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[House Report 116-442]
[From the U.S. Government Publishing Office]


116th Congress }                                          { Report
                        HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES
  2d Session   }                                          { 116-442

======================================================================

                      WILLIAM M. (MAC) THORNBERRY
        NATIONAL DEFENSE AUTHORIZATION ACT FOR FISCAL YEAR 2021

                               ----------                              

                              R E P O R T

                                 OF THE

                      COMMITTEE ON ARMED SERVICES
                        HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES

                                   ON

                               H.R. 6395

                             together with

              ADDITIONAL, SUPPLEMENTAL, AND MINORITY VIEWS

      [Including cost estimate of the Congressional Budget Office]


                                     
[GRAPHIC(S) NOT AVAILABLE IN TIFF FORMAT]

                                     


  July 9, 2020.--Committed to the Committee of the Whole House on the 
              State of the Union and ordered to be printed
              
              
                               __________
                               

                    U.S. GOVERNMENT PUBLISHING OFFICE                    
40-707                        WASHINGTON : 2020                     
          
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------              
 
                      COMMITTEE ON ARMED SERVICES
                     One Hundred Sixteenth Congress

                    ADAM SMITH, Washington, Chairman

SUSAN A. DAVIS, California           WILLIAM M. ``MAC'' THORNBERRY, 
JAMES R. LANGEVIN, Rhode Island          Texas
RICK LARSEN, Washington              JOE WILSON, South Carolina
JIM COOPER, Tennessee                ROB BISHOP, Utah
JOE COURTNEY, Connecticut            MICHAEL R. TURNER, Ohio
JOHN GARAMENDI, California           MIKE ROGERS, Alabama
JACKIE SPEIER, California            K. MICHAEL CONAWAY, Texas
TULSI GABBARD, Hawaii                DOUG LAMBORN, Colorado
DONALD NORCROSS, New Jersey          ROBERT J. WITTMAN, Virginia
RUBEN GALLEGO, Arizona               VICKY HARTZLER, Missouri
SETH MOULTON, Massachusetts          AUSTIN SCOTT, Georgia
SALUD O. CARBAJAL, California        MO BROOKS, Alabama
ANTHONY G. BROWN, Maryland, Vice     PAUL COOK, California
    Chair                            BRADLEY BYRNE, Alabama
RO KHANNA, California                SAM GRAVES, Missouri
WILLIAM R. KEATING, Massachusetts    ELISE M. STEFANIK, New York
FILEMON VELA, Texas                  SCOTT DesJARLAIS, Tennessee
ANDY KIM, New Jersey                 RALPH LEE ABRAHAM, Louisiana
KENDRA S. HORN, Oklahoma             TRENT KELLY, Mississippi
GILBERT RAY CISNEROS, Jr.,           MIKE GALLAGHER, Wisconsin
    California                       MATT GAETZ, Florida
CHRISSY HOULAHAN, Pennsylvania       DON BACON, Nebraska
JASON CROW, Colorado                 JIM BANKS, Indiana
XOCHITL TORRES SMALL, New Mexico     LIZ CHENEY, Wyoming
ELISSA SLOTKIN, Michigan             PAUL MITCHELL, Michigan
MIKIE SHERRILL, New Jersey           JACK BERGMAN, Michigan
VERONICA ESCOBAR, Texas              MICHAEL WALTZ, Florida
DEBRA A. HAALAND, New Mexico
JARED F. GOLDEN, Maine
LORI TRAHAN, Massachusetts
ELAINE G. LURIA, Virginia
ANTHONY BRINDISI, New York

                     Paul Arcangeli, Staff Director
                           
                           
                           C O N T E N T S

                              ----------                              
                                                                   Page

Purpose of the Legislation.......................................     1
Rationale for the Committee Bill.................................     2
Hearings.........................................................     3
Committee Position...............................................     4
Explanation of the Committee Amendments..........................     4
Relationship of Authorization to Appropriations..................     4
Summary of Discretionary Authorizations in the Bill..............     4
Budget Authority Implication.....................................     5

