and 
supervision. The Subcommittee will review the overall 
operations of the SLSDC, the management of commercial traffic 
through the St. Lawrence Seaway in coordination with Canada's 
Saint Lawrence Seaway Authority, and the progress made by the 
SLSDC in meeting its 10-year asset renewal effort for U.S.-
controlled assets of the Seaway.
    6. Natural Resources Conservation Service. The Natural 
Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) of the Department of 
Agriculture is authorized to give technical and financial help 
to local organizations planning and carrying out watershed 
projects for flood protection, agricultural water management, 
recreation, municipal and industrial water supply, and wildlife 
enhancement. The Subcommittee will review the overall 
operations of the NRCS as they relate to implementation of the 
Watershed and Flood Prevention programs and Watershed 
Rehabilitation Program, which are under the jurisdiction of the 
Subcommittee.
    7. International Boundary and Water Commission. The 
International Boundary and Water Commission (IBWC) was 
established in 1889 with the responsibility for applying the 
boundary and water treaties between the U.S. and Mexico and 
settling any disputes over their application. The body is 
comprised of both U.S. and Mexican sections, headed by an 
Engineer-Commissioner who is appointed by the President. The 
U.S. Section is headquartered in El Paso, TX and operates under 
the guidance of the State Department. The IBWC carries out, in 
accordance with their governing treaties, the distribution, 
regulation, and conservation of water in the Rio Grande and 
Colorado Rivers for use by both countries; joint construction, 
operations, and maintenance of international storage dams and 
reservoirs; and hydroelectric plants, flood protection, and 
sanitation projects for border water quality problems, as well 
as demarcating the boundary between the U.S. and Mexico.
    The Subcommittee will review the overall operations of the 
IBWC, including its management of several flood damage 
reduction and water supply infrastructure projects under the 
authority of the Commission.

                     OVERSIGHT PLAN--MINORITY VIEWS

    Although much of the Oversight Plan was developed in a 
bipartisan manner, the Minority Members submit additional 
minority views to clarify one aspect of the Oversight Plan with 
regard to the Subcommittee on Highways and Transit, 
specifically, the paragraph regarding ``Surface Transportation 
Investment--Current and Future Needs.'' While the minority 
agrees it is important to build stronger, more resilient 
transportation networks, we do not agree with the specificity 
of the purpose for doing so set forth by the majority. As we 
seek to maximize scarce taxpayer resources, reduce future 
costs, and ensure communities are able to re-build, the 
minority continues to believe that building stronger, more 
resilient transportation infrastructure is simply good 
practice. With that, we submit the following modification to 
the portion of the Oversight Plan which specifically addresses 
work under the Subcommittee on Highways and Transit.

                  SUBCOMMITTEE ON HIGHWAYS AND TRANSIT

    1. Surface Transportation Investment--Current and Future 
Needs. Bringing the Nation's crumbling transportation 
infrastructure to a state of good repair, upgrading bridges, 
improving road quality, addressing capacity needs, and ensuring 
access to reliable transit options will require substantial 
investment. According to the Department of Transportation 
(DOT), we need to invest $1.7 trillion at all levels of 
government over the next 10 years to bring roads, bridges, and 
transit systems to a state of good repair and to expand 
capacity. At the same time, transportation investments made 
today must meet the needs of the future. This includes 
utilizing new technologies and incorporating innovative 
mobility solutions to move people and goods more safely and 
efficiently. This also includes building stronger, more 
resilient transportation networks. The Subcommittee will probe 
surface transportation investment needs and emerging policy 
areas in preparation for a long-term reauthorization bill.
                                   Sam Graves,
                                           Ranking Member.

                     COMMITTEE ON VETERANS' AFFAIRS

                             OVERSIGHT PLAN

    Pursuant to rule X of the House of Representatives, the 
Committee on Veterans' Affairs is responsible for determining 
whether laws and programs within its jurisdiction are being 
implemented according to Congressional intent. The Committee on 
Veterans' Affairs conducts its oversight with the help of five 
Subcommittees: the Subcommittee on Disability Assistance and 
Memorial Affairs, the Subcommittee on Economic Opportunity, the 
Subcommittee on Health, the Subcommittee on Oversight and 
Investigations, and the Subcommittee on Technology 
Modernization. It is expected that oversight of the issues 
outlined below will be a shared responsibility of both the full 
Committee and the appropriate subcommittees.

       Subcommittee on Disability Assistance and Memorial Affairs

    Appeals Reform.--The Veterans Benefits Administration (VBA) 
and the Board of Veterans Appeals (BVA) are responsible for 
reviewing a veterans' appeal when they disagree with the 
decision made by a Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) Regional 
Office (RO) on their initial benefits claim. In August of 2017, 
the Appeals Improvement and Modernization Act was signed into 
law (P.L. 115-55) in an attempt to reduce the growing number of 
appeals, to reduce the time veterans waited for a decision, and 
to streamline the process. After 18 months of planning and 
preparation, the Secretary of VA must ``certify'' that the 
necessary procedures, regulations, staff, and IT are in place 
for successful implementation by February 15, 2019. As a first 
order of business, the Committee will assess whether this 
timeline has been met and whether impediments exist to a 
successful and timely roll out of this long-awaited reform. The 
Committee also intends to continue the pattern of holding 
status hearings at regular intervals so that VA leadership is 
held publicly accountable for meeting the goals clearly stated 
in the statute to provide fairer, more timely, and more 
accurate appeals decisions for veterans, and for soliciting and 
incorporating input from veterans service organizations in 
every aspect of this effort. The Committee intends to continue 
past efforts to ensure that all veteran-facing communications 
such as decision letters and informational websites use plain--
focus-group-tested--English designed to provide veterans with a 
clear understanding of their rights and the next steps 
available to them.
    VBA Training.--A consistent finding by the VA Office of the 
Inspector General (IG) across a wide variety of programs is 
that Veterans Benefits Administration's (VBA) training is 
generally ineffective and results in many errors. In the past, 
VBA's challenge training was poor and did not adequately 
prepare examiners to process claims. The VBA manual is 
frequently updated, and employees are not required to undergo 
new training or open email notifications explaining the 
changes. The Committee will conduct oversight of the quality of 
current VBA training and how VBA implements new training. If 
necessary, it will recommend steps necessary to improve 
training, so veterans receive the benefits to which they are 
entitled. VA employees who are evaluated through work credits 
earned for accuracy and speed--often without adequate training 
or time to understand process changes--will be asked directly 
for their recommendations for how to improve the training they 
receive with the goal of ensuring that the veterans receive 
full and fair consideration of the evidence in their claims so 
decisions are not rushed through with only a cursory look. The 
Committee will ask VBA to describe ways employee input is 
incorporated in the planning and implementation of program 
training throughout VBA on an ongoing basis.
    Military Sexual Trauma.--The VBA reported that it processed 
approximately 12,000 veterans' claims per year for post-
traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) related to military sexual 
trauma (MST) over the last three years. A number of years ago, 
VA relaxed the evidentiary requirements and directed claims 
processors to look for ``markers'' (i.e., signs, events, or 
circumstances) that provide some indication that the traumatic 
event happened. In FY 2017, VBA denied about 5,500 or 46 
percent of those claims. A review by the IG determined that 
nearly half of those were not properly processed in accordance 
with VBA policy which may have resulted in the denial of 
benefits to victims of MST who may have been entitled to 
receive them. Almost immediately after the release of the 
report, the Under Secretary for Benefits responded by requiring 
enhanced training for clinicians conducting disability exams 
for MST-related PTSD claims, for all newly-hired claims 
processors, and for Women Veterans Coordinators and MST 
Coordinators. The Under Secretary also announced his intention 
to revisit whether separate lanes in only a few ROs should be 
established so these complicated claims could be processed by 
specialized employees. The Committee intends to closely monitor 
all aspects of these and other process changes VA will be using 
to adjudicate claims for PTSD as a result of MST. The Committee 
will also provide vigorous oversight of the promised 
reconsideration of many of the denied claims described in the 
IG report. The Committee will also consider whether 
codification of the current evidentiary standard might lead to 
greater consistency and improved quality for veterans filing 
MST related claims.
    National Cemeteries.--The Committee will continue oversight 
of the National Cemetery Administration (NCA), Arlington 
National Cemetery (ANC), and the American Battle Monuments 
Commission (ABMC), to include each organization's mission, 
operations, and inquiries into matters of unclaimed remains, 
access, and the methodology for determining veteran 
satisfaction. Each of the above organizations provides a 
hallowed resting place for veterans. VA alone operates over 150 
National Cemeteries to provide an honorable resting placed for 
veterans and certain dependents. While customer service surveys 
continue to give the NCA high marks for the services they 
provide veterans and their survivors, the Committee intends to 
conduct oversight of the relatively new Legacy Program to 
ensure the curricula and instructional materials produced 
through NCA contracts with institutions of higher education are 
following and meeting the goals of the program. The Committee 
will consider proposals to convert from a Federal contract 
program to a grant program. The Committee will also oversee 
whether there is significant backlog in the Pre-Need program 
designed to provide veterans with the assurance before death of 
their eligibility for burial benefits. If a significant backlog 
exists the Committee will work with the NCA until it is 
eliminated, ensuring a timely and streamlined funeral process 
for family members making final arrangements.
    Deported Veterans.--VBA has processed roughly one-million 
disability claims a year for the past five years. A sub-set of 
these claims are from veterans who live outside of the United 
States. Veterans living abroad are eligible for the same 
disability compensation benefits as domestic veterans. VBA 
primarily relies on a specialized team in a Veterans Service 
Center to process claims for veterans living abroad, including 
obtaining and translating medical evidence and examinations for 
these veterans. On average, VBA takes longer to make a 
disability determination on claims filed by veterans living 
abroad, which is not unexpected given the need to translate 
medical information. However, questions have been raised about 
whether some veterans living abroad are inappropriately being 
denied claims or given lower disability ratings. The Committee 
will assess the outcomes of claims for veterans living abroad 
and factors that contribute to these outcomes. The Committee 
will also determine whether the Secretary should conduct a 
review of deported veterans' claims to determine if claims have 
been unduly denied because of a misunderstanding of the 
regulations as they pertain to deportation. The Committee will 
consider a recommendation that the Secretary establish a full-
time position within the VA to provide information and support 
to deported veterans and guide them through the appropriate 
steps in the benefits process. The liaison would also serve as 
the point of contact at VA for the Departments of Defense and 
Justice on deported veteran policy.
    Fiduciary Reform.--The Committee will review the 
performance of the VBA Fiduciary Program. The program is 
designed to provide financial security to veterans who have 
been determined unable to manage their VA benefit payments. 
Fiduciaries are designated by VA and can be a family member, a 
close friend, or a professional fiduciary. IG reviewed VA's 
Fiduciary Program to determine whether VBA finalized proposed 
incompetency determinations in a timely manner. IG found delays 
in final competency determinations completed in the latter part 
of 2017. These delays can result in incompetent beneficiaries 
receiving ongoing benefits payments without protection of a VA 
appointed fiduciary and in beneficiaries waiting longer for 
withheld retroactive benefits. The Committee will review 
legislation that would better enable VBA to protect and serve 
veterans in need of fiduciary support, taking particular 
interest in a proposal that currently required site inspections 
be replaced in some cases by phone call reviews.
    Contract Physicians.--Some veterans require a VA medical 
examination as a part of the adjudication of a claim for 
disability benefits. Unfortunately, there are not enough VA 
examiners to perform these evaluations in a timely manner, and 
some veterans experience lengthy delays before VA is able to 
schedule such examinations. It may be especially difficult for 
VA to timely schedule these examinations if the veteran needs 
to see a specialist, such as a cardiologist or orthopedic 
surgeon. Moreover, veterans who live in rural areas may have to 
travel many miles to a VA facility in order to see a VA 
examiner for a disability examination. To provide veterans with 
more timely examinations, VA has authority to contract with 
independent physicians to conduct disability examinations. The 
Committee will look into whether this program is functioning as 
intended.
    Manila Regional Office.--The authorization for the Manila 
Regional Office expires on September 30, 2019. The Committee 
will look at whether the Manila Regional Office is providing 
effective and efficient services to World War II veterans who 
reside in the Philippines.
    The Advisory Committee on Minority Veterans.--The Advisory 
Committee on Minority Veterans provides advice to the Secretary 
on the administration of VA benefits for veterans who are 
minority group members on the topics of health care, 
compensation, and other services. The authorization for the 
Advisory Committee on Minority Veterans expires on December 31, 
2019. The Committee will conduct oversight to make sure that 
this program is ensuring that all veterans receive the respect 
and services to which they are entitled.
    Department of Veterans Affairs Debt Collection 
Activities.--Section 504 of the Veterans Benefits and 
Transition Act of 2018 mandates that VA work with VSOs to 
develop a new standard format for notification letters that, in 
plain language, clearly explain why such alleged debt was 
created, and the steps the veteran can take to dispute or 
mitigate the debt. VA is required to notify Congress when the 
development of such letter is complete. If such letter is not 
complete within 90 days of the date of enactment, VA shall 
notify Congress and detail the progress of developing the 
letter and explain why such letter is not complete. 
Furthermore, VA shall submit a report to Congress every 30 days 
thereafter, until development of such letter is complete.
    This section would also require the Secretary to develop an 
option for individual to choose to receive notice of a debt by 
electronic means. Those individuals who do not elect to receive 
electronic notification will receive their letter by standard 
mail. Sec. 504 would also require the Secretary to coordinate 
with the Secretary of the Treasury to research the number of 
veterans who do not receive debt notification letters and 
provide a report to Congress detailing the steps VA (working 
with the Treasury) can adopt to reduce the number of notices 
sent to incorrect addresses and provide a timeline for adopting 
such options. The report would also include an estimated cost 
of sending debt collection letters via certified mail, and an 
analysis of the effectiveness of sending notices by certified 
mail, among other considerations.