DIVISION A--DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE AUTHORIZATIONS.................     5
TITLE I--PROCUREMENT.............................................     5
    Aircraft Procurement, Army...................................     5
      Items of Special Interest..................................     5
        Army Aviation Radio Modernization........................     5
        Army intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance 
          programs...............................................     5
        CH-47 Chinook helicopter.................................     6
        Load Stability Systems...................................     6
        Short Range Reconnaissance Small Unmanned Aircraft System     7
        UH-60M Army National Guard Fielding Strategy.............     7
        UH-60V Total Force Fielding Strategy.....................     8
        UH-72 Lakota helicopter commercial-off-the-shelf 
          modifications..........................................     8
    Procurement of Weapons and Tracked Combat Vehicles, Army.....     8
      Items of Special Interest..................................     8
        Combat and tactical vehicle interior flame resistant 
          materials..............................................     8
        M240 medium machine gun modernization and sustainment....     9
    Procurement of Ammunition, Army..............................     9
      Items of Special Interest..................................     9
        Handgun Ammunition Procurement...........................     9
        Shoulder-launched munitions..............................    10
    Other Procurement, Army......................................    10
      Items of Special Interest..................................    10
        All-terrain cranes.......................................    10
        Assessment of the Army's tactical wheeled vehicle 
          strategy and implementation efforts....................    11
        Soldier Enhancement Program..............................    11
        Tactical Wheeled Vehicle Industrial base.................    12
    Aircraft Procurement, Navy...................................    12
      Items of Special Interest..................................    12
        Anti-submarine warfare low frequency sonar capability....    12
        Department of the Navy Strike-Fighter management.........    13
        P-8 aircraft.............................................    14
        VH-92A Executive Helicopter training aircraft............    14
    Weapons Procurement, Navy....................................    15
      Items of Special Interest..................................    15
        Fleet Proficiency for Ballistic Missile Defense..........    15
    Shipbuilding and Conversion, Navy............................    16
      Items of Special Interest..................................    16
        Advanced degaussing for DDG-51 destroyers................    16
        Aegis combatants and 5th Generation aircraft 
          interoperability.......................................    16
        Amphibious Shipbuilding..................................    17
        DDG-51 multiyear procurement.............................    17
        National Surface Warship Engineering and Design 
          Capability.............................................    18
        Navy Auxiliary General Ocean Surveillance Ships (T-AGOS) 
          Program................................................    18
        Ship Counting Methodology................................    19
        Submarine Supplier Development...........................    19
        Technology Insertion in New Ship Designs.................    20
        Variable Depth Sonar for DDG-51 destroyers...............    20
        Virginia-class submarine.................................    21
    Other Procurement, Navy......................................    21
      Items of Special Interest..................................    21
        Laser shock peening (LSP) technology.....................    21
        Long-term charter requirements...........................    22
        Pilot program regarding the viability of electronic 
          actuators..............................................    22
        Unmanned maritime systems................................    22
    Procurement, Marine Corps....................................    23
      Items of Special Interest..................................    23
        Marine Corps hearing protection program..................    23
        Marine Corps vertical lift munitions.....................    23
        Modular Aviator Body Armor Vest Acquisition Strategy.....    24
        Rapid acquisition of rifle integrated controller.........    24
    Aircraft Procurement, Air Force..............................    24
      Items of Special Interest..................................    24
        A-10 Synthetic Aperture Radar Improvements...............    24
        Airlift tactical data link...............................    25
        C-130H propeller/engine upgrades.........................    25
        E-8 Joint Surveillance Target Attack Radar System........    25
        Expanded Carriage for the B-1............................    26
        KC-46A full rate production..............................    26
        MQ-9 Reaper..............................................    27
    Procurement, Defense-Wide....................................    28
      Items of Special Interest..................................    28
        Commonality and cost efficiencies in degraded visual 
          environment systems....................................    28
        F-35.....................................................    28
        Ground tactical vehicles for special operations forces...    29
        Increased research for counter unmanned aircraft systems 
          in austere locations abroad............................    29
        Replacement of Special Operations Command DHC-8 aircraft.    30
  LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS.........................................    30
    Subtitle A--Authorization of Appropriations..................    30
      Section 101--Authorization of Appropriations...............    30
    Subtitle B--Navy Programs....................................    30
      Section 111--Independent Cost Estimate of FFG(X) Frigate 
        Program..................................................    30
    Subtitle C--Air Force Programs...............................    31
      Section 121--Modification of Force Structure Objectives for 
        B-1 Bomber Aircraft......................................    31
      Section 122--Extension of Limitation on Availability of 
        Funds for Retirement of RC-135 Aircraft..................    31
      Section 123--Modification of Limitation on Availability of 
        Funds for Retirement of E-8 JSTARS Aircraft..............    31
      Section 124--Limitation on Availability of Funds for the 
        Advanced Battle Management System Pending Certification 
        Relating to RQ-4 Aircraft................................    31
      Section 125--Inventory Requirements for Certain Air 
        Refueling Tanker Aircraft................................    32
      Section 126--Limitation on Production of KC-46A Aircraft...    32
      Section 127--Assessment and Certification Relating to OC-
        135 Aircraft.............................................    32
      Section 128--Modernization Plan for Airborne Intelligence, 
        Surveillance, and Reconnaissance.........................    32
      Section 129--Minimum Bomber Aircraft Force Level...........    33
    Subtitle D--Defense-Wide, Joint, and Multiservice Matters....    33
      Section 131--Documentation Relating to the F-35 Aircraft 
        Program..................................................    33
      Section 132--Notification on Software Regression Testing 
        for F-35 Aircraft........................................    33
      Section 133--Notification on Efforts to Replace Inoperable 
        Ejection Seat Aircraft Locator Beacons...................    33
      Section 134--Limitation on Use of Funds for the Armed 
        Overwatch Program........................................    34
TITLE II--RESEARCH, DEVELOPMENT, TEST, AND EVALUATION............    34
    Research, Development, Test, and Evaluation, Army............    34
      Items of Special Interest..................................    34
        Accelerating Army Aircraft Cleaning and Deicing Systems 
          for rotary-wing aircraft...............................    34
        Auxiliary power units for armored and tactical vehicles..    35
        Briefing on Army's Carbine Magazine Development Strategy.    35
        Carbon composite materials for helicopter wheels and 
          brakes.................................................    36
        Carbon fiber and graphite foam for combat and tactical 
          vehicles...............................................    36
        Electrification of Army combat and tactical vehicles.....    37
        Extended Range Cannon Artillery Program..................    37
        Future Vertical Lift sensor payloads.....................    38
        Instrumental Synthetic Training Environment and Modeling 
          and Simulation Capabilities............................    38
        Modeling and Simulation for Ground Vehicle Development 
          and Sustainment........................................    39
        Next generation Integrated Visual Augmentation System....    39
        Next Generation Squad Weapons and Small Business 
          Innovation Research....................................    39
        Pragmatic Artificial Intelligence and New Technology 
          (PAINT)................................................    40
        Report on the Future Tactical Unmanned Aerial System 
          Program................................................    40
        Stryker weapons station commonality......................    40
        Supercavitating Ammunition...............................    41
        Thermoplastic drive shafts for helicopter tail rotor 
          drive systems..........................................    41
    Research, Development, Test, and Evaluation, Navy............    42
      Items of Special Interest..................................    42
        Advanced Low Cost Munition Ordnance......................    42
        Advanced Submarine Countermeasures.......................    42
        Aviation Survivability of Marine Corps, Navy, and Air 
          Force Rotary Wing Aircraft.............................    42
        Conformal Acoustic Velocity Sonar........................    43
        Expeditionary Fast Transport conversion to an unmanned 
          surface vessel.........................................    43
        Medium Range Interceptor Capability......................    44
        Medium unmanned undersea vehicles........................    44
        Report on the Navy's Long-Range Ocular Interrupter 
          Program................................................    44
        Research opportunities in cloud-aerosol effects and 
          atmospheric sunlight reflection........................    45
        RF and EMP defense technology solutions..................    46
        Shipboard Information Warfare Exploit....................    46
        SSN(X) future propulsion and power requirements..........    47
        Surface Navy Laser Weapon System Briefing................    47
        Transformational Reliable Acoustic Path System...........    48
    Research, Development, Test, and Evaluation, Air Force.......    48
      Items of Special Interest..................................    48
        Air Force Advanced Technology Development Report.........    48
        Air Force Institute of Technology research, development, 
          test, and evaluation...................................    49
        Air Force Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) 
          Program................................................    49
        Airborne Augmented Reality Systems.......................    50
        Assessment of the Air Force Test Center enterprise.......    50
        Briefing on Air Force Vanguard Programs..................    51
        Flight test air refueling support........................    51
        Report on Counter-Radar Electronic Warfare and Signal 
          Processing Capabilities................................    51
        University Consortium to Address Research Needs Unique to 
          the Space Force........................................    52
        Wide area motion imagery.................................    52
    Research, Development, Test, and Evaluation, Defense-Wide....    53
      Items of Special Interest..................................    53
        Alliance innovation partnerships.........................    53
        Assessment of High-Powered Microwave Systems.............    54
        Bio-engineering roadmap for the Department of Defense....    54
        Classified ready engineering workforce...................    54
        Department of Defense chemical and biological emerging 
          threats response efforts...............................    55
        Development of technology to increase the resiliency in 
          mitigating viral pandemics.............................    56
        Enhancing research into human performance and resilience 
          technologies in support of special operations force 
          personnel..............................................    57
        Establishing a research consortium of excellence for 
          irregular warfare and advanced analytics...............    57
        Evaluation of emergent technologies in support of special 
          operations forces in great power competition...........    58
        Feasibility assessment of establishing large and open 
          defense based data sets................................    59
        Forecasting and modeling partnerships for countering 
          infectious diseases....................................    60
        GPS-based precision approach and landing system..........    60
        High energy laser endless magazine definition............    60
        Hydrogen safety for battery use..........................    61
        Implementation of Department of Defense Inspector General 
          recommendations on additive manufacturing..............    61
        Infrastructure to support research, development, test, 
          and engineering at China Lake..........................    62
        Investment in research and development for 
          decontamination technology to support civilian 
          applications...........................................    62
        Investment in research and development for technology to 
          test treatments for nuclear, chemical, and biological 
          exposure...............................................    63
        Joint vaccine acquisition program........................    63
        Modular Open Systems common data standards...............    63
        Next generation semiconductor development and 
          manufacturing..........................................    64
        Nuclear micro reactors...................................    65
        Public-Private Partnerships for Product Support on 
          software-intensive government systems..................    65
        Quantum research efforts.................................    66
        Report on Department of Defense university research 
          COVID-19 recovery......................................    66
        Report on employing and strengthening the United States' 
          hypersonics research and development workforce.........    66
        Report on waterjet demilitarization technology...........    67
        Report to Congress on High Mach and Hypersonic Aircraft 
          Capabilities...........................................    67
        Tactical training range instrumentation..................    68
        Testing of lithium ion batteries.........................    68
        Use of artificial intelligence to analyze beneficial 
          ownership of defense contractors.......................    69
  LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS.........................................    69
    Subtitle A--Authorization of Appropriations..................    69
      Section 201--Authorization of Appropriations...............    69
    Subtitle B--Program Requirements, Restrictions, and 
        Limitations..............................................    69
      Section 211--Modification of Science, Mathematics, and 
        Research for Transformation (SMART) Defense Education 
        Program..................................................    69
      Section 212--Enhanced Participation of Department of 
        Defense Contractors in Science, Technology, Engineering, 
        and Mathematics Activities...............................    70
      Section 213--Modification of Requirements Relating to 
        Certain Cooperative Research and Development Agreements..    70
      Section 214--Pilot Program on Talent Optimization..........    70
      Section 215--Codification of the National Security 
        Innovation Network.......................................    70
      Section 216--Modification of Pilot Program on Enhanced 
        Civics Education.........................................    71
      Section 217--Modification of Joint Artificial Intelligence 
        Research, Development, and Transition Activities.........    71
      Section 218--Modification of National Security Innovation 
        Activities and Manufacturing Pilot Program...............    72
      Section 219--Extension of Pilot Program for the Enhancement 
        of the Research, Development, Test, and Evaluation 
        Centers of the Department of Defense.....................    72
      Section 220--Digital Data Management and Analytics 
        Capability...............................................    72
      Section 221--Social Science, Management Science, and 
        Information Science Research Activities..................    73
      Section 222--Measuring and Incentivizing Programming 
        Proficiency..............................................    74
      Section 223--Information Technology Modernization and 
        Security Efforts.........................................    74
      Section 224--Board of Directors for the Joint Artificial 
        Intelligence Center......................................    74
      Section 225--Directed Energy Working Group.................    75
      Section 226--Program Executive Officer for Autonomy........    75
      Section 227--Accountability Measures Relating to the 
        Advanced Battle Management System........................    75
      Section 228--Measures to Address Foreign Talent Programs...    75
      Section 229--Disclosure of Foreign Funding Sources in 
        Applications for Federal Research Awards.................    75
      Section 230--Limitations Relating to Large Unmanned Surface 
        Vessels and Associated Offensive Weapon Systems..........    76
      Section 231--Limitation on Availability of Funds Pending 
        Review and Report on Next Generation Air Dominance 
        Capabilities.............................................    76
    Subtitle C--Emerging Technology and Artificial Intelligence 
        Matters..................................................    76
      Section 241--Steering Committee on Emerging Technology.....    76
      Section 242--Training for Human Resources Personnel in 
        Artificial Intelligence and Related Topics...............    76
      Section 243--Unclassified Workspaces for Personnel with 
        Pending Security Clearances..............................    76
      Section 244--Pilot Program on the Use of Electronic 
        Portfolios to Evaluate Applicants for Certain Technical 
        Positions................................................    76
      Section 245--Self-Directed Training in Artificial 
        Intelligence.............................................    77
      Section 246--Part-Time and Term Employment of University 
        Professors and Students in the Defense Science and 
        Technology Enterprise....................................    77
      Section 247--Microelectronics and National Security........    77
      Section 248--Acquisition of Ethically and Responsibly 
        Developed Artificial Intelligence Technology.............    77
      Section 249--Enhancement of Public-Private Talent Exchange 
        Programs in the Department of Defense....................    77
    Subtitle D--Sustainable Chemistry Research and Development...    78
      Section 251--Short Title...................................    78
      Section 252--Findings......................................    78
      Section 253--National Coordinating Entity for Sustainable 
        Chemistry................................................    78
      Section 254--Strategic Plan for Sustainable Chemistry......    78
      Section 255--Agency Activities in Support of Sustainable 
        Chemistry................................................    78
      Section 256--Partnerships in Sustainable Chemistry.........    78
      Section 257--Prioritization................................    79
      Section 258--Rule of Construction..........................    79
      Section 259--Major Multi-User Research Facility Project....    79
    Subtitle E--Plans, Reports, and Other Matters................    79
      Section 261--Modification to Annual Report of the Director 
        of Operational Test and Evaluation.......................    79
      Section 262--Repeal of Quarterly Updates on the Optionally 
        Manned Fighting Vehicle Program..........................    79
      Section 263--Independent Evaluation of Personal Protective 
        and Diagnostic Testing Equipment.........................    80
      Section 264--Reports on F-35 Physiological Episodes and 
        Mitigation Efforts.......................................    80
      Section 265--Study on Mechanisms for Attracting and 
        Retaining High Quality Talent in the National Security 
        Innovation Base..........................................    80
TITLE III--OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE.............................    81
  ITEMS OF SPECIAL INTEREST......................................    81
      Energy and Environment Issues..............................    81
      Application of Geological Survey Information Related to Red 
        Hill Bulk Fuel Storage Facility..........................    81
      Aviation Ground Support Equipment..........................    81
      Biomass Support of Installation Energy Resiliency..........    82
      Defense Energy Resilience Authorities and Programs.........    82
      Execution of the Military Munitions Response Program.......    83
      Expanding the Scope of and Partners for DOD PFAS Research 
        and Development..........................................    83
      Federal-State Partnerships and the Readiness Environmental 
        Protection Integration Program...........................    83
      Implementation of Operational Energy Cost Savings..........    84
      Increased Resiliency and Lethality through Operational 
        Energy Investment........................................    84
      Report on Department of Defense Fuel Contracting...........    85
      Water and Sewage Resiliency Gaps at Military Installations.    85
    Logistics and Sustainment Issues.............................    85
      Air Force Undergraduate Pilot Training and T-7A Redhawk 
        Transition Plan..........................................    85
      Army Combat Aviation Sustainment...........................    86
      Department of Defense Warehouse Space Management...........    87
      Depot Carryover............................................    87
      Domestically Sourced Corrosion Control.....................    88
      F-35 Sustainment...........................................    88
      Navy and Air Force Fixed-Wing Aviation Field-Level 
        Maintenance..............................................    89
      Navy Deferred Maintenance..................................    90
      Navy Ship Field-Level Maintenance..........................    90
      Pilot Program for Enhancing Ship Readiness through Digital 
        Techniques...............................................    91
      Transparency in Food Ingredient Policies and Standards.....    92
      United States Air Force Academy Mission Network............    92
    Readiness Issues.............................................    93
      Air Force T-38C Transition and Formation Landings..........    93
      Air Support Service Contracts..............................    93
      Army Briefing on Static-Line Parachuting Proficiency 
        Requirements.............................................    94
      Army Sustainable Readiness Model...........................    96
      Briefing on Deployment of Next Generation 911 on Military 
        Installations............................................    96
      Department of Defense Law Enforcement Training and 
        Standards................................................    97
      Directed Readiness Tables and Readiness Reporting..........    97
      Dynamic Force Employment...................................    98
      Exercise Northern Strike...................................    98
      High-Speed Test Track Infrastructure Requirements..........    99
      Marine Corps Aviation Readiness and Sustainment............    99
      Personnel Parachute and Cargo Inventory Management.........    99
      Readiness of Firefighting Infrastructure and Equipment.....   100
      Report on the Air Force's Use of Executive Decision Model 
        Analytics................................................   100
      Surface Navy Seamanship and Skills Assessment..............   101
    Other Matters................................................   101
      Civilian Participation in War Games........................   101
      Community Integration Programs.............................   102
      Counter Drone Center of Excellence.........................   102
      Military Working Dogs......................................   103
      Mishap Reporting and Data Analysis.........................   103
      Navy Museum and Historical Exchanges.......................   104
      United States Coast Guard Defense Readiness Resource 
        Allocation...............................................   104
  LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS.........................................   105
    Subtitle A--Authorization of Appropriations..................   105
      Section 301--Authorization of Appropriations...............   105
    Subtitle B--Energy and Environment...........................   105
      Section 311--Military Aviation and Installation Assurance 
        Clearinghouse for Review of Mission Obstructions.........   105
      Section 312--Military Aviation and Installation Assurance 
        Clearinghouse for Review of Mission Obstructions.........   105
      Section 313--Agreements to Limit Encroachments and Other 
        Constraints on Military Training, Testing, and Operations   106
      Section 314--Modification of Department of Defense 
        Environmental Restoration Authorities to Include Federal 
        Government Facilities Used by National Guard.............   106
      Section 315--Increased Transparency through Reporting on 
        Usage and Spills of Aqueous Film-Forming Foam at Military 
        Installations............................................   106
      Section 316--Replacement of Non-Tactical Motor Vehicles at 
        the End of Service Life with Electric or Hybrid Motor 
        Vehicles.................................................   106
      Section 317--Budgeting of Department of Defense Relating to 
        Operational Energy Improvement...........................   106
      Section 318--Assessment of Department of Defense 
        Operational Energy Usage.................................   106
      Section 319--Improvement of the Operational Energy 
        Capability Improvement Fund of the Department of Defense.   106
      Section 320--Five-Year Reviews of Containment Technologies 
        Relating to Red Hill Bulk Fuel Storage Facility..........   107
      Section 321--Limitation on Use of Funds for Acquisition of 
        Furnished Energy for Rhine Ordnance Barracks Army Medical 
        Center...................................................   107
      Section 322--Requirement to Update Department of Defense 
        Climate Change Roadmap...................................   107
      Section 323--Comptroller General Report on Department of 
        Defense Installation Energy..............................   107
      Section 324--Department of Defense Report on Emissions 
        Levels...................................................   107
      Section 325--Objectives, Performance Standards, and 
        Criteria for Use of Wildlife Conservation Banking 
        Programs.................................................   107
      Section 326--Offshore Wind Energy Development, Morro Bay, 
        California...............................................   107
      Section 327--Long-Duration Demonstration Initiative and 
        Joint Program............................................   108
      Section 328--Prizes for Development of Non-PFAS-Containing 
        Fire-Fighting Agent......................................   108
      Section 329--Survey of Technologies for Department of 
        Defense Application in Phasing Out the Use of Fluorinated 
        Aqueous Film-Forming Foam................................   108
      Section 330--Interagency Body on Research Related to Per- 
        and Polyfluoroalkyl Substances...........................   108
      Section 331--Restriction on Procurement by Defense 
        Logistics Agency of Certain Items Containing 
        Perfluoroalkyl Substances and Polyfluoroalkyl Substances.   108
      Section 332--Standards for Removal or Remedial Actions with 
        Respect to PFOS or PFOA Contamination....................   108
      Section 333--Research and Development of Alternative to 
        Aqueous Film-Forming Foam................................   108
      Section 334--Notification to Agricultural Operations 
        Located in Areas Exposed to Department of Defense PFAS 
        Use......................................................   109
      Section 335--Public Disclosure of Results of Department of 
        Defense Testing for Perfluoroalkyl or Polyfluoroalkyl 
        Substances...............................................   109
    Subtitle C--Logistics and Sustainment........................   109
      Section 351--National Defense Sustainment and Logistics 
        Review...................................................   109
      Section 352--Extension of Sunset Relating to Charter Air 
        Transportation Services..................................   109
      Section 353--Additional Elements for Inclusion in Navy Ship 
        Depot Maintenance Budget Report..........................   109
      Section 354--Modification to Limitation on Length of 
        Overseas Forward Deployment of Naval Vessels.............   109
      Section 355--Independent Advisory Panel on Weapon System 
        Sustainment..............................................   110
      Section 356--Biannual Briefings on Status of Shipyard 
        Infrastructure Optimization Plan.........................   110
      Section 357--Materiel Readiness Metrics and Objectives for 
        Major Weapon Systems.....................................   110
    Subtitle D--Munitions Safety and Oversight...................   110
      Section 361--Chair of Department of Defense Explosive 
        Safety Board.............................................   110
      Section 362--Explosive Ordnance Disposal Defense Program...   110
      Section 363--Assessment of Resilience of Department of 
        Defense Munitions Enterprise.............................   110
      Section 364--Report on Safety Waivers and Mishaps in 
        Department of Defense Munitions Enterprise...............   111
    Subtitle E--Other Matters....................................   111
      Section 371--Pilot Program for Temporary Issuance of 
        Maternity-Related Uniform Items..........................   111
      Section 372--Servicewomen's Commemorative Partnerships.....   111
      Section 373--Biodefense Analysis and Budget Submission.....   111
TITLE IV--MILITARY PERSONNEL AUTHORIZATIONS......................   111
  ITEMS OF SPECIAL INTEREST......................................   111
      Impact of U.S. Population Trends on National Guard Force 
        Structure................................................   111
  LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS.........................................   112
    Subtitle A--Active Forces....................................   112
      Section 401--End Strengths for Active Forces...............   112
      Section 402--Revisions in Permanent Active Duty End 
        Strength Minimum Levels..................................   114
      Section 403--Modification of the Authorized Number and 
        Accounting Method for Senior Enlisted Personnel..........   114
    Subtitle B--Reserve Forces...................................   114
      Section 411--End Strengths for Selected Reserve............   114
      Section 412--End Strengths for Reserves on Active Duty in 
        Support of the Reserves..................................   116
      Section 413--End Strengths for Military Technicians (Dual 
        Status)..................................................   118
      Section 414--Maximum Number of Reserve Personnel Authorized 
        To Be on Active Duty for Operational Support.............   120
    Subtitle C--Authorization of Appropriations..................   121
      Section 421--Military Personnel............................   121
TITLE V--MILITARY PERSONNEL POLICY...............................   121
  ITEMS OF SPECIAL INTEREST......................................   121
      A Report on the Military Lending Act and the Effects of 
        High Interest Rates on Readiness.........................   121
      Air Force Institute of Technology and Space Education Study   121
      Concerns about Uncharacterized Discharges..................   122
      Disinformation Training Incorporated into Pre-deployment 
        Training.................................................   122
      Effectiveness of Military Justice Reforms..................   123
      Expanding World Language Program to Offer Strategic 
        Language Training to DODEA Students Earlier..............   123
      Gender Integration at Marine Corps Recruit Depots..........   123
      Improvements to the Special Victims' Counsel Program.......   124
      Military Judge Advocate General End Strength...............   124
      Military Spouse Licensure Reciprocity......................   124
      Morale, Welfare, and Recreation Reservation System 
        Modernization............................................   125
      Officer and Enlisted Qualification Testing.................   125
      Parental Leave Parity for Reservists.......................   126
      Participation in Transition Assistance Programs at Small 
        and Remote Military Installations........................   126
      Professional Military Education Reform.....................   127
      Report on Feasibility of Implementation of Flexible 
        Spending Account Options for Members of the Uniformed 
        Services and Their Families..............................   127
      Reserve Component General and Flag Officer Development.....   128
      Reserve Component Record of Service........................   128
      Review of Medical Accessions Standards for Appointment, 
        Enlistment, or Induction into Military Services..........   128
      Review of the Preservation of the Force and Family Program 
        for Special Operations Forces............................   129
      Sexual Assault Information Management System...............   130
      Space Force Personnel......................................   130
      United States Space Force Commissioning Programs...........   131
  LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS.........................................   131
    Subtitle A--Officer Personnel Policy.........................   131
      Section 501--Authorized Strength: Exclusion of Certain 
        General and Flag Officers of the Reserve Components on 
        Active Duty..............................................   131
      Section 502--Diversity in Selection Boards.................   132
      Section 503--Redaction of Personally Identifiable 
        Information from Records Furnished to a Promotion Board..   132
    Subtitle B--Reserve Component Management.....................   132
      Section 511--Grants to Support STEM Education in the Junior 
        Reserve Officers' Training Corps.........................   132
      Section 512--Modification of Education Loan Repayment 
        Program for Members of Selected Reserve..................   132
      Section 513--Requirement of Consent of the Chief Executive 
        Officer for Certain Full-Time National Guard Duty 
        Performed in a State, Territory, or the District of 
        Columbia.................................................   132
      Section 514--Constructive Credit for Certain Members of the 
        Reserve Components Who Cannot Complete Minimum Annual 
        Training Requirements as a Result of the COVID-19 
        Pandemic.................................................   132
      Section 515--Guidance for Use of Unmanned Aircraft Systems 
        by the National Guard....................................   132
      Section 516--Direct Employment Pilot Program for Certain 
        Members of the Reserve Components........................   133
      Section 517--Temporary Limitation on Authority to Transfer, 
        Relocate, or Dissolve Elements of the Reserve Components 
        of the Air Force.........................................   133
      Section 518--Pilot Programs in Connection with SROTC Units 
        and CSPI Programs at Historically Black Colleges and 
        Universities and Minority Institutions...................   133
    Subtitle C--General Service Authorities and Correction of 
        Military Records.........................................   133
      Section 521--Temporary Authority to Order Retired Members 
        to Active Duty in High-Demand, Low-Density Assignments 
        During War or National Emergency.........................   133
      Section 522--Reenlistment Waivers for Persons Separated 
        from the Armed Forces Who Commit One Misdemeanor Cannabis 
        Offense..................................................   133
      Section 523--Review of Seaman to Admiral-21 Program; Credit 
        Towards Retirement.......................................   133
    Subtitle D--Military Justice and Other Legal Matters.........   134
      Section 531--Punitive Article on Violent Extremism.........   134
      Section 532--Preservation of Court-Martial Records.........   134
      Section 533--Electronic Notarization for Members of the 
        Armed Forces.............................................   134
      Section 534--Clarifications regarding Scope of Employment 
        and Reemployment Rights of Members of the Uniformed 
        Services.................................................   134
      Section 535--Absentee Ballot Tracking Program..............   134
      Section 536--Tracking Mechanism and Reporting Requirements 
        for Supremacist, Extremist, and Criminal Gang Activity in 
        the Armed Forces.........................................   134
      Section 537--Military-Civilian Task Force on Domestic 
        Violence and Related Information Collection Activities...   134
      Section 538--Actions to Address Military-Connected Child 
        Abuse....................................................   135
      Section 539--Multidisciplinary Board to Evaluate Suicide 
        Events...................................................   135
    Subtitle E--Sexual Assault...................................   135
      Section 541--Protection of Attorney-Client Privilege 
        between Victims and Special Victims' Counsel.............   135
      Section 542--Authority of Military Judges and Military 
        Magistrates to Issue Military Court Protective Orders....   135
      Section 543--Additional Bases for Provision of Advice by 
        the Defense Advisory Committee for the Prevention of 
        Sexual Misconduct........................................   136
      Section 544--Modification of Reporting and Data Collection 
        on Victims of Sexual Offenses............................   136
      Section 545--Modification of Annual Report regarding Sexual 
        Assaults Involving Members of the Armed Forces...........   136
      Section 546--Coordination of Support for Survivors of 
        Sexual Trauma............................................   136
      Section 547--Policy on Separation of Victim and Accused at 
        Military Service Academies...............................   136
      Section 548--Safe-to-Report Policy Applicable across the 
        Armed Forces.............................................   137
      Section 549--Question in Workplace and Gender Relations 
        Surveys regarding Prosecutions of Sexual Assault.........   137
      Section 549A--Pilot Program on Prosecution of Special 
        Victim Offenses Committed by Attendees of Military 
        Service Academies........................................   137
      Section 549B--Report on Status of Investigations of Alleged 
        Sex-Related Offenses.....................................   137
    Subtitle F--Member Education, Training, and Transition.......   137
      Section 551--Counseling in the Transition Assistance 
        Program regarding Sexual Assault, Sexual or Gender 
        Harassment, and Intimate Partner Violence................   137
      Section 552--Establishment of Mentoring and Career 
        Counseling Program.......................................   138
      Section 553--Defense Language Institute Foreign Language 
        Center...................................................   138
      Section 554--Defense Language Institute Foreign Language 
        Center...................................................   138
      Section 555--Increase in Number of Permanent Professors at 
        the United States Air Force Academy......................   138
      Section 556--Information on Nominations and Applications 
        for Military Service Academies...........................   138
      Section 557--Transformation of the Professional Military 
        Education Enterprise.....................................   138
      Section 558--College of International Security Affairs of 
        the National Defense University..........................   138
      Section 559--Public-Private Consortium to Improve 
        Professional Military Education..........................   139
    Subtitle G--Military Family Readiness and Dependents' 
        Education................................................   139
      Section 561--Family Readiness: Definitions; Communication 
        Strategy; Report.........................................   139
      Section 562--Support Services for Members of Special 
        Operations Forces and Immediate Family Members...........   139
      Section 563--Authority to Provide Assistance to Certain In-
        Home Child Care Providers for Members of the Armed Forces 
        and Survivors of Members Who Die in Combat in the Line of 
        Duty.....................................................   139
      Section 564--Expansion of Financial Assistance under My 
        Career Advancement Account Program.......................   139
      Section 565--Child Care....................................   139
      Section 566--Continuation of Paid Parental Leave upon Death 
        of Child.................................................   140
      Section 567--Study and Report on the Performance of the 
        Department of Defense Education Activity.................   140
      Section 568--Comptroller General of the United States 
        Report on the Structural Condition of Department of 
        Defense Education Activity Schools.......................   140
      Section 569--Pilot Program to Expand Eligibility for 
        Enrollment at Domestic Dependent Elementary and Secondary 
        Schools..................................................   140
      Section 569A--Continued Assistance to Schools with 
        Significant Numbers of Military Dependent Students.......   140
      Section 569B--Standardization of the Exceptional Family 
        Member Program...........................................   140
    Subtitle H--Diversity and Inclusion..........................   141
      Section 571--Diversity and Inclusion Reporting Requirements   141
      Section 572--Establishment of Diversity and Inclusion 
        Advisory Council of the Department of Defense............   141
      Section 573--Establishment of Special Inspector General for 
        Racial and Ethnic Disparities in the Armed Forces; 
        Amendments to Inspector General Act......................   141
      Section 574--Questions regarding Racism, Anti-Semitism, and 
        Supremacism in Workplace Surveys Administered by the 
        Secretary of Defense.....................................   141
      Section 575--Report on Demographics of Officers Appointed 
        to Certain Grades........................................   141
      Section 576--Plans to Increase Female and Minority 
        Representation in the Armed Forces.......................   141
      Section 577--Evaluation of Barriers to Minority 
        Participation in Certain Units of the Armed Forces.......   142
    Subtitle I--Decorations and Awards...........................   142
      Section 581--Establishment of the Atomic Veterans Service 
        Medal....................................................   142
      Section 582--Authorization for Award of the Distinguished-
        Service Cross for Ramiro F. Olivo for Acts of Valor 
        during the Vietnam War...................................   142
    Subtitle J--Miscellaneous Reports and Other Matters..........   142
      Section 591--Expansion of Department of Defense STARBASE 
        Program..................................................   142
      Section 592--Inclusion of Certain Outlying Areas in the 
        Department of Defense STARBASE Program...................   142
      Section 593--Prohibition on Charging for or Counting 
        Certain Acronyms on Headstones of Individuals Interred at 
        Arlington National Cemetery..............................   142
      Section 594--Report on Placement of Members of the Armed 
        Forces in Academic Status Who Are Victims of Sexual 
        Assault onto Non-Rated Periods...........................   143
      Section 595--Sense of Congress regarding Advertising 
        Recruiting Efforts.......................................   143
TITLE VI--COMPENSATION AND OTHER PERSONNEL BENEFITS..............   143
  ITEMS OF SPECIAL INTEREST......................................   143
      Department of Defense Impact Aid Program Report............   143
      Disabled Service Member Transition Assistance..............   143
      Military Spouse Employment.................................   144
      Operation of Commissaries during Period of Expiration of 
        Appropriations...........................................   144
      Private Sector Wage Verification Assessment................   145
      Report on the Advisability of Permitting Military Personnel 
        to Use Education Benefits for Nontraditional Cyber-
        Related Education Programs...............................   146
      Transitional Compensation..................................   146
  LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS.........................................   147
    Subtitle A--Pay and Allowances...............................   147
      Section 601--Increase in Basic Pay.........................   147
      Section 602--Basic Needs Allowance for Low-Income Regular 
        Members..................................................   147
      Section 603--Reorganization of Certain Allowances Other 
        Than Travel and Transportation Allowances................   147
    Subtitle B--Bonuses and Special Incentive Pays...............   147
      Section 611--One-Year Extension of Certain Expiring Bonus 
        and Special Pay Authorities..............................   147
      Section 612--Increase in Certain Hazardous Duty Incentive 
        Pay for Members of the Uniformed Services................   147
      Section 613--Standardization of Payment of Hazardous Duty 
        Incentive Pay for Members of the Uniformed Services......   147
      Section 614--Clarification of 30 Days of Continuous Duty on 
        Board a Ship Required for Family Separation Allowance for 
        Members of the Uniformed Services........................   148
      Section 615--Expansion of Reimbursable State Licensure and 
        Certification Costs for a Military Spouse Arising from 
        Relocation...............................................   148
    Subtitle C--Family and Survivor Benefits.....................   148
      Section 621--Expansion of Authority to Provide Financial 
        Assistance to Civilian Providers of Child Care Services 
        or Youth Program Services for Survivors of Members of the 
        Armed Forces Who Die in the Line of Duty.................   148
      Section 622--Expansion of Death Gratuity for ROTC Graduates   148
      Section 623--Recalculation of Financial Assistance for 
        Providers of Child Care Services and Youth Program 
        Services for Dependents..................................   148
      Section 624--Priority for Certain Military Family Housing 
        to a Member of the Armed Forces Whose Spouse Agrees to 
        Provide Family Home Day Care Services....................   148
      Section 625--Study on Feasibility of TSP Contributions by 
        Military Spouses.........................................   148
    Subtitle D--Defense Resale Matters...........................   149
      Section 631--Base Responders Essential Needs and Dining 
        Access...................................................   149
      Section 632--First Responder Access to Mobile Exchanges....   149
      Section 633--Updated Business Case Analysis for 
        Consolidation of the Defense Resale System...............   149
    Subtitle E--Other Personnel Benefits.........................   149
      Section 641--Maintenance of Funding for Stars and Stripes..   149
TITLE VII--HEALTH CARE PROVISIONS................................   149
  ITEMS OF SPECIAL INTEREST......................................   149
      Adult Residential Treatment for Eating Disorders...........   149
      Behavioral Health Requirements of the Department of Defense   150
      Cardiac Arterial Disease Diagnostic Improvements...........   151
      Creative Arts Therapies....................................   151
      Financial Management of U.S. Army Medical Research and 
        Development Command......................................   151
      Improving Health Care Choices for Severely Injured Service 
        Members..................................................   152
      Military Medical Surge Capacity Partnerships...............   152
      Rare Cancer Treatment......................................   153
      Report on Force Plate Technology Utilizing Machine Learning 
        for Improving Combat Readiness...........................   153
      Reporting of Data Related to Accession Standards and Mental 
        Health History...........................................   154
      Review on the Existing Department of Defense Capabilities 
        to Operate, Maintain, and Transport Sterile Clinical, 
        Surgical, and Resuscitative Capabilities.................   154
      Status of Implementation of Guidance for Ensuring Access to 
        Contraception for Service Members........................   155
      Supply Chain Resilience and Critical Supplies Stockpile....   156
      Traumatic Brain Injury Preventative Devices................   157
      Ultrasound Technology to Identify Subdermal Injuries in 
        Strangulation Victims....................................   157
      Women's Comprehensive Health Clinics.......................   157
  LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS.........................................   158
    Subtitle A--TRICARE and Other Health Care Benefits...........   158
      Section 701--Expansion of Mental Health Assessments for 
        Members of the Armed Forces..............................   158
      Section 702--Mandatory Referral for Mental Health 
        Evaluation...............................................   158
      Section 703--Assessments and Testing Relating to Exposure 
        to Perfluoroalkyl and Polyfluoroalkyl Substances.........   158
      Section 704--Improvement to Breast Cancer Screening........   158
    Subtitle B--Health Care Administration.......................   159
      Section 711--Protection of the Armed Forces from Infectious 
        Diseases.................................................   159
      Section 712--Inclusion of Drugs, Biological Products, and 
        Critical Medical Supplies in National Security Strategy 
        for National Technology and Industrial Base..............   159
      Section 713--Contract Authority of the Uniformed Services 
        University of the Health Sciences........................   159
      Section 714--Extension of Organization Requirements for 
        Defense Health Agency....................................   159
      Section 715--Modification to Limitation on the Realignment 
        or Reduction of Military Medical Manning End Strength....   159
      Section 716--Modifications to Implementation Plan for 
        Restructure or Realignment of Military Medical Treatment 
        Facilities...............................................   160
      Section 717--Policy to Address Opioid Prescription Abuse 
        Prevention...............................................   160
      Section 718--Addition of Burn Pit Registration to 
        Electronic Health Records of Members of the Armed Forces 
        and Veterans.............................................   160
    Subtitle C--Matters Relating to COVID-19.....................   160
      Section 721--COVID-19 Military Health System Review Panel..   160
      Section 722--COVID-19 Global War on Pandemics..............   160
      Section 723--Registry of TRICARE Beneficiaries Diagnosed 
        with COVID-19............................................   161
    Subtitle D--Reports and Other Matters........................   161
      Section 731--Modifications to Pilot Program on Civilian and 
        Military Partnerships to Enhance Interoperability and 
        Medical Surge Capability and Capacity of National 
        Disaster Medical System..................................   161
      Section 732--Reports on Suicide among Members of the Armed 
        Forces and Suicide Prevention Programs and Activities of 
        the Department of Defense................................   161
      Section 733--Clarification of Research under Joint Trauma 
        Education and Training Directorate and Inclusion of 
        Military Working Dogs....................................   161
      Section 734--Extension of the Joint Department of Defense-
        Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Facility 
        Demonstration Project....................................   161
      Section 735--Information Sharing by Secretary of Defense 
        regarding Prevention of Infant and Maternal Mortality....   162
      Section 736--Grant Program for Increased Cooperation on 
        Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder Research between United 
        States and Israel........................................   162
      Section 737--Pilot Program on Cryopreservation and Storage.   162
      Section 738--Pilot Program on Parents Serving as Certified 
        Nursing Assistants for Children under TRICARE Program....   162
      Section 739--Study on Incidence of Cancer Diagnosis and 
        Mortality among Pilots in the Armed Forces...............   162
      Section 740--Report on Diet and Nutrition of Members of the 
        Armed Forces.............................................   162
      Section 741--Report on Costs and Benefits of Allowing 
        Retired Members of the Armed Forces to Contribute to 
        Health Savings Accounts..................................   163
      Section 742--Study on Toxic Exposure at Karshi-Khanabad Air 
        Base, Uzbekistan.........................................   163
      Section 743--Audit of Medical Conditions of Tenants in 
        Privatized Military Housing..............................   163
      Section 744--Report on Integrated Disability Evaluation 
        System...................................................   163
      Section 745--Review and Report on Prevention of Suicide 
        among Members of the Armed Forces Stationed at Remote 
        Installations outside the Contiguous United States.......   163
    Subtitle E--Mental Health Services from Department of 
        Veterans Affairs for Members of Reserve Components.......   164
      Section 751--Short Title...................................   164
      Section 752--Expansion of Eligibility for Readjustment 
        Counseling and related Outpatient Services from 
        Department of Veterans Affairs to Include Members of 
        Reserve Components of the Armed Forces...................   164
      Section 753--Provision of Mental Health Services from 
        Department of Veterans Affairs to Members of Reserve 
        Components of the Armed Forces...........................   164
      Section 754--Inclusion of Members of Reserve Components in 
        Mental Health Programs of Department of Veterans Affairs.   164
      Section 755--Report on Mental Health and Related Services 
        Provided by Department of Veterans Affairs to Members of 
        the Armed Forces.........................................   164
TITLE VIII--ACQUISITION POLICY, ACQUISITION MANAGEMENT, AND 
    RELATED MATTERS..............................................   165
  ITEMS OF SPECIAL INTEREST......................................   165
      Assessment of Section 889 of the National Defense 
        Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2019...................   165
      Briefing on Section 889 of the National Defense 
        Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2019...................   165
      Commercial Airlift Review Board Requirements...............   166
      Commercial Items Group Supporting Procuring Contracting 
        Officers in Making Commercial Item Determinations........   166
      Commercial Supply Stores...................................   167
      Compliance with Contract Services Planning, Programming, 
        and Budgeting Requirements and Statutory Limitations on 
        Outsourcing Government Jobs..............................   167
      Consistency in the Management and Execution of Audits of 
        Contractor Business System Reviews Conducted by the 
        Defense Contract Audit Agency............................   168
      COVID-19 Uniformed Mask Distribution to Service Members....   169
      Department of Defense Proposal for Reports on Acquisition 
        Programs and Activities..................................   169
      Efforts to Improve the Domestic Nonavailability Waiver 
        Process..................................................   170
      Efforts to Streamline the Internal Control Audit Framework 
        Used to Evaluate Contractor Business Systems.............   170
      Evaluating Possibility of Conflicts of Interest for 
        Federally Funded Research and Development Centers........   170
      GAO Report on GSA E-commerce Portal Data Usage.............   171
      GAO Report on Time-and-Materials and Labor-Hour Contracts..   171
      Incremental Funding of Services Contracts..................   172
      Plan To Address Obsolete MIL-PRF-19500 Discrete Parts......   172
      Procurement Technical Assistance Program Management and 
        Oversight................................................   173
      Report on Cybersecurity Maturity Model Certification.......   173
      Report on Source Content Supplier for Major Defense 
        Acquisition Programs.....................................   174
      Secure Supply Chain for Niobium............................   174
      Sensor Open Systems Architecture and C4ISR Modular Open 
        Suite of Standards Military Standards Initiative.........   175
      Status of Implementing Regulations Related to Procurement 
        Administrative Lead Times................................   176
      Strategic and Critical Materials in Department of Defense 
        Industrial Base..........................................   176
  LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS.........................................   177
    Subtitle A--Acquisition Policy and Management................   177
      Section 801--Congressional Notification of Termination of a 
        Middle Tier Acquisition Program..........................   177
      Section 802--Modification to the Definition of 
        Nontraditional Defense Contractor........................   177
      Section 803--Major Weapon Systems: Life-Cycle Sustainment 
        Plan.....................................................   177
      Section 804--Contractor Business Systems...................   177
      Section 805--Acquisition Authority of the Director of the 
        Joint Artificial Intelligence Center.....................   178
      Section 806--Reforming the Department of Defense...........   178
      Section 807--Alternative Space Acquisition System for the 
        United States Space Force................................   178
    Subtitle B--Amendments to General Contracting Authorities, 
        Procedures, and Limitations..............................   178
      Section 811--Sustainment Reform for the Department of 
        Defense..................................................   178
      Section 812--Modifications to Comptroller General 
        Assessment of Acquisition Programs and Related 
        Initiatives..............................................   178
      Section 813--Contractor Whistleblower Protections Relating 
        to Nondisclosure Agreements..............................   178
      Section 814--Competition Requirements for Purchases from 
        Federal Prison Industries................................   179
      Section 815--Disclosure of Beneficial Owners in Database 
        for Federal Agency Contract and Grant Officers...........   179
      Section 816--Inclusion of Optical Transmission Components 
        in the Analytical Framework for Supply Chain Risks.......   179
      Section 817--Amendment to Definition of Qualified 
        Apprentice...............................................   179
      Section 818--Contract Closeout Authority for Services 
        Contracts................................................   179
      Section 819--Plan to Improve Department-wide Management of 
        Investments in Weapon Systems............................   179
    Subtitle C--Industrial Base Matters..........................   180
      Section 821--Quarterly National Technology and Industrial 
        Base Briefings...........................................   180
      Section 822--Expansion on the Prohibition on Acquiring 
        Certain Metal Products...................................   180
      Section 823--Requirement that Certain Ship Components Be 
        Manufactured in the National Technology and Industrial 
        Base.....................................................   180
      Section 824--Preference for Sourcing Rare Earth Materials 
        from the National Technology and Industrial Base.........   180
      Section 825--Enhanced Domestic Content Requirement for 
        Major Defense Acquisition Programs.......................   180
      Section 826--Additional Requirements Pertaining to Printed 
        Circuit Boards...........................................   180
      Section 827--Report on Use of Domestic Nonavailability 
        Determinations...........................................   181
      Section 828--Sense of Congress on the Prohibition on 
        Certain Telecommunications and Video Surveillance 
        Services or Equipment....................................   181
    Subtitle D--Small Business Matters...........................   181
      Section 831--Transfer of Verification of Small Business 
        Concerns Owned and Controlled by Veterans or Service-
        Disabled Veterans to the Small Business Administration...   181
      Section 832--Equitable Adjustments to Certain Construction 
        Contracts................................................   181
      Section 833--Exemption of Certain Contracts Awarded to 
        Small Business Concerns from Category Management 
        Requirements.............................................   181
      Section 834--Report on Accelerated Payments to Certain 
        Small Business Concerns..................................   182
    Subtitle E--Other Matters....................................   182
      Section 841--Modifications to Supervision and Award of 
        Certain Contracts........................................   182
      Section 842--Amendments to Submissions to Congress Relating 
        to Certain Foreign Military Sales........................   182
      Section 843--Revisions to Requirement to Use Firm Fixed-
        Price Contracts for Foreign Military Sales...............   182
      Section 844--Small Business Industrial Base Resiliency 
        Program..................................................   182
      Section 845--Requirements Relating to Reports and 
        Limitations on the Availability of Funds.................   183
      Section 846--Assessment of the Requirements Processes of 
        the Military Departments.................................   183
      Section 847--Report on Transfer and Consolidation of 
        Certain Defense Acquisition Statutes.....................   183
TITLE IX--DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE ORGANIZATION AND MANAGEMENT......   184
  ITEMS OF SPECIAL INTEREST......................................   184
      Assistant Secretary of Defense for Space and Strategic 
        Deterrence...............................................   184
      Implementation of the Directed Roles and Responsibilities 
        of the Assistant Secretary of Defense for Special 
        Operations and Low-Intensity Conflict....................   184
      U.S. Special Operations Command Force Structure and 
        Organization.............................................   185
  LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS.........................................   185
    Subtitle A--Office of the Secretary of Defense and Related 
        Matters..................................................   185
      Section 901--Repeal of Position of Chief Management Officer   185
      Section 902--Assistant Secretary of Defense for Industrial 
        Base Policy..............................................   186
    Subtitle B--Other Department of Defense Organization and 
        Management Matters.......................................   186
      Section 911--Limitation on Reduction of Civilian Workforce.   186
      Section 912--Chief Diversity Officers......................   186
      Section 913--Establishment of Deputy Assistant Secretaries 
        for Sustainment..........................................   186
      Section 914--Office of Defense Community Cooperation and 
        Economic Adjustment......................................   186
      Section 915--Input from Chief of National Guard Bureau to 
        the Joint Requirements Oversight Council.................   187
      Section 916--Redesignation of the Joint Forces Staff 
        College..................................................   187
    Subtitle C--Space Matters....................................   187
      Section 921--Assistant Secretary of Defense for Space and 
        Strategic Deterrence Policy..............................   187
      Section 922--Office of the Chief of Space Operations.......   187
      Section 923--Space Force Medal.............................   187
      Section 924--Clarification of Procurement of Commercial 
        Satellite Communications Services........................   187
      Section 925--Temporary Exemption from Authorized Daily 
        Average of Members in Pay Grade E-8 and E-9..............   187
      Section 926--One-Time Uniform Allowance for Members 
        Transferred to the Space Force...........................   187
TITLE X--GENERAL PROVISIONS......................................   188
  ITEMS OF SPECIAL INTEREST......................................   188
    Other Matters................................................   188
      Airfield Capabilities in GPS Denied Environments...........   188
      Audit Accountability.......................................   188
      Audit Innovation...........................................   188
      Close Combat Lethality Task Force..........................   189
      Implementation of Findings and Recommendations of the 2020 
        U.S. Special Operations Command Comprehensive Review.....   189
      Presentation of Defense Budget Materials...................   190
      Prioritizing Material Weaknesses...........................   191
      Report on Audit Expertise in Remediation Services..........   191
      Report on Service Consolidation of General Ledger Financial 
        Management Systems.......................................   191
      Reserve Components and National Guard Units Supporting 
        Special Operations Command Operational and Training 
        Requirements.............................................   192
      United Service Organizations and Identification Cards......   192
  LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS.........................................   193
    Subtitle A--Financial Matters................................   193
      Section 1001--General Transfer Authority...................   193
      Section 1002--Determination of Budgetary Effects...........   193
      Section 1003--Pandemic Preparedness and Resilience National 
        Security Fund............................................   193
      Section 1004--Budget Materials for Special Operations 
        Forces...................................................   194
    Subtitle B--Counterdrug Activities...........................   194
      Section 1011--Support for Counterdrug Activities and 
        Activities to Counter Transnational Organized Crime 
        Affecting Flow of Drugs into the United States...........   194
      Section 1012--Congressional Notification with Respect to 
        Department of Defense Support Provided to Other United 
        States Agencies for Counterdrug Activities and Activities 
        to Counter Transnational Organized Crime.................   194
    Subtitle C--Naval Vessels....................................   194
      Section 1021--Limitation on Availability of Certain Funds 
        without Naval Vessels Plan and Certification.............   194
      Section 1022--Limitations on Use of Funds in the National 
        Defense Sealift Fund for Purchase of Foreign Constructed 
        Vessels..................................................   194
      Section 1023--Use of National Sea-Based Deterrence Fund for 
        Incrementally Funded Contracts to Provide Full Funding 
        for Columbia Class Submarines............................   194
      Section 1024--Preference for United States Vessels in 
        Transporting Supplies by Sea.............................   195
      Section 1025--Restrictions on Overhaul, Repair, etc. of 
        Naval Vessels in Foreign Shipyards.......................   195
      Section 1026--Biannual Report on Shipbuilder Training and 
        the Defense Industrial Base..............................   195
      Section 1027--Prohibition on Use of Funds for Retirement of 
        Certain Littoral Combat Ships............................   195
      Section 1028--Report on Implementation of Commandant's 
        Planning Guidance........................................   195
      Section 1029--Limitation on Naval Force Structure Changes..   195
    Subtitle D--Counterterrorism.................................   195
      Section 1031--Prohibition on Use of Funds for Transfer or 
        Release of Individuals Detained at United States Naval 
        Station, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, to Certain Countries......   195
    Subtitle E--Miscellaneous Authorities and Limitations........   196
      Section 1041--Support of Special Operations to Combat 
        Terrorism................................................   196
      Section 1042--Prohibition on Retirement of Nuclear Powered 
        Aircraft Carriers before First Refueling.................   196
      Section 1043--Required Minimum Inventory of Tactical 
        Airlift Aircraft.........................................   196
      Section 1044--Modification and Technical Correction to 
        Department of Defense Authority to Provide Assistance 
        along the Southern Land Border of the United States......   196
      Section 1045--Battlefield Airborne Communications Node 
        Certification Requirement................................   196
      Section 1046--Requirements Relating to Newest Generations 
        of Personal Protective Equipment.........................   197
      Section 1047--Mandatory Criteria for Strategic Basing 
        Decisions................................................   197
      Section 1047--Prohibition on Use of Funds for Retirement of 
        A-10 Aircraft............................................   197
      Section 1048--Limitation on Use of Funds Pending Public 
        Availability of Top-Line Numbers of Deployed Members of 
        the Armed Forces.........................................   197
      Section 1049--Limitation on Physical Move, Integration, 
        Reassignment, or Shift in Responsibility of Marine Forces 
        Northern Command.........................................   197
      Section 1050--Conditions for Permanently Basing United 
        States Equipment or Additional Forces in Host Countries 
        with At-Risk Vendors in 5G or 6G Networks................   198
TITLE XI--CIVILIAN PERSONNEL MATTERS.............................   198
  ITEMS OF SPECIAL INTEREST......................................   198
      Defense Finance and Accounting Service.....................   198
      General Schedule Locality Pay Program......................   199
      Report on Denial of Security Clearances....................   199
      Report on Improving Equal Employment Opportunity Processes 
        in the Department of Defense.............................   200
  LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS.........................................   200
    Subtitle A--General Provisions...............................   200
      Section 1101--Family and Medical Leave Amendments..........   200
      Section 1102--Limitation on Authority to Exclude Employees 
        from Chapter 71 of Title 5...............................   200
      Section 1103--Authority to Provide Travel and 
        Transportation Allowances in Connection with Transfer 
        Ceremonies of Department of Defense and Coast Guard 
        Civilian Employees Who Die Overseas......................   200
      Section 1104--One-Year Extension of Authority to Waive 
        Annual Limitation on Premium Pay and Aggregate Limitation 
        on Pay for Federal Civilian Employees Working Overseas...   201
      Section 1105--One-Year Extension of Temporary Authority to 
        Grant Allowances, Benefits, and Gratuities to Civilian 
        Personnel on Official Duty in a Combat Zone..............   201
      Section 1106--Limiting the Number of Local Wage Areas 
        Defined within a Pay Locality............................   201
      Section 1107--Civilian Faculty at the Defense Security 
        Cooperation University and Institute of Security 
        Governance...............................................   201
      Section 1108--Expansion of Authority for Appointment of 
        Recently-Retired Members of the Armed Forces to Positions 
        at Certain Industrial Base Facilities....................   201
      Section 1109--Fire Fighters Alternative Work Schedule 
        Demonstration Project....................................   201
      Section 1110--Special Rules for Certain Monthly Workers' 
        Compensation Payments and Other Payments for Federal 
        Government Personnel under Chief of Mission Authority....   202
    Subtitle B--Elijah E. Cummings Federal Employee 
        Antidiscrimination Act of 2020...........................   202
      Section 1121--Short Title..................................   202
      Section 1122--Sense of Congress............................   202
      Section 1123--Notification of Violation....................   202
      Section 1124--Reporting Requirements.......................   202
      Section 1125--Data To Be Posted by Employing Federal 
        Agencies.................................................   202
      Section 1126--Data To Be Posted by the Equal Employment 
        Opportunity Commission...................................   202
      Section 1127--Notification and Federal Employee 
        Antidiscrimination and Retaliation Act of 2002 Amendments   202
      Section 1128--Nondisclosure Agreement Limitation...........   203
TITLE XII--MATTERS RELATING TO FOREIGN NATIONS...................   203
  ITEMS OF SPECIAL INTEREST......................................   203
      Assessment on Acceding to United Nations Convention on Law 
        of the Seas..............................................   203
      Authorities for U.S. Military Personnel in Syria...........   204
      Briefing from the United States-China Economic and Security 
        Review Commission on Cooperation with Similar 
        Organizations among U.S. Allies and Partners.............   204
      Briefing on Nation-State Election Interference Efforts.....   205
      Briefing on the Consequences of Capping the Number of U.S. 
        Service Members Stationed in Germany at 25,000...........   205
      Briefing on the New START Treaty...........................   206
      Co-Development of Next Generation Ground-Based Anti-Ship 
        Missile..................................................   206
      Department of Defense Involvement in Embassy China Working 
        Groups...................................................   207
      Efforts to Implement the Foreign Investment Risk Review 
        Modernization Act........................................   207
      Indo-Pacific Reassurance Initiative........................   208
      Military Exchanges between Senior Officers and Officials of 
        the United States and Taiwan.............................   209
      Modernized Operational Concepts and the Indo-Pacific.......   210
      North Korea's Chemical and Biological Weapons Capabilities.   210
      Report on Activities and Resources Necessary to Achieve the 
        Objectives of the Indo-Pacific Reassurance Initiative....   211
      Report on Department of Defense Strategy for Competition 
        below the Threshold of Armed Conflict....................   212
      Report on the Use of Unmanned Platforms to Improve Taiwan's 
        Self-Defense Capability..................................   213
      Report on Ties between Russia and China....................   214
      Security Sector Assistance Training for Foreign Students...   214
      Taiwan Defense Relations...................................   215
      United States Strategy on China............................   216
      Utilization of Smaller Vessels in Indo-Pacific Area of 
        Operations...............................................   216
      West African Airlift Support...............................   216
  LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS.........................................   217
    Subtitle A--Assistance and Training..........................   217
      Section 1201--Modification and Extension of Support of 
        Special Operations for Irregular Warfare.................   217
      Section 1202--Department of Defense Participation in 
        European Program on Multilateral Exchange of Surface 
        Transportation Services..................................   217
      Section 1203--Extension of Authority to Transfer Excess 
        High Mobility Multipurpose Wheeled Vehicles to Foreign 
        Countries................................................   217
      Section 1204--Modification and Extension of Update of 
        Department of Defense Freedom of Navigation Report.......   217
      Section 1205--Extension of Report on Workforce Development.   218
    Subtitle B--Matters Relating to Afghanistan and Pakistan.....   218
      Section 1211--Extension and Modification of Authority for 
        Reimbursement of Certain Coalition Nations for Support 
        Provided to United States Military Operations............   218
      Section 1212--Extension of the Afghan Special Immigrant 
        Visa Program.............................................   218
      Section 1213--Limitation on Use of Funds to Reduce 
        Deployment to Afghanistan................................   218
      Section 1214--Report on Operation Freedom Sentinel.........   218
    Subtitle C--Matters Relating to Syria, Iraq, and Iran........   219
      Section 1221--Extension and Modification of Authority to 
        Provide Assistance to Counter the Islamic State of Iraq 
        and Syria................................................   219
      Section 1222--Extension of Authority to Provide Assistance 
        to the Vetted Syrian Opposition..........................   219
      Section 1223--Extension of Authority to Support Operations 
        and Activities of the Office of Security Cooperation in 
        Iraq.....................................................   219
      Section 1224--Prohibition on Provision of Weapons and Other 
        Forms of Support to Certain Organizations................   219
      Section 1225--Consolidated Budget Display and Report on 
        Operation Spartan Shield.................................   220
      Section 1226--Sense of Congress on Peshmerga Forces as a 
        Partner in Operation Inherent Resolve....................   220
    Subtitle D--Matters Relating to Russia.......................   220
      Section 1231--Prohibition on Availability of Funds Relating 
        to Sovereignty of the Russian Federation over Crimea.....   220
      Section 1232--Extension of Limitation on Military 
        Cooperation between the United States and the Russian 
        Federation...............................................   220
      Section 1233--Modification and Extension of Ukraine 
        Security Assistance Initiative...........................   221
      Section 1234--United States Participation in the Open Skies 
        Treaty...................................................   221
    Subtitle E--Matters Relating to Europe and NATO..............   222
      Section 1241--Limitations on Use of Funds to Reduce the 
        Total Number of Members of the Armed Forces Serving on 
        Active Duty Who Are Stationed in Germany, to Reduce the 
        Total Number of Members of the Armed Forces Stationed in 
        Europe, and to Divest Military Infrastructure in Europe..   222
      Section 1242--Sense of Congress on Support for Coordinated 
        Action to Ensure the Security of Baltic Allies...........   222
      Section 1243--Sense of Congress on Support for Estonia, 
        Latvia, and Lithuania....................................   222
      Section 1244--Sense of Congress on Support for Georgia.....   222
      Section 1245--Sense of Congress on Burden Sharing by 
        Partners and Allies......................................   222
      Section 1246--Sense of Congress on NATO's Response to the 
        COVID-19 Pandemic........................................   222
    Subtitle F--Matters Relating to the Indo-Pacific Region......   223
      Section 1251--Indo-Pacific Reassurance Initiative..........   223
      Section 1252--Limitation on Use of Funds to Reduce the 
        Total Number of Members of the Armed Forces Serving on 
        Active Duty Who Are Deployed to South Korea..............   223
      Section 1253--Implementation of GAO Recommendations on 
        Preparedness of United States Forces to Counter North 
        Korean Chemical and Biological Weapons...................   223
      Section 1254--Public Reporting of Chinese Military 
        Companies Operating in the United States.................   224
      Section 1255--Independent Study on the Defense Industrial 
        Base of the People's Republic of China...................   224
      Section 1256--Report on China's One Belt, One Road 
        Initiative in Africa.....................................   224
      Section 1257--Sense of Congress on Enhancement of the 
        United States-Taiwan Defense Relationship................   224
      Section 1258--Report on Supply Chain Security Cooperation 
        with Taiwan..............................................   224
      Section 1259--Report on United States-Taiwan Medical 
        Security Partnership.....................................   224
    Subtitle G--Other Matters....................................   225
      Section 1261--Provision of Goods and Services to Kwajalein 
        Atoll....................................................   225
      Section 1262--Annual Briefing on Certain Foreign Military 
        Bases of Adversaries.....................................   225
      Section 1263--Report on Progress of the Department of 
        Defense with Respect to Denying a Fait Accompli by a 
        Strategic Competitor against a Covered Defense Partner...   225
      Section 1264--Modification to Requirements of the 
        Initiative to Support Protection of National Security 
        Academic Researchers from Undue Influence and Other 
        Security Threats.........................................   225
      Section 1265--Report on Directed Use of Fishing Fleets.....   225
      Section 1266--Expanding the State Partnership Program in 
        Africa...................................................   226
      Section 1267--Report Relating to Reduction in the Total 
        Number of United States Armed Forces Deployed to United 
        States Africa Command Area of Responsibility.............   226
      Section 1268--Report on Enhancing Partnerships between the 
        United States and African Countries......................   226
      Section 1269--Sense of Congress with Respect to Qatar......   226
      Section 1270--Sense of Congress on United States Military 
        Support for and Participation in the Multinational Force 
        and Observers............................................   226
      Section 1271--Prohibition on Support for Military 
        Participation against the Houthis........................   226
      Section 1272--Rule of Construction Relating to Use of 
        Military Force...........................................   227
TITLE XIII--COOPERATIVE THREAT REDUCTION.........................   227
  ITEMS OF SPECIAL INTEREST......................................   227
      Importance of the Cooperative Threat Reduction Program.....   227
  LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS.........................................   227
      Section 1301--Funding Allocations; Specification of 
        Cooperative Threat Reduction Funds.......................   227
TITLE XIV--OTHER AUTHORIZATIONS..................................   228
  LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS.........................................   228
    Subtitle A--Military Programs................................   228
      Section 1401--Working Capital Funds........................   228
      Section 1402--Chemical Agents and Munitions Destruction, 
        Defense..................................................   228
      Section 1403--Drug Interdiction and Counter-Drug 
        Activities, Defense-Wide.................................   228
      Section 1404--Defense Inspector General....................   228
      Section 1405--Defense Health Program.......................   228
      Section 1406--National Defense Sealift Fund................   228
    Subtitle B--Other Matters....................................   228
      Section 1411--Authority for Transfer of Funds to Joint 
        Department of Defense-Department of Veterans Affairs 
        Medical Facility Demonstration Fund for Captain James A. 
        Lovell Health Care Center, Illinois......................   228
      Section 1412--Authorization of Appropriations for Armed 
        Forces Retirement Home...................................   229
TITLE XV--AUTHORIZATION OF ADDITIONAL APPROPRIATIONS FOR OVERSEAS 
    CONTINGENCY OPERATIONS.......................................   229
  ITEMS OF SPECIAL INTEREST......................................   229
      National Guard and Reserve Equipment Account...............   229
  LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS.........................................   229
    Subtitle A--Authorization of Appropriations..................   229
      Section 1501--Purpose......................................   229
      Section 1502--Procurement..................................   230
      Section 1503--Research, Development, Test, and Evaluation..   230
      Section 1504--Operation and Maintenance....................   230
      Section 1505--Military Personnel...........................   230
      Section 1506--Working Capital Funds........................   230
      Section 1507--Drug Interdiction and Counter-Drug 
        Activities, Defense-Wide.................................   230
      Section 1508--Defense Inspector General....................   230
      Section 1509--Defense Health Program.......................   230
    Subtitle B--Financial Matters................................   230
      Section 1511--Treatment as Additional Authorizations.......   230
      Section 1512--Special Transfer Authority...................   231
    Subtitle C--Other Matters....................................   231
      Section 1521--Afghanistan Security Forces Fund.............   231
TITLE XVI--STRATEGIC PROGRAMS, CYBER, AND INTELLIGENCE MATTERS...   231
  ITEMS OF SPECIAL INTEREST......................................   231
    Space Activities.............................................   231
      Army GEOINT................................................   231
      Cislunar Space Capabilities................................   231
      Commercial Space-Based Radio Frequency Mapping.............   232
      Digital Ground Satellite Communications Architecture.......   232
      Intelligence Community and Space Situational Awareness.....   233
      Military Application of LiDAR Satellites...................   233
      Mission Assurance in Launch................................   233
      National Reconnaissance Office Future Commercial Sources of 
        Satellite Imagery........................................   234
      Non-Traditional Space Companies............................   235
      Nuclear Command, Control and Communications Enterprise 
        Modernization............................................   235
      Policy and Technology Review on Minimizing Orbital Debris 
        Threats..................................................   236
      Program to Improve Launch Support and Infrastructure at 
        Federal Ranges...........................................   236
      Satellite Solar Power Technology Sourcing..................   237
      Sensor-to-Shooter Tactical Satellite Targeting Support to 
        Deep Strike Weapons......................................   237
      Space Acquisition..........................................   238
      Space Development Agency...................................   238
      Space-Based Broadband and Cellular Technologies............   239
      Terrestrial Based Backup for GPS...........................   239
      Weather Acquisition Strategy...............................   240
    Missile Defense Programs.....................................   241
      Ballistic Missile Defense System Advanced Technology 
        Mission Assessment Architecture..........................   241
      Boost Phase Missile Defense................................   241
      Missile Defense Agency High-Speed Flight Experiment Testing   242
      Report on Arctic Distant Early Warning Sites...............   242
      Report on Discrimination Improvements to the Missile 
        Defense System...........................................   242
    Nuclear Forces...............................................   243
      Air Force Global Strike Command Technology Innovation and 
        Collaboration............................................   243
      Manning and Personnel Optimization for Air Force Global 
        Strike Command and Ground-Based Strategic Deterrence 
        Program..................................................   244
      Nuclear Employment, Strategic Conventional Strike, and the 
        Law of Armed Conflict....................................   244
      Potential Delays to Nuclear Modernization..................   245
      Requirements Planning for Nuclear Complex and Nuclear 
        Enterprise...............................................   246
      Use of Artificial Intelligence at U.S. Strategic Command...   246
    Cyber-Related Matters........................................   247
      21st Century Integrated Digital Experience Act.............   247
      Consolidated Defense Data Program..........................   248
      Cyber Excepted Service.....................................   248
      Cyber Maturity Model Certification.........................   248
      Cyber Mission Assurance Team Pilot Program.................   249
      Department of Defense's Use of Efficient Peering Sites.....   249
      Digital Persona Protection.................................   249
      Fourth Estate Network Optimization.........................   250
      GAO Assessment on DOD Cyber Incident Management Efforts....   250
      GAO Study and Report on Electronic Continuity of Operations 
        on the Department of Defense.............................   251
      Improving the Cybersecurity of Disadvantaged Small 
        Businesses in the Defense Industrial Base................   252
      Information Environment Best Practices and Audience 
        Segmentation Methodologies...............................   252
      Information Technology Asset Management and Inventory......   253
      Internet Architecture Security.............................   253
      Joint Artificial Intelligence Center Outreach to the 
        Private Sector...........................................   254
      National Guard Access to Classified Information............   254
      Report and GAO Briefing on DOD Cyber Hygiene and 
        Cybersecurity Maturity Model Certification Framework.....   254
      Report on the Security of DOD Networks while Expanding 
        Remote Work for Classified Information and Data..........   255
      Report on Use of Automated Manufacturing Technologies......   256
      Supporting Innovation for Servicemember and Family 
        Readiness and Resiliency.................................   256
    Intelligence Matters.........................................   257
      Department of Defense Artificial Intelligence Capabilities 
        and Strategy.............................................   257
      Funding for Research into Long-Range Weather Patterns......   257
      Joint Intelligence Brigade.................................   258
      National Center for Medical Intelligence of the Defense 
        Intelligence Agency Responsibilities.....................   258
  LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS.........................................   259
    Subtitle A--Space Activities.................................   259
      Section 1601--National Security Space Launch Program.......   259
      Section 1602--Requirement to Buy Certain Satellite 
        Component from National Technology and Industrial Base...   259
      Section 1603--Commercial Space Domain Awareness 
        Capabilities.............................................   260
      Section 1604--Responsive Satellite Infrastructure..........   260
      Section 1605--Policy to Ensure Launch of Small-Class 
        Payloads.................................................   260
      Section 1606--Tactically Responsive Space Launch Operations   260
      Section 1607--Limitation on Availability of Funds for 
        Prototype Program for Multi-Global Navigation Satellite 
        System Receiver Development..............................   261
      Section 1608--Limitation on Awarding Contracts to Entities 
        Operating Commercial Terrestrial Communication Networks 
        That Cause Interference with the Global Positioning 
        System...................................................   261
      Section 1609--Prohibition on the Availability of Funds for 
        Certain Purposes Relating to the Global Positioning 
        System...................................................   261
      Section 1610--Report on Resilient Protected Communications 
        Satellites...............................................   261
    Subtitle B--Defense Intelligence and Intelligence-Related 
        Activities...............................................   261
      Section 1611--Validation of Capability Requirements of 
        National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency..................   261
      Section 1612--Safety of Navigation Mission of the National 
        Geospatial-Intelligence Agency...........................   262
      Section 1613--National Academies Climate Security 
        Roundtable...............................................   262
      Section 1614--Report on Risk to National Security Posed by 
        Quantum Computing Technologies...........................   262
    Subtitle C--Cyberspace-Related Matters.......................   262
      Section 1621--Cyber Mission Forces and Cyberspace 
        Operations Forces........................................   262
      Section 1622--Cyberspace Solarium Commission...............   262
      Section 1623--Tailored Cyberspace Operations Organizations.   263
      Section 1624--Responsibility for the Sector Risk Management 
        Agency Function of the Department of Defense.............   263
      Section 1625--Department of Defense Cyber Workforce Efforts   263
      Section 1626--Reporting Requirements for Cross Domain 
        Compromises and Exemptions to Policies for Information 
        Technology...............................................   263
      Section 1627--Assessing Private-Public Collaboration in 
        Cybersecurity............................................   264
      Section 1628--Cyber Capabilities and Interoperability of 
        the National Guard.......................................   264
      Section 1629--Evaluation of Non-Traditional Cyber Support 
        to the Department of Defense.............................   264
      Section 1630--Establishment of Integrated Cyber Center.....   264
      Section 1631--Cyber Threat Information Collaboration 
        Environment..............................................   264
      Section 1632--Defense Industrial Base Participation in a 
        Threat Intelligence Sharing Program......................   265
      Section 1633--Assistance for Small Manufacturers in the 
        Defense Industrial Supply Chain on Matters Relating to 
        Cybersecurity............................................   265
      Section 1634--Defense Industrial Base Cybersecurity Threat 
        Hunting and Sensing, Discovery, and Mitigation...........   265
      Section 1635--Defense Digital Service......................   265
      Section 1636--Limitation of Funding for National Defense 
        University...............................................   265
    Subtitle D--Nuclear Forces...................................   266
      Section 1641--Coordination in Transfer of Funds by 
        Department of Defense to National Nuclear Security 
        Administration...........................................   266
      Section 1642--Exercises of Nuclear Command, Control, and 
        Communications System....................................   266
      Section 1643--Independent Studies on Nuclear Weapons 
        Programs of Certain Foreign States.......................   266
    Subtitle E--Missile Defense Programs.........................   266
      Section 1651--Extension and Modification of Requirement for 
        Comptroller General of the United States Review and 
        Assessment of Missile Defense Acquisition Programs.......   266
      Section 1652--Extension of Transition of Ballistic Missile 
        Defense Programs to Military Departments.................   266
      Section 1653--Development of Hypersonic and Ballistic 
        Missile Tracking Space Sensor Payload....................   266
      Section 1654--Annual Certification on Hypersonic and 
        Ballistic Missile Tracking Space Sensor Payload..........   267
      Section 1655--Alignment of the Missile Defense Agency 
        within the Department of Defense.........................   267
      Section 1656--Analysis of Alternatives for Homeland Missile 
        Defense Missions.........................................   267
      Section 1657--Next Generation Interceptors.................   268
      Section 1658--Oversight of Next Generation Interceptor 
        Program..................................................   268
      Section 1659--Missile Defense Cooperation between the 
        United States and Israel.................................   268
      Section 1660--Report on Defense of Guam from Integrated Air 
        and Missile Threats......................................   268
      Section 1661--Report on Cruise Missile Defense.............   269
    Subtitle F--Other Matters....................................   269
      Section 1671--Conventional Prompt Global Strike............   269
      Section 1672--Submission of Reports under Missile Defense 
        Review and Nuclear Posture Review........................   269
      Section 1673--Report on Consideration of Risks of 
        Inadvertent Escalation to Nuclear War....................   269
TITLE XVII--REPORTS AND OTHER MATTERS............................   269
  ITEMS OF SPECIAL INTEREST......................................   269
      Assessment of Department of Defense Training Programs and 
        Resources regarding the Role of Women as Participants of 
        Violent Extremism........................................   269
      Feasibility Study on the Adoption of AFRICOM CivCas 
        Initiatives by Each Combatant Command....................   270
      Report on Non-Traditional Manned ISR.......................   270
      Report on Special Operations Command Armed Overwatch 
        Concept..................................................   271
  LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS.........................................   271
    Subtitle A--Studies and Reports..............................   271
      Section 1701--Review of Support of Special Operations to 
        Combat Terrorism.........................................   271
      Section 1702--FFRDC Study of Explosive Ordnance Disposal 
        Agencies.................................................   272
      Section 1703--Report on the Human Rights Office at United 
        States Southern Command..................................   272
      Section 1704--Report on Joint Training Range Exercises for 
        the Pacific Region.......................................   272
      Section 1705--Study on Chinese Policies and Influence in 
        the Development of International Standards for Emerging 
        Technologies.............................................   272
    Subtitle B--Electronic Message Preservation..................   272
      Section 1711--Short Title..................................   272
      Section 1712--Preservation of Electronic Messages and Other 
        Records..................................................   273
      Section 1713--Presidential Records.........................   273
    Subtitle C--Space Technology Advancement Report (STAR) Act of 
        2020.....................................................   273
      Section 1721--Short Title..................................   273
      Section 1722--Findings.....................................   273
      Section 1723--Report; Strategy.............................   273
    Subtitle D--AMBER Alert Nationwide...........................   274
      Section 1731--Cooperation with Department of Homeland 
        Security.................................................   274
      Section 1732--AMBER Alerts along Major Transportation 
        Routes...................................................   274
      Section 1733--AMBER Alert Communication Plans in the 
        Territories..............................................   274
      Section 1734--Government Accountability Office Report......   274
    Subtitle E--Other Matters....................................   275
      Section 1741--Technical, Conforming, and Clerical 
        Amendments...............................................   275
      Section 1742--Addition of Chief of the National Guard 
        Bureau to the List of Officers Providing Reports of 
        Unfunded Priorities......................................   275
      Section 1743--Acceptance of Property by Military Academies 
        and Museums..............................................   275
      Section 1744--Reauthorization of National Oceanographic 
        Partnership Program......................................   275
      Section 1745--Requirements Relating to Program and Project 
        Management...............................................   275
      Section 1746--Quarterly Briefings on Joint All Domain 
        Command and Control Concept..............................   275
      Section 1747--Resources to Implement a Department of 
        Defense Policy on Civilian Casualties in Connection with 
        United States Military Operations........................   276
      Section 1748--Sense of Congress regarding Reporting of 
        Civilian Casualties Resulting from United States Military 
        Operations...............................................   276
      Section 1749--Prohibition of Public Display of Confederate 
        Battle Flag on Department of Defense Property............   276
      Section 1750--Deployment of Real-Time Status of Special Use 
        Airspace.................................................   276
      Section 1751--Duties of Secretary under Uniformed and 
        Overseas Citizens Absentee Voting Act....................   276
      Section 1752--Publicly Available Database of Casualties of 
        Members of the Armed Forces..............................   276
      Section 1753--Notice and Comment for Proposed Actions of 
        the Secretary of Defense Relating to Food and Beverage 
        Ingredients..............................................   277
      Section 1754--Space Strategies and Assessment..............   277
      Section 1755--Nonimmigrant Status for Certain Nationals of 
        Portugal.................................................   277
      Section 1756--Sense of Congress on Extension of Limitations 
        on Importation of Uranium from Russian Federation........   277
      Section 1757--Authority to Establish a Movement 
        Coordination Center Pacific in the Indopacific Region....   277
      Section 1758--Establishment of Vetting Procedures and 
        Monitoring Requirements for Certain Military Training....   278
      Section 1759--Women, Peace, and Security Act Implementation   278
      Section 1760--Developing Crisis Capabilities to Meet Needs 
        for Homeland Security-Critical Supplies..................   278
      Section 1761--Establishment of Western Emergency Refined 
        Petroleum Products Reserve...............................   278
DIVISION B--MILITARY CONSTRUCTION AUTHORIZATIONS.................   278
  PURPOSE........................................................   278
  MILITARY CONSTRUCTION AND FAMILY HOUSING OVERVIEW..............   278
      Section 2001--Short Title..................................   279
      Section 2002--Expiration of Authorizations and Amounts 
        Required To Be Specified by Law..........................   279
      Section 2003--Effective Date...............................   279
TITLE XXI--ARMY MILITARY CONSTRUCTION............................   279
  SUMMARY........................................................   279
  ITEMS OF SPECIAL INTEREST......................................   279
      Explanation of Funding Adjustments.........................   279
      Army Corps Headquarters Stationing Decision................   280
      Mission Training Complex Report............................   281
  LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS.........................................   282
      Section 2101--Authorized Army Construction and Land 
        Acquisition Projects.....................................   282
      Section 2102--Family Housing...............................   282
      Section 2103--Authorization of Appropriations, Army........   282
      Section 2104--Limitation on Military Construction Project 
        at Kwajalein Atoll.......................................   282
      Section 2105--Modification of Authority to Carry Out 
        Certain Fiscal Year 2017 Project.........................   282
TITLE XXII--NAVY MILITARY CONSTRUCTION...........................   282
  SUMMARY........................................................   282
  ITEMS OF SPECIAL INTEREST......................................   282
      Explanation of Funding Adjustments.........................   282
  LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS.........................................   284
      Section 2201--Authorized Navy Construction and Land 
        Acquisition Projects.....................................   284
      Section 2202--Family Housing and Improvements to Military 
        Family Housing Units.....................................   284
      Section 2203--Authorization of Appropriations, Navy........   285
TITLE XXIII--AIR FORCE MILITARY CONSTRUCTION.....................   285
  SUMMARY........................................................   285
  ITEMS OF SPECIAL INTEREST......................................   285
      Explanation of Funding Adjustments.........................   285
      Space Training and Readiness, S&T..........................   287
      Strategic Basing Process for U.S. Space Command............   287
  LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS.........................................   288
      Section 2301--Authorized Air Force Construction and Land 
        Acquisition Projects.....................................   288
      Section 2302--Family Housing and Improvements to Military 
        Family Housing Units.....................................   288
      Section 2303--Authorization of Appropriations, Air Force...   288
      Section 2304--Modification of Authority to Carry Out 
        Certain Fiscal Year 2018 Project.........................   288
      Section 2305--Modification of Authority to Carry Out 
        Certain Fiscal Year 2019 Projects........................   288
      Section 2306--Modification of Authority to Carry Out 
        Certain Fiscal Year 2020 Projects........................   288
      Section 2307--Technical Corrections Related to Authority to 
        Carry Out Certain Fiscal Year 2020 Family Housing 
        Projects.................................................   289
TITLE XXIV--DEFENSE AGENCIES MILITARY CONSTRUCTION...............   289
  SUMMARY........................................................   289
  ITEMS OF SPECIAL INTEREST......................................   289
      Explanation of Funding Adjustments.........................   289
  LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS.........................................   290
      Section 2401--Authorized Defense Agencies Construction and 
        Land Acquisition Projects................................   290
      Section 2402--Authorized Energy Resilience and Conservation 
        Investment Program Projects..............................   290
      Section 2403--Authorization of Appropriations, Defense 
        Agencies.................................................   290
      Section 2404--Military Construction Infrastructure and 
        Weapon System Synchronization for Ground Based Strategic 
        Deterrent................................................   291
TITLE XXV--INTERNATIONAL PROGRAMS................................   291
  SUMMARY........................................................   291
  LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS.........................................   291
    Subtitle A--North Atlantic Treaty Organization Security 
        Investment Program.......................................   291
      Section 2501--Authorized NATO Construction and Land 
        Acquisition Projects.....................................   291
      Section 2502--Authorization of Appropriations, NATO........   291
    Subtitle B--Host Country In-Kind Contributions...............   291
      Section 2511--Republic of Korea Funded Construction 
        Projects.................................................   291
      Section 2512--State of Qatar Funded Construction Projects..   291
TITLE XXVI--GUARD AND RESERVE FORCES FACILITIES..................   292
  SUMMARY........................................................   292
  ITEMS OF SPECIAL INTEREST......................................   292
      Explanation of Funding Adjustments.........................   292
      Disposition of Building 158 at Joint Base Cape Cod.........   292
  LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS.........................................   292
      Section 2601--Authorized Army National Guard Construction 
        and Land Acquisition Projects............................   292
      Section 2602--Authorized Army Reserve Construction and Land 
        Acquisition Projects.....................................   293
      Section 2603--Authorized Navy Reserve and Marine Corps 
        Reserve Construction and Land Acquisition Projects.......   293
      Section 2604--Authorized Air National Guard Construction 
        and Land Acquisition Projects............................   293
      Section 2605--Authorized Air Force Reserve Construction and 
        Land Acquisition Projects................................   293
      Section 2606--Authorization of Appropriations, National 
        Guard and Reserve........................................   293
      Section 2607--Modification of Authority to Carry Out 
        Certain Fiscal Year 2020 Project.........................   293
TITLE XXVII--BASE REALIGNMENT AND CLOSURE ACTIVITIES.............   294
  SUMMARY........................................................   294
  ITEMS OF SPECIAL INTEREST......................................   294
      Explanation of Funding Adjustments.........................   294
  LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS.........................................   294
      Section 2701--Authorization of Appropriations for Base 
        Realignment and Closure Activities Funded through 
        Department of Defense Base Closure Account...............   294
TITLE XXVIII--MILITARY CONSTRUCTION GENERAL PROVISIONS...........   294
  ITEMS OF SPECIAL INTEREST......................................   294
      Child Development Centers..................................   294
      Construction in Support of Not-for-Profit Research and 
        Development Entities.....................................   295
      Mobilization Infrastructure Investments....................   295
      Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion and Seawater Air 
        Conditioning Projects on Installations in the Pacific....   296
      Oversight of Environmental Hazards at Government-Owned 
        Family Housing...........................................   296
      Progress Report on Implementation of Installation 
        Resilience Measures Related to Extreme Weather...........   297
      Soo Locks, Sault Ste. Marie, Michigan......................   297
      Standardization of Metrics Used to Evaluate Privatized 
        Military Family Housing..................................   297
      TRLIA 200-Year Goldfields Levee Project Acquisition of 
        Easement from Beale Air Force Base.......................   298
  LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS.........................................   299
    Subtitle A--Military Construction Program Changes............   299
      Section 2801--Modification and Clarification of 
        Construction Authority in the Event of a Declaration of 
        War or National Emergency................................   299
      Section 2802--Extension of Sunset for Annual Locality 
        Adjustment of Dollar Thresholds Applicable to Unspecified 
        Minor Military Construction Authorities..................   299
      Section 2803--Modification of Reporting Requirement 
        regarding Cost Increases Associated with Certain Military 
        Construction Projects and Military Family Housing 
        Projects.................................................   299
      Section 2804--Expansion of Department of Defense Land 
        Exchange Authority.......................................   299
      Section 2805--Congressional Project Authorization Required 
        for Military Construction Projects for Energy Resilience, 
        Energy Security, and Energy Conservation.................   299
      Section 2806--One-Year Extension of Temporary, Limited 
        Authority to Use Operation and Maintenance Funds for 
        Construction Projects in Certain Areas outside the United 
        States...................................................   299
      Section 2807--Pilot Program to Support Combatant Command 
        Military Construction Priorities.........................   299
      Section 2808--Biannual Report regarding Military 
        Installations Supported by Disaster Relief Appropriations   300
    Subtitle B--Military Family Housing Reforms..................   300
      Section 2811--Expenditure Priorities in Using Department of 
        Defense Family Housing Improvement Fund..................   300
      Section 2812--Promulgation of Guidance to Facilitate Return 
        of Military Families Displaced from Privatized Military 
        Housing..................................................   300
      Section 2813--Promulgation of Guidance on Mold Mitigation 
        in Privatized Military Housing...........................   300
      Section 2814--Expansion of Uniform Code of Basic Standards 
        for Privatized Military Housing and Hazard and 
        Habitability Inspection and Assessment Requirements to 
        Government-Owned and Government-Controlled Military 
        Family Housing...........................................   300
      Section 2815--Establishment of Exceptional Family Member 
        Program Housing Liaison..................................   300
      Section 2816--Department of Defense Report on Criteria and 
        Metrics Used to Evaluate Performance of Landlords of 
        Privatized Military Housing That Receive Incentive Fees..   300
      Section 2817--Report on Department of Defense Efforts 
        regarding Oversight and Role in Management of Privatized 
        Military Housing.........................................   301
    Subtitle C--Real Property and Facilities Administration......   301
      Section 2821--Codification of Reporting Requirements 
        regarding United States Overseas Military Enduring 
        Locations and Contingency Locations......................   301
      Section 2822--Limitations on Renewal of Utility 
        Privatization Contracts..................................   301
      Section 2823--Vesting Exercise of Discretion with Service 
        Secretaries regarding Entering into Longer-Term Contracts 
        for Utility Services.....................................   301
      Section 2824--Use of On-Site Energy Production to Promote 
        Military Installation Energy Resilience and Energy 
        Security.................................................   301
      Section 2825--Availability of Energy Resilience and 
        Conservation Investment Program Funds for Certain 
        Activities Related to Privatized Utility Systems.........   301
      Section 2826--Improving Water Management and Security on 
        Military Installations...................................   301
      Section 2827--Pilot Program to Test Use of Emergency Diesel 
        Generators in a Microgrid Configuration at Certain 
        Military Installations...................................   302
      Section 2828--Improved Electrical Metering of Department of 
        Defense Infrastructure Supporting Critical Missions......   302
      Section 2829--Renaming Certain Military Installations and 
        Other Defense Property...................................   302
    Subtitle D--Land Conveyances.................................   302
      Section 2831--Land Conveyance, Camp Navajo, Arizona........   302
      Section 2832--Modification of Land Exchange Involving Naval 
        Industrial Reserve Ordnance Plant, Sunnyvale, California.   302
      Section 2833--Land Conveyance, Sharpe Army Depot, Lathrop, 
        California...............................................   302
      Section 2834--Land Exchange, San Bernardino County, 
        California...............................................   302
      Section 2835--Land Conveyance, Over-the-Horizon Backscatter 
        Radar System Receiving Station, Modoc County, California.   302
      Section 2836--Transfer of Administrative Jurisdiction, 
        Naval Support Activity Panama City, Florida, Parcel......   303
    Subtitle E--Military Land Withdrawals........................   303
      Section 2841--Renewal of Land Withdrawal and Reservation to 
        Benefit Naval Air Facility, El Centro, California........   303
      Section 2842--Renewal of Fallon Range Training Complex Land 
        Withdrawal and Reservation...............................   303
      Section 2843--Renewal of Nevada Test and Training Range 
        Land Withdrawal and Reservation..........................   303
      Section 2844--Co-Management, New Memorandum of 
        Understanding, and Additional Requirements regarding 
        Nevada Test and Training Range...........................   303
      Section 2845--Specified Duration of White Sands Missile 
        Range Land Withdrawal and Reservation and Establishment 
        of Special Reservation Area for Northern and Western 
        Extension Areas..........................................   303
    Subtitle F--Asia-Pacific and Indo-Pacific Issues.............   303
      Section 2851--Change to Biennial Reporting Requirement for 
        Interagency Coordination Group of Inspectors General for 
        Guam Realignment.........................................   303
      Section 2852--Additional Exception to Restriction on 
        Development of Public Infrastructure in Connection with 
        Realignment of Marine Corps Forces in Asia-Pacific Region   304
      Section 2853--Development of Master Plan for Infrastructure 
        to Support Rotational Armed Forces in Australia..........   304
      Section 2854--Study and Strategy regarding Bulk Fuels 
        Management in United States Indo-Pacific Command Area of 
        Responsibility...........................................   304
    Subtitle G--Other Matters....................................   304
      Section 2861--Defense Community Infrastructure Program.....   304
      Section 2862--Pilot Program on Reduction of Effects of 
        Military Aviation Noise on Certain Covered Property......   304
      Section 2863--Department of Defense Policy for Regulation 
        of Dangerous Dogs in Military Communities................   305
TITLE XXIX--OVERSEAS CONTINGENCY OPERATIONS MILITARY CONSTRUCTION   305
  SUMMARY........................................................   305
  LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS.........................................   305
      Section 2901--Authorized Navy Construction and Land 
        Acquisition Projects.....................................   305
      Section 2902--Authorized Air Force Construction and Land 
        Acquisition Projects.....................................   305
      Section 2903--Authorization of Appropriations..............   305
DIVISION C--DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY NATIONAL SECURITY AUTHORIZATIONS 
  AND OTHER AUTHORIZATIONS.......................................   306
TITLE XXXI--DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY NATIONAL SECURITY PROGRAMS......   306
  ITEMS OF SPECIAL INTEREST......................................   306
    National Nuclear Security Administration.....................   306
      Weapons Activities.........................................   306
        Comptroller General review of construction and 
          infrastructure recapitalization projects...............   306
        Comptroller General review of laboratory-, plant-, and 
          site-directed research and development for nuclear 
          weapons production improvement.........................   306
        Cooperative Audit Strategy...............................   307
        Establishment of an industrial base analysis capability..   308
        Leasing Authority for National Nuclear Security 
          Administration and Management and Operating Contractors   308
        Stockpile Responsiveness.................................   309
        Stockpile stewardship....................................   309
        W93 warhead program......................................   309
      Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation...........................   310
        Comptroller General review of safeguards.................   310
        Incident at Harborview Research and Training Facility....   311
      Federal Salaries and Expenses..............................   311
        Financial Integration....................................   311
    Environmental and Other Defense Activities...................   311
      Defense Environmental Cleanup..............................   311
        Comptroller General review of Environmental Management...   311
      Other Defense Activities...................................   312
        Advanced Computer Tools to Identify Classified 
          Information............................................   312
  LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS.........................................   312
    Subtitle A--National Security Programs and Authorizations....   312
      Section 3101--National Nuclear Security Administration.....   312
      Section 3102--Defense Environmental Cleanup................   313
      Section 3103--Other Defense Activities.....................   313
      Section 3104--Nuclear Energy...............................   313
    Subtitle B--Program Authorizations, Restrictions, 
        Limitations, and Other Matters...........................   313
      Section 3111--Nuclear Warhead Acquisition Processes........   313
      Section 3112--Uncosted and Unobligated Amounts of National 
        Nuclear Security Administration..........................   313
      Section 3113--Extension of Limitation Relating to 
        Reclassification of High-Level Waste.....................   313
      Section 3114--Extension of Pilot Program on Unavailability 
        for Overhead Costs of Amounts Specified for Laboratory-
        Directed Research and Development........................   313
      Section 3115--Plutonium Pit Production.....................   314
      Section 3116--Program for Research and Development of 
        Advanced Naval Nuclear Fuel System Based on Low-Enriched 
        Uranium..................................................   314
      Section 3117--Independent Study on Effects of Use of 
        Nuclear Weapons..........................................   314
      Section 3118--Reports on Diversity of Certain Contractor 
        Employees of National Nuclear Security Administration....   314
      Section 3119--Findings, Purpose, and Apology Relating to 
        Fallout Emitted During the Government's Atmospheric 
        Nuclear Tests............................................   315
      Section 3120--Sense of Congress regarding Uranium Mining 
        and Nuclear Testing......................................   315
TITLE XXXII--DEFENSE NUCLEAR FACILITIES SAFETY BOARD.............   315
  ITEMS OF SPECIAL INTEREST......................................   315
        Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board and the 
          Department of Energy...................................   315
  LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS.........................................   316
      Section 3201--Authorization................................   316
TITLE XXXIV--NAVAL PETROLEUM RESERVES............................   316
  LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS.........................................   316
      Section 3401--Authorization of Appropriations..............   316
TITLE XXXV--MARITIME ADMINISTRATION..............................   316
  ITEMS OF SPECIAL INTEREST......................................   316
        Commercial Design Options for Sealift Recapitalization...   316
  LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS.........................................   316
    Subtitle A--Maritime Administration..........................   316
      Section 3501--Authorization of the Maritime Administration.   316
      Section 3502--Sense of Congress regarding Role of Domestic 
        Maritime Industry in National Security...................   317
      Section 3503--Nonapplicability of Requirement Relating to 
        Minimum Number of Operating Days for Vessels Operating 
        under MSP Operating Agreements...........................   317
      Section 3504--Improvements to Process for Waiving 
        Navigation and Vessel-Inspection Laws....................   317
    Subtitle B--Tanker Security Fleet............................   317
      Section 3511--Tanker Security Fleet........................   317
DIVISION D--FUNDING TABLES.......................................   317
      Section 4001--Authorization of Amounts in Funding Tables...   317
      Summary of National Defense Authorizations for Fiscal Year 
        2021.....................................................   318
      National Defense Budget Authority Implication..............   323
TITLE XLI--PROCUREMENT...........................................   325
      Section 4101--Procurement..................................   325
      Section 4102--Procurement for Overseas Contingency 
        Operations...............................................   369
TITLE XLII--RESEARCH, DEVELOPMENT, TEST, AND EVALUATION..........   380
      Section 4201--Research, Development, Test, and Evaluation..   380
      Section 4202--Research, Development, Test, and Evaluation 
        for Overseas Contingency Operations......................   423
TITLE XLIII--OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE...........................   426
      Section 4301--Operation and Maintenance....................   426
      Section 4302--Operation and Maintenance for Overseas 
        Contingency Operations...................................   449
TITLE XLIV--MILITARY PERSONNEL...................................   461
      Section 4401--Military Personnel...........................   461
      Section 4402--Military Personnel for Overseas Contingency 
        Operations...............................................   462
TITLE XLV--OTHER AUTHORIZATIONS..................................   463
      Section 4501--Other Authorizations.........................   463
      Section 4502--Other Authorizations for Overseas Contingency 
        Operations...............................................   467
TITLE XLVI--MILITARY CONSTRUCTION................................   468
      Section 4601--Military Construction........................   468
      Section 4602--Military Construction for Overseas 
        Contingency Operations...................................   478
TITLE XLVII--DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY NATIONAL SECURITY PROGRAMS.....   480
      Section 4701--Department of Energy National Security 
        Programs.................................................   480
DIVISION E--NATIONAL ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE INITIATIVE ACT OF 
  2020...........................................................   490
      Section 5001--Short Title..................................   490
      Section 5002--Findings.....................................   490
      Section 5003--Definitions..................................   490
TITLE I--NATIONAL ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE INITIATIVE.............   490
  LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS.........................................   490
      Section 5101--National Artificial Intelligence Initiative..   490
      Section 5102--National Artificial Intelligence Initiative 
        Office...................................................   490
      Section 5103--Coordination by Interagency Committee........   490
      Section 5104--National Artificial Intelligence Advisory 
        Committee................................................   490
      Section 5105--National Academies Artificial Intelligence 
        Impact Study on Workforce................................   491
      Section 5106--GAO Report on Computational Needs............   491
      Section 5107--National AI Research Resource Task Force.....   491
      Section 5108--Sense of Congress............................   491
TITLE II--NATIONAL ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE RESEARCH INSTITUTES...   492
  LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS.........................................   492
      Section 5201--National Artificial Intelligence Research 
        Institutes...............................................   492
TITLE III--NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF STANDARDS AND TECHNOLOGY 
    ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE ACTIVITIES...........................   492
  LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS.........................................   492
      Section 5301--National Institute of Standards and 
        Technology Activities....................................   492
TITLE IV--NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE 
    ACTIVITIES...................................................   492
  LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS.........................................   492
      Section 5401--Artificial Intelligence Research and 
        Education................................................   492
TITLE V--DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE RESEARCH 
    PROGRAM......................................................   493
  LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS.........................................   493
      Section 5501--Department of Energy Artificial Intelligence 
        Research Program.........................................   493