                  Subcommittee on Economic Opportunity

    Effectiveness of the Transition Assistance Program (TAP).--
The Committee continues to be concerned about the effectiveness 
of the TAP program which is intended to prepare servicemembers 
for their return to civilian life. The Departments of Defense 
(DoD), VA, and Department of Labor (DoL) jointly manage and 
provide content to the five-day course that focuses on skills 
needed to obtain gainful employment as well as an understanding 
of the benefits that are available to them from VA and DoL. The 
Committee will conduct an oversight hearing with GAO, DoD, VA, 
and DoL to discuss the recent changes made in the Fiscal Year 
2019 National Defense Authorization Act, implementation of 
those changes, and discuss how TAP can continue to be enhanced 
for transitioning servicemembers and their families. The 
Committee will work with the Committees on Armed Services and 
Education and Labor to address cross-jurisdictional issues to 
improve the TAP program.
    Effectiveness and Outcomes of Education and Training 
Programs for Returning Veterans.--The Post-9/11 GI bill, which 
is administered by VA, is the most generous education program 
for veterans since the original World War II GI Bill. Based on 
the length of service, the program funds up to full tuition and 
fees at public institutions of higher learning and about 
$23,600 per year at private institutions as well as a monthly 
living stipend based on the housing allowance paid to 
servicemembers at the rank of E-5 (with dependents) and the zip 
code of the location where the veteran is taking the majority 
of their classes. Recent changes to the program have increased 
the benefit tiers for servicemembers that serve less than three 
years on active duty, restored benefit eligibility for 
individuals who attended an institution of higher learning that 
closed mid-semester, and expanded eligibility for National 
Guard and Reserve Component servicemembers mobilized under 
certain orders. The Committee intends to determine how VA is 
implementing those changes, as well as others included in the 
Harry W. Colmery Veterans Educational Assistance Act of 2017. 
Further, as avenues for learning and training continue to 
evolve and modernize, the Committee will examine these new 
programs and examine the effectiveness of institutions of 
higher learning in providing quality education to 
servicemembers, veterans, and survivors. In addition, the 
Committee will examine outcome measures for users of the Post-
9/11 GI Bill, including graduation rates and job placement 
data, to ensure the effectiveness of taxpayers' investment in 
veterans' education benefits and identify predatory 
institutions targeting servicemembers, veterans, and survivors. 
The Committee will work with the State Approving Agencies to 
put in place policies that protect student veterans against 
predatory or deceitful recruiting practices of schools, such as 
providing misinformation about student outcomes or encouraging 
veterans to take out unnecessary private student loans.
    Vocational Rehabilitation and Employment (VR&E) program.--
VA's VR&E program provides education and training benefits for 
disabled veterans with barriers to employment. The program will 
fund all costs related to long and short-term education and 
training as well as immediate job placement services. VR&E also 
manages the Independent Living (IL) program designed to enable 
the most severely injured veterans to live as independently as 
possible and the Veteran Success on Campus program, which 
currently stations VA Vocational Rehabilitation staff at 
institutions of higher learning. The Committee continues to be 
concerned about counselor caseloads and outcomes of VR&E 
programs as well as the administration of the self-employment 
track of the VR&E program, which can often result in high 
costs. The Committee will also conduct oversight over 
management and overall effectiveness of the VR&E program.
    Loan Guaranty Service.--VA's Loan Guaranty Service provides 
a loan guaranty benefit to eligible veterans and 
servicemembers, which enables them to purchase a home at a 
competitive interest rate often without requiring a down 
payment or private mortgage insurance. This benefit is highly 
beneficial to veterans, servicemembers, and their families. 
Therefore, the Committee plans to conduct oversight of the home 
loan program with a focus on the appraisal process as well as a 
continued focus on the need for an increased, or eliminated, 
cap on the loan limits for a VA-backed loan. The Loan Guaranty 
Service also administers grants under the Specially Adapted 
Housing (SAH) program and the Special Housing Adaptation (SHA) 
program. These grants, provided to eligible veterans with 
permanent and total service-connected disabilities, enables the 
veteran to adapt their home or construct a new home that allows 
them to live in a home that is not obstructive to them due to 
their disabilities. These grants are beneficial for the most 
severely injured veterans, and the Committee intends to 
evaluate the overall grant amounts and what is needed to adapt 
a home. The Committee will also examine whether VA can better 
interact with and track the contractors that veterans use to 
make adaptations to their homes. There is also a smaller grant 
under the SAH program, the SAH Assistive Technology (SAHAT) 
grant program, which is authorized to award grants up to 
$200,000 per fiscal year per grantee to make certain technical 
adaptations to the veteran's home, such as voice recognition 
operations and adaptive feeding equipment. SAHAT is authorized 
$1 million and the authorization expires on September 30, 2020. 
The Committee will examine the SAHAT program and how it is 
administered.
    Adaptive Sports Program.--This program is administered by 
VA, which provides grants to qualifying organizations who 
provide adaptive sports activities and opportunities at the 
local, regional and national levels, including Paralympic 
activities, to disabled veterans and servicemembers. This 
program is authorized at $8 million. The authorization for the 
Adaptive Sports Program expires on September 30, 2020. The 
Committee will continue to examine how VA awards grants under 
this program and the organizations who are receiving funding, 
as well as how VA is working with local communities and the 
Paralympic community to promote and enhance adaptive sports 
programs for disabled veterans and servicemembers.
    Office of Small and Disadvantaged Business Utilization 
(OSDBU).--VA's OSDBU is responsible for vetting the 
applications of veteran and service-disabled veteran owned 
small businesses wanting to participate in the program designed 
to increase the amount of procurement dollars spent with 
veteran and disabled veteran-owned small businesses. The 
Committee will review OSDBU's performance and coordinate with 
the Small Business Committee to determine appropriate 
alternatives.
    Licensing and Credentialing Issues.--DoD spends billions of 
tax dollars to provide servicemembers with the skills needed to 
complete DoD's mission. The vast majority of those skills 
translate well to civilian jobs. Unfortunately, not all states 
and institutions of higher learning recognize and give credit 
for military training to qualify for state-licensed positions; 
therefore, the training provided by DoD is essentially wasted. 
The Committee will review efforts by states and other entities 
to provide appropriate licenses and credentials to qualified 
veterans whose military training make them eligible for such 
credentials or licenses, as well as the progress that states 
are making to make certain licenses and credentials 
transferable across state lines.
    Homeless Veteran Reintegration Program (HVRP).--HVRP is a 
program administered by DoL's Veteran Employment and Training 
Service (VETS), which provides grants to state and local 
workforce investment boards, local public agencies, and 
nonprofit organizations, and tribal governments, including 
faith-based and community organizations. The organizations that 
compete and receive these grants provide homeless veterans with 
occupational, classroom and on-the-job training as well as job 
search and placement assistance. The authorization for HVRP 
expires on September 30, 2020. The Committee will examine the 
organizations that are receiving these grants as well as 
conduct oversight of VETS awarding of these grants, and how the 
program can be enhanced at the federal and state levels to 
place more homeless veterans in careers. The Committee will 
also work with the Committee on Education and Labor to examine 
how HVRP harmonizes with other areas of DoL.
    Performance of the VETS State Grant program including 
performance of the Disabled Veterans Outreach Program 
Specialist/ Local Veterans Employment Representative (DVOPS and 
LVERs) use of Employment Outcome Measures.--The DVOPS/LVER 
program is administered by DoL VETS and funds state employment 
service staff dedicated to placing veterans in good-paying 
jobs. There are significant issues surrounding the inconsistent 
performance of this program across the states and the outcome 
measures used to determine performance continue to be 
inadequate. The Committee will continue to review this program 
and the performance outcomes of DVOPS and LVERs as well as 
conduct oversight of the National Veterans' Training Institute 
(NVTI), which trains DVOPS and LVERs on job placement and 
training skills for veterans.
    Homeless Veterans.--The Committee will thoroughly examine 
the actions VA has taken to reduce veteran homelessness by 
providing homeless and at-risk veterans with appropriate 
housing and supportive services. The Committee will examine the 
Supportive Services for Veteran Families (SSVF) and Housing and 
Urban Development-Veterans Affairs Supportive Housing (HUD-
VASH) programs and will work to ensure that the progress VA has 
made in lessening the number of veterans who are homeless 
continues to be successful and sustainable and that VA efforts 
address the myriad factors that underlie veteran homelessness, 
rather than just increased housing opportunities. The Committee 
will also continue to oversee VA's integration efforts to 
support vulnerable veterans by facilitating access to benefits, 
care, and services.

                         Subcommittee on Health

    Implementation of VA's Community Care Networks.--The 
Committee will work with VA to ensure the development of 
Community Care Networks align with congressional intent behind 
passage of the VA MISSION Act of 2018 (MISSION Act). The 
MISSION Act is intended to reform delivery of VA community care 
and expand the Caregiver Support Program to include veterans of 
all eras. It is estimated to cost roughly $47 billion over five 
years by the Congressional Budget Office. As part of the 
Committee's work, it will consider responsible funding 
mechanisms which failed to be included in the MISSION Act. This 
would prevent VA from being forced to cut funding to other VA 
programs--including healthcare provided in VA facilities--to 
pay for more expensive, lower quality, and less culturally 
competent services available in the private sector. Multiple 
studies have found VA to deliver a higher quality of healthcare 
than its private sector counterparts. The Committee will 
consider actions to preserve and continually improve veterans' 
access to high-quality, VA healthcare. Additionally, the 
Committee will work more closely with veteran service 
organizations to ensure VA's Community Care Networks operate 
according to the desires of the nation's approximately 20 
million veterans.
    Health Equity.--The Committee will consider measures to 
ensure all eligible veterans, regardless of social or physical 
disparities, are allowed the opportunity to participate in the 
nation's most advanced, qualified, and culturally competent 
healthcare system designed to serve them: the Veterans Health 
Administration (VHA). According to multiple authorities such as 
the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, health 
inequities can result in lower life expectancy, lower quality 
of life, higher rates of disease, disability, death, and other 
adverse health outcomes. The Committee is committed to ensuring 
all veterans are allowed the opportunity to access physicians 
and treatments in environments that are welcoming and safe, 
regardless of social determinants of health.
    Mental Health and Suicide Prevention.--The Committee will 
continue to closely monitor VA's mental health and suicide 
prevention efforts. In 2018, VA was found to have 
misrepresented the number of veterans included in its annual 
suicide data report as it apparently included both active duty 
service members and never-before activated national guardsmen 
and women. Additionally, the U.S. Government Accountability 
Office (GAO) found that in 2018, VA's suicide prevention 
outreach activities declined significantly after four 
consecutive years of increases. Due to the critical nature of 
this issue, the Committee is committed to continuing oversight 
of VA's current suicide prevention activities and support VA's 
innovative research in this area, such as the development of 
the REACHVET technology created in conjunction with the 
National Institutes of Health.
    Pain and Medication Management and Complementary and 
Integrative Health.--The Committee will continue to examine the 
increased use of prescription medications to treat veterans 
experiencing acute and chronic pain. Effective pain management 
is a critical issue for the veteran population as data suggests 
veterans are a particularly high-risk population for 
prescription misuse, substance use disorder, accidental 
overdose, accidents, and/or self-inflicted injury. Recent 
studies have shown that veterans with the highest-risk 
conditions are also the most likely to receive the highest-
dose, highest-risk opioid therapies. By working with the 
medical community and veterans, the Committee will pursue 
reasonable alternatives to opioid usage that promote healing, 
reduce negative side effects associated with opioid usage, and 
allow veterans to understand and determine the best method of 
pain management that works for them. Additionally, the 
Committee will encourage access to integrative healthcare to 
ensure veterans treatment options are not limited to 
pharmacological interventions.
    Expansion of the Program for Comprehensive Assistance for 
Family Caregivers.--As part of the MISSION Act, Congress 
authorized, but did not fund, an expansion of the Program for 
Comprehensive Assistance for Family Caregivers (``Caregiver 
Program'') so that family caregivers for veterans of all eras 
could access the increased support formerly available only to 
veterans who served after September 11, 2001. The Committee 
will consider measures to ensure implementation and expansion 
of the Caregiver Program aligns with congressional intent that 
current eligibility requirements be preserved and expanded to 
all eras. The Committee will also oversee the implementation of 
the IT system for the Caregiver Program which was originally 
mandated as part of the Caregivers and Veterans Omnibus Health 
Services Act of 2010, and again mandated as part of the VA 
MISSION Act of 2018. The Committee will consider measures to 
increase both Congressional support for the program and 
accountability measures related to implementation and expansion 
of the Caregiver Program.
    Anywhere to Anywhere Telehealth Services.--The Committee 
will consider measures to support and advance VA's 2018 
Anywhere to Anywhere' initiative. The initiative is an effort 
by VA to expand access to healthcare through virtual 
technologies such as Real-Time and Store-and-Forward 
Telehealth, as well as services to allow veterans to access 
telehealth technologies from their homes. As part of the 
Committee's work, it will focus on the accessibility and 
usability of these services by both rural providers and 
veteran-patients.
    Long Term Support and Services.--The Committee will assess 
VA's broad array of Long Term Support and Services (LTSS) to 
ensure eligible veterans have access to the most up-to-date 
methods of care delivery. It is projected that by 2030, one in 
five Americans will be a senior citizen. VA's VetPop 2016 
Projection Model indicates that while the entire veteran 
population is expected to decrease from 20 million in 2017 to 
13.6 million in 2037, the baby boomer generation (born 1946-
1964), will continue to be a substantial percentage of the 
total population. Within VA, LTSS refers to both home and 
community-based services (HCBS) as well as institution-based 
services. While VA has developed a network of institution-based 
services consisting of VA Community Living Centers, State 
Veterans Homes, and contracted nursing homes, VA must now work 
to develop a network of HCBS. The Committee will consider 
measures that promote a balance of institutional and non-
institutional based services able to support the growing aging-
veteran population.
    Healthcare for Homeless Veterans.--The Committee will 
continue to combat veteran homelessness by considering measures 
that increase homeless and at-risk veterans' access to 
healthcare and services provided by both VA and its community 
partners. As part of this work, the Committee looks to empower 
and support each Veterans Integrated Service Network's (VISN) 
Homeless Coordinator to conduct aggressive outreach and develop 
strong community partnerships within each VISN's catchment 
area.
    VA Research.--The Committee will oversee VA's medical and 
prosthetic research program to identify and eliminate 
redundancies and ensure the dissemination of best practices and 
a focus on veteran-centric research. VA's Office of Research 
and Development was established in 1925 to fulfill VA's mission 
``to discover knowledge and create innovations that advance 
healthcare for veterans and the Nation.'' The Committee intends 
to promote this goal by supporting research into the areas most 
likely to enhance the quality and delivery of healthcare to 
veterans, such as the effects of hazardous exposures on 
veterans and their families and efficacy of medicinal cannabis 
to treat medical conditions specific and non-specific to the 
veteran population.
    Enhanced Efficiency through Predictability.--Although the 
Committee understands that some programs, during their infancy, 
should not be made permanent, many temporarily authorized VA 
programs have proven essential to improving veterans' health 
and should be made permanent. Permanent authority for programs 
such as the Child Care Pilot Program and Transportation Grants 
for Veteran Service Organization (both expected to expire 
September 30, 2019) would likely increase veterans' confidence 
that these services will be available as needed and would also 
increase the efficiency of these programs by allowing for long 
term planning and permanent funding. The Committee plans to 
assess temporary programs and determine whether they should be 
made permanent.

              Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations

    VA Inspector General Budget and Performance.--The Committee 
will review the budget of the VA Inspector General (IG) and 
review how VA uses the recommendations of the IG to increase 
efficiency and effectiveness in providing services to veterans. 
The Committee will also examine the IG's current resources 
versus workload to confirm that IG has the resources to 
investigate hotline complaints, congressional requests, and 
conduct routine inspections and audits. The Committee will also 
closely monitor whether IG is granted access to VA documents, 
information, and employees when requested, and act to ensure IG 
has the access and authority to conduct its investigations, 
inspections, and audits.
    Improper Influence by Non-Government Actors and Government 
Transparency.--The Committee will investigate instances of non-
government actors attempting to improperly influence the 
execution of VA's mission. It will also examine VA's adherence 
to federal laws preventing corruption, political influence, 
private entities' improper influence on the VA, and government 
transparency, including the Federal Advisory Committee Act, the 
Hatch Act, and the Freedom of Information Act.
    Whistleblowers.--Whistleblowers continue to be a vital 
source of accurate and timely information. Protecting an 
employee's legal right to communicate with Congress, and report 
to the IG alleged violations of laws, rules or regulations, 
waste, abuse, mismanagement, and safety issues is essential for 
investigations and effective oversight of the executive branch. 
Despite passage of the Accountability and Whistleblower 
Protection Act of 2017 (Accountability Act), the Office of 
Special Counsel (OSC) reports that over 40 percent of its 
whistleblower retaliation complaints originate from VA, and the 
Committee has observed an increase in the number of 
whistleblower complaints to Congress. The Committee will 
examine the implementation of the Accountability Act, including 
the implementation and operations of the Office of 
Accountability and Whistleblower Protection, and its 
effectiveness at assisting whistleblowers and investigating 
complaints.
    Mental Health and Suicide Prevention.--The Committee will 
continue to closely monitor VA's mental health and suicide 
prevention efforts. In December 2018, the Government 
Accountability Office (GAO) found that the Veterans Health 
Administration's (VHA) suicide prevention outreach declined 
significantly since 2016 due to lack of leadership and 
significant turnover. Of the $6.2 million obligated for suicide 
prevention paid media, VHA had spent only $57,000 of its paid 
media budget as of September 2018. Furthermore, a September 
2018 IG report found that a veteran who committed suicide in 
the parking lot of a VA medical facility had not received 
coordination of treatment during discharge, including adequate 
documentation of access to firearms. As veteran suicides in VA 
medical facility parking lots increase, the Committee will 
examine VA's top clinical priority and its efforts to provide 
mental and behavioral health treatment to veterans in crisis, 
including VA's decision to stop publishing the statistic that 
20 veterans and military servicemembers commit suicide every 
day, stalled implementation of the President's January 2018 
Executive Order, ``Supporting our Veterans During their 
Transition from Uniformed Service to Civilian Life,'' and its 
failure to effectively notify veterans of the mental health 
services it offers.
    Government Accountability Office High Risk List.--The VHA 
has been on the High Risk List (HRL) since 2015. The five areas 
of concern GAO identified when it decided to place VHA on the 
HRL are: (1) ambiguous policies and inconsistent processes; (2) 
inadequate oversight and accountability; (3) information 
technology (IT) challenges; (4) inadequate training for VA 
staff; and (5) unclear resource needs and allocation 
priorities. According to GAO, VHA has not made demonstrable 
progress towards removal from the HRL. GAO has five criteria 
for removal: (1) leadership commitment, (2) capacity, (3) 
action plan, (4) monitoring, and (5) demonstrated progress. The 
Committee is concerned that root causes have yet to be 
identified and appropriately analyzed, plans to remove VHA have 
not been sufficiently developed, and actions have not been 
taken according to plans. VHA has been without an Under 
Secretary for Health since January 2017, demonstrating a lack 
of senior leadership commitment towards VHA's removal.
    VA's Acquisition Process.--VA continues to spend more than 
$20 billion annually for the procurement of pharmaceuticals, 
medical and surgical supplies, prosthetic devices, information 
technology, construction, and services. VA faces significant 
organizational and workforce challenges, so it is capable of 
implementing a more efficient, effective, and coordinated 
acquisition function. The Committee will continue to scrutinize 
and pursue possible legislative remedies to address VA's 
procurement practices and functions that place the program at 
risk, including: lack of inventory controls at VA medical 
centers, over-reliance on and misuse of purchase cards, failure 
to include clinicians and end-users in the procurement process, 
failure to notify and train the VA contracting workforce on 
changes to policies, directives, and regulations, and failure 
to comply with the Veterans First Contracting Program.
    Prescription of Opioids and Treatment for Pain.--The 
Committee will scrutinize VA's medication prescription program, 
its opioid safety initiative, substance abuse treatment 
programs, and access to alternative chronic and acute pain 
treatments. The Committee will continue to monitor access to 
medication assisted treatment at VA medical facilities, 
adherence to the opioid safety initiative and best practices 
for reducing the prescription of opioids, training of 
clinicians on safe prescribing practices, and monitor VHA 
participation in states' prescription drug monitoring programs. 
It will also continue its oversight work to prevent drug 
diversion within VHA facilities including the review of VHA's 
policies for tracking and managing controlled substances, and 
compliance with inspection requirements.
    VHA Police.--The Committee will conduct oversight of police 
at VHA facilities. In 2018, the IG found that governance of the 
VA police program at VA medical facilities was inadequate. VA 
lacks central oversight of VA police programs at medical 
facilities, or mechanisms to prevent or address civil rights 
violations, abuse, or misconduct caused by VA police. The IG 
also found significant understaffing and inadequate staffing 
models at VA medical facilities. The Dr. Chris Kirkpatrick 
Whistleblower Protection Act of 2017 also mandated a GAO study 
on staffing accountability, reporting and chain of command 
structure of VA police at VA medical centers that is expected 
to be published this Congress. The Committee will determine 
whether legislative remedies are needed to bring greater 
accountability to the VA police force, prevent real or 
perceived conflicts of interest, and provide avenues of redress 
for those whose rights have been violated by VA police.
    Sexual Harassment at VA.--According to a 2018 Merit Systems 
Protection Board study on sexual harassment in the federal 
workforce, VA had the second highest rate of employees 
experiencing sexual harassment in the federal government. 
However, no significant actions have been taken by VA leaders 
to address sexual harassment. The Committee will conduct fact 
finding to examine the high rate of sexual harassment in the 
VA, develop solutions to prevent and address sexual harassment, 
facilitate an environment in which victims feel comfortable 
reporting sexual harassment, empower employees and supervisors 
to intervene when sexual harassment is witnessed or reported, 
and hold VA leaders accountable for non-action.
    VA Administration, VA Employee Adverse Actions, and Federal 
Labor Protections.--The Committee will continue its oversight 
of disciplinary actions taken against VA employees, including 
the disproportionate removal of lower level VA employees in 
comparison to supervisors and senior VA employees. The 
Committee will also review whether VA employees subject to 
adverse actions receive due process--including access to 
representation. The Committee will examine whether the 
Accountability Act has been implemented according to 
congressional intent and whether it has achieved its desired 
outcome to address poor employee performance and discipline 
employees for misconduct, clean up toxic work environments that 
exist within VA, and hold leaders accountable for non-action or 
contributing to toxic work environments.
    Chronic Understaffing.--According to figures released in 
February 2019, VA currently has 48,985 staff vacancies 
throughout the Department. Almost 43,000 of those vacancies are 
in VHA. The Committee will examine VA's efforts to hire 
employees to address access to healthcare at VA facilities, and 
processing of benefits claims and appeals. It will also examine 
high attrition rates and lack of training for human resources 
employees, and recruitment, hiring, and onboarding processes 
for VA employees. Finally, the Committee will also review rates 
of pay and other recruitment and retention incentives and 
programs.
    Office of the Medical Inspector.--Questionable findings 
released by the VA Office of the Medical Inspector (OMI) in 
three separate congressionally-requested reviews or 
investigations require the Committee to examine the OMI's 
processes and methods for conducting reviews and inspections at 
VA medical facilities. The Committee will also examine whether 
the OMI is resourced appropriately due to significant demands 
placed on the office from the OSC, the VA IG, and VHA.
    Next Generation-Medical Surgical Prime Vendor Program.--NG-
MSPV is the largest procurement program in VA. It is an effort 
to develop a medical-surgical product formulary for use by VHA 
clinicians and achieve major cost savings by buying in bulk. 
This program has been hampered by a lack of leadership, 
resources, clinician involvement, outdated IT systems, and an 
inability to award the necessary contracts in a timely fashion. 
The Committee will continue examining VA's implementation 
effort, including VA's failure to follow the Veterans First 
Contracting Program during development of the formulary, and 
other significant challenges faced by the VA contracting 
organization.
    Construction.--The Committee will closely monitor remaining 
construction projects designed or commenced before the U.S. 
Army Corps of Engineers' (USACE) involvement through 
completion. The Committee will also monitor the relationship 
between the VA and USACE to ensure cooperation and coordination 
between the agencies and improve VA's activation of newly built 
hospitals.
    Leasing.--Leasing land and buildings for new VHA facilities 
is fraught with delays and challenges. Leasing is carried out 
through a complicated interplay of the VA Central Office, the 
Government Services Administration, local offices, and real 
estate broker contractors. Jurisdictional battles within VA, 
poor management of broker contracts, and previous delays in 
congressional authorization have contributed to inefficiencies 
and delays in the system. The Committee will work to uncover 
the root causes of these problems.
    Payment of Community Providers.--VA continues to struggle 
with its failure to promptly pay community providers. This is 
caused in part by a failure to implement updates to its 
software, reliance on dozens of decentralized claims processing 
centers, and inefficient manual adjudication processes. The 
Committee will continue to evaluate the root causes of VA's 
payment deficiencies and consider remedial actions to improve 
efficiency.
    Improper and Over-Payments for Care in the Community.--In 
2017 and 2018, IG audits determined that VA was overcharged 
$140 million from November 2014 to March 2017 by third party 
community care contract administrators. These third-party 
administrators are under civil and criminal investigation for 
excessive, duplicative, or improper claims, and wire fraud and 
misused government funds. The Committee will conduct fact-
finding into whether VA was overcharged and oversee VA's 
efforts to recoup any improperly paid claims.
    Unauthorized or Expiring Authorities.--The Committee will 
conduct oversight regarding unauthorized appropriations and 
expiring authorizations under the Committee's jurisdiction to 
identify those in need of authorization.