Department of Defense Authorization Request......................   493
Communications from Other Committees.............................   496
Congressional Budget Office Estimate.............................   513
Statement Required by the Congressional Budget Act...............   514
Committee Cost Estimate..........................................   514
Advisory of Earmarks.............................................   514
Oversight Findings...............................................   514
General Performance Goals and Objectives.........................   515
Statement of Federal Mandates....................................   515
Federal Advisory Committee Statement.............................   515
Applicability to the Legislative Branch..........................   515
Duplication of Federal Programs..................................   515
Committee Votes..................................................   516
Changes in Existing Law Made by the Bill, as Reported............   529
Additional Views.................................................   530
Supplemental Views...............................................   532
Minority Views...................................................   535


116th Congress }                                          { Report
                        HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES
  2d Session   }                                          { 116-442

======================================================================
 
                      WILLIAM M. (MAC) THORNBERRY
        NATIONAL DEFENSE AUTHORIZATION ACT FOR FISCAL YEAR 2021


                                _______
                                

 July 19, 2020.--Committed to the Committee of the Whole House on the 
              State of the Union and ordered to be printed

                                _______
                                

    Mr. Smith of Washington, from the Committee on Armed Services, 
                        submitted the following

                              R E P O R T

                             together with

              ADDITIONAL, SUPPLEMENTAL, AND MINORITY VIEWS

                        [To accompany H.R. 6395]

      [Including cost estimate of the Congressional Budget Office]

    The Committee on Armed Services, to whom was referred the 
bill (H.R. 6395) to authorize appropriations for fiscal year 
2021 for military activities of the Department of Defense and 
for military construction, to prescribe military personnel 
strengths for such fiscal year, and for other purposes, having 
considered the same, reports favorably thereon with amendments 
and recommends that the bill as amended do pass.
    The amendments are as follows:
    The amendment strikes all after the enacting clause of the 
bill and inserts a new text which appears in italic type in the 
reported bill.
    The title of the bill is amended to reflect the amendment 
to the text of the bill.

                       PURPOSE OF THE LEGISLATION

    The bill would: (1) authorize appropriations for fiscal 
year 2021 for procurement and for research, development, test, 
and evaluation (RDT&E); (2) authorize appropriations for fiscal 
year 2021 for operation and maintenance (O&M) and for working 
capital funds; (3) authorize for fiscal year 2021 the personnel 
strength for each Active Duty Component of the military 
departments, and the personnel strength for the Selected 
Reserve for each Reserve Component of the Armed Forces; (4) 
modify various elements of compensation for military personnel 
and impose certain requirements and limitations on personnel 
actions in the defense establishment; (5) authorize 
appropriations for fiscal year 2021 for military construction 
and family housing; (6) authorize appropriations for Overseas 
Contingency Operations; (7) authorize appropriations for fiscal 
year 2021 for the Department of Energy national security 
programs; and (8) authorize appropriations for fiscal year 2021 
for the Maritime Administration.

                    RATIONALE FOR THE COMMITTEE BILL

    H.R. 6395, the William M. (Mac) Thornberry National Defense 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2021, is the primary vehicle 
through which Congress fulfills its responsibility as mandated 
in Article I, Section 8, of the Constitution of the United 
States, granting Congress the power to provide for the common 
defense, to raise and support an Army, to provide and maintain 
a Navy, and to make rules for the government and regulation of 
the land and naval forces. Rule X of the House of 
Representatives provides the House Committee on Armed Services 
with jurisdiction over the Department of Defense generally and 
over the military application of nuclear energy. The committee 
bill includes findings and recommendations resulting from its 
oversight activities, conducted through hearings and briefings 
with Department of Defense and Department of Energy civilian 
and military officials, intelligence analysts, outside experts, 
and industry representatives, and it is informed by 
institutional experience. H.R. 6395 provides the Department of 
Defense and the Department of Energy with important policy 
authorities to speed decision making and improve agility, while 
improving readiness and increasing capabilities and capacities.
    H.R. 6395 addresses our country's greatest military threats 
by authorizing a defense enterprise that is inclusive, 
accountable, and responsible in the management of its 
resources. H.R. 6395 focuses on improving the lives of our men 
and women in uniform, authorizing a 3 percent pay increase and 
implementing reforms to improve the quality of military 
housing. The committee recognizes that our service members 
confront unique, complex challenges and deserve our support.
    H.R. 6395 ensures America's military maintains its 
competitive edge and increases accountability over how defense 
resources are allocated and spent. The global security 
environment requires affordably managing strategic risk by 
prioritizing the relevant military capabilities and capacities 
necessary to meet our greatest threats, adequately resource 
those priorities by accepting some risk with well-considered 
and agreed upon tradeoffs, and, at the same time, realize cost 
savings through aggressive oversight and control of 
mismanagement and unjustified costs.
    H.R. 6395 supports an overall authorization of $740.5 
billion dollars for our national defense. H.R. 6395 would 
authorize approximately $662.6 billion in discretionary 
spending for national defense and approximately $69.0 billion 
in discretionary spending for Overseas Contingency Operations. 
This authorization level will allow our military to maintain 
readiness, expand capabilities, and invest in the new software 
and technologies required to secure our country. H.R. 6395 
meets the committee's goal to facilitate a strong national 
defense apparatus that is resourced properly, accountable, and 
cognizant of the essential, direct oversight role of Congress.

                                HEARINGS

    For the purposes of section 103(i) of H. Res. 6 of the 
116th Congress--
    (1) the following hearings were used to develop or consider 
H.R. 6395:
    The committee held a hearing ``The Fiscal Year 2021 
National Defense Authorization Budget Request from the 
Department of Defense'' on February 26, 2020. The committee 
received testimony from the Honorable Dr. Mark T. Esper, 
Secretary of Defense, and General Mark A. Milley, Chairman of 
the Joint Chiefs of Staff.
    The committee held a hearing ``The Fiscal Year 2021 
National Defense Authorization Budget Request for the 
Department of the Navy on February 27, 2020. The committee 
received testimony from the Honorable Thomas B. Modly, Acting 
Secretary of the Navy, Admiral Michael M. Gilday, Chief of 
Naval Operations, and General David H. Berger, Commandant of 
the U.S. Marine Corps.
    The committee held a hearing ``The Fiscal Year 2021 
National Defense Authorization Budget Request for the 
Department of the Army'' on March 3, 2020. The committee 
received testimony from the Honorable Ryan McCarthy, Secretary 
of the Army and General James McConville, Chief of Staff of the 
Army.
    The committee held a hearing ``The Fiscal Year 2021 
National Defense Authorization Budget Request for the 
Department of the Air Force'' on March 4, 2020. The committee 
received testimony from the Honorable Barbara Barrett, 
Secretary of the Air Force, General David Goldfein, Chief of 
Staff of the Air Force, and General John Raymond, Chief of 
Space Operations, U.S. Space Force.
    The committee held a hearing ``National Security Challenges 
and U.S. Military Activities in the Greater Middle East and 
Africa'' on March 10, 2020. The committee received testimony 
from the Honorable Kathryn Wheelbarger, Assistant Secretary of 
Defense for International Security Affairs, General Kenneth F. 
McKenzie Jr., USMC, Commander, U.S. Central Command, and 
General Stephen Townsend, USA, Commander, U.S. Africa Command.
    The committee held a hearing on ``National Security 
Challenges and U.S. Military Activity in North and South 
America'' on March 11, 2020. The committee received testimony 
from the Honorable Kenneth P. Rapuano, Assistant Secretary of 
Defense for Homeland Defense and Global Security, Admiral Craig 
S. Faller, USN, Commander, U.S. Southern Command, and General 
Terrence J. O'Shaughnessy, USAF, Commander, U.S. Northern 
Command.
    The committee held a hearing on ``Department of Defense 
COVID-19 Response to Defense Industrial Base Challenges'' on 
June 10, 2020. The committee received testimony from the 
Honorable Ellen Lord, Under Secretary of Defense for 
Acquisition and Sustainment.
    In addition, the six subcommittees of the committee 
conducted 12 hearings and 6 markups to develop and consider 
H.R. 6395.

                           COMMITTEE POSITION

    On July 1, 2020, the Committee on Armed Services held a 
markup session to consider H.R. 6395. The committee ordered the 
bill H.R. 6395, as amended, favorably reported to the House of 
Representatives by a recorded vote of 56-0, a quorum being 
present.

                EXPLANATION OF THE COMMITTEE AMENDMENTS

    The committee adopted an amendment in the nature of a 
substitute during the consideration of H.R. 6395. The title of 
the bill is amended to reflect the amendment to the text of the 
bill. The remainder of the report discusses the bill, as 
amended.

            RELATIONSHIP OF AUTHORIZATION TO APPROPRIATIONS

    The bill does not provide budget authority. This bill 
authorizes appropriations; subsequent appropriations acts will 
provide budget authority. However, the committee strives to 
adhere to the recommendations as issued by the Committee on the 
Budget as it relates to the jurisdiction of this committee.
    The bill addresses the following categories in the 
Department of Defense budget: procurement; research, 
development, test, and evaluation; operation and maintenance; 
military personnel; working capital funds; and military 
construction and family housing. The bill also addresses the 
Armed Forces Retirement Home, Department of Energy National 
Security Programs, the Naval Petroleum Reserve, and the 
Maritime Administration.
    Active Duty and Reserve personnel strengths authorized in 
this bill and legislation affecting compensation for military 
personnel determine the remaining appropriation requirements of 
the Department of Defense. However, this bill does not provide 
authorization of specific dollar amounts for military 
personnel.

          SUMMARY OF DISCRETIONARY AUTHORIZATIONS IN THE BILL

    The President requested discretionary budget authority of 
$731.6 billion for programs within the jurisdiction of the 
committee for fiscal year 2021. Of this amount, $636.3 billion 
was requested for base Department of Defense programs, $69.0 
billion was requested for Overseas Contingency Operations 
requirements covering the entire fiscal year, $26.0 billion was 
requested for Department of Energy national security programs 
and the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board, and $0.31 
billion was requested for defense-related activities associated 
with the Maritime Administration.
    The committee recommends an overall discretionary 
authorization of $731.6 billion in fiscal year 2021. The 
committee authorization is a $1.67 billion increase above the 
levels provided for in the National Defense Authorization Act 
for Fiscal Year 2020 (Public Law 116-92).
    The table preceding the detailed program adjustments in 
division D of this report summarizes the committee's 
recommended discretionary authorizations by appropriation 
account for fiscal year 2021 and compares these amounts to the 
President's request.

                      BUDGET AUTHORITY IMPLICATION

    The President's total request for the national defense 
budget function (050) in fiscal year 2021 is $752.4 billion, as 
estimated by the Congressional Budget Office. In addition to 
funding for programs addressed in this bill, the total 050 
request includes discretionary funding for national defense 
programs not in the committee's jurisdiction, discretionary 
funding for programs that do not require additional 
authorization in fiscal year 2021, and mandatory programs.
    The table preceding the detailed program adjustments in 
division D of this report details changes to the budget request 
for all aspects of the national defense budget function.

            DIVISION A--DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE AUTHORIZATIONS

                          TITLE I--PROCUREMENT

                       Aircraft Procurement, Army


                       Items of Special Interest


Army Aviation Radio Modernization

    The committee is encouraged by the Army's efforts to 
modernize radio communication technology and increase 
interoperability through the Integrated Tactical Network (ITN) 
for operational rotorcraft platforms and ground systems. The 
committee supports the Army's use of program of record radios 
as well as use of a federated integration approach under the 
Air to Ground Networking Radio (AGNR) program. The committee 
recognizes the critical need to maintain radio development and 
production within the industrial base and believes that an open 
and competitive process will deliver the most cost effective 
capability to the Army.
    As such, the committee directs the Assistant Secretary of 
the Army for Acquisition, Logistics and Technology to provide a 
briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services no later than 
October 1, 2020 on the acquisition strategy for the AGNR 
program, to include how the Army plans to use full and open 
competition to ensure best value for radio integration into 
existing rotorcraft platforms, the current inventory of 
available radios in existing programs of record, the test and 
evaluation plan, and the impact of the AGNR program on the 
tactical radio industrial base.

Army intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance programs

    The committee recognizes that airborne intelligence, 
surveillance, and reconnaissance (AISR) capability has become 
an integral aspect of modern military operations. Each military 
service has fielded its own AISR, often optimized for service-
specific mission requirements. The committee is aware that the 
Army ISR Task Force is examining AISR requirements and 
available options for fulfilling these requirements in a cost-
efficient manner. Long range precision fires, the Army's 
highest modernization priority, depends upon deep sensing 
provided by ISR assets.
    Available information from the Army indicates that long-
term modernization plans for the Airborne Reconnaissance Low-
Enhanced (ARE-L), the Guardrail Common Sensor, and the Enhanced 
Medium Altitude Reconnaissance and Surveillance System are 
unclear beyond the Future Years Defense Program. The committee 
further notes that while the Army's budget briefings depict 
data link and avionics upgrades to the MQ-1 Gray Eagle unmanned 
aircraft system, the Army has yet to outline plans for a 
service life extension program or a follow-on medium-altitude 
ISR aircraft.
    The committee is concerned about the tendency of each 
military service to construct acquisition plans without 
accounting for the role of the joint force and capability 
overlap between military services. Elsewhere in this Act, the 
committee requires the Department of the Air Force to submit a 
comprehensive plan on AISR modernization and replacement. The 
committee is aware of Army ISR Task Force discussions with 
other military services and encourages the Task Force to 
continue this collaboration across the military services to 
ensure the Army invests in the critical and service-specific 
capabilities it will need to support the joint force.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of the Army, 
in consultation with the Chief of Staff of the Army, to provide 
a briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services by November 
1, 2020, on plans for modernization of the Army's airborne 
intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance capability. This 
briefing should cover the entire Army AISR enterprise, 
demonstrate how the Army intends to meet ISR requirements 
through fiscal year 2034, and detail which requirements the 
Army expects other services to provide.

CH-47 Chinook helicopter

    The budget request included $229.6 million for CH-47 
Chinook helicopter procurement and $15.5 million in Advance 
Procurement. The committee continues to be concerned about the 
Army's lack of planning for future heavy lift and notes that 
the request only included funding for six Block II Chinook 
helicopters for special operations forces. Further, the 
committee is aware that, despite Congress having added $28.0 
million in fiscal year 2020 for CH-47F Block II Advance 
Procurement, the Army has yet to put any of this funding on 
contract and has no current plans to begin procuring long lead 
items.
    The committee expects the Army to provide a realistic 
acquisition strategy for future heavy lift. Therefore, the 
committee recommends $365.8 million, an increase of $136.2 
million, for the CH-47 Chinook program and recommends $44.5 
million, an increase of $29.0 million, for CH-47 Chinook 
Advance Procurement.

Load Stability Systems

    The committee is aware that load stability technology has 
the potential to offer performance and safety improvements for 
military utility and medical evacuation helicopters. The 
committee understands that Army Futures Command and Army 
Program Directorate Medical Evacuation have expressed interest 
in additional test and evaluation of litter-attached load 
stability systems on helicopter hoists. The committee further 
understands that a litter load stability system currently in 
testing is due to receive a limited air worthiness release by 
the end of fiscal year 2020.
    The committee supports completing the testing and 
certification of this type of safety stabilization technology 
and allowing units to make use of this capability for life-
saving and other missions. The committee directs the Commander, 
U.S. Army Futures Command, to provide a briefing to the House 
Committee on Armed Services by March 1, 2021, on the military 
utility of helicopter load stability systems, to include an 
assessment of technologies under evaluation, the potential 
application of these technologies, and estimated costs to 
procure and field these technologies.

Short Range Reconnaissance Small Unmanned Aircraft System

    The committee notes that the Army is conducting a rapid 
prototyping procurement for a Short Range Reconnaissance (SRR) 
Small Unmanned Aircraft System (sUAS) and that an acquisition 
decision for the first tranche of systems is scheduled for the 
third quarter of fiscal year 2020. The committee acknowledges 
that the Army could benefit from a platoon-level intelligence, 
surveillance, and reconnaissance asset and supports the Army's 
use of a rapid acquisition process focused on available mature 
systems that could be ready for fielding during fiscal year 
2021.
    However, the committee is concerned that the Army's 
expedited process could potentially introduce vulnerabilities 
into the SRR program. The committee understands that the SRR 
Tranche I acquisition consisted of several non-traditional 
vendors and did not necessarily incorporate costs of compliance 
with Department of Defense cybersecurity policy. The committee 
commends the Army for seeking innovative solutions but expects 
the service to consider and fully address security concerns in 
critical systems intended for operation at the tactical edge.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of the Army 
to provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services 
by December 1, 2020, on the acquisition strategy for all future 
SRR sUAS tranches. The briefing should include how the Army 
intends to allow for established domestic sUAS manufacturers 
with existing full-scale production capability to compete in 
the prototype phase, SRR compliance with Department of Defense 
cybersecurity policy and statutory and regulatory bans on 
Chinese sUAS components in the prototyping phase, and SRR 
compliance with all applicable Defense Federal Acquisition 
Regulation Supplement domestic content laws.

UH-60M Army National Guard Fielding Strategy

    The committee understands the UH-60M Black Hawk is the most 
modernized utility helicopter in the Army's inventory. The UH-
60M is a digital networked platform that provides greater range 
and lift in order to support maneuver forces through air 
assault, general support command and control, and aeromedical 
evacuations. The committee notes the UH-60M Black Hawk is also 
a critical dual-use item for Army National Guard forces 
performing Title 32 missions.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of the Army, 
in conjunction with the Chief of the National Guard Bureau and 
the Director of the Army National Guard, to provide a briefing 
to the House Committee on Armed Services by March 1, 2021, on 
the Army's fielding strategy and plans to accelerate fielding 
of UH-60M helicopters to the Army National Guard.

UH-60V Total Force Fielding Strategy

    The committee believes the Army's UH-60V modernization 
program is critical for ensuring legacy Blackhawk helicopters 
remain safe and relevant for multi-domain operations. The 
committee supports the Army's current plan to field the UH-60V 
across all components in order to maintain fleet and mission 
parity within the Army. Further, the Committee is aware that 
the Army's UH-60V acquisition strategy indicates 48 UH-60Vs to 
be delivered per year once the program enters full rate 
production. Given the importance of this modernization effort, 
the committee believes the Army may want to consider options to 
accelerate production and fielding to include the potential of 
supplemental industry support or expanding capacity at Corpus 
Christi Army Depot. Therefore, the committee directs the 
Secretary of the Army to provide a briefing to the House 
Committee on Armed Services by March 1, 2021 on the 
advisability and feasibility of accelerating fielding of UH-
60Vs to both the active and reserve components and address 
potential courses of action that would be required for this 
acceleration.

UH-72 Lakota helicopter commercial-off-the-shelf modifications

    The committee understands the UH-72A Lakota helicopter 
performs a variety of missions including flight training, 
medical evacuation, border security, VIP transport, and 
disaster response. The committee understands there are 
commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) technologies that could 
potentially improve UH-72A communications and health monitoring 
systems by providing a digital, lightweight, beyond-line-of-
sight, push-to-talk radio, with Voice over Internet and real-
time fleet health monitoring, recording, and next-generation 
satellite communications. The committee believes that these 
same COTS solutions could also potentially improve training on 
the UH-72A.
    The committee directs the Secretary of the Army to provide 
a briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services by October 
30, 2020, on the status of UH-72A health monitoring 
capabilities and an assessment of existing COTS solutions that 
could improve the effectiveness and lifecycle sustainment of 
the UH-72A fleet.

        Procurement of Weapons and Tracked Combat Vehicles, Army


                       Items of Special Interest


Combat and tactical vehicle interior flame resistant materials

    The committee is aware that the military services have not 
established baseline requirements for flame resistant vehicle 
soft armor, such as spall liners, and other internal materials. 
The Committee is concerned that the Army and the Marine Corps 
may not have adequately addressed this issue in its 
requirements analysis and development processes and, therefore, 
encourages each to consider including flame resistant 
standards, like those outlined in the Military Handbook 684, 
``Design of Ground Combat Vehicles for Survivability,'' among 
the technical requirements for the modernization of combat and 
tactical vehicles. In this regard, the committee directs the 
Secretary of the Army, in coordination with the Secretaries of 
the Navy and the Air Force, not later than December 15, 2020, 
to provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services, 
on the availability, feasibility, suitability, and 
affordability of flame resistant materials and their potential 
for increasing the survivability and safety of occupants inside 
combat and tactical vehicles.

M240 medium machine gun modernization and sustainment

    The committee remains concerned that the Army has neither 
planned nor requested sufficient resources to ensure long-term 
viability of the M240 family of medium machine guns and the 
associated industrial base. The committee notes that Congress 
has provided resources to sustain the M240 production line, 
which the Army has utilized successfully to maintain the 
program to date. However, the committee requires additional 
information in response to ongoing concerns related to M240 
lifecycle sustainment and management of the associated 
industrial base. The committee remains concerned over the 
absence of funding in future years which may result in a 
shutdown in the M240 production line, which would significantly 
limit the Army's ability to procure additional weapons as well 
as lead to reduced capability to maintain existing weapons.
    Accordingly, the committee directs the Secretary of the 
Army to provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed 
Services not later than October 30, 2020, that includes, but is 
not limited to:
    (1) the projected service life of the current M240B 
inventory and the overall readiness of these machine guns both 
in the field and in inventory;
    (2) the Army's plan and schedule to replace the current 
M240B inventory either with newer M240 models or an entirely 
new system;
    (3) an updated cost and risk analysis for restarting the 
M240 production line if allowed to shut down;
    (4) a coordinated description and assessment of the M240 
production industrial base; and
    (5) the advisability, feasibility, and cost of 
transitioning the Army's entire existing inventory of M240B 
medium machine guns to the lighter weight M240L model.

                    Procurement of Ammunition, Army


                       Items of Special Interest


Handgun Ammunition Procurement

    The committee understands the Army's budget request for 
small caliber ammunition includes $328.3 million which includes 
funding for handgun 9mm, 5.56mm, 7.62mm, .50 caliber, and 
advanced technology armor piercing rounds. Regarding the 
handgun 9mm round request, the committee notes a substantial 
decrease from prior year funding requests. Specifically, the 
budget request only includes $853 thousand for handgun 9mm 
rounds, which is a 95 percent decrease compared to fiscal year 
2020 funding levels. The committee understands the Army 
believes this to be an acceptable risk given current 
inventories and stockpile requirements. However, the committee 
remains concerned over the impact this could present to the 
industrial base in terms of potential production breaks and 
generating inefficiencies in the handgun 9mm line.
    The committee directs the Secretary of the Army to provide 
a briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services by December 
15, 2020 on the long-term acquisition strategy for small 
caliber ammunition. The briefing should include but not limited 
to actions being taken to prevent any production breaks for 
handgun 9mm rounds, planned funding across the future year's 
defense program, and current inventory levels for small caliber 
rounds.

Shoulder-launched munitions

    The committee understands shoulder-launched munitions are 
used extensively by all branches of the military services 
including special operation forces in order to defeat a wide 
variety of targets such as light vehicles, bunkers, and enemy 
personnel. The committee also notes this wide array of targets 
has often required unique munitions and weapon system platforms 
tailored to specific mission requirements. The committee is 
aware that special operation forces and the Marine Corps both 
use a variety of shoulder-launched munitions to deliver the 
necessary battlefield effects, reduce weight on the soldier, 
and allow for increased mobility. However, the committee 
requires additional information regarding the Army's strategy 
and plans for developing and procuring shoulder-launched 
munitions for brigade combat teams. The committee expects the 
Army to leverage and coordinate with the Marine Corps and U.S. 
Special Operations Command (USSOCOM) regarding the development 
and procurement of shoulder-launched munitions.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of the Army, 
in consultation with the Commanding General of Army Futures 
Command, to provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed 
Services by January 31, 2021, on the Army's shoulder-launched 
munitions acquisition strategy to include how the Army is 
coordinating jointly with the other military services including 
USSOCOM.

                        Other Procurement, Army


                       Items of Special Interest


All-terrain cranes

    The budget request contained $70.5 million for all-terrain 
cranes.
    The family of all-terrain cranes (Type I medium and Type II 
heavy) are critical logistic systems necessary for large-scale 
combat operations and provide the ability to assemble, 
disassemble, and maintain bridges for wet or dry gap crossings, 
as well as provide capabilities to rapidly offload critical 
supplies such as weapons, ammunition, artillery pieces, fuel, 
and water. The committee notes these systems are also 
considered critical dual-use systems supporting both the Active 
and Reserve Components in title 10 and title 32 operations. The 
committee supports the budget request; however, the committee 
does have concerns over the projected funding levels for these 
critical logistical systems across the Future Years Defense 
Program.
    The committee directs the Program Executive Officer for 
Combat Support and Combat Service Support to provide a briefing 
to the House Committee on Armed Services not later than October 
30, 2020, on the long-term acquisition strategy for all-terrain 
crane systems.
    The committee recommends $70.5 million, the full amount 
requested, for all-terrain cranes.

Assessment of the Army's tactical wheeled vehicle strategy and 
        implementation efforts

    The Committee notes that tactical wheeled vehicle fleets 
throughout the Army appear to be aging without significant 
technology upgrades or replacement by taking advantage of 
commercial industry investments in new technologies such as 
emissions controls, autonomous operation, and electric and 
hybrid-electric drive. The Committee is concerned about the 
potential impacts this has for the defense industrial base, the 
acquisition of commercially available technology, and the 
broader implications this may have for competition and cost for 
future wheeled vehicles acquisitions. The committee is 
interested to learn more about the analysis, decision-making 
processes, and the frequency with which technological upgrade 
or replacement of tactical wheeled vehicles could, should, or 
should not be competed. Therefore, the committee directs the 
Comptroller General of the United States, not later than March 
1, 2021, to provide the House Armed Services Committee a report 
that assesses the Army's tactical wheeled vehicle strategy and 
implementation efforts. The assessment should include an 
analysis of the tactical wheeled vehicle industrial base and 
potential opportunities, if any, for significant advancements 
in technology and savings through competition. The assessment 
should also include the identification of and recommendations 
for overcoming obstacles to insertion of new technology and 
competition. The committee further directs the Comptroller 
General to provide a briefing to the House Armed Services 
Committee not later than December 11, 2020, on the preliminary 
findings of its assessment.

Soldier Enhancement Program

    The budget request contained no funds for the Soldier 
Enhancement Program (SEP). The committee is disappointed and 
concerned by the absence of funds in the budget request, as 
well as across the Future Years Defense Program.
    The committee commends the work accomplished to date by the 
SEP through the Program Executive Office-Soldier that continues 
to provide critically needed improvements and upgrades to 
individual soldier equipment. This program was created by 
Congress and mandated to evaluate and, where appropriate, type 
classify existing prototypes or commercially available items 
that enhance soldiers' ability to execute their combat 
missions. The committee notes that through soldier-led 
evaluations, SEP initiatives resulted in the procurement of 
items that meet current operational needs, close a capability 
gap, provide real-time operational feedback, inform 
requirements, generate new requirements or transition a system 
into a new or existing Program of Record. The committee also 
notes that approximately 40 percent of the Program Executive 
Office-Soldier portfolio was started or initiated within SEP, 
such as Soldier Borne Sensors, AT 4 Confined Space Warhead, 
Polymer Magazines, and 50 Cal. Quick Change Barrel.
    Therefore, the committee recommends $5.0 million for 
continuation of the SEP. The committee also directs the 
Secretary of the Army to provide a briefing to the House 
Committee on Armed Services, not later than December 1, 2020, 
on the current and future programs being evaluated by the SEP.

Tactical Wheeled Vehicle Industrial base

    The committee is concerned by the strategic risk the Army 
may be accepting in the defense tactical wheeled vehicle (TWV) 
industrial base. The committee notes the Army has specifically 
used tactical wheeled vehicles, such as the Family of Medium 
Tactical Vehicles (FMTV), Joint Light Tactical Vehicle (JLTV), 
High Mobility Multi-Purpose Wheeled Vehicle (HMMWV), and Heavy 
Expanded Mobile Tactical Truck (HEMTT), as bill payers for its 
higher priority development and modernization programs.
    The committee further notes that truncated plans and 
resources for the development or procurement of upgrades and 
replacements for these vehicles has resulted in uncertainty and 
a lack of predictability over time. This ultimately increases 
cost for the Army as well as creates significant risks in the 
loss of capacity and capability in the TWV industrial base. As 
the committee predicted two years ago, the drastic, unexpected 
decrease in procurement projections for these vehicle programs 
has negatively affected the medium and heavy tactical wheeled 
vehicle industrial base. The committee believes the TWV 
industrial base needs stability and predictability from the 
Army in its near and longer-term plans and programs that 
appropriately manages risks through investment in production 
levels that meet or exceed agreed upon minimum sustaining rates 
ensuring its availability to support the Army in current 
operations and into the future.
    Accordingly, the committee directs that the Secretary of 
the Army, not later than December 15, 2020, to provide a 
briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services on the Army's 
near and long-term strategy to meet the Army current and future 
requirements for tactical wheeled vehicles. The briefing should 
also address how the Army will assess and manage risk in the 
industrial base to include detailed development and acquisition 
plans as well as funding profiles through the future years 
defense program.

                       Aircraft Procurement, Navy


                       Items of Special Interest


Anti-submarine warfare low frequency sonar capability

    The budget request included $131.6 million for MH-60 
modifications.
    The committee continues to be concerned with the threat 
that adversary submarines pose to aircraft carriers. With the 
cancellation of the surface ship torpedo defense program, the 
aircraft carrier's only organic anti-submarine warfare (ASW) 
capability is the airborne low frequency system (ALFS) that is 
embarked aboard the MH-60 helicopters. The ALFS system has 
experienced a very high mishap rate over the last 10 years and 
continues to demonstrate poor reliability. The committee 
understands that allied partners that also utilize MH-60 
variants employ alternate low frequency systems that not only 
have greater reliability but have also demonstrated superior 
performance. The Navy has been slow to address the poor 
reliability of the ALFS system despite repeated calls for 
improvement by the committee.
    The committee recommends $136.6 million, an increase of 
$5.0 million, for the procurement of one helicopter-mounted low 
frequency active sonar system for the Littoral Combat Ship ASW 
mission module to demonstrate other viable alternative 
technologies currently available for aircraft carrier ASW risk 
reduction efforts.

Department of the Navy Strike-Fighter management

    The budget request contained $2.97 billion for the 
procurement of 24 F/A-18E/F new aircraft, and ongoing 
modifications, upgrades, and improvements for the existing 
fleet of Department of the Navy F/A-18 aircraft. However, the 
budget request did not include the fiscal year 2020 planned 
advance procurement funding of $28.1 million for fiscal year 
2021 that would support the previously planned procurement of 
12 F/A-18E/F new aircraft in fiscal year 2022 for the U.S. 
Navy. The Navy's budget also eliminated procurement of 24 new 
aircraft planned in fiscal years 2023 and 2024.
    The committee notes that the Navy's decision to eliminate 
36 new aircraft from its fiscal year 2022 to 2025 future years 
defense plan incurs greater risk for combatant commanders and 
increases the Navy's strike-fighter deficit in fiscal year 2021 
from -49 to -58 aircraft. The committee notes this is 
equivalent to greater than one aircraft carrier air-wing (CVW) 
quantity of aircraft short of inventory requirements. 
Additionally, the Navy currently plans its strike-fighter 
inventory without including traditional margin for attrition 
reserve aircraft that would supplement forces in cases of 
training or contingency operational losses of aircraft. The 
Navy should budget for 54 aircraft per CVW, but instead only 
budgets for 44 aircraft per CVW. Consequently, the Navy has an 
actual deficit of -148 strike-fighter aircraft when including 
attrition reserve planning factors.
    The Navy hopes to resolve its strike-fighter deficit in 
2035 with initial fielding of its next-generation fighter, FA-
XX, which is in the concept development stages of execution. 
The committee recalls the Navy curtailed F/A-18 procurement 
approximately 10 years ago with aspirational goals to maintain 
strike-fighter inventory levels with planned procurement of F-
35C. That plan was not realized due to F-35 program execution 
and subsequently required the Navy to procure additional F/A-
18E/F aircraft to reduce operational risk. The committee 
expects a similar outcome may occur with the Navy's current 
plan for FA-XX due to affordability and technological 
challenges, as well as initial results from the F/A-18E/F 
Service Life Modification (SLM) program. Due to the Navy's non-
compliance with field maintenance procedures, practices and 
tooling recommended by the original equipment manufacturer, 
compounded by the Navy's inability to consolidate scheduled 
unit-level maintenance inspections and repairs, the Navy has 
encountered widespread corrosion in unpredicted areas on F/A-
18E/F aircraft causing a 135 percent increase in costs for the 
initial two aircraft finishing the SLM program. The Navy 
subsequently reduced the planned induction quantity of aircraft 
in fiscal year 2021 from 18 to 10 aircraft.
    Therefore, the committee supports and encourages the Navy 
to procure additional F/A-18E/F new aircraft beyond fiscal year 
2021. Additionally, the committee directs the Chairman of the 
Joint Chiefs of Staff to provide a briefing to the House 
Committee on Armed Services not later than March 1, 2021, that 
assesses the operational risk incurred for regional combatant 
commanders to meet steady-state and contingency requirements as 
a result of the Navy not budgeting for attrition reserve 
aircraft in its strike-fighter force planning. Finally, the 
committee directs the Department of Defense Inspector General 
to provide a report to the congressional defense committees not 
later than September 30, 2021, that assesses all Active and 
Reserve Navy and Marine Corps F/A-18C/D/E/F/G aircraft 
squadrons regarding adherence to organizational and unit-level 
maintenance and repair technical orders and procedures 
prescribed by the original equipment manufacturer, in 
particular those processes and procedures designed to mitigate 
damage and degradation to the aircraft and structural 
components due to corrosion incurred by operations in harsh 
sand and salt-water environments.

P-8 aircraft

    The committee notes that the budget request contained no 
funds for P-8A Poseidon aircraft. The budget request for fiscal 
year 2021 did not take into account the increased warfighter 
requirement of 19 additional P-8A aircraft. This increase is 
driven by the proliferation of adversarial submarine fleets and 
their increasingly active operational tempo. The new 
requirement includes 12 aircraft to recapitalize the 2 maritime 
patrol and reconnaissance squadrons assigned to the Navy 
Reserve. These squadrons currently operate legacy P-3C Orion 
aircraft, and the Chief of Navy Reserve estimates they will 
decommission by 2023 unless they are recapitalized with new 
aircraft. The committee is encouraged by the Navy's recognition 
of the Navy Reserve force and the contribution they can provide 
to the increased requirement for the P-8A. However, the 
committee was discouraged that the Navy failed to budget for 
the additional aircraft to meet the warfighting requirement.
    The committee recommends $1.02 billion for P-8A 
procurement, to procure six additional P-8A aircraft in fiscal 
year 2021.