                Subcommittee on Technology Modernization

    Electronic Health Record Modernization (EHRM).--The VA 
signed a contract in May 2018 to procure the Cerner Millennium 
EHR system. The implementation is expected to take at least ten 
years, cost over $16 billion, and be interoperable with the 
Department of Defense (DoD) MHS Genesis system and community 
providers' systems. The initial implementation of the system is 
scheduled for March 2020 in VISN 20 (Washington State). The 
Committee will monitor all aspects of implementation of the 
EHRM, including governance and accountability, cost, schedule, 
clinical impact, testing and evaluation, and interoperability, 
among other areas.
    VistA Sustainment.--Because the EHRM is expected to take 
over a decade to implement, the VA will need to sustain the 
existing VistA system at a projected cost of nearly $20 billion 
for ten years. Future implementation sites will need a 
functioning VistA system throughout the implementation period. 
The VA is expected to develop a sustainment plan but has not 
yet done so and is continuing to implement changes (or 
``builds'') to VistA as needed. The Committee will monitor 
efforts to create the sustainment plan and will review how the 
VA manages VistA during EHRM implementation.
    Financial Management System Modernization.--The VA 
continues to move forward with the Financial Management 
Business Transformation (FMBT) project, although significant 
work remains to be done. The project will replace a 30-year-old 
COBOL-based system and is estimated to cost $2.3 billion over 
ten years. The Committee will monitor the program as it moves 
through the analysis and requirements development phase and 
will review the VA's acquisition plans.
    Enterprise Investments.--VA information technology (IT) has 
been on GAO's High Risk List since 2015, and modernization 
plans are currently in development are part of VA's effort to 
be removed from the list. The Committee will evaluate the final 
modernization plans to assess how they address GAO's concerns, 
as well as gauging whether VA's modernization efforts address 
enterprise-wide technology deficits instead of leading to 
further siloing of investments.
    IT Workforce Investments.--The VA has lost internal 
capacity to develop and manage its technology portfolio and has 
become heavily reliant on contractor support. VA officials have 
plans to staff up program offices to address some of this 
deficit, but it is not clear that there is a comprehensive 
workforce plan or whether future budget submissions will 
address this shortfall. The Committee will monitor VA's efforts 
to rebuild its technology expertise and assess whether 
workforce staffing plans will meet technology implementation 
needs and modernization plans.
    Scheduling System Acquisition.--In January 2019, VA 
announced a decision to not move forward with its scheduling 
system pilot--described as very successful--and will instead 
acquire a Cerner scheduling system that will be implemented 
over a two-year period. VA officials have provided little 
information about the decision and how it will impact EHRM 
implementation. The Committee will assess the VA's decision-
making process on the pilot project and will assess the 
implementation across the enterprise and its impacts on the 
EHRM program.
    Cybersecurity, Data Management, and Privacy.--The 
acquisition of new IT systems by VA will prompt many questions 
about cybersecurity and data management. In addition, the 
implementation of EHRM will have implications for the 
protection of veteran health information and will need further 
assessment for cyber risks due to the interoperable environment 
for the system. VA has yet to deliver a cybersecurity strategy 
for EHRM to the Committee. The Committee will monitor and 
review the development of strategies and governance plans 
related to cybersecurity. The Committee will also assess how 
modernization efforts comply with other statutory requirements, 
such as the annual FISMA audit.
    Healthcare Innovation through Technology Modernization.--
The VA has often led in healthcare innovation and the 
modernization projects present opportunities to engage in more 
innovation. The Committee will assess how innovation is being 
built into technology acquisitions and whether it is being 
executed in meaningful ways across the VA enterprise.

                            ADDITIONAL VIEWS

    Rule X of the House of Representatives for the 116th 
Congress no longer requires committees to adopt oversight plans 
in an open meeting. Rule X now requires the Chairman, in 
consultation with the ranking member, to prepare an oversight 
plan; circulate the plan among committee members for at least 
seven days before filing the plan; and gives members the right 
to submit additional views. What follows are additional views 
for the Committee's proposed oversight plan for the 116th 
Congress.
    The Committee's oversight activities must prioritize 
oversight of the department's implementation of 
transformational programs enacted during the 115th Congress. 
Specifically, during the 115th Congress, Congress passed, and 
the president signed into law, several major pieces of 
legislation to improve the benefits and services provided to 
veterans and their families. This legislation included: the VA 
Accountability and Whistleblower Protection Act of 2017, the 
Veterans Appeals Improvement and Modernization Act of 2017, the 
Harry W. Colmery Veterans Educational Assistance Act of 2017, 
and the VA MISSION Act of 2018. Additionally, in May 2018 the 
department embarked on 10-year and $16.1 billion program to 
modernize its electronic health record. Although I largely 
support the majority's proposed oversight plan, I offer the 
following suggestions to improve the plan.

       Subcommittee on Disability Assistance and Memorial Affairs

    VBA Quality Review--VA employs a variety of mechanisms to 
review the quality of initial claims decisions. For example, 
one of VBA's main tools to review the accuracy of claim 
decisions is the Systematic Technical Accuracy Review (STAR) 
checklist. The checklist has a very restrictive category of 
what constitutes an ``error,'' and a more expansive category of 
what would be considered a ``comment,'' which is why VA claims 
a 98 percent accuracy rating despite many complaints by 
veterans and Congress as to the quality of decisions. Moreover, 
by allowing quality reviewers to simply comment on many errors, 
VA can sidestep actually holding employees accountable for 
inaccuracies. Additionally, recent VA Office of Inspector 
General (OIG) reports on reevaluations, intent to files, and 
post-traumatic stress disorder claims based on military sexual 
trauma found that VA's quality control procedures did not 
identify that employees were making systematic errors and, 
therefore, VA failed to develop and update training and 
guidance to prevent these errors in the future. The Committee 
should investigate how VBA has designed its quality review 
measures, to what extent that design yields accurate results, 
and whether VA's quality controls are sufficient to locate 
deficiencies in training and guidance.
    Toxic and Environmental Exposures Benefits--Veterans have 
raised questions about the negative effects that in-service 
toxic and environmental exposures, such as mustard gas/
lewisite, herbicides, and burn pits may have had on certain 
health outcomes. To address some of the concerns, VA has been 
contracting with the National Academies of Sciences, 
Engineering, and Medicine (formerly the Institute of Medicine), 
a non-governmental organization, to scientifically review 
evidence on the long-term health effects of toxic and 
environmental exposures. The Committee should review VA's 
responses to these reports to ensure that veterans who were 
exposed to toxic and environmental exposures receive all the 
benefits they have earned, and whether there are opportunities 
for VA and DOD to conduct additional research to help address 
whether these exposures are causing disabilities in veterans 
that should be subject to VA compensation.
    VA Compliance with Brady Act Reporting Requirements--Under 
the Brady Act, VA is required to report the names of veterans 
and beneficiaries who it adjudicates as in need of a fiduciary 
to manage their finances. The Committee should investigate the 
department's compliance with this reporting requirement and the 
impact that proposed changes to the Brady Act will have on 
veterans' Second Amendment rights.

                  Subcommittee on Economic Opportunity

    Effectiveness of the Transition Assistance Program (TAP)--I 
share the majority's interest in TAP. In its review of the TAP 
program, however, the Committee should also work with the 
Committee on Small Business to review the ``Boots to Business'' 
track of the TAP program that provides transitioning 
servicemembers training on entrepreneurship. The Committee 
should examine ways to connect transitioning servicemembers to 
community-based organizations that can assist them in accessing 
training and services in the community where they transitioning 
to after service. The Committee should also examine how to help 
create and implement meaningful and statistically valid outcome 
measures to validate whether TAP is meeting the needs of 
transitioning servicemembers.
    Vocational Rehabilitation and Employment (VR&E)--I share 
the majority's interest in VR&E. The Committee should also 
examine VA's efforts to modernize the IT systems for 
administering the VR&E benefit. Last Congress, the Committee 
uncovered that VA had paid over $12 million to a third party 
contractor to create a new case management system to help VR&E 
counselors track participants. This system was poorly designed 
and VA ultimately determined that the system was unsalvageable. 
Now VA has decided to purchase a commercial off the shelf 
system along with other IT upgrades to meet the original 
requirements of the case management system. The Committee 
should continue to closely monitor VA's effort and ensure that 
no additional money is wasted on updating this critical system 
for administering VR&E benefits. The Committee should also 
continue to monitor the implementation of the VR&E longitudinal 
study and look for ways to better quantify VR&E outcomes.
    VBA IT Infrastructure--In addition to the aforementioned 
issues with the VR&E case management system, the Committee 
should continue to be concerned with VBA's aging IT 
infrastructure. The age and performance of the myriad systems 
that are required to process a Post 9/11 GI Bill claim warrants 
further attention as well as VBA's efforts to retire and 
modernize these systems. In addition, the Committee should 
continue its oversight of VA's creation of an IT system to 
implement sections 107 and 501 of the Harry W. Colmery Veterans 
Educational Assistance Act of 2017.
    Home Loan Limits--The Committee should investigate whether 
the statutory conforming loan for the VA Home Loan Guaranty 
Program is limiting qualified participants' ability to use this 
benefit.