VH-92A Executive Helicopter training aircraft

    The VH-92A program is the replacement for the current fleet 
of executive helicopters flown by Marine Helicopter Squadron 
One (HMX-1) in support of the Presidential world-wide vertical-
lift mission. Despite the importance of the VH-92 mission, the 
program currently has no dedicated training aircraft for pilot 
or maintainer flight training and aircraft familiarization. The 
committee is aware the Department of the Navy is reviewing a 
requirement for five CH-92A training aircraft to supplement the 
VH-92A fleet. The committee understands that if the requirement 
change is validated, the CH-92A aircraft would facilitate Fleet 
Marine Force pilot and maintainer transition training as well 
as provide logistic mission support for the executive flight 
detachment.
    Helicopter pilots assigned to HMX-1 go through an extensive 
pilot conversion training syllabus prior to flying the 
Presidential missions. The committee recognizes that adding the 
CH-92A aircraft would enable pilots to maintain monthly and 
annual flight time minimums without impacting operational 
Presidential lift assets. The committee also notes that newly 
assigned aircraft crew chiefs and maintenance personnel could 
start training on the CH-92A while awaiting their security 
clearances, a process that can take up to a year to complete.
    Accordingly, the committee directs the Secretary of the 
Navy to provide a report to the House Committee on Armed 
Services by November 1, 2020, on training requirements for the 
VH-92A aircraft. This report should encompass flight and 
maintenance training requirements and should examine the need 
for dedicated CH-92A trainer aircraft for both training and 
augmentation of HMX-1 ``greenside'' operations. The committee 
expects this report to provide a cost/benefit analysis of 
acquiring CH-92A aircraft and an assessment of the risk that 
potential industrial base changes, including a manufacturing 
facility closure, would pose to the ability to meet a validated 
trainer aircraft requirement. The National Defense 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2020 (Public Law 116-92) 
directed an assessment of risks to the VH-92A industrial base, 
but the response received from the Secretary of the Navy 
provided none of the requested information or analysis.

                       Weapons Procurement, Navy


                       Items of Special Interest


Fleet Proficiency for Ballistic Missile Defense

    The committee is concerned about the fleet proficiency of 
the Navy's ballistic missile defense ships and crews. The 
Navy's Aerial Targets program provides threat representative 
aerial targets for test and evaluation and fleet training 
events. The threat representative targets are used to test and 
evaluate both ship and crew and are required for fleet 
proficiency evaluation prior deployment or fielding systems to 
the fleet. However, the Navy does currently not have an 
inventory of affordable ballistic missile, threat-
representative targets to test and evaluate the proficiency of 
its ballistic missile defense ships and crews to include new 
Aegis DDG construction and modernization. The committee 
believes the inability to test and evaluate its ballistic 
missile defense ships and crews against threat-representative 
targets directly impacts the overall proficiency, readiness and 
combat capability of the fleet.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of the Navy 
to provide a briefing to the committee by November 30, 2020, 
that includes a plan to fund the procurement of low-cost, 
subscale ballistic missile threat-representative targets to 
maintain the fleet proficiency of the Navy's ballistic missile 
defense ships and crews. The plan will include, at a minimum, 
an assessment of current ballistic missile defense fleet 
proficiency, current use of threat-representative targets for 
ballistic missile defense testing and evaluation broken down by 
ship and crew, funding and number of low-cost, subscale 
ballistic missile threat-representative targets required to 
maintain ballistic missile defense fleet proficiency, and 
direction for Navy Air Systems Command and Surface Warfare 
Directorate to execute procurement and execution of the 
ballistic missile defense fleet proficiency plan.

                   Shipbuilding and Conversion, Navy


                       Items of Special Interest


Advanced degaussing for DDG-51 destroyers

    The committee understands that the DDG-51 destroyers, 
including the latest Flight III version, incorporate a mine 
protection degaussing system dating back to the lead ship, DDG-
51, commissioned on July 4, 1991. This more than 28-year-old 
degaussing mine protection system is seriously out of date, 
significantly outside of the Navy's own magnetic signature 
specifications, and leaves the Navy's primary large surface 
combatant, with a crew of 329, vulnerable to the most basic 
mines available today. The Navy has invested considerable 
research and development funding to develop advanced degaussing 
systems, the latest of which will be incorporated into LPD 28/
29/30, that will provide greater than five times more effective 
mine protection than the current system aboard all the DDG-51 
destroyers. The newest advanced degaussing systems are a third 
of the weight, requiring a third of the cable and cable length 
and typically require less electrical power. The committee 
believes the Navy should consider a backfit plan for in-service 
destroyers as well as a plan to incorporate an advanced 
degaussing system on new-construction destroyers. Therefore, 
the committee directs the Secretary of the Navy to provide a 
briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services by February 
1, 2021, on the potential to backfit in-service destroyers with 
advanced degaussing as well as the potential for incorporating 
it on new-construction destroyers.

Aegis combatants and 5th Generation aircraft interoperability

    The committee directs the Secretary of the Navy to provide 
a classified report and briefing to the House and Senate 
defense committees not later than December 1, 2020 on 
interoperability challenges among combatant ships and between 
AEGIS combatants and 5th Generation tactical aircraft. This 
report shall include:
    (1) a review of the Fire Control Loop Improvement Program, 
the Accelerated Mid-Term Interoperability Improvement Project, 
the Far-Term Interoperability Improvement Project and the 
introduction of Interrogation Friend or Foe (IFF) Mode 5 into 
all ship classes and applicable aircraft;
    (2) a plan to integrate the Multifunction Advanced Data 
Link of the F35 with legacy Tactical Data Links, including 
planned investments, timelines for integration and capabilities 
and limitations for our legacy platforms and command and 
control networks;
    (3) plans to unify surface combat systems' hardware 
platforms and software suites with investment plans and 
timelines;
    (4) findings of Strike Force Interoperability Officers 
since FY12 and the Navy's performance at reducing the 
identified deficiencies;
    (5) reasons for differences within the Common Source 
Library as fielded and the challenges these differences cause 
in planning strike group operations and the presumed 
differences between strike group capabilities in high end 
conflicts.

Amphibious Shipbuilding

    The Committee notes the President's Budget Request for 
Fiscal Year 2021 includes $1.156 billion for LPD 31, the 2nd 
ship of the San Antonio-class LPD Flight II, which was 
authorized in the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal 
Year 2020 (P.L. 116-92). The Committee continues to support the 
most efficient procurement and construction of these warships 
and further notes there are only 2 active amphibious vessel 
production lines within the shipbuilding industrial base. In 
the absence of a 30 Year Shipbuilding Plan, Future Naval Force 
Study, and Integrated Naval Force Structure Assessment, the 
only available shipbuilding forecast available for review is 
the Future Years' Defense Plan accompanying the fiscal year 
2021 request. The Future Years' Defense Plan forecasts 
construction of 3 additional amphibious warships, including an 
America-class LHA amphibious assault ship and 2 San Antonio-
class LPD Flight II vessels. The Committee is further aware of 
recent guidance issued by the Commandant of the Marine Corps 
which envisions new approaches and new platforms for the 
integrated naval force. The Committee supports developing 
additional amphibious capabilities to enable these new 
approaches while maintaining the existing industrial base to 
produce survivable L-class warships that support the integrated 
naval force.
    The Committee is aware of alternative contracting 
strategies for the construction of these warships which may 
reduce the overall cost of acquisition. Therefore, the 
Committee directs the Secretary of the Navy to provide a report 
within 180 days which provides options for the most efficient 
procurement of the 3 forecasted amphibious warships. The report 
should include a list of any additional necessary legislative 
authorities and an estimate of cost efficiencies generated by 
each option.

DDG-51 multiyear procurement

    The committee continues to support the 355-ship fleet 
codified in the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal 
Year 2018 (Public Law 115-91) as an essential part of the 
National Defense Strategy and its emphasis on near-peer 
competitors such as Russia and China. DDG-51 destroyers are the 
backbone of the surface fleet, providing multi-mission 
flexibility and increasing capability with the introduction of 
Flight III and the AN/SPY-6 radar. With plans for the future 
Large Surface Combatant toward the end of this decade, and the 
current multiyear procurement of DDG-51s running through fiscal 
year 2022, it is imperative that another 10-ship multiyear 
contract is awarded for fiscal year 2023 to ensure that Flight 
III capability will be available to the fleet. Such efforts 
will further strengthen the defense industrial base, maximize 
savings, and provide the shipyards a clear projection of work. 
Therefore, the committee encourages the Secretary of Defense 
and the Secretary of the Navy to make all necessary steps that 
will allow for another multiyear contract for DDG-51 Flight 
IIIs beginning in fiscal year 2023.

National Surface Warship Engineering and Design Capability

    The Committee notes the President's Fiscal Year 2021 Budget 
does not forecast funding for any new surface shipbuilding 
programs throughout the Future Years' Defense Plan (FYDP). The 
Committee is aware of testimony from senior naval officials 
suggesting that the DDG-51 Flight III design is effectively 
complete and that the ship will continue its procurement 
throughout the FYDP, with a potential additional multiyear 
procurement for DDG Flight III beginning in fiscal year 2023. 
The Committee also recognizes that when the detailed design for 
FFG(X) is completed in 2022, there will be no active national 
surface combatant engineering and design efforts underway that 
will allow for the preservation of this critical and strategic 
domestic defense capability.
    The design and development talent needed to create and 
sustain surface warship programs, like the DDG-51 and its 
successors, requires unique and increasingly scarce maritime 
systems and technological expertise. In the rapidly evolving 
threat environment, engineers and designers must also support 
the essential integration of complex next generation 
technologies such as autonomous and unmanned vehicles, 
hypersonic missiles, directed energy weapons, larger radars and 
other vital technologies.
    The Committee believes this engineering and design 
capability must be maintained in order to produce the Large 
Surface Combatant, Next Generation Amphibious warship, and 
potential unmanned surface vessels across the shipbuilding 
industrial base. Moreover, the Committee believes that the 
challenges confronting future surface ship combatants such as 
production and operations costs, energy management, and the 
flexibility to accommodate current and evolving technologies 
are addressable via a robust and properly sequenced engineering 
and design activity. The Committee notes similar actions have 
been successfully taken to ensure the health of the nuclear 
engineering and design industrial base with positive results 
that enabled the next generation of nuclear-powered aircraft 
carriers and submarines to be designed and produced 
efficiently.
    Therefore, not later than 180 days after enactment, the 
Committee directs the Secretary of the Navy to assess the 
current and future workloads of the surface ship engineering 
and design industrial base and provide recommendations for the 
sustainment of this critical national capability. Such 
recommendations should be informed by both the current program 
of record but should also include industry's perspective on how 
to best fortify and retain the capability and capacity resident 
in several locations nationwide.

Navy Auxiliary General Ocean Surveillance Ships (T-AGOS) Program

    The committee is aware of the Navy's requirement for seven 
Small Waterplane Area Twin Hull (SWATH) ocean surveillance 
ships to support the Military Sealift Command's theater anti-
submarine warfare mission for the Pacific and Atlantic fleets. 
The Navy currently operates five ships, but according to the 
Program of Record, it needs seven ships to meet increasing 
requirements. The cost per ship and current fiscal year funding 
level will not support this need.
    In order to address the increased requirements and achieve 
significant cost and schedule savings, the committee directs 
the Secretary of the Navy to submit a report to the Committees 
on Armed Services of the Senate and the House of 
Representatives by January 1, 2021, outlining options to 
support a fleet of seven SWATH ships, support a T-AGOS (X) 
competition based on a performance specification for the ship 
which meets the U.S. Navy's mission requirements, and presents 
significant cost savings opportunities as well as accelerates 
the timing of deployment of this capability.

Ship Counting Methodology

    In light of expanding maritime threats, the committee 
strongly supports efforts to grow naval force structure to 
support section 1025 of the National Defense Authorization Act 
for Fiscal Year 2018 (P.L. 115-91) entitled ``Policy of the 
United States on Minimum Number of Battle Force Ships''. As the 
Navy continues to develop the Integrated Naval Force Structure 
and 30 Year Shipbuilding plan, there has been increasing 
discussion, including from the Department of the Navy, whether 
unmanned vessels should be included in the Department's ship 
counting methodology. Recognizing both the growing promise of 
unmanned vessels and the important roles played by existing 
battle force inventory ships, the committee believes the 
Secretary of the Navy should examine the intrinsic warfighting 
capabilities of vessels when considering its future ship 
counting methodology. Therefore, the Committee directs the 
Secretary of the Navy to provide a report to the congressional 
defense committees, by January 1, 2021 as to Navy's plan to 
assess the family of unmanned underwater and surface vessels 
incorporation into the ship counting methodology of section 
231(f) of title 10, United States Code. For the purposes of 
making this determination, for both manned and unmanned 
vessels, this report shall assess factors such as:
    (1) Intended mission, in both competition and conflict;
    (2) Capability, either through a platform's weapons, 
sensors, or embarked personnel to interact with targets beyond 
visual range;
    (3) Ability to perform fleet support functions essential to 
power projection or sea control in competition or conflict.

Submarine Supplier Development

    The committee recognizes that the submarine supply base 
lost approximately 12,000 suppliers since the end of the Cold 
War. Material provided by the submarine industrial base is 
planned to grow by more than 200 percent over the next 5 years, 
after more than two decades of nurturing a fragile industrial 
base where 75 percent of funding for supplier material was 
awarded to single or sole-source suppliers. Congress authorized 
and appropriated funding in fiscal year 2019 and fiscal year 
2020 and provided flexible authorities supporting submarine 
industrial base expansion and stability initiatives. In fiscal 
year 2019, the Navy identified 324 suppliers as execution-
critical and has been conducting assessments of the health and 
readiness of those suppliers. In the 2020 assessment, the 
number of critical suppliers has grown to 350, of which 61 have 
been identified as challenged to meet future demand. The 
committee believes that continued investment in supplier 
development will reduce material lead times and improve the 
ability of the submarine industrial base to meet challenging 
construction schedules at higher rates of production. 
Therefore, the committee encourages the Secretary of the Navy 
to include supplier development funding in future budget 
requests until the number of challenged suppliers has been 
significantly reduced.

Technology Insertion in New Ship Designs

    The committee recognizes that ongoing delays on the lead 
FORD class aircraft carrier may indicate systemic problems with 
Navy shipbuilding practices with how new technologies are 
developed and incorporated. It is unfortunate that new 
technologies such as the advanced weapons elevators were not 
prototyped before being incorporated on the lead ship, a 
mistake that has contributed to lengthy delays. The committee 
is concerned with the Navy's decision to accept a ship that 
still had major discrepancies. The committee supports expanded 
prototyping activities for new technologies to ensure required 
reliability is obtained before ship authorization. Therefore, 
the committee directs the Secretary of the Navy to submit a 
report to the congressional defense committees by February 1, 
2021 detailing the number of times the Navy has accepted a ship 
prior to the incorporation and completion of major subsystems 
over the last twenty years, the circumstances that drove the 
Navy to accept such ship, and the length of time between 
acceptance and final incorporation of such subsystems. 
Additionally, the committee directs the Secretary to 
specifically assess emerging technologies, their associated 
technology readiness levels and required prototyping activities 
that are being incorporated in emerging programs including the 
following specific programs: Columbia-class ballistic missile 
submarine; the guided missiles frigate; the next generation 
attack submarine; large surface combatant; and, the large 
unmanned surface vessel.

Variable Depth Sonar for DDG-51 destroyers

    The committee recognizes and supports the Navy's efforts to 
leverage mature technologies and systems for the DDG-51 and 
small surface combatant programs. The committee continues to 
encourage the Secretary of the Navy to emphasize commonality 
across Navy platforms, commonality with existing platform 
equipment, and reduced acquisition and lifecycle and 
sustainment costs in developing a best value solution for the 
platform. However, the committee also believes it is critical 
that the Navy increase technical capabilities, particularly in 
the area of anti-submarine warfare (ASW). Given ongoing efforts 
by adversarial nations to increase the capability, lethality, 
and size of their respective submarine fleets, the committee 
recognizes the critical role the DDG-51 and small surface 
combatants will play in performing ASW missions around the 
globe. As such, it is imperative that the platform be deployed 
with the most capable ASW technology available.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of the Navy 
to provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services 
not later than February 1, 2021, on the feasibility of 
backfitting the AN/SQS-62 Variable Depth Sonar system on 
surface combatants. The briefing shall include:
    (a) an explanation of the current DDG-51 ASW performance 
capabilities, including any plans for ensuring the DDG-51s are 
part of a broader implementation of low-frequency active 
capabilities aboard tactical surface ships;
    (b) an analysis of commonality with program of record ASW 
systems, particularly those recently developed as part of the 
littoral combat ship ASW Mission Package, to include common 
hardware, spares, training, and logistics;
    (c) an acquisition plan, including schedule, for AN/SQS-62 
backfit into DDG-51s;
    (d) the program schedule to fully incorporate AN/SQS-62 
into the ASW mission packages associated with the littoral 
combat ship; and
    (e) an assessment of options to forward fit AN/SQS-62 into 
frigate.

Virginia-class submarine

    The budget request included $2.33 billion for one Virginia-
class submarine. The committee was discouraged to see that the 
second submarine that had been previously planned and was 
reflected in the fiscal year 2020 budget, was no longer 
included in the budget request despite clear direction from 
Congress in the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal 
Year 2020 (Public Law 116-92). This not only conflicts with 
years of testimony from combatant commanders, not only deepens 
the gap between the projected fleet size versus the 
requirement, but it also puts the Department of Defense's 
highest priority procurement program, the Columbia-class 
ballistic missile submarine, at additional risk. Due to the 
nature of the multiyear procurement contract, the true impact 
of not funding the second Virginia-class submarine in fiscal 
year 2021 will not be realized until 2023, at a time when both 
shipyards are reaching a peak in their hiring in order to 
support the construction of the first Columbia-class submarine. 
A decline in Virginia-class work during that period will likely 
have a dramatic impact on the Columbia program due to the 
hiring agreements that were previously negotiated between the 
labor unions and the two shipyards. The committee believes that 
all measures should be taken to avoid any disruptions to the 
Columbia-class submarine program, which has consumed all 
schedule margin and is still at great risk of achieving its 
required first strategic patrol date.
    Therefore, the committee recommends $4.43 billion, an 
increase of $2.1 billion, for a second Virginia-class 
submarine.

                        Other Procurement, Navy


                       Items of Special Interest


Laser shock peening (LSP) technology

    The committee notes there are several ship classes that use 
aluminum in ship construction. Unfortunately, in the 
construction of 22 in-service Cruisers (CG) constructed between 
1980-1994 with aluminum superstructures, these aluminum 
structures are experiencing fatigue. The committee notes that 
there are unique issues associated with the CG superstructure 
lifecycle maintenance costs.
    The committee supports the use of innovative aluminum 
fatigue interventions to extend the service life of these 
ships. The committee notes the use of laser shock peening (LSP) 
technology to mitigate these challenges with aluminum and 
understands that LSP has been used in various high-risk, high-
quality industries to include the nuclear industry and aviation 
sectors.
    The committee supports the use of innovative maintenance 
options that provide increased aluminum survivability, 
resiliency, and battlefield longevity for current and future 
classes of warships constructed with aluminum. Therefore, the 
committee directs the Secretary of the Navy to provide a brief 
to the House Committee on Armed Services by February 1, 2021 
that assesses specific applications and tooling, such as LSP 
and others, that can be used to extend the life of aluminum 
superstructures.

Long-term charter requirements

    The committee notes that the Secretary of the Navy has 
entered long-term charter agreements for nine transoceanic 
vessels for the Departments of the Navy and Army. The committee 
believes that organic transoceanic vessels may be more cost 
effective than the long-term charter strategy currently 
employed by the Secretary of the Navy. Therefore, the committee 
directs the Secretary of the Navy to provide a briefing to the 
House Committee on Armed Services by February 1, 2021, on 
alternative force structure options to support these long-term 
charter requirements. The briefing shall include an assessment 
of the current long-term charter requirements and a cost 
comparison of an organic fleet capability compared with the 
long-term charters.

Pilot program regarding the viability of electronic actuators

    The committee recognizes that a variety of shipboard 
systems rely on remote valve actuation for system operations 
for shipboard safety. Fuel, water, ballast/de-ballast, 
ventilation, and fire main systems all depend on reliable 
remote valves and actuators to properly align system 
configurations. When remote valve actuation fails, there are 
two choices: work around the failed valve by reconfiguring a 
system or have sailors attempt to manually align the valve. 
Either choice is a known departure from design standards and 
manifests as reduced readiness. The committee recognizes that 
technological advances have been made in shipboard electronic 
actuators. These actuators appear to be more reliable and 
provide electronic limit-switching, which eliminates drift. 
They also have reliable communication with the ship's machinery 
control system and are much easier for sailors to maintain. 
These actuators could lead to a much lower sustainment cost for 
the Navy.
    The budget request included $50.5 million for LPD class 
support equipment. The committee recommends $55.5 million, an 
increase of $5.0 million, for a pilot program aboard LPD 17 
class amphibious ships in order to demonstrate the viability 
and reliability of shipboard electronic actuators.

Unmanned maritime systems

    The Navy is refocusing its maritime strategy to counter an 
increasing competition among nations in the maritime 
environment, coupled with a rapid rise in technological 
creation and adoption of new weapons. To expedite technology 
development and accelerate fielding initial capabilities, the 
Navy is using a range of new acquisition authorities that allow 
the department to bypass traditional lines of program 
oversight. In particular, the Navy has added significant 
resources to its budget to rapidly and aggressively acquire a 
family of over 200 new unmanned and optionally manned surface 
and undersea vehicles. While unmanned maritime systems offer 
promise, past efforts, such as the Remote Minehunting Vehicle, 
have proven costly and unsuccessful.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Comptroller General of 
the United States to provide a report to the congressional 
defense committees by March 1, 2021, on a review of the Navy's 
unmanned surface and undersea vehicles. As part of this review, 
the Comptroller General shall assess:
    (1) the current status of the Navy's efforts to develop and 
produce unmanned and optionally manned surface and undersea 
vehicles, including cost and schedule;
    (2) the successes and challenges the Navy is experiencing 
in executing and planning its unmanned surface and undersea 
vehicles;
    (3) the extent to which the Navy is managing requirements 
to best ensure that the planned capabilities will meet mission 
needs;
    (4) the Navy's plans for replacing manned ships with 
unmanned ships and also including unmanned systems in its ship 
counts; and
    (5) any other areas that the Comptroller General deems 
appropriate.

                       Procurement, Marine Corps


                       Items of Special Interest


Marine Corps hearing protection program

    The committee commends U.S. Marine Corps Systems Command 
(MARCORSYSCOM) for taking proactive action to provide enhanced 
hearing protection measures in training and combat for both 
infantry and artillery personnel. As hearing loss remains the 
top disability claim for service members transitioning to 
Veterans Administration health care, the Marine Corps has made 
active hearing protection integrated with communications 
systems a top priority. The committee encourages MARCORSYSCOM 
leadership and program managers to continue this program as it 
is currently implemented to ensure that all Marine Corps 
infantry and artillery personnel in combat and training 
environments are provided the best available and currently 
specified and fielded hearing protection solution.

Marine Corps vertical lift munitions

    The committee is aware that during fiscal year 2019, the 
Army conducted a successful test of an allied munition system 
to demonstrate increased standoff and lethality for the AH-64 
Apache helicopter. The committee supports the Army's initiative 
to field an interim long-range precision munition capability 
for current attack helicopters and believes that this 
capability could potentially provide greater standoff combat 
capability to similar military platforms, such as the Marine 
Corps AH-1W SuperCobra or AH-1Z Viper attack helicopter.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of the Navy 
to provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services 
by January 15, 2021, on vertical lift munitions capabilities 
gaps and potential commercial-off-the-shelf solutions that 
could serve as an interim solution for meeting future 
Department of the Navy vertical lift demands. The briefing 
should include an analysis of requirements and costs to test 
any relevant domestic or allied commercial-off-the-shelf 
munitions from an AH-1W SuperCobra or AH-1Z Viper Marine Corps 
attack helicopter.

Modular Aviator Body Armor Vest Acquisition Strategy

    The committee is aware that the current aviation life 
support equipment flight vests worn by Marine helicopter 
aircrews have excessive bulk which can impede the operational 
performance of precision mission tasks. The committee notes 
that U.S. Marine Corps Aviation has a requirement for a modular 
aviator body armor vest (ABAV) system that can improve mobility 
and performance, while enhancing survivability by reducing 
weight, bulk, and heat stress. The committee notes in fiscal 
year 2020, $2.2 million was requested to purchase 1,000 vests 
for UH-1Y and AH-1Z, but a plan has not been established to 
outfit other airframes such as the V-22 and CH-53. Therefore, 
the committee directs the Deputy Commandant for Aviation to 
provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services by 
March 1, 2021, on its plan to equip CH-53 and V-22 airframes 
with ABAV systems.

Rapid acquisition of rifle integrated controller

    In the committee report accompanying the National Defense 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2020 (H. Rept. 116-120), the 
committee encouraged the Marine Corps to complete the phase 2 
evaluation of the rifle accessory control unit (RACU) and 
indicated support for the capability to result in a validated 
requirement upon successful completion of the phase 2 
evaluation. Following development of such a requirement, the 
committee encouraged the Commandant of the Marine Corps to 
consider a rapid acquisition strategy to accelerate operational 
testing, procurement, and fielding of the RACU utilizing 
existing acquisition reform authorities. The committee remains 
concerned by the lack of progress and expects the Marine Corps 
to complete its phased evaluation of the RACU in a timely 
manner in order to make a decision regarding rapid production 
and fielding.

                    Aircraft Procurement, Air Force


                       Items of Special Interest


A-10 Synthetic Aperture Radar Improvements

    The committee supports continued Air Force efforts to 
modernize and upgrade the A-10 fleet of aircraft. However, the 
committee believes the Air Force could take further steps to 
reduce aircrew risk and enhance the aircraft's capability to 
perform close air support in adverse weather and low-visibility 
environmental conditions. The committee understands that a 
recent Air Force study entitled ``A-10C DoDAF View CV-3 
Capability Phasing Roadmap, Revision 6.6,'' dated January 2, 
2018, determined that integration of a synthetic aperture radar 
(SAR) could resolve the capability deficiencies in the areas of 
locating, identifying, tracking, and engaging targets in the 
aforementioned types of environmental conditions. Consequently, 
the committee also notes that the Air Force is currently 
performing an operational utility evaluation by integrating SAR 
capability on A-10 aircraft and evaluating workload impacts on 
A-10 aircrews.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of the Air 
Force to provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed 
Services by March 1, 2021, on the status and any known findings 
from the operational utility evaluation of integrating SAR 
capability onto A-10 aircraft.

Airlift tactical data link

    The committee is concerned with the lack of a resilient and 
survivable network for airlift aircraft in a highly contested 
operational environment.
    The National Defense Strategy's shift to peer and near-peer 
threats requires capabilities for operations in all 
environments. The committee recognizes that a tactical data 
link provides situational awareness and could also be a future 
network node for the Joint All Domain Command and Control.
    The committee is aware that modifications are in place to 
provide situational awareness for the C-130J and encourages the 
Air Force to consider the operational benefits of a tactical 
data link for other tactical and strategic airlift.

C-130H propeller/engine upgrades

    The committee notes again that the C-130H aircraft that are 
flown primarily by the Air National Guard and Air Force Reserve 
continue to provide critical tactical airlift capabilities and 
will continue to support this mission for years to come. The 
committee is again disappointed with the amount of time it has 
taken for the Air Force to address a safety of flight issue 
with the legacy propeller system of the C-130H.
    Procurement of new composite propeller blades is the 
obvious solution to this serious safety of flight and readiness 
issue. The Air Force has moved slowly in addressing the issue 
and still refers to the propeller upgrade as a capability 
improvement and not a safety requirement. A new composite blade 
would also decrease maintenance time and improve logistics 
support, which will result in increased readiness. Delays are 
unacceptable considering the inherent safety of flight and 
readiness risks surrounding this issue.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of the Air 
Force to provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed 
Services by January 31, 2021, updating the acquisition strategy 
for procuring new blades. This plan should include updated 
estimated costs, timelines, and a unit upgrade schedule. The 
briefing should also include the Air Force plan to incorporate 
C-130H T-56 Series 3.5 Engine Enhancement Packages. Congress 
has repeatedly added additional funds for these upgrades and 
the Air Force has yet to budget for them despite the 
demonstrated performance benefits and fuel efficiencies.