                         Subcommittee on Health

    Mental Health and Suicide Prevention--I share the 
majority's interest in mental health and suicide prevention. 
The Committee also should continue aggressive oversight of VA's 
mental health programming and associated funding, to include 
the Readjustment Counseling Service. The Committee should also 
continue overseeing VA's implementation of Public Law 114-2, 
the Clay Hunt Suicide Prevention for American Veterans Act, 
which--among other things--requires VA to partner with 
community organizations to improve the transition process for 
veterans.
    Capital Asset and Infrastructure Review--The Committee must 
continue aggressive oversight of VA's documentation of major 
medical facility construction and leasing program needs and the 
market assessments needed to fully analyze and define the 
veteran population distribution and community support capacity 
as that overlays VA's vast and aging capital asset footprint.
    VHA Organizational Structure--The Committee should continue 
its examination of how the Veterans Health Administration (VHA) 
defines Veteran Integrated Service Networks (VISN) roles and 
responsibilities, including managing and overseeing VA medical 
centers and to what extent VISNs vary in implementing those 
roles and responsibilities--to include data reporting and 
monitoring/enforcing compliance with directives. It should 
continue to press VA to establish staffing models for all lines 
of care. With a current growth rate of approximately two to 
three percent per year, it is not clear whether the VA is 
prioritizing hiring against certain critical care shortages.
    For example, a 2016 Government Accountability Office report 
on VA's human capital management found that VHA suffers from 
limited human resources capacity and weak internal control 
practices, both of which have undermined VA's ability to 
improve the delivery of care to veteran patients. The Committee 
should continue to closely monitor VHA's HR Management 
Modernization effort and assess how that effort improves 
staffing and hiring practices. The Committee should also 
continue monitoring clinical productivity and efficiency 
throughout the VA healthcare system following a 2017 finding by 
the Government Accountability Office regarding significant 
barriers and limitations with respect to the metrics and models 
that VA uses to assess productivity and efficiency in VA 
medical facilities.
    VA Research--I share the majority's interest in VA 
research. The Committee should continue to promote the 
advancement of treatment and care for women through dedicated 
research focusing on the effects of combat and environmental 
exposure that may result in gender-specific physiological 
disabilities--with particular emphasis on the reproductive, 
endocrine, and immune systems.
    Rural Veterans--The Committee should assess VA's efforts to 
provide timely and accessible care to veterans in rural and 
hard-to-reach areas through tools like telehealth, community 
partnerships, and other means. The VA Mission Act included 
numerous provisions specifically designed to bolster 
underserved areas and facilities, recruit providers willing to 
serve in rural areas, and increase access for rural veterans 
and the Committee should work to ensure these provisions are 
implemented as intended.
    Impact of Medicare for All.--Legislation has been 
introduced in the House of Representatives to expand Medicare 
to all Americans. While initial reports indicate that the 
Department of Veterans Affairs will be permitted to operate, 
such significant restructuring of the health care market is 
bound to impact the department. Therefore, the Committee must 
investigate the potential impact an expansion of Medicare will 
have on the department and health care services provided to 
veterans.

              Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations

    Accountability.--I share the majority's interest in 
continued oversight of these issues. The Committee should 
continue its oversight over the implementation of the Veterans 
Accountability and Whistleblower Protection Act of 2017. While 
VA data indicates that the total number of adverse actions 
against VA employees increased following passage of the Act, it 
does not necessarily support the claim that VA is disciplining 
lower level employees at a higher rate than before the Act. The 
Committee should review how VA managers are using the new 
accountability measures authorized by this law. Further, the 
Committee should also review the operations of the Office of 
Accountability and Whistleblower Protection (OAWP). This review 
should include the office's staffing levels, budget, and 
adherence to law that created this office.
    VA Administration, VA Employee Adverse Actions, and Federal 
Labor Protections.--I share the majority's interest in 
continued oversight of these issues. The Committee should 
continue its oversight over the implementation of the Veterans 
Accountability and Whistleblower Protection Act of 2017. While 
VA data indicates that the total number of adverse actions 
against VA employees increased following passage of the Act, it 
does not necessarily support the claim that VA is disciplining 
lower level employees at a higher rate than before the Act. The 
Committee should review how VA managers are using the new 
accountability measures authorized by this law. Further, the 
Committee should also review the operations of the Office of 
Accountability and Whistleblower Protection (OAWP). This review 
should include the office's staffing levels, budget, and 
adherence to law that created this office.
    Additionally, the Committee must investigate the impact 
that collective bargaining agreements have on the department's 
operations. In 2018, the department determined that medical 
personnel were no longer eligible for taxpayer funded official 
time. As a result, VA returned nearly 430 clinician positions 
to full-time veteran patient care. VA estimated the cost of the 
taxpayer funded union time of those clinicians to be nearly $49 
million annually. As the Committee reviews federal labor 
protections at the department, it must fully understand the 
costs--both monetary and opportunity--of taxpayer funded union 
time and collective bargaining at VA.
    Affiliations Agreements.--The Committee should continue to 
investigate the relationship of VA medical facilities and 
personnel with affiliated medical institutions, especially 
academic centers and those involved in research. The Committee 
should also evaluate the extent to which agreements between 
these entities promote an efficient allocation of VA resources 
for the welfare and health care of veterans. Further, the 
Committee should analyze VA's contracted care with academic 
affiliates in order to monitor the negotiation of costs for 
services and payment amounts to affiliates for medical and 
dental services.

                Subcommittee on Technology Modernization

    Healthcare Innovation and Interoperability.--Beyond 
overseeing EHRM implementation, the Committee should work to 
ensure that VA adequately plans for and pursues the modernized 
enterprise data and analytics capabilities, clinical 
interoperability platform, and open-application program 
interfaces (APIs) that are necessary to benefit from 
advancements in the health information technology marketplace 
and achieve the comprehensive interoperability solution that is 
needed. This approach decreases risk to the EHRM program and 
maximizes enterprise value for veterans. VA has in the past 
primarily pursued analytics capabilities focused on business 
intelligence, and such technologies now in use in the 
department are fundamentally the same as those available in the 
early 2000s. The Committee should advocate expanding VA's 
clinical orchestration platforms, proactive standardization of 
Computerized Patient Record System (CPRS) workflows, limited 
modifications to VistA and CPRS where necessary to allow open-
API-based applications to function in the CPRS workflows. It 
should also advocate for the creation of interoperable content, 
and the acquisition of third party web applications, with the 
goal of maintaining the enterprise-wide standard of care during 
the Cerner implementation and reducing EHRM implementation 
risk.
    Financial Management System Modernization.--I share the 
majority's interest in the financial management system 
modernization. The Financial Management Business Transformation 
(FMBT) program seeks to replace VA's legacy core financial 
management system and related financial, accounting, and 
administrative software with one modern, commercial, integrated 
system. The Committee should be concerned that FMBT, which is 
now entering its third year, lacks direction and firm 
requirements. To date, the program has relied on voluntary 
commitments from the various organizational units of the 
department to replace individual software packages. The 
Committee should also be concerned that FMBT's initial 
implementation cost estimate of $400 million has increased to a 
lifecycle cost estimate of over $2.3 billion in the relatively 
short time since its inception. The Committee should continue 
monitoring the program aggressively and base its oversight on 
the imperative that VA demonstrates meaningful new capabilities 
are being implemented over a timeline that corresponds to the 
department's functional needs.
    Enterprise Investments.--I share the majority's interest in 
enterprise investments but note that VA information technology, 
specifically, is not presently on the GAO High Risk list. It 
appears that the majority is referring to VA's repeat Federal 
Information Security Modernization Act (FISMA) audit findings. 
VA's FISMA auditor continues to document many of the same 
findings since the annual audit commenced in 2015. Relatedly, 
VA is included within the GAO's ``Improving the Management of 
IT Acquisitions and Operations'' High Risk List area, which 
pertains to the federal government in general. Many of the 
Office of Information and Technology's information technology 
modernization initiatives are integral to the department's 
efforts to resolve the audit findings. The Committee will 
continue to evaluate such modernization initiatives in the 
context of their effectiveness in addressing the FISMA audit 
and federal-wide IT management weaknesses, which necessitates 
an enterprise-wide approach rather than further siloing of 
investments.
    IT Workforce Investments.--I share the majority's concern 
about the Office of Information and Technology's increasing 
reliance on contractors but believe attributing the 
organization's problems to this alone is incorrect and 
recommend a more holistic oversight approach.
    The Office of Information and Technology's internal 
capacity to develop and manage its technology portfolio and has 
become severely degraded. Rapid turnover, low morale, the 
dispersed nature of the workforce, and the resulting escalating 
reliance on support contractors to manage even core operations 
are contributing factors. While the department has demonstrated 
some plans to prioritize staffing program offices, and has 
utilized the U.S. Digital Service in an exemplary and effective 
manner, it is not clear that there is a comprehensive workforce 
plan to address the deficit, or that budget planning reflects 
such a workforce plan. The Committee should continue to monitor 
VA's efforts to rebuild its technology expertise and assess 
whether workforce staffing plans will meet technology 
implementation needs and modernization plans.
    Scheduling System Acquisition.--I share the majority's 
interest in the scheduling system implementation and add that 
in December 2018, VA announced its decision not to expand its 
Columbus, Ohio scheduling system pilot. Instead, the department 
will continue to acquire the Cerner Millennium scheduling 
package and implement it on an accelerated three-year timeline, 
as a component critical path in the EHRM integrated master 
schedule. Despite continuous Committee oversight of the matter, 
VA officials have provided little to no information about how 
this decision will be carried out or how it will impact the 
larger EHRM program. Therefore, the Committee should assess 
VA's decision making process, the adequacy of the department's 
planning for the accelerated scheduling implementation, and its 
impacts.

                                   Phil Roe,
                                           Ranking Member.

                      COMMITTEE ON WAYS AND MEANS

                                  House of Representatives,
                                     Washington, DC, March 1, 2019.
Hon. Elijah E. Cummings,
Chairman, Committee on Oversight & Reform,
Washington, DC.
Hon. Zoe Lofgren,
Chair, Committee on House Administration,
Washington, DC.
    Dear Chairman Cummings and Chairwoman Lofgren: In 
accordance with the requirements of clause 2 of rule X of the 
Rules of the House of Representatives, the following is the 
Oversight plan of the Committee on Ways and Means for the 116th 
Congress. Where applicable, the Ways and Means Committee will 
continue to consult and coordinate with other committees in 
areas of shared jurisdiction on the below oversight hearings 
and oversight-related activities.

Matters under the Committee's Federal Budget Jurisdiction

     Economic and Budget Outlook. Oversight hearings 
and other activities with various Administration officials to 
discuss the President's budget proposals, current economic and 
budget conditions, and limits on the public debt.

Matters under the Committee's Tax Jurisdiction

     Tax Reform. Hearings and other activities related 
to comprehensive reform of the tax code to create a fairer, 
simpler tax code built for growth. Discuss and consider 
appropriate tax relief for families and individuals and 
employers of all sizes.
     Priorities of the Department of the Treasury. 
Hearings with the Treasury Secretary and other Administration 
officials to receive information regarding the Administration's 
tax-related priorities for the 116th Congress. Specifically, 
discuss and consider legislative and administrative proposals 
contained in the President's fiscal year 2020 and 2021 budgets.
     Tax Provisions Contained in Public Law 115-97. 
Hearings and other activities regarding the 2017 tax act (the 
Act), including hearings examining the Act's disparate impact 
across geographical regions, and the Act's effect on income 
inequality, charitable giving, home prices, funding of state 
and local governments, the national debt, wage stagnation, 
levels of business investment (including changes in the number 
of domestic jobs) and stock buybacks. Consider the 
international provisions of the Act, and whether those 
provisions created incentives for multinational corporations to 
move jobs and economic activity offshore and to avoid taxes by 
taking advantage of loopholes created by the Act.
     Infrastructure.  Hearings and other activities 
related to robust investment in American infrastructure 
directed at modernizing how Americans travel and the American 
economy grows, creating good jobs and meaningful economic 
development at the local, state, and federal levels. 
Examination of provisions within the Committee's jurisdiction 
to create jobs in a green economy and invest in underdeveloped 
areas, including bond-financing programs and tax credit 
incentives.
     Internal Revenue Service Operations/Administration 
of Tax Laws. Oversight of the major Internal Revenue Service 
programs, including enforcement, collection, taxpayer services, 
returns processing, and information systems. Continue oversight 
over major operating areas of the agency to ensure the nation's 
tax laws are being administered in a fair and impartial manner. 
Consider analyses and reports provided to the Congress by the 
IRS National Taxpayer Advocate, Treasury Inspector General for 
Tax Administration (TIGTA), and the Government Accountability 
Office (GAO). Oversight of IRS funding and staffing levels 
needed to provide taxpayer assistance, enforce the tax law 
effectively and efficiently, and to modernize the IRS 
information technology systems. Evaluate tax return filing 
seasons, including returns processing, availability of taxpayer 
services, and the revision of forms and issuance of guidance. 
Examine proposals and programs to address the ``tax gap'' and 
improve tax law compliance. Discuss proposed funding and 
staffing levels for the IRS, and legislative proposals and 
administrative proposals contained in the President's fiscal 
year 2020 and 2021 budgets.
     Tax-Exempt Organizations. Oversight of Federal tax 
laws, regulations, and filing requirements that affect tax-
exempt organizations, including new requirements under the Act. 
Evaluate overall IRS efforts to provide assistance to and 
monitor tax-exempt organizations, identify areas of non-
compliance, prevent abuse, and ensure timely disclosure to the 
public about tax-exempt organization activities and finances.
     Tax Code Simplification. Oversight of tax code 
complexity, particularly for individuals, with the goal of 
legislative or administrative simplification. Review areas 
where taxpayers and professional return preparers have 
difficulty, including areas where they make the most errors, 
and consider solutions. Evaluate simplification of information 
returns to assist taxpayers in determining taxable income.
     Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC). Oversight of the 
refundable federal income tax credit designed to assist low to 
moderate-income working individuals and families. Evaluate 
participation rates and administration of the credit.
     Tax Scams and Improper Payments. Oversight of the 
latest tax scams and tax fraud activities with a goal of 
protecting taxpayers and preventing identity theft. Examine IRS 
programs designed to identify and remedy identity theft and tax 
fraud. Consult and review analyses of GAO and TIGTA on this 
subject.
     Federal Excise Taxes and Related Trust Funds. 
Oversight review of Federal excise taxes, including credits and 
refunds, and the trust funds financed by these taxes.
     Pensions and Retirement Security. Oversight review 
of the financial condition, operations, and governance of the 
Pension Benefit Guaranty Corporation (PBGC), including the 
financial exposure of the PBGC.
     Tax Returns. Oversight of legislative proposals 
and tax law related to Presidential and Vice-Presidential tax 
returns.

Matters under the Committee's Health Jurisdiction

     Health Reform. Hearings and other activities 
related to reform of the health care system to reduce costs, 
lower premiums, expand choices, and ensure access to affordable 
coverage.
     Priorities of the Department of Health and Human 
Services. Oversight hearings with the Health and Human Services 
Secretary to discuss priorities for the 116th Congress and 
concerns related to the delivery of health services and payment 
under Medicare. Specifically, discuss and consider legislative 
and administrative proposals contained in the President's 
fiscal year 2020 budget.
     Health Provisions Contained in the ``Affordable 
Care Act'' (ACA). Hearings and other activities regarding 
various health provisions contained in the Patient Protection 
and Affordable Care Act (P.L. 111-148) and the Health Care and 
Education Reconciliation Act of 2010 (P.L. 111-152), known 
collectively as the ACA. Oversight and other activities related 
to ACA health provisions, including its changes to the annual 
updates to Medicare Fee-For-Service's payment rates, changes to 
Medicare Advantage's payment rates, benefit changes to fee-for-
service and Medicare Advantage, and the Center for Medicare and 
Medicaid Innovation.
     Medicare Part A and Part B (Fee-for-Service 
Providers). Oversight of Medicare to ensure efficient use of 
resources, quality of care, and access to providers for 
Medicare beneficiaries. Specific topics include: adequacy and 
appropriateness of provider payments, including incentive 
payments and implementation of reforms to physician payment 
systems; program benefits; patient out-of-pocket costs; 
workforce supply; treatment of specific populations such as 
people with disabilities and low-income beneficiaries; social 
determinants of health and health disparities; prescription 
drug costs; quality improvement efforts; and waste, fraud, and 
abuse activities.
     Medicare Advantage. Oversight of Medicare 
Advantage health plans, including: enrollment; benefit 
packages; quality; beneficiary choice; coding risk adjustment 
and payment accuracy; and submission of encounter data and 
health risk assessments.
     Medicare Part D (Prescription Drug Plans). 
Oversight of the Medicare prescription drug program, including: 
costs of prescription drugs; beneficiary premiums and cost-
sharing; the risk sharing structure and reinsurance; 
improvements to the low income subsidy program; impacts of 
recently enacted legislation and regulations on the Part D 
program; access to retiree prescription drug coverage; and the 
use of Medicare negotiation and competition to lower 
prescription drug costs.
     Medicare Trust Fund Stewardship. Oversight of 
program changes on the Medicare Trust Funds; premium and copay 
levels; provider payments; benefit design, and improvements to 
the program's long-term sustainability.
     CMS Administration. Oversight of CMS, including 
issuance of regulations and their impact on Medicare 
beneficiaries and providers; the adequacy and use of CMS' 
budget and staff; contracting activities; communications with 
beneficiaries; adherence to the Administrative Procedure Act; 
and general agency accountability.
     Private Health Insurance Coverage. Oversight and 
review of private health coverage, including: cost, access, 
subsidies to purchase insurance, benefit design, coverage 
options, pooling mechanisms, and employer-sponsored benefits; 
COBRA; HCTC; health savings accounts and flexible spending 
arrangements; options to reduce the cost of health coverage, 
expand coverage, and address the rate of increase in health 
care costs; the impact of the ACA and related regulations on 
those with private insurance, the uninsured, employers, the 
economy, and state budgets; and adherence to the Administrative 
Procedures Act.
     Surprise Billing. Oversight of the causes and 
consequences of surprise medical bills, state actions to 
protect consumers, and federal options to ensure families are 
not left unprotected from unanticipated charges by health 
providers.
     Prescription Drugs. Oversight of the landscape of 
federal policies that can be changed to lower prescription drug 
prices including tax incentives, payment incentives, and 
misaligned incentives among various entities in the health 
system, as well as ways to directly lower patient cost as well 
as costs overall in health care and costs to taxpayers.

Matters under the Committee's Worker and Family Support Jurisdiction

     Work Support. Review proposals designed to better 
support low-income families in working and increasing their 
earnings so they can escape poverty, including programs and 
policies that help parents qualify for, obtain, and retain good 
jobs.
     Unemployment Compensation. Provide oversight of 
the nation's unemployment compensation benefits and financing 
systems, including those designed to accelerate returns to 
work, and to ensure that they are prepared for future 
recessions.
     Child Welfare. Provide oversight of the nation's 
child welfare programs, including foster care, adoption 
assistance, and child and family service programs under Titles 
IV-B and IV-E of the Social Security Act. Review state efforts 
to promote adoption, provide prevention services, decrease the 
inappropriate use of congregate care settings, strengthen 
family connections, and successfully address the health and 
educational needs of foster children.
     Paid Family Leave. Review proposals in the 
Committee's jurisdiction to provide paid family leave to 
workers in order to improve economic and family outcomes.

Matters under the Committee's Social Security Jurisdiction

     Adequacy of benefits and options for strengthening 
Social Security. Examine the role of Social Security benefits 
in ensuring economic security for retirees, persons with 
career-ending disabilities, and survivors; how well the program 
is meeting the needs of current and future beneficiaries; and 
financing challenges facing Social Security. In addition, 
compare and contrast options to strengthen Social Security.
     Ability of Social Security Administration (SSA) to 
serve the public and effectively administer benefits. Examine 
SSA's ability to serve the public in person at local field 
offices and hearing offices, as well as by phone and via the 
internet; office closures and other barriers to in-person 
assistance; and the problems of backlogs and service delays, 
including long delays in the disability appeals process. 
Evaluate SSA's ability to prevent errors and detect fraud. 
Oversee SSA's implementation of recent legislation including 
reforms in the representative payment program. Examine the 
adequacy of SSA's administrative budget.
     Access to earned disability benefits. Examine the 
extent to which SSA's policies and procedures ensure due 
process and access to benefits for individuals who meet 
eligibility criteria in the law.
     Information technology, cybersecurity and identity 
theft. Oversee SSA's investments in information technology, 
including its modernization program, cybersecurity at SSA, and 
the prevention of identity theft involving Social Security 
numbers.