E-8 Joint Surveillance Target Attack Radar System

    The budget request included $11.0 million for E-8 Joint 
Surveillance Target Attack Radar System (JSTARS) aircraft 
modifications and upgrades.
    The committee recognizes the JSTARS platform continues to 
be a high-demand asset required by the global combatant 
commands and notes this platform has been a vital contributor, 
with over 100,000 combat flying hours in every major conflict 
of the past two decades. Section 147 of the John S. McCain 
National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2019 (Public 
Law 115-232) required the Air Force to increase JSTARS aircraft 
availability. Accordingly, the committee remains concerned by 
the lack of modernization funding, to include funding for 
necessary avionics and communications upgrades, planned and 
programmed for JSTARS across the Future Years Defense Program. 
The committee believes the JSTARS platform must be kept 
operationally relevant to meet warfighter needs until a 
replacement of equal or superior capability is fielded and 
operational.
    The committee recommends $38.0 million, an increase of 
$27.0 million, for avionics and communication modernization 
upgrades in order to mitigate diminishing manufacturing sources 
of supply and maintain compliance with international avionics 
mandates.

Expanded Carriage for the B-1

    The committee notes that the Secretary of the Air Force 
completed an expanded carriage assessment of the B-1B Lancer 
bomber that demonstrated the feasibility of increasing the B-1B 
weapons capacity to integrate future advanced weapons. The two 
potential programs--external carriage and long bay options--
would allow the B-1B to carry weapons externally, significantly 
increasing its magazine capacity for munitions, as well as 
adding larger, heavier munitions, such as hypersonic weapons. 
The demonstration showed that the B-1B is able to move the 
bulkhead from the forward intermediate bay to the forward 
location; increasing the intermediate bay capacity from 180 
inches to 269 inches. Additionally, the demonstration 
determined that the bomber can still carry weapons externally 
on six of the eight hard points, which increases the B-1s 
overall carriage capacity. The committee further notes that the 
bomber road map portends to retain the B-1 fleet through the 
2030s until their capability is replaced by the B-21 bomber. 
The committee supports the continued modernization of the B-1 
aircraft and urges the Secretary of the Air Force to develop a 
modernization roadmap that tracks with the anticipated service 
life of the overall fleet. Therefore, the committee directs the 
Secretary of the Air Force to provide a brief to the House 
Committee on Armed Services by February 1, 2021 as to the 
Secretary's intent to provide the expanded carriage capability 
and other modernization efforts to the overall B-1 fleet.

KC-46A full rate production

    The committee notes that Boeing Defense has not yet 
delivered 6 of 7 Lot 1 and 6 of 12 Lot 2 KC-46A aircraft. These 
Lot 1 and 2 aircraft were authorized in fiscal year 2015 and 
2016 respectively. Considering the budget request for fiscal 
year 2021 supported a Lot 7 order of 15 aircraft, the delays 
associated with Lots 1 and 2 could impact deliveries of Lot 7.
    Additionally, the committee notes that the KC-46A has three 
category one deficiencies: the remote vision system, the boom 
telescope actuator, and a new excessive fuel system leak. The 
category one deficiency in the remote vision system has 
resulted in the Air Force determination that the KC-46A is not 
capable of being operationally employed. The Air Force has 
assessed the remote vision system category one deficiency will 
take approximately 3 to 4 years to correct. If Boeing can 
maintain schedule they will have delivered the first 6 lots 
representing a total of 79 aircraft that are not capable of 
being operationally employed.
    The Air Force has indicated their intent in fiscal year 
2021 to conclude the initial operational test and evaluation 
and proceed to full rate production of an aircraft that is not 
operationally capable. The committee believes that a decision 
to enter full rate production before these category one 
deficiencies are corrected and production challenges are 
alleviated should be carefully considered by the milestone 
decision authority. Therefore, the committee directs the 
Secretary of the Air Force to provide a briefing to the House 
Committee on Armed Services by September 1, 2020, before the 
KC-46A program goes into full rate production, as to how the 
Secretary intends to mitigate the concurrency of development 
associated with these category one deficiencies with a full 
rate production decision.

MQ-9 Reaper

    The budget request contained $171.8 million for the MQ-9 
unmanned aircraft system but included no funding for 
procurement of additional aircraft.
    The committee recognizes that the MQ-9 Reaper, while an 
invaluable asset in counterterrorism and current steady-state 
military operations, is not designed to operate in the 
contested environment of the future. The committee notes that 
while the Air Force budget request for fiscal year 2021 did 
include $0.3 million to begin trade studies for a next-
generation medium-altitude intelligence, surveillance, and 
reconnaissance (ISR) capability, fielding a new capability will 
likely take several years. Given combatant commanders' 
consistently high demand for ISR, the committee agrees with Air 
Force plans to maintain the existing MQ-9 fleet as work begins 
on a future capability.
    However, the committee is concerned about the potential 
near-term operational risk the Air Force is accepting in making 
budget-driven decisions across its ISR portfolio rather than 
focusing on the appropriate mix of capability and capacity to 
support the combatant commands and manage impacts to the 
industrial base. The committee believes that the Air Force 
should have planned a more gradual reduction to MQ-9 production 
to avoid potential disruption to the industrial base and 
increased risk in the supply chain needed for sustainment of 
the MQ-9 fleet. The committee supports continuing procurement 
in fiscal year 2021 to allow the industrial base to better plan 
for preservation of the MQ-9 supply chain and production 
capability for future ISR requirements.
    Therefore, the committee recommends $279.8 million, an 
increase of $108.0 million, for the MQ-9 Reaper program.

                       Procurement, Defense-Wide


                       Items of Special Interest


Commonality and cost efficiencies in degraded visual environment 
        systems

    The committee supports recent efforts by the military 
services to prioritize acquiring enhanced systems to assist 
aircraft navigating degraded visual environments (DVE). The 
committee report accompanying the National Defense 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2020 (H. Rept. 116-120) 
directed the Secretary of Defense to examine available DVE 
capabilities and brief the committee on efforts to develop and 
procure systems to improve safety of flight. The committee 
understands that U.S. Special Operations Command and the Army 
plan to field a DVE Quick Reaction Capability on 15 medical 
evacuation and 25 special operations aircraft deploying to U.S. 
Central Command. Further, the committee understands that the 
Air Force awarded a contract last year to install a DVE system 
on the HH-60G Pave Hawk helicopter.
    The committee believes that enhanced DVE should remain a 
priority for rotary aviation communities and encourages the 
military services to continue collaborating with the goal of 
developing and acquiring common joint systems where possible. 
To that end, the committee directs the Secretary of the Army, 
in coordination with the Secretary of the Navy and the 
Secretary of the Air Force, to provide a report to the 
congressional defense committees, not later than December 1, 
2020, on DVE development and acquisition, to include systems in 
procurement or under consideration for procurement, planned 
fielding schedules for these systems, identify systems being 
integrated on multiple programs, as well as identify service- 
or platform-specific needs requiring unique capability 
solutions.

F-35

    The budget request contained $10.3 billion for the 
procurement of 79 F-35 aircraft, and associated spares, 
modifications, depot activations, and advanced procurement for 
fiscal year 2021 aircraft for the Air Force, Navy, and Marine 
Corps. The budget request contained $1.7 billion for research 
and development related to deployability and suitability 
initiatives, Block 4 and Continuous Capability Development and 
Delivery (C2D2), and Air Force dual-capable aircraft efforts. 
The committee notes that the unfunded priority lists for the 
Air Force and Navy contained 12 F-35A and 5 F-35C aircraft, 
respectively.
    The committee continues support for the F-35 program and 
understands it is a capability needed against potential 
adversary's advanced integrated air defense systems operating 
against the United States or its foreign partners and allies 
during high-end contingencies. However, the committee maintains 
the same concerns regarding the F-35 program as expressed in 
the committee report accompanying the National Defense 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2020 (H. Rept. 116-120), in 
addition to the issues highlighted in two recent Government 
Accountability Office reports (GAO-20-151 and GAO-20-316). 
Furthermore, the committee notes that the Defense Contract 
Management Agency observed during the July 2019 through 
December 2019 time period that the quality evaluation metrics 
for suppliers remained steady at a satisfactory level, but that 
production shortages had increased for overall suppliers, and 
overall quality and delivery evaluation metrics had degraded 
for all 23 suppliers designated as critical suppliers. Finally, 
the committee is concerned with issues regarding mitigation of 
F-35 physiological episode occurrences and software testing to 
ensure capability and compatibility with the F-35 fire-control 
radar and currently certified weapons.
    Consequently, the committee includes three provisions 
elsewhere in this Act, that would require providing the 
congressional defense committees information on the F-35 
program's progress for resolving physiological episode 
occurrences, the methodologies for executing operational flight 
program software testing, and the Department's formal 
evaluation of the program's preparedness for entering full-rate 
production.

Ground tactical vehicles for special operations forces

    The budget request included $33.1 million for the 
procurement of ground tactical vehicles and modifications for 
special operations forces (SOF). The committee recognizes the 
necessity of agile and innovative technologies to support SOF 
efforts to counter violent extremism and compete with near-peer 
competitors.
    The Non-Standard Commercial Vehicles (NSCV) and Ground 
Mobility Vehicles (GMV) capabilities enable SOF to execute an 
array of critical global missions including counterterrorism, 
counterproliferation, and unconventional warfare. NSCVs are 
low-signature vehicles chosen to blend in with the surroundings 
of the operating environment and can be modified to support a 
variety of SOF activities. The GMV 1.1 is an inherently mobile 
capability, transportable by a MH-47 to allow SOF operators a 
fast roll-on/roll-off capability ideal for a full spectrum of 
operations.
    The committee supports the budget request of $33.1 million 
for the procurement of ground tactical vehicles for SOF.

Increased research for counter unmanned aircraft systems in austere 
        locations abroad

    The budget request contained $293.3 million for Warrior 
Systems. Of this amount, $12.5 million was requested for the 
counter unmanned aircraft system (cUAS) program.
    The committee notes that there is currently an operational 
requirement for increased research and development into cUAS 
capabilities. Recent events in Syria, Iraq, and Djibouti 
highlight that this is an increasing threat to military 
personnel engaged in countering violent extremism and great 
power competition missions which, if left underdeveloped, the 
committee understands to be an immediate threat challenging 
U.S. strategic locations abroad.
    The committee is aware of the efforts underway by the U.S. 
Army to evaluate and field alternative cUAS capabilities to 
meet the force protection needs of the joint force. The 
committee supports U.S. Army efforts, but appreciates the 
testing and experimentation of such emergent cUAS capabilities 
in austere locations facilitated by U.S. Special Operations 
Command (USSOCOM). Given the rapid pursuit of armed unmanned 
aircraft systems (UAS) technologies by adversaries of the 
United States, the committee understands that desirable 
criteria for any cUAS technologies must be able to autonomously 
search, identify, and track threats while fusing multiple data 
sources with the sense-making ability enabled by radar, 
electro-optical, and infrared collection capabilities to employ 
an effect against adversary UAS.
    While the committee notes that such individual technologies 
exist today to meet this force protection requirement, work 
remains to integrate these requirements in more austere 
environments. Therefore, the committee recommends $17.5 
million, an increase of $5.0 million, for further development 
of an integrated, multi-sensor autonomous cUAS program.
    Further, the committee directs the Commander, USSOCOM, to 
provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services by 
October 30, 2020, on the efforts to develop and field test 
autonomous, multi-sensor cUAS capabilities in austere 
environments. The briefing shall also include details on 
efforts to share best practices and capability updates with the 
U.S. Army, as designated lead for cUAS systems and strategies 
development for the joint force.

Replacement of Special Operations Command DHC-8 aircraft

    The budget request contained $5.0 million in Manned ISR for 
the manned intelligence, surveillance, reconnaissance (ISR) 
program. The committee recognizes the importance of maintaining 
dedicated airborne ISR platforms, including the DHC-8, for U.S. 
military forces operating in austere environments, as ISR 
provides unique collection, overwatch, and force protection 
capabilities in dynamic and complex threat environments. On 
January 5, 2020, the terrorist organization known as al-Shabaab 
attacked U.S. forces stationed at Camp Simba in Manda Bay, 
Kenya. The DHC-8 was one of the several aircraft destroyed in 
that attack.
    Therefore, the committee recommends $45.1 million, an 
increase of $40.1 million, in Manned ISR for the U.S. Special 
Operations Command manned ISR program to replace the DHC-8 due 
to combat loss while supporting Operation Enduring Freedom-Horn 
of Africa missions.

                         LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS


              Subtitle A--Authorization of Appropriations


              Section 101--Authorization of Appropriations

    This section would authorize appropriations for procurement 
at the levels identified in section 4101 of division D of this 
Act.

                       Subtitle B--Navy Programs


    Section 111--Independent Cost Estimate of FFG(X) Frigate Program

    This section would require the Secretary of Defense to 
ensure that an independent cost estimate has been completed 
prior to milestone B.

                     Subtitle C--Air Force Programs


Section 121--Modification of Force Structure Objectives for B-1 Bomber 
                                Aircraft

    This provision would amend section 9062(h)(2) of title 10, 
United States Code, by changing the B-1 combat coded aircraft 
requirement from 36 to 24. This provision also sets 
requirements for storage and maintainer billets.

   Section 122--Extension of Limitation on Availability of Funds for 
                     Retirement of RC-135 Aircraft

    This section would prohibit the Air Force from retiring, or 
preparing to retire, any RC-135 aircraft through fiscal year 
2025 until 60 days after the date on which the Secretary of 
Defense certifies to the congressional defense committees that 
equivalent RC-135 capacity and capability exists to meet 
combatant commander requirements for indications and warning, 
intelligence preparation of the operational environment, and 
direct support to kinetic and non-kinetic operations.

 Section 123--Modification of Limitation on Availability of Funds for 
                   Retirement of E-8 JSTARS Aircraft

    This section would amend section 147(a) of the John S. 
McCain National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2019 
(Public Law 115 232) to prohibit any use of funds authorized to 
be appropriated in fiscal year 2021 or any subsequent year for 
the Air Force to retire, or prepare to retire, any E-8 Joint 
Surveillance Target Attack Radar System aircraft until the date 
on which the Secretary of Defense certifies to the 
congressional defense committees that there is a replacement 
capability identified that meets or exceeds the current 
capability and capacity of the 16-aircraft E-8 fleet to meet 
global combatant command requirements.

   Section 124--Limitation on Availability of Funds for the Advanced 
    Battle Management System Pending Certification Relating to RQ-4 
                                Aircraft

    This section would limit obligation or expenditure of 50 
percent of the funding available for the Advanced Battle 
Management System until one of three conditions is met: (1) the 
Secretary of the Air Force certifies that the Air Force will 
not retire any RQ-4 Global Hawk aircraft during fiscal year 
2021; (2) the Under Secretary of Defense for Acquisition and 
Sustainment certifies that the validated operating and 
sustainment costs of any capability developed to replace the 
RQ-4 aircraft are less than the validated operating and 
sustainment costs for the RQ-4 aircraft on a comparable flight-
hour cost basis, and the Chairman of the Joint Requirements 
Oversight Council certifies that any replacement capability for 
the RQ-4 aircraft would result in equal or greater capability 
available to the commanders of the combatant commands and would 
not result in less capacity available to the commanders of the 
combatant commands; or (3) the Secretary of Defense certifies 
that a replacement capability for the RQ-4 aircraft is worth 
increased operating and sustainment costs.

 Section 125--Inventory Requirements for Certain Air Refueling Tanker 
                                Aircraft

    This section would prohibit the use of funds authorized to 
be appropriated in fiscal year 2021 to fiscal year 2023 for the 
retirement of any KC-135 aircraft, or reduce the number of 
primary mission KC-135 aircraft. This section would also 
require the Air Force to maintain a minimum of 50 primary 
mission KC-10A aircraft in fiscal year 2021, 38 primary mission 
KC-10A aircraft in fiscal year 2022, and 26 primary mission KC-
10A aircraft in fiscal year 2023.

        Section 126--Limitation on Production of KC-46A Aircraft

    This section would prohibit purchasing more than the 12 KC-
46A aircraft in fiscal year 2021 until certain category-one 
deficiencies are fixed. This section would also require the 
Secretary of the Air Force to provide a report by February 1, 
2021, on the schedule for the correction of each category-one 
deficiency described, a plan to engage an independent test 
organization to verify the effectiveness of any proposed 
solutions to such category-one deficiencies; and an acquisition 
strategy for the aircraft that identifies principal acquisition 
milestones; and will ensure that there is sufficient 
competition for the procurement of a nondevelopmental tanker 
aircraft at the conclusion of the KC-46A production contract.

 Section 127--Assessment and Certification Relating to OC-135 Aircraft

    This section would prohibit the Air Force from retiring, or 
preparing to retire, any OC-135 aircraft in fiscal year 2021 
until 90 days after the date on which the Secretary of the Air 
Force provides a report and a certification to the 
congressional defense committees on the feasibility and cost 
effectiveness of using the OC-135 aircraft to fulfill other 
unclassified aerial imagery requirements for alternative 
missions.

      Section 128--Modernization Plan for Airborne Intelligence, 
                    Surveillance, and Reconnaissance

    This section would require the Secretary of the Air Force 
to provide a comprehensive strategy for Air Force airborne 
intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance (ISR) to ensure 
alignment between requirements, future Air Force budget 
submissions, and authorization of appropriations. The required 
plan would cover current steady-state, contingency, and future 
multidomain operations for Air Force ISR. This section would 
also require the Air Force to submit a classified annex to the 
report as necessary.
    The Air Force fiscal year 2021 budget request included 
several significant changes to ISR force mix and modernization. 
The request proposed immediate divestment of all RQ-4 Global 
Hawk Block 30 multi-intelligence aircraft, as well as an end to 
the MQ-9 Reaper production line in fiscal year 2020 without any 
time to allow for adequate supply chain management planning. 
While these changes may align with long-term Air Force 
strategy, the absence of such a strategy incorporating both 
current and future capabilities concerns the committee. The 
committee expects the directed strategy to address required 
capabilities and capacities, to identify anticipated gaps in 
both areas, and to cover both manned and unmanned ISR 
capabilities.

            Section 129--Minimum Bomber Aircraft Force Level

    This section would require a report not later than February 
1, 2021, by the Secretary of the Air Force on the bomber 
aircraft force structure that enables the Air Force to meet the 
requirements of its long-range strike mission under the 
National Defense Strategy.

       Subtitle D--Defense-Wide, Joint, and Multiservice Matters


    Section 131--Documentation Relating to the F-35 Aircraft Program

    This section would require the Secretary of Defense to 
provide the congressional defense committees with certain 
information and certifications by the Secretary regarding cost, 
schedule, risk, program execution and significant deficiency 
resolution plans in the areas of production, Block 4 hardware 
and software development, modernization, upgrades and training 
systems for the F-35 program before entering full-rate 
production and a Milestone C acquisition award can be granted 
by the Secretary.

   Section 132--Notification on Software Regression Testing for F-35 
                                Aircraft

    This section would require the Under Secretary of Defense 
for Acquisition and Sustainment, in consultation with the 
Director, Operational Test and Evaluation, to provide the 
congressional defense committees with a notification not later 
than 30 days after F-35 air vehicle or mission systems 
production software is released to units under the F-35 
program's continuous capability development and delivery 
process. The notification would include information regarding:
    (1) what type and method of regression testing was 
completed prior to production release of the software to ensure 
compatibility and proper functionality with the F-35 fire 
control radar system and any weapons currently certified for 
carriage and employment for each variant of F-35 aircraft;
    (2) which entities, U.S. Government entities or U.S. 
Government contractors, performed the production software 
regression testing;
    (3) a list of deficiencies discovered during the production 
software regression testing and what software modifications 
were completed to resolve or mitigate any software deficiencies 
noted; and
    (4) a list of deficiencies discovered during the software 
regression testing that may or may not be corrected in later F-
35 production software releases.

  Section 133--Notification on Efforts to Replace Inoperable Ejection 
                     Seat Aircraft Locator Beacons

    This section would require the Under Secretary of Defense 
for Acquisition and Sustainment to provide the congressional 
defense committees a semiannual written notification about the 
efforts being undertaken by the senior acquisition executives 
of the Department of the Air Force and the Department of the 
Navy to replace emergency locator seat beacons in ejection-seat 
equipped aircraft that have been found to be inoperable in 
water, and the funding budgeted for such efforts. The Under 
Secretary would be required to report on the issue until 
locator beacons are replaced in all affected ejection-seat 
equipped aircraft, or a period of 5 years has elapsed since the 
date the initial report is received by the congressional 
defense committees.

Section 134--Limitation on Use of Funds for the Armed Overwatch Program

    This section would prohibit the obligation or expenditure 
of any funds authorized to be appropriated by this Act or 
otherwise made available for fiscal year 2021 for procurement 
for the Armed Overwatch Program of U.S. Special Operations 
Command until the Secretary of Defense and Commander, U.S. 
Special Operations Command, review, validate, and certify the 
Armed Overwatch Program. This section would also require the 
Secretary of Defense to review the roles and responsibilities 
of the Air Force and Special Operations Command with respect to 
close air support and armed intelligence, surveillance, and 
reconnaissance capabilities, and upon favorable determination, 
certify Armed Overwatch as a special operations forces-peculiar 
requirement. This section would require the Commander, U.S. 
Special Operations Command, to provide a comprehensive 
requirements plan and roadmap analyzing application of the 
Armed Overwatch capability against the totality of 
intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance requirements of 
the various special operations forces units and missions, and 
the geographic combatant commands.

         TITLE II--RESEARCH, DEVELOPMENT, TEST, AND EVALUATION

           Research, Development, Test, and Evaluation, Army


                       Items of Special Interest


Accelerating Army Aircraft Cleaning and Deicing Systems for rotary-wing 
        aircraft

    The committee has long expressed concern about the impact 
of corrosion on aviation assets and supported efforts to 
improve aircrew safety, aircraft availability, and aircraft and 
unit readiness through cost-effective corrosion mitigation. The 
committee understands that an aircraft cleaning and deicing 
system (ACDS) capability would help prevent and control 
corrosion of aviation assets through development and testing of 
an aircraft washing system. The committee remains concerned by 
the Army's current plans for ACDS which moves ACDS development 
and demonstration further into the future years defense program 
despite a persistent requirement to mitigate corrosion on 
aircraft. The committee is aware that existing commercial-off-
the-shelf aircraft cleaning systems are currently available for 
test and evaluation and expects the Army to consider these 
systems as a potential option to rapidly address corrosion 
mitigation issues for aviation assets.
    The committee directs the Secretary of the Army to provide 
a briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services by December 
15, 2020, on the Army's plan to prevent and control the impact 
of corrosion on rotary- and fixed-wing aircraft. The briefing 
shall include, but not be limited to a detailed description of 
policies, programs, funding, and investment strategy to address 
corrosion prevention and control on Army aircraft, a plan to 
accelerate ACDS efforts, evaluations of commercial off the 
shelf systems, and consideration given to creating a program of 
record for this capability.

Auxiliary power units for armored and tactical vehicles

    The committee is aware that armored and tactical vehicles 
may lack enough electrical power to accommodate the weapons, 
sensors, and payloads needed for effective operations in 
current and future combat environments. The committee 
understands that some of these power generation shortfalls 
could be addressed using auxiliary power units (APU), however, 
existing APU's are often impractical for use on Army vehicles 
due to their large size and weight.
    The committee understands that there are research and 
development efforts to develop innovative small generators and 
APUs that could provide significant improvements in size, 
weight, and fuel efficiency. The committee encourages the Army 
to explore these innovative systems for potential use on 
current armored and tactical vehicles as well as the next 
generation combat vehicles, such as the Optionally Manned 
Fighting Vehicle and Robotic Combat Vehicles.
    Accordingly, the committee directs the Secretary of the 
Army to provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed 
Services by October 30, 2020, on efforts to address power 
generation requirements for its current and future ground 
combat and tactical vehicle fleets. The report shall include, 
but not be limited to:
    (1) an overview of current ground combat and tactical 
vehicles demonstrating significant power generation problems, 
and the resulting operational impacts;
    (2) an analysis of expected power generation requirements 
for the systems contemplated as part of the Next Generation 
Combat Vehicle Program; and
    (3) any current or planned efforts to explore innovative 
small form factor auxiliary power units for armored or tactical 
vehicles.

Briefing on Army's Carbine Magazine Development Strategy

    The committee supports the Department of the Army's Next 
Generation Squad Weapons (NGSW) program and commends the 
service for continuously assessing new and advanced materials, 
such as polymer compounds, to provide warfighters with the best 
equipment necessary for mission success. As the Army proceeds 
with the NGSW program, the committee believes that the service 
should seek the highest-performing 6.8mm magazine composed of 
modern materials to maximize soldier lethality and improve 
soldier survivability.
    The committee notes that the Army has completed several 
5.56mm magazine tests, the results of which led the Departments 
of the Air Force, Marine Corps, Coast Guard, and Special 
Operations Command to formally adopt a high-performing polymer 
magazine that the Army has authorized for its own acquisition. 
The committee views synchronization in magazine selection 
between the services as a positive development that advances 
force interoperability and increases military preparedness. The 
committee believes that these outcomes should inform the Army's 
magazine selection process under the NGSW program.
    The committee expects the Army to implement lessons learned 
from previous magazine procurement and testing and require that 
the highest-performing magazines be used in NGSW rifles. The 
committee therefore directs the Secretary of the Army to 
provide a briefing to the congressional defense committees not 
later than October 30, 2020, on the Army's comprehensive 
strategy on NGSW magazine procurement. The briefing shall 
include a description of the Army's expected requirements for 
the NGSW magazines, such as performance metrics, materials, and 
visual indicators for rounds remaining.

Carbon composite materials for helicopter wheels and brakes

    The budget request included $46.1 million in PE 0607137A 
for the Chinook Product Improvement program.
    The committee has previously supported research efforts to 
develop lightweight carbon composite materials and notes that 
such materials could also be used in manufacturing aircraft 
brake housings, wheels, and associated components. Traditional 
aluminum aircraft braking components add substantial weight to 
aircraft, reducing payload capacity and increasing fuel 
consumption. The committee understands that replacing aluminum 
with high temperature carbon composites could significantly 
reduce the weight of a brake or wheel part by up to 30-50 
percent, depending on the aircraft. Incorporating carbon 
composite materials in certain components could potentially 
improve operational capabilities for the CH-47 Chinook 
helicopter, the Army's primary heavy-lift aircraft. The 
committee also notes that development conducted for the CH-47 
Chinook helicopter in these materials could be applied to other 
helicopter programs.
    Therefore, the committee recommends $51.1 million, an 
increase of $5.0 million, in PE 0607137A, for development of 
lightweight carbon composite materials for CH-47 Chinook 
helicopter brake housings and wheels.

Carbon fiber and graphite foam for combat and tactical vehicles

    The committee notes that the Army's Ground Vehicle Systems 
Center and U.S. Special Operations Command (USSOCOM) are 
conducting developmental research on the potential wider 
application of carbon fiber composite wheels and graphitic 
carbon foam in support of the Army Next Generation Combat 
Vehicle (NGCV) cross-functional team's (CFT) lines of effort 
and the special operations forces tactical vehicle programs. 
The committee understands that graphite and carbon fiber 
components could reduce total vehicle weight and fuel 
consumption, while at the same time increase payload capacity 
and extend service life for a wide variety of combat and 
tactical vehicles. The committee recognizes the potential 
versatility and broad application that graphite and carbon 
fiber technology could provide for the military services and 
expects that the NGCV CFT and USSOCOM will continue the 
development and testing of carbon fiber and graphitic carbon 
foam components. In this regard, the committee encourages the 
NGCV CFT and USSOCOM to engage and communicate with the combat 
and tactical vehicle industrial base to ensure awareness of 
their interest in new graphite and carbon fiber technologies as 
well as to continue to assess their potential application to 
future combat and tactical vehicles.