Matters under the Committee's Trade Jurisdiction

     Trade Negotiations. Fully exercise Congress' 
constitutional role and oversight responsibilities regarding 
existing and new trade negotiations. Ensure the 
Administration's compliance with statutory Congressional 
notification, consultation, and transparency requirements, with 
the goal of concluding meaningful, comprehensive and high-
ambition agreements, with particular focus on: addressing long-
standing structural and competitively consequential challenges 
with China; the European Union; Asia-Pacific; and other 
relevant trading partners or topical issues. Closely monitor 
the withdrawal of the United Kingdom from the European Union to 
determine an appropriate approach and timeline for negotiations 
concerning a trade agreement with the United Kingdom.
     Enforcement. Oversight of enforcement of U.S. 
rights under trade agreements, including the World Trade 
Organization (WTO) Agreements and bilateral and regional free 
trade agreements, to hold U.S. trading partners accountable and 
render commitments secured from trading partners meaningful. 
Oversight of the implementation of the Trade Facilitation and 
Trade Enforcement Act of 2015 to ensure that the new 
enforcement tools in the bill are being fully utilized, 
particularly with respect to evasion of trade remedies, forced 
labor, intellectual property rights violations, currency 
policy, and violations of trade agreements. Particular 
oversight of enforcement activities related to China's WTO 
commitments, as well as continuing barriers imposed by other 
countries and economies. Oversight of the administration of 
U.S. trade remedy laws, as well as enforcement related to U.S. 
intellectual property rights, import safety, and illegal 
transshipment.
     Implemented Trade Agreements and Agreements in the 
Process of Implementation. Oversight of implemented agreements 
with Colombia; Panama; Peru; Costa Rica, Dominican Republic, El 
Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, and Nicaragua (CAFTA-DR); Oman; 
Bahrain; Singapore; Chile; Australia; Morocco; Jordan; Canada 
and Mexico (NAFTA); and Israel. Oversight of implemented 
elements of the agreement with Korea and provisions of the 2018 
renegotiation that Korea is still in the process of 
implementing. Continued analysis of the impact of these trade 
agreements for American workers, companies, ranchers, and 
farmers. Identify provisions of such trade agreements that 
should be improved or updated.
     Miscellaneous Tariff Bill (MTB). Oversight of the 
implementation of the procedures set forth in the American 
Manufacturing Competitiveness Act of 2016, to include: ensuring 
that the International Trade Commission and the Executive 
Branch perform their roles within the timeframes set forth in 
the bill and maintain an open and transparent process; and 
producing a legislative package of noncontroversial provisions 
for consideration by the House.
     Impact of Trade on U.S. Job Creation. Oversight of 
the impact of trade on U.S. jobs, wages, and economic growth or 
displacement.
     Trade Remedies. Oversight and promotion of the 
enforcement of the trade remedy laws, in compliance with the 
legal and evidentiary requirements established by Congress. 
Oversight of implementation of the Enforce and Protect Act of 
2015 by Customs and Border Protection (CBP) to address trade 
remedy evasion and ensure CBP's compliance with the law as 
written. Support of Administration efforts to defend the use of 
the criteria established by Congress to identify non-market 
economy countries for the purposes of antidumping cases.
     China. Oversight of Administration strategies to 
respond to or counteract continued high level of government 
intervention in China's economy. Oversight of systemic problems 
in U.S.-China trade relations, including issues related to 
China's compliance with its commitments and adoption of norms 
reflected in the rules of the WTO; labor and environmental 
standards; consistent lack of protection and enforcement of 
U.S. intellectual property rights; excess production capacity 
for steel, aluminum, and many other commodities; indigenous 
innovation requirements; use of subsidies to advance industrial 
policies; and currency policies. Oversight of enforcement 
issues including ensuring that implementation of U.S. trade 
remedy laws appropriately accounts for China's state 
intervention in its economy.
     Preference Programs. Oversight, reform and renewal 
of major U.S. trade preference programs, including the 
Generalized System of Preferences (expiring December 31, 2020) 
and the African Growth and Opportunity Act.
     Labor. Oversight and promotion of Administration 
efforts to enforce labor obligations in U.S. trade agreements 
and to implement the ban on imports produced as a result of 
forced labor. Continued oversight of U.S. trade agreements 
under which a petition has been filed alleging that the country 
is not complying with the labor obligations in the agreement, 
including Colombia, Peru, Honduras, and the Dominican Republic.
     Environment. Oversight and promotion of 
Administration efforts to enforce environmental obligations in 
U.S. trade agreements. Continued oversight of the U.S.-Peru 
Trade Promotion Agreement which provides for specific, 
additional obligations to address forestry management and trade 
in illegally harvested timber.
     Agriculture. Oversight and promotion of 
Administration efforts to enforce provisions relating to and to 
remove tariff and unjustified non-tariff barriers to U.S. 
agriculture and biotechnology. Continued analysis and 
assessment of the benefits of agriculture exports to U.S. 
farmers, ranchers, companies, workers, and rural communities, 
and the need to increase U.S. agriculture exports.
     Manufacturing. Oversight and promotion of 
Administration efforts to enforce provisions relating to and 
remove tariff and non-tariff barriers to U.S. manufacturing, 
with particular focus on effectively addressing global excess 
production capacity for steel, aluminum, and other commodities. 
Continued analysis and assessment of the impact of 
manufacturing exports to U.S. manufacturers and their 
employees, and the need to increase U.S. manufacturing exports.
     Services. Oversight and promotion of 
Administration efforts to enforce provisions relating to and to 
remove barriers to the U.S. services sector. Analysis and 
assessment of the benefits of services to all sectors of the 
U.S. economy and the need to increase U.S. exports. Oversight 
over ``covered agreement'' insurance negotiations.
     Digital Trade and E-commerce. Oversight regarding 
trade barriers faced by U.S. workers, manufacturers, service 
providers, and the agriculture sector in the area of digital 
trade and e-commerce, particularly with respect to data issues 
(localization measures and dataflows). Oversight regarding how 
to address these issues through enforcement and trade 
negotiations.
     World Trade Organization (WTO). Oversight of U.S. 
goals in the WTO, including reform proposals, negotiations 
(including efforts such as the Environmental Goods Agreement, 
Trade in Services Agreement, relating to fisheries subsidies, 
e-commerce), the functioning and reform of the dispute 
settlement system, and WTO accessions (including consideration 
of legislation granting Permanent Normal Trade Relations status 
and graduation from the Jackson-Vanik amendment's 
requirements). Analysis of the impact of WTO membership for the 
United States, including the U.S. experience and record in WTO 
dispute settlement, the role of a rules-based system for U.S. 
businesses, producers, workers, and consumers, and the cost of 
non-compliance or lack of compliance by other WTO members with 
WTO rules. Monitor the progress of WTO members in undertaking 
the domestic processes necessary to bring the Trade 
Facilitation Agreement into force.
     Trade Sanctions. Oversight concerning import 
sanctions with, among others, Iran, Russia, Cuba, North Korea, 
Syria, and Venezuela.
     Trade Adjustment Assistance. Continued oversight 
concerning the Trade Adjustment Assistance programs for 
workers, firms, communities, and farmers, to monitor the 
effectiveness of these programs in providing training and new 
jobs for displaced workers and determine the parameters for 
effective reform and improvement.
     Priorities of the Office of the United States 
Trade Representative (USTR). Oversight over USTR to evaluate 
priorities for the 116th Congress and the trade agenda, and to 
assure its statutory role with respect to trade policy. 
Possible consideration of authorization, at the earliest 
opportunity. Oversight over trade advisory committees.
     Priorities of Customs and Border Protection (CBP). 
Oversight over CBP and implementation of Customs revenue 
functions. Oversight of the implementation of the Enforce and 
Protect Act of 2015 to ensure that the new enforcement tools 
provided in the bill are being fully utilized by CBP, including 
provisions relating to evasion of trade remedy laws and forced 
labor.
     Priorities of the United States International 
Trade Commission. Oversight over the Commission concerning 
overall priorities and operations. Possible consideration of 
authorization, at the earliest opportunity.
    This list is not intended to be exclusive. The Committee 
anticipates that additional oversight hearings and activities 
will be scheduled as issues arise and as time permits. Also, 
the Committee's oversight priorities and particular concerns 
may change as the 116th Congress progresses over the coming two 
years.
            Sincerely,
                                           Richard E. Neal,
                                                          Chairman.

                      COMMITTEE ON WAYS AND MEANS

                                  House of Representatives,
                                 Washington, DC, February 28, 2019.
Hon. Elijah Cummings,
Chairman, Committee on Oversight & Reform,
Washington, DC.
Hon. Zoe Lofgren,
Chair, Committee on House Administration,
Washington, DC.
    Dear Chairman Cummings and Chairwoman Lofgren: In 
accordance with the requirements of clause 2 of rule X of the 
Rules of the House of Representatives, the following is the 
Minority view of the Oversight plan of the Committee on Ways 
and Means for the 116th Congress.

                              I. Oversight

    Below is a list of oversight hearings and oversight-related 
activities that the Committee on Ways and Means and its 
Subcommittees should conduct during the 116th Congress.
Matters under the Committee's Federal Budget Jurisdiction
     Economic and Budget Outlook. Oversight hearings 
and other activities with various Administration officials to 
discuss current economic and budget conditions, including the 
long-term outlook, the state of the economy, prospects for 
short- and long-term growth, our economic competitiveness, 
private sector job creation, and limits on the public debt.
Matters under the Committee's Tax Jurisdiction
     Tax Reform. Discuss and consider appropriate tax 
relief for families and individuals and employers of all sizes. 
Also discuss and consider restructuring of the Internal Revenue 
Service with a service-first focus to better align the tax 
administrator with the simpler, pro-growth tax code.
     Priorities of the Department of the Treasury. 
Hearings with the Treasury Secretary and other Administration 
officials to receive information regarding the Administration's 
tax-related priorities for the 116th Congress. Specifically, 
discuss and consider legislative and administrative proposals 
contained in the President's fiscal year 2020 and 2021 budgets.
     Tax Provisions Contained in the ``Affordable Care 
Act'' (ACA). Hearings and other activities regarding various 
tax provisions contained in the Patient Protection and 
Affordable Care Act (P.L. 111-148) and the Health Care and 
Education Reconciliation Act of 2010 (P.L. 111-152), known 
collectively as the ACA. Continued oversight and other 
activities related to ACA tax provisions, such as the 
individual mandate, the employer mandate, the premium tax 
credit, the Exchange subsidies, the medical device tax, and the 
3.8 percent surtax on capital gains, dividends, and other 
investment income.
     Internal Revenue Service Operations/Administration 
of Tax Laws. Oversight of the major Internal Revenue Service 
programs, including enforcement, collection, taxpayer services, 
returns processing, and information systems. Continue oversight 
over major operating areas of the agency to ensure the nation's 
tax laws are being administered in a fair and impartial manner. 
Consider analyses and reports provided to the Congress by the 
IRS National Taxpayer Advocate, Treasury Inspector General for 
Tax Administration (TIGTA), and the GAO. Oversight of IRS 
funding and staffing levels needed to provide taxpayer 
assistance and enforce the tax law effectively and efficiently. 
Evaluate tax return filing seasons, including electronic 
filing, improper payments levels, identity theft, and fraud 
prevention efforts. Review proposed funding and staffing levels 
for the IRS, and legislative proposals and administrative 
proposals contained in the President's fiscal year 2020 and 
2021 budgets.
     IRS Audit Selection Procedures. Oversight of the 
processes the IRS uses to select individuals and groups for 
audit. Continue coordination with GAO regarding audit work 
assessing IRS audit selection procedures and safeguards across 
all IRS business units. Consider analyses and reports on this 
subject by GAO and TIGTA.
     Tax-Exempt Organizations. Oversight of Federal tax 
laws, regulations, and filing requirements that affect tax-
exempt organizations. Evaluate overall IRS efforts to monitor 
tax-exempt organizations, identify areas of non-compliance, 
prevent abuse, and ensure timely disclosure to the public about 
tax-exempt organization activities and finances. Review IRS 
tax-exempt application process and agency oversight of new 
exempt organizations. Consider analyses and reports completed 
by TIGTA on the IRS' treatment of tax-exempt organizations and 
those entities applying for tax-exempt status.
     Tax Code and Tax Form Simplification. Oversight of 
tax code and tax form complexity, particularly for individuals, 
with the goal of legislative or administrative simplification. 
Review areas where taxpayers and professional return preparers 
have difficulty, including areas where they make the most 
errors, and consider solutions. Evaluate simplification of 
information returns to assist taxpayers in determining taxable 
income. Examine proposals to close the ``tax gap'' by 
simplifying compliance with our tax laws.
     Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC). Oversight of the 
refundable federal income tax credit designed to assist low to 
moderate income working individuals and families. Evaluate the 
participation and improper payment rates within the program, 
and IRS efforts to eliminate EITC abuse.
     Tax Scams and Improper Payments. Oversight of the 
latest tax scams, tax shelters, and tax fraud activities with a 
goal of protecting taxpayers and preventing identity theft. 
Examine IRS initiatives and efforts to curb tax fraud and the 
abuse of tax credits, including improper payments in the 
administration of tax credits. Review IRS processes designed to 
identify and remedy identity theft. Consult and review analyses 
of GAO and TIGTA on this subject.
     Federal Excise Taxes and Related Trust Funds. 
Oversight review of Federal excise taxes, credits, and refunds, 
including the trust funds financed by these taxes.
     Pensions and Retirement Security. Oversight review 
of the financial condition, operations, and governance of the 
Pension Benefit Guaranty Corporation (``PBGC''), including the 
financial exposure of the PBGC.
Matters under the Committee's Health Jurisdiction
     Health Reform. Hearings and other activities 
related to significant reform of the health care system to 
reduce costs, lower premiums, expand choices and ensure access 
to affordable coverage.
     Priorities of the Department of Health and Human 
Services. Oversight hearings with the Health and Human Services 
Secretary to discuss priorities for the 116th Congress and 
concerns related to the delivery of health services and 
reimbursement under Medicare. Specifically, discuss and 
consider legislative and administrative proposals contained in 
the President's fiscal year 2020 and 2021 budgets.
     Health Provisions Contained in the ``Affordable 
Care Act'' (ACA). Hearings and other activities regarding 
various health provisions contained in the Patient Protection 
and Affordable Care Act (P.L. 111-148) and the Health Care and 
Education Reconciliation Act of 2010 (P.L. 111-152), known 
collectively as the ACA. Continued oversight and other 
activities related to ACA health provisions, including its 
changes to the annual updates to Medicare Fee-For-Service's 
payment rates, changes to Medicare Advantage's payment rates, 
benefit changes to fee-for-service and Medicare Advantage, and 
creation of the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Innovation.
     Medicare Part A and Part B (Fee-for-Service 
Providers). Oversight of the major Medicare programs to ensure 
efficient use of resources, quality of care, and access to 
providers for Medicare beneficiaries. Specific topics include: 
adequacy and appropriateness of provider reimbursements, 
including incentive payments and implementation of reforms to 
physician payment systems through the Medicare Access and CHIP 
Reauthorization Act of 2015 (P.L. 114-10); program benefits; 
cost sharing; workforce supply; the doctor-patient 
relationship; treatment of specific populations such as people 
with disabilities and low-income beneficiaries; quality 
improvement efforts; and waste, fraud, and abuse activities.
     Medicare Advantage. Oversight of Medicare 
Advantage health plans, including: enrollment; reimbursements; 
benefit packages; quality; beneficiary choice; and recent 
statutory and regulatory changes affecting Medicare Advantage 
health plans and their enrollees.
     Medicare Part D (Prescription Drug Plans). 
Oversight of the Medicare prescription drug program, including: 
drug pricing; benefits; beneficiary premiums and cost-sharing; 
beneficiary choice; impacts of recently enacted legislation and 
regulations and their impact on the Part D program; and access 
to retiree prescription drug coverage.
     Medicare Entitlement. Oversight of program changes 
on the Medicare Trust Funds; premium and copay levels; provider 
payments; and benefit design, and improving the program's long-
term sustainability.
     CMS Administration. Oversight of CMS, including 
issuance of regulations and their impact on Medicare 
beneficiaries and providers; the adequacy and use of CMS' 
budget and staff; contracting activities; communications with 
beneficiaries; adherence to the Administrative Procedures Act; 
and general agency accountability.
     Private Health Insurance Coverage. Oversight and 
review of private health coverage, including: cost, access, 
subsidies to purchase insurance, benefit design, coverage 
options, pooling mechanisms, and employer-sponsored benefits; 
COBRA; HCTC; health savings accounts and flexible spending 
arrangements; options to reduce the cost of health coverage, 
expand coverage, and address the rate of increase in health 
care costs; the impact of the ACA and related regulations on 
those with private insurance, the uninsured, employers, the 
economy, and state budgets; and adherence to the Administrative 
Procedures Act.
     Women's Health Outcomes. Oversight of maternal 
mortality and morbidity causes related to pregnancy or 
childbirth in the United States. Evaluate steps taken to 
identify at-risk women, track, review, and reduce pregnancy-
related deaths and severe harms. Examine health practices for 
treating victims of sexual assault.
Matters under the Committee's Worker and Family Support Jurisdiction
     Welfare Reform. Review proposals designed to 
better assist low-income families in increasing their work and 
earnings so they can escape poverty, including by developing 
innovative efforts to improve cooperation between and the 
performance of TANF, child care, social services and multiple 
other benefit programs. As part of this process, ensure that 
programs are rigorously evaluated and held accountable for 
achieving measurable performance goals, including substantive 
work and activity requirements for adult recipients, such as 
the TANF program has applied since 1996 reforms. Also review 
opportunities to prevent duplication, overlap, and 
fragmentation, in order to improve the overall effectiveness of 
efforts to serve low-income individuals. Examine associated 
barriers to increasing self-sufficiency among low-income 
families with children, and how changes may better address the 
needs of adult beneficiaries who face barriers to employment.
     Unemployment Compensation. Provide oversight of 
the nation's unemployment compensation benefits and employment 
security systems, especially those designed to accelerate 
returns to work, prevent inappropriate benefit payments, and 
improve overpayment recovery.
     Child Welfare. Provide oversight of the nation's 
child welfare programs, including foster care, adoption 
assistance, and child and family service programs under Titles 
IV-B and IV-E of the Social Security Act, including the newly 
enacted Family First Prevention Services Act. Review state 
efforts to promote adoption, provide prevention services, 
decrease the inappropriate use of congregate care settings, 
strengthen family connections, and successfully address the 
health and educational needs of foster children.
Matters under the Committee's Social Security Jurisdiction
     Securing the Future of Social Security. Examine 
the role of Social Security benefits in the retirement security 
of today's and future retirees, financing challenges facing 
Social Security, the cost to taxpayers and beneficiaries of 
delay in addressing those challenges, and options to strengthen 
Social Security, including how the program is meeting the needs 
of today's and future beneficiaries.
     Use of the Social Security Number. Examine the use 
of the Social Security number (SSN) as a unique identifier, 
whether that use is necessary and appropriate, and options for 
the future of the SSN.
     Stewardship of Social Security Programs. Provide 
oversight of the management, performance, and long-range 
strategic planning related to Social Security programs.
     Deployment of Resources. Oversight of the SSA's 
deployment of limited resources to serve the public and 
taxpayers, including evolving service delivery approaches, 
policy administration and program implementation impacts, and 
the SSA's role in supporting other Federal programs through 
interagency and data sharing agreements.
Matters under the Committee's Trade Jurisdiction
     U.S.-Mexico-Canada Agreement (USMCA). Passage of 
legislation under Trade Promotion Authority (TPA) to implement 
the USMCA in a manner that meets TPA requirements and Member 
priorities.
     Trade Negotiations and Trade Promotion Authority. 
Fully exercise Congress' oversight responsibilities regarding 
existing and new trade negotiations. Ensure the 
Administration's compliance with TPA's Congressional 
notification, consultation, and transparency requirements. 
Ensure the Administration's consideration of Congressional 
trade objectives contained in TPA, with the goal of concluding 
comprehensive and high-ambition agreements, with particular 
focus on Japan, the European Union, the United Kingdom and 
other interested trading partners/relevant topical issues.
     China. Oversight of systemic problems in U.S.-
China trade relations, including issues related to China's 
consistent lack of protection and enforcement of U.S. 
intellectual property rights; excess production capacity for 
steel, aluminum, and many other commodities; indigenous 
innovation requirements; use of industrial subsidies; export 
restraints on key products; high level of government 
intervention including through state-owned enterprises; and 
currency policies. Oversight of the implementation of the 
Synthetics Trafficking and Overdose Prevention Act of 2018 to 
ensure that the new enforcement tools for stopping the flow of 
illegal opioids/fentanyl from entering the United States 
through the international mail are being fully executed.
     Tariff policy. Given the constitutional authority 
of Congress over tariffs, oversight over the use of tariffs, 
particularly those imposed under Section 232 of the Trade 
Expansion Act of 1962 and Section 301 of the Trade Act of 1974. 
Analysis of the goals and effectiveness of such tariffs, 
including the impact of tariffs and retaliation by other 
countries on U.S. manufacturers and consumers as well as U.S. 
allies engaged in fair trade. Oversight over product exclusion 
and country exemption processes.
     Enforcement. Oversight of enforcement of U.S. 
rights under trade agreements, including the WTO Agreements and 
bilateral and regional free trade agreements, to hold U.S. 
trading partners accountable. Oversight of the implementation 
of the Trade Facilitation and Trade Enforcement Act of 2015 to 
ensure that the new enforcement tools in the bill are being 
fully utilized, particularly with respect to evasion of trade 
remedies, intellectual property violations, currency policy, 
forced labor, and violations of trade agreements. Particular 
oversight of enforcement activities related to China's WTO 
commitments, as well as continuing barriers imposed by India. 
Oversight of the administration of U.S. trade remedy laws, as 
well as enforcement related to U.S. intellectual property 
rights, import safety, and illegal transshipment. Oversight of 
the implementation of the Synthetics Trafficking and Overdoes 
Prevention Act of 2018 to ensure that the new enforcement tools 
for stopping the flow of illegal opioids/fentanyl from entering 
the United States through the international mail are being 
fully executed.
     Implemented Trade Agreements. Oversight of 
implemented agreements with Colombia; Panama; Korea; Peru; 
Costa Rica, Dominican Republic, El Salvador, Guatemala, 
Honduras, and Nicaragua (CAFTA-DR); Oman; Bahrain; Australia; 
Morocco; Singapore; Chile; Jordan; and Israel. Continued 
analysis of the benefits of these trade agreements for American 
companies, workers, ranchers, and farmers. Identify provisions 
of such trade agreements that should be updated to increase and 
improve the benefits, including by drawing on work from 
previous trade negotiations.
     Miscellaneous Tariff Bill (MTB). Oversight of the 
implementation of the procedures set forth in the American 
Manufacturing Competitiveness Act of 2016 to reduce or suspend 
tariffs for U.S. manufacturers on products not made in the 
United States, to include: ensuring that the International 
Trade Commission and the Executive Branch perform their roles 
within the timeframes set forth in the process bill and 
maintain an open and transparent process; and working to 
produce a legislative package of noncontroversial provisions 
for consideration by the House.
     Role of Trade in U.S. Job Creation. Oversight of 
the role of trade in creating U.S. jobs and economic growth and 
how to create new market access for U.S. manufactured goods, 
agriculture, and services.
     Trade Remedies. Oversight and promotion of the 
enforcement of the trade remedy laws, in compliance with the 
legal and evidentiary requirements established by Congress. 
Oversight of implementation of the Enforce and Protect Act of 
2015 by Customs and Border Protection (CBP) to address trade 
remedy evasion and ensure CBP's compliance with the law as 
written. Support of Administration efforts to defend the use of 
the criteria established by Congress to identify non-market 
economy countries for the purposes of antidumping cases.
     Preference Programs. Oversight of major U.S. trade 
preference programs, including the Generalized System of 
Preferences and the African Growth and Opportunity Act, the 
Caribbean Basin Trade Partnership Act, and the Haitian 
Hemispheric Opportunity through Partnership Encouragement Act.
     Agriculture. Oversight and promotion of 
Administration efforts to increase enforcement and remove 
tariff and non-tariff barriers to U.S. agriculture, including 
non-science based sanitary and phytosanitary measures and 
barriers to agriculture biotechnology. Continued analysis and 
assessment of the broad and crucial benefits of agriculture 
exports to U.S. farmers, ranchers, companies, workers, and 
rural communities, and the need to increase U.S. agriculture 
exports.
     Manufacturing. Oversight and promotion of 
Administration efforts to increase enforcement and remove 
tariff and non-tariff barriers to U.S. manufacturing. Continued 
analysis and assessment of the broad and crucial benefits of 
manufacturing exports to U.S. manufacturers and their 
employees, and the need to increase U.S. manufacturing exports.
     Services. Oversight and promotion of 
Administration efforts to increase enforcement to remove 
barriers to the U.S. services sector. Analysis and assessment 
of the broad and crucial benefits of services to all sectors of 
the U.S. economy and the need to increase U.S. exports.
     Digital Trade and E-commerce. Oversight regarding 
trade barriers faced by U.S. manufacturers, service providers, 
and the agriculture sector in digital trade and e-commerce, 
particularly with respect to data issues (localization measures 
and dataflows). Oversight regarding how to address these issues 
through enforcement and trade negotiations.
     World Trade Organization (WTO). Oversight of U.S. 
goals in the WTO, including negotiations, the functioning of 
the dispute settlement system, and WTO accessions (including 
consideration of legislation granting Permanent Normal Trade 
Relations status and graduation from the Jackson-Vanik 
amendment's requirements). Analysis of the benefits of WTO 
membership for the United States, including the success of the 
WTO dispute settlement system and the importance of predictable 
rules to U.S. businesses and consumers. Monitoring the progress 
of WTO members in undertaking the domestic processes necessary 
to bring the Trade Facilitation Agreement into force. Oversight 
over negotiations on e-commerce.
     Trade Sanctions. Oversight concerning import 
sanctions with, among others, Iran, Russia, North Korea, Syria, 
and Cuba.
     Trade Adjustment Assistance. Continued oversight 
concerning the Trade Adjustment Assistance programs for 
workers, firms, communities, and farmers, to monitor the 
effectiveness of these programs in providing training and new 
jobs for displaced workers in a simple and cost-effective 
manner.
     Priorities of the Office of the United States 
Trade Representative (USTR). Oversight over USTR to evaluate 
priorities for the 116th Congress and the trade agenda, and to 
assure its statutory role with respect to trade policy. 
Oversight over trade advisory committees.
     Priorities of Customs and Border Protection (CBP). 
Oversight over CBP and implementation of Customs revenue 
functions. Oversight of the implementation of the Trade 
Facilitation and Enforcement Act of 2015 to ensure that the new 
enforcement tools provided in the bill are being fully utilized 
by CBP, including provisions relating to evasion of trade 
remedy laws and forced labor.
     Priorities of the United States International 
Trade Commission. Oversight over the Commission concerning 
overall priorities and operations.
    This list is not intended to be exclusive. The Committee 
anticipates that additional oversight hearings and activities 
will be scheduled as issues arise and as time permits. Also, 
the Committee's oversight priorities and particular concerns 
may change as the 116th Congress progresses over the coming two 
years.
            Sincerely,
                                               Kevin Brady,
                                                    Ranking Member.

                                  [all]