Electrification of Army combat and tactical vehicles

    The committee understands that electric or hybrid-electric 
powertrains could increase performance, allow relatively silent 
operation, generate significant on-board power generation, and 
reduce the logistical burden associated with transporting and 
storing fuel. The committee notes the Army has for several 
years been working on electrification and has experimented with 
hybrid-electric tactical wheeled vehicles to include successful 
efforts to integrate on-board vehicle electric power through a 
Transmission Integral Generator for the Army's Terminal High 
Altitude Air Defense launcher. The committee is not aware, 
however, of any plans for the further development or 
integration of electrification technologies into combat and 
tactical vehicles and believes the Army should continue to 
invest and consider the potential military applications of this 
technology given rapidly advancing commercial industry 
developments.
    Accordingly, the committee directs the Secretary of the 
Army to provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed 
Services by December 15, 2020, on the status of its 
electrification research and development strategy for combat 
and tactical vehicles. The briefing should include, but not be 
limited to:
    (1) current and future requirements and opportunities for 
electrification of combat and tactical vehicles, including such 
vehicle capabilities that could be related and necessary based 
on the 2018 National Defense Strategy, operational plans, or to 
satisfy concepts for Multi-Domain Operations;
    (2) the current and future priorities for electrification 
of combat and tactical vehicles including plans, if any, to 
spiral hybrid-electric powertrains into existing combat and 
tactical vehicles;
    (3) a description and assessment of potential Army 
timelines for initial, partial, and full electrification of 
existing and future combat and tactical vehicles; and
    (4) details of ongoing science and technology initiatives 
that involve hybrid-electric propulsion and full-electric drive 
of combat and tactical vehicles to include plans, if any, to 
further develop integrated electric axle technology, motors and 
generators, power electronics, inverters, converters, energy 
storage systems, and transmissions.

Extended Range Cannon Artillery Program

    The committee has consistently supported Army modernization 
of long-range precision fires. However, the committee has 
recently learned of technical issues effecting the Extended 
Range Cannon Artillery program with respect to auto-loader 
technology. The committee understands these technical issues 
have resulted in excess funds for the program. Accordingly, the 
committee directs the Secretary of the Army, not later than 
December 20, 2020, to provide a briefing to the House Armed 
Services Committee that identifies potential solutions to the 
technical issues impacting the Extended Range Cannon Artillery 
program and the steps that the Army has taken or will take to 
address the technical issues discovered. The committee 
encourages the Army, in restructuring this program, to consider 
directing available resources to other technical solutions that 
could accomplish this same purpose and to include those 
considerations in the above directed briefing. Finally, the 
Secretary of the Army is directed to include in the briefing a 
description of how the funding for the Extended Range Cannon 
Artillery has been executed for the past two years, and the 
Army's plans to properly fund this effort over the next five 
fiscal years.

Future Vertical Lift sensor payloads

    The committee expects the Army's Future Vertical Lift (FVL) 
program to field advanced sensor payloads capable of detecting, 
tracking, and countering threats in the future operational 
environment. The committee notes that the Army has yet to 
define the acquisition strategy for FVL mission equipment 
payloads and sensors, despite an accelerated platform 
development schedule. The committee understands that fielding 
mission equipment that is as advanced and capable as the 
platforms themselves will require investment and development in 
the coming years. The committee is concerned that without a 
well-defined acquisition strategy and risk reduction effort for 
mission equipment payloads and sensors, industry will be unable 
to make the investments necessary to deliver advanced 
capabilities on time for FVL programs.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of the Army 
to submit a report to the Committees on Armed Services of the 
Senate and the House of Representatives by December 1, 2020, on 
Future Vertical Lift mission equipment payloads and sensors. 
The report should include:
    (1) the acquisition strategy for FVL mission equipment 
payloads and sensors, including radar, electronic warfare, 360 
degree distributed aperture, missile warning, and advanced 
electro-optical infrared;
    (2) planned risk reduction activities for the sensor 
payloads; and
    (3) an estimate of the cost and schedule for the 
development and production of required sensor payloads.

Instrumental Synthetic Training Environment and Modeling and Simulation 
        Capabilities

    The committee is aware of potential adversaries' 
investments in leap-ahead technologies, including dual-use 
commercial technologies, to gain an asymmetric advantage over 
the United States. The committee urges the Department to use 
its alternative acquisition mechanism authorities provided by 
Congress to enable prototyping of emerging technologies and 
engage with the private sector to continue driving vital 
innovation in these critical areas.
    The committee therefore directs the Assistant Secretary of 
the Army for Acquisition, Logistics and Technology to submit a 
briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services by January 
31, 2021 on the Army's plan to continue to integrate virtual 
training and simulations into its future force design 
decisions. The briefing shall include how the Army is 
partnering with the Navy and Marine Corps to further integrate 
advanced simulation and virtual training technologies to inform 
future force design and foster force development through 
expanded wargaming, live-virtual-constructive training, and 
scalable realistic simulations.

Modeling and Simulation for Ground Vehicle Development and Sustainment

    The Committee recognizes the importance and value of 
modeling and simulation (M&S) in supporting digital design, 
experimentation, and developmental and operational test and 
evaluation for military ground vehicle systems. When used 
appropriately, modeling and simulation can help save money and 
time delivering affordable technology to soldiers faster. The 
Committee notes that the Army's Ground Vehicle Systems Center 
(GVSC) has been using available funds to improve and expand its 
M&S capabilities through public-private partnerships and 
finding M&S tools developed by entities outside the military 
and brought to the Center's attention through their innovative 
outreach program. The Committee understands that partnerships 
with industry, academia, and non-profit science, technology, 
engineering, and math organizations could increase the 
likelihood of success for technology development and transfers 
between GVSC and non-traditional defense industry and 
organizations. In this regard, the committee directs the 
Assistant Secretary of the Army for Acquisition, Logistics, and 
Technology, not later than December 21, 2020, to provide a 
briefing to the House Armed Services Committee that outlines 
the Army's plans, if any, to support the improvement and 
expansion of GVSC's internal and external M&S capabilities and 
their relationship to the Army's high priority programs for 
combat and tactical vehicle modernization and sustainment.

Next generation Integrated Visual Augmentation System

    The committee is aware that the Integrated Visual 
Augmentation System (IVAS) is due to begin delivering first 
units to the Army in the fourth quarter of fiscal year 2021. 
The committee is further aware that a decision point for second 
generation of IVAS (IVAS 2.0) development is due to occur early 
in fiscal year 2023. Following the IVAS 2.0 decision point, 
development of the next generation of the program is projected 
to start at the beginning of fiscal year 2024.
    However, due to the large quantity of hardware, software, 
and funds allocated for the program, as well as an aggressive 
development schedule, the committee expects the Army to utilize 
this technology in developing any new heads-up displays for air 
and ground vehicles. Therefore, the committee directs the 
Secretary of the Army to provide a briefing to the House 
Committee on Armed Services not later than December 1, 2020, on 
how the Army plans to integrate IVAS technology across major 
Army platforms, including but not limited to air and ground 
vehicle operators.

Next Generation Squad Weapons and Small Business Innovation Research

    The committee recognizes the Department of the Army's 
ongoing effort to enhance soldier lethality and battlefield 
connectivity through its Next Generation Squad Weapons (NGSW) 
and Next Generation Squad Weapon Fire Control (NGSW-FC) 
programs, as well as its programs to strengthen the battlefield 
network and support cooperative engagements. The committee 
encourages the Department of the Army to continue to integrate 
proven solutions for power, data energy efficiency, increased 
accuracy, and improved situational awareness in partnership 
with small businesses through the Small Business Innovation 
Research Program (SBIR). Therefore, the committee directs the 
Secretary of the Army to provide a briefing to the 
congressional defense committees not later than February 1, 
2021, on the SBIR efforts within the NGSW and NGSW-FC programs.

Pragmatic Artificial Intelligence and New Technology (PAINT)

    The committee notes that artificial intelligence and 
machine learning are being leveraged by the Army to help solve 
complex problems, including designing testing scenarios for 
missile defense systems. The committee is encouraged by the use 
of this technology by the Army's Space and Missile Defense 
Command and believes an opportunity exists to continue 
leveraging artificial intelligence and machine learning 
techniques as the Army's Integrated Air and Missile Defense 
Program continues to integrate current and future air and 
missile defense sensors and weapons.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of the Army 
to brief the House Committee on Armed Services not later than 
January 15, 2021, on the Army's plans to incorporate artificial 
intelligence techniques in its efforts to continue development 
of near-term engineering solutions to improve existing missile 
defense systems to keep pace with current and anticipated 
missile threats.

Report on the Future Tactical Unmanned Aerial System Program

    The committee understands the Army's Future Tactical 
Unmanned Aircraft System (FTUAS) would serve as a replacement 
for the RQ-7B Shadow in Army brigade combat teams. Further, the 
committee notes the FTUAS would be a Group 2/3 unmanned 
aircraft system (UAS) with a point take-off and landing 
capability to provide the BCT commander with a joint all-domain 
operations capable, runway independent, reconnaissance, 
surveillance, and target acquisition capability. The committee 
is pleased the Department of Army is taking steps to advance 
the development and procurement of next generation tactical UAS 
programs. However, recognizing the need to grow the domestic 
UAS industry and the rapid pace of technological innovation, 
the committee expects the Army would fully evaluate and 
consider all domestic UAS proven technologies already fielded 
under a Small Business Innovation Research grant phase 2 or 3 
contract, before issuing a production award under the Army's 
FTUAS program.
    The committee directs the Secretary of the Army to provide 
a briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services by February 
15th, 2021, that includes but is not limited to: (1) the FTUAS 
program's progress to date; (2) the current acquisition 
strategy and schedule for FTUAS prototyping and development; 
(3) planned funding and resources required for FTUAS across the 
future years defense program.

Stryker weapons station commonality

    The committee is aware of and supports current Army efforts 
to modify Stryker infantry carriers to improve anti-armor and 
air defense capabilities and capacities. These programs include 
integration of a 30mm cannon in a Medium Caliber Weapon System 
(MCWS) for anti-armor and Stinger missiles, as well as other 
weapons, in an Initial Maneuver Short-Range Air Defense (IM-
SHORAD) system for air defense. The committee notes and 
supports that the Army is currently conducting a full and open 
competition for the MCWS. The committee also notes both of 
these systems would be based upon an unmanned but accessible 
turreted vehicle weapons station. In this regard, the committee 
is interested to know what advantages, if any, the Army could 
gain by developing as much commonality as possible between both 
systems with turret hardware and fire control software. 
Commonality has the potential to reduce the overall acquisition 
and life cycle management costs of both weapons systems.
    Accordingly, the committee directs the Secretary of the 
Army to provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed 
Services not later than February 1, 2021, on the potential and 
plans, if any, for achieving commonality of the MCWS and IM-
SHORAD weapons stations.

Supercavitating ammunition

    In the committee reports (H. Rept 115-200 and H. Rept 115-
70) to accompany the National Defense Authorizations Acts for 
Fiscal Years 2018 and 2019 the committee has shared its 
interest in supercavitating ammunition technologies and 
supported the Department's efforts to evaluate and field this 
capability. The committee understands that a solution has been 
identified and is ready for procurement pending final 
evaluations.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of the Army 
to provide to the Committees on Armed Services of the Senate 
and the House of Representatives, no later than September 30, 
2020, an update to the briefing provided pursuant to the 
committee reports accompanying the National Defense 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2018 and Fiscal Year 2019. 
This briefing shall include an overview of the current status 
of the project and an estimated plan for procurement.

Thermoplastic drive shafts for helicopter tail rotor drive systems

    The budget request included $11.2 million in PE 0607136A 
for the Blackhawk Product Improvement Program.
    The committee is aware that helicopter tail rotor drive 
systems typically require frequent maintenance and often affect 
aircraft maneuverability due to their significant weight. The 
committee is also aware that thermoplastic drive shafts could 
potentially improve helicopter performance while reducing 
operations and sustainment costs by providing lighter weight 
components with greater ballistic tolerances. The committee 
notes that the Army's UH-60 Blackhawk program could potentially 
benefit from additional development and engineering of 
thermoplastic drive shafts for a lighter weight, more reliable 
system.
    Accordingly, the committee recommends $16.2 million, an 
increase of $5.0 million, in PE 0607136A for the Blackhawk 
Product Improvement Program for thermoplastic drive shaft 
development and engineering.

           Research, Development, Test, and Evaluation, Navy


                       Items of Special Interest


Advanced Low Cost Munition Ordnance

    The committee continues to support development of the 
Advanced Low Cost Munition Ordnance, a guided 57mm projectile, 
with fire-and-forget capability that requires no Littoral 
Combat Ship fire control system changes, to counter the growing 
threats posed by small boat swarms, unmanned aerial systems, 
and other emerging threats.

Advanced Submarine Countermeasures

    The committee notes that Navy is proposing a new advanced 
submarine countermeasures that incorporates sophisticated 
acoustic decoy capabilities to counter the growing threats of 
modern acoustic homing torpedoes. These new countermeasures 
must also incorporate advanced mobility functionality to 
enhance tactics in littoral waters. The ADC MK 5 incorporates 
these new acoustic and mobility capabilities at the same 
physical size as the current ADC MK 2 devices to maintain 
compatibility with existing submarine launch devices and 
support systems. The integration of the new ADC MK 5 acoustic 
and mobility capabilities into the existing device form factor 
represents a significant technological advancement of the 
Navy's submarine countermeasures, and this technology can be 
applied to other countermeasure needs across the fleet. The 
committee supports the continued development of this advanced 
submarine countermeasure system and the eventual award of a 
production MK5 variant. Therefore, the committee directs the 
Secretary of the Navy to brief the House Committee on Armed 
Services by February 1, 2021 as to advanced submarine kinetic 
and non-kinetic countermeasures and the associated acquisition 
timelines to deploy these capabilities.

Aviation Survivability of Marine Corps, Navy, and Air Force Rotary Wing 
        Aircraft

    The committee recognizes the importance of the Distributed 
Aperture Infrared Countermeasure System (DAIRCM) and the 
Department of Defense's efforts to integrate an aircraft 
protection system to protect small to medium rotary wing 
aircraft from increased threats. These protection systems have 
been combat deployed by the Air Force. The committee is aware 
of enhanced capabilities that can provide light and medium 
rotary aircraft a dual-warning and defeat capability, able to 
counter surface-to-air missiles, small arms fire, and other 
anti-aircraft or laser-directed weapons threats confronting our 
forward-deployed forces. The committee recognizes there is a 
future gap in this aircraft survivability capability for both 
the Air Force and Marine Corps in the coming fiscal years and 
supports the efforts by these services to rapidly transition to 
a production capability. This transition will ensure all Marine 
Expeditionary Units and forward deployed Air Force rotary wing 
aircraft are properly equipped to meet this threat.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of the Navy 
in coordination with the Commandant of the Marine Corps and 
Chief of Staff of the Air Force, to provide a briefing to the 
House Committee on Armed Services by March 1, 2021, on the 
effective integration of DAIRCM into additional light and 
medium rotary wing aircraft and the long-term strategy for 
aircraft survivability of the Marine Corps and Air Force rotary 
wing fleet.

Conformal Acoustic Velocity Sonar

    The committee notes that the Conformal Acoustic Velocity 
Sonar project was developed to provide an affordable ``smart-
skin'' acoustic sonar receive array to the Virginia-class 
submarine. Replacing traditional spherical sonar arrays with a 
conformal bow array would significantly improve submarine 
structural design and improve the submarine's stealth 
characteristics. The committee is also aware of the improved 
sonar performance observed in large vertical arrays which have 
been tested on various submarines during at-sea operations.
    Considering the many benefits of this new technology used 
in large vertical arrays, the committee remains supportive of 
an acoustic sonar in a bow conformal array configuration. The 
committee urges continued Navy's effort to develop this 
technology in a bow configuration, continued test to prove out 
this technology and the insertion of the Large Vertical Array 
and conformal bow array into the submarine fleet. Finally, the 
committee directs the Secretary of the Navy to prepare a brief 
to the House Committee on Armed Services by February 15, 2021 
as to current programming associated with the continued 
introduction of the large vertical arrays and conformal bow 
arrays; operational tests associated with these capabilities; 
and, industrial base implications associated with continued 
production.

Expeditionary Fast Transport conversion to an unmanned surface vessel

    The committee recognizes that unmanned surface vessels will 
play an essential role in future fleets of the Navy and 
supports the development of this capability in a manner that 
responsibly fields this new capability. The committee continues 
to believe that the Navy's current acquisition strategy 
incorporates an excessive amount of concurrency and is overly 
focused on the hull. The desire to move immediately from 
development into serial production will only yield similar 
misfortunes as past shipbuilding programs with similar 
strategies. The committee believes the Navy should be primarily 
focused on the autonomy piece of this capability and ensuring 
that technologies that will need to be developed to support 
autonomous operations are mature before being incorporated on a 
purpose built vessel. A strategy that includes prototyping and 
test-of-ship systems such as propulsion, Command, Control, 
Communications, Computers and Intelligence, and other major 
Hull, Mechanical and Engineering systems prior to hull form 
decisions is a more prudent strategy that may actually field 
this capability sooner. The committee is also concerned with 
what level of manning if any will be required for these 
vessels. In briefings, the Navy has stated that initially these 
vessels will need to be minimally manned rather than fully 
unmanned in order to maximize Concept of Operations (CONOPS) 
development. The committee believes that the Navy should modify 
existing mature manned ships to support autonomous operations 
in order to develop CONOPS rather than procuring new ships that 
will need to support manned operations, but will eventually be 
fully unmanned.
    Therefore, the committee recommends $45.0 million in PE 
0603178N for the conversion of two Expeditionary Fast Transport 
(EPF) ships to support autonomous operations and accelerate 
CONOPS development.

Medium Range Interceptor Capability

    The committee notes the Marine Corps' effort to take 
advantage of existing capabilities and components, including, 
but not limited to, the AN/TPS-80 G/ATOR radar system, the 
common aviation command and control system, and the Iron Dome 
battle management and weapons control and Tamir missiles, to 
rapidly field a Medium Range Interceptor Capability (MRIC) 
under the Ground Based Air Defense family of systems. The 
committee understands the MRIC is intended to provide a 
critically needed capability to defend Marine Air Ground Task 
Force (MAGTF) sites primarily against cruise missiles and 
secondarily against manned and unmanned aircraft and other 
aerial threats. The committee is aware that missile, rocket, 
mortar threats have become increasingly prevalent with attacks 
on both U.S. forces and our allies in Iraq.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Commanding General of 
the Marine Corps Combat Development Command to provide a 
briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services no later than 
December 21, 2020 on the timeline and funding plan to develop, 
test, and procure MRIC, including costs, requirements, and any 
opportunities or challenges associated with accelerating the 
program to respond to increased threats to deployed U.S. Marine 
forces.

Medium unmanned undersea vehicles

    The committee understands that the new medium unmanned 
undersea vehicle (MUUV) program will consolidate the MUUVs to a 
common but open architecture vehicle of between 10 and 21 
inches in diameter, which will allow it to perform a wide range 
of missions, depending on the sensor. This includes being 
deployed from expeditionary, surface, and submarine platforms. 
The new MUUV program represents a significant step forward to 
putting out a new generation of unmanned undersea vehicles 
(UUVs), which will also include a more modular open software 
architecture allowing for spiral developments and the 
deployment of a variety of sensors from this common platform. 
Existing MK 18 mod 2 UUVs have been very reliable and have 
exceeded the availability and reliability requirements. The 
committee understands that they are also heavily used as the 
fleet's only operational mine countermeasure UUV. The committee 
encourages the Navy to continue making technology advances 
utilizing a common architecture with MUUVs.

Report on the Navy's Long-Range Ocular Interrupter Program

    The committee is concerned with the ongoing development of 
the Navy's Long-Range Ocular Interrupter (LROI) Program. The 
committee understands that the LROI is intended to provide the 
Navy with the capability to deliver a bright light producing a 
dazzling or glare effect on a closing target to warn and/or 
suppress potential threats through increasing levels of visual 
degradation. According to the Navy, LROI will generate 
controlled, high-intensity output, providing warning and 
suppression effects and will enhance Joint Force operations in 
assessing the intent of personnel and controlling the potential 
threat as early as possible.
    The committee agrees with the military utility of this 
capability, and the need for the Navy to move forward to field 
a materiel solution. However, the committee is troubled by the 
continued schedule slippage of LROI in the Engineering and 
Material Development (EMD) acquisition phase. For example, the 
committee is concerned that the Navy is continuing to develop 
the LROI system when existing commercial-off-the-shelf 
capabilities are already being fielding by other military 
services. The committee is further concerned that there are 
ongoing disputes over the intellectual property of the LROI 
system.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of the Navy, 
not later than February 1, 2021, to provide a report to the 
congressional defense committees on the LROI acquisition 
strategy, past development contracts and costs, past test and 
evaluation strategy and results, market research efforts to 
identify LROI COTS solutions, and currently fielded ocular 
interrupter systems used by other military services.

Research opportunities in cloud-aerosol effects and atmospheric 
        sunlight reflection

    The United States faces a complex array of threats to our 
national security, as highlighted in a December 2018 GAO Report 
(GAO-19-204SP) which identified emerging threats of high 
consequence that will evolve as adversaries develop militarily, 
weapons and technology advances, and as environmental changes 
occur, including threats arising through extreme weather 
events--such as hurricanes, floods and droughts, that could 
intensify and affect energy resources, critical infrastructure 
and military installations.
    The Committee is aware of basic research opportunities in 
cloud-aerosol effects and atmospheric sunlight reflection and 
believes this research has the potential to benefit the 
military by providing improvements to short-term prediction of 
operationally relevant weather behavior and by reducing 
uncertainty in medium and long-term forecasting of extreme 
weather and climate conditions affecting military 
infrastructure, tactical operations and readiness. This 
research also has the potential to expand the portfolio of 
options for reducing risks to military infrastructure, 
operations and readiness and to ensure U.S. leadership in an 
area of innovation with significant implications for national 
security. The Committee also understands that other nations 
have established research programs on the physical, chemical, 
and optical properties of atmospheric aerosols and to study, 
among other things, their impact on climate.
    Furthermore, temperature data shows that the Arctic is 
getting warmer faster than any other region of the world, 
making it a bellwether for future climate damages and a major 
driver of tipping points with the potential to cause rapid and 
geopolitically destabilizing environmental changes. It is also 
a domain of renewed great power competition, as other nations 
position themselves to exploit the increasing accessibility of 
the Arctic even as US investment in Artic-ready platforms has 
lagged. The United States has the world's greatest 
concentration of military and civilian assets and technology to 
observe, assess, and predict changing conditions in the Arctic, 
but has not adequately invested in maintaining its northernmost 
scientific and national security infrastructure. The US 
capability to forecast near and long-term weather and 
environmental conditions in the Arctic underwrites technical 
and tactical advantages essential for maintaining strategic 
security guarantees, and provides crucial intelligence 
essential to anticipate, prioritize, and counter suspicious 
patterns of activity in airborne and maritime traffic passing 
through or within the Arctic. At the same time, decadal 
projections of Arctic conditions are essential for prioritizing 
investments into Arctic-capable vessels and exercises to 
prepare personnel for the unique challenges of operating in the 
Arctic environment. Improving these forecasts will depend on 
increasing our scientific understanding of processes driving 
Arctic changes.
    Therefore, to improve the Department's ability to forecast 
operationally relevant weather behavior, better understand 
climate risk, and ensure U.S. leadership in this field, the 
Committee directs the Chief of Naval Research to review 
research opportunities in cloud-aerosol effects and atmospheric 
sunlight reflection, and to report back to the Committee not 
later than 90 days after the enactment of this Act on the 
capabilities the Office of Naval Research can provide to the 
Department and the National Laboratories to support this 
critical research.

RF and EMP defense technology solutions

    The committee is concerned that the United States faces an 
increasing and serious threat from hostile entities and state-
sponsored terrorist organizations employing malicious Radio 
Frequency (RF) energy devices to actively interrogate, 
interfere, and compromise sensitive United States military 
assets and operational capabilities. The United States Navy has 
had no durable repeat-use solution to shield against RF energy 
that is flexible enough to be draped over sensitive equipment 
and could be formed into a practical cover. The committee 
understands through Cooperative Research and Development 
Agreements, the Naval Surface Warfare Center has developed cost 
effective and easily deployable RF shielding materials that 
mitigate or prevent the use of the RF spectrum by adversaries. 
The material developed through the Navy's efforts is also being 
researched as a defensive shield against Electro-Magnetic Pulse 
(EMP) signals from both natural and hostile sources and other 
tactical solutions. The committee recognizes the significance 
of technology to defend against RF and EMP threats. Therefore, 
the committee directs the Assistant Secretary of the Navy for 
Research, Development and Acquisition to provide a report to 
the congressional defense committees by February 15th, 2021 on 
the progress of the research, development, and deployment of 
cost-effective, easily deployable RF and EMP defense technology 
solutions. The report shall include recommendations for funding 
continued research and deployment of RF and EMP shielding cover 
technology.

Shipboard Information Warfare Exploit

    The committee notes that the Spectral program is an 
incremental acquisition, Government Off-The-Shelf/Commercial 
Off-The-Shelf program that provides cryptologic signals 
exploitation capabilities designed to meet the requirements for 
shipboard cryptologic operations within the Ship's Signal 
Exploitation Space (SSES) aboard a variety of ship classes and 
shore facilities. The Spectral system is programmed to provide 
a mobile, passive capability to detect, classify, track, and 
determine the intent of enemy units through exploitation of 
their command and control emissions. The system will be 
scalable, reconfigurable to mission, modular, remotable and 
dynamically reprogrammable in response to new threats and 
capabilities. The committee believes that the Secretary of the 
Navy should expedite the development of this critical 
capability and supports decoupling the hardware from the 
software so that capability enhancements are delivered by 
software as soon as they are developed. To achieve maximum 
competition and to solicit the most current technologies, the 
committee further believes that the Secretary should continue 
to prioritize an open architecture approach so that the new 
system can readily integrate emerging third-party capabilities. 
Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of the Navy to 
prepare a brief to the House Committee on Armed Services by 
January 30, 2021 as to implementation of the Spectral Program 
to include both program capabilities and timelines.

SSN(X) future propulsion and power requirements

    The committee supports the efforts of the Navy to develop a 
new class of attack submarine capable of meeting future threats 
posed by near peer competitors through the end of the century. 
The Next Generation Attack Submarine, SSN(X), will counter 
threats posed by peer adversary submarines, future unmanned 
underwater vehicles, and emerging persistent threats to U.S. 
undersea supremacy that already utilize the benefits of 
electric propulsion. Critical to the success of the Next 
Generation Attack Submarine is the ability to combine stealth 
and speed while maintaining the power needed to operate future 
sensors and weapons to prosecute undersea warfare. The Navy's 
prior investments and advancements achieved in the Columbia 
class program have led to a superior quiet acoustic propulsion 
system capable of meeting current and future threats while also 
providing the power architecture and flexibility needed to 
enable future weapons and sensors. The committee supports 
efforts by the Navy to seek designs and technologies that will 
provide the future SSN(X) with greater warfighting capabilities 
combined with total reduced costs through leveraging prior 
investments from the Columbia class program. The committee 
encourages the Navy to balance superior technological 
capability with affordability by evaluating non-developmental 
electric power and propulsion solutions. These solutions have 
demonstrated superior quiet operational capabilities and 
lethality and will ensure the future SSN(X) can meet the 
essential operational and mission requirements within an 
accelerated submarine build cycle.

Surface Navy Laser Weapon System Briefing

    The Committee commends the Department of the Navy's recent 
success with the Laser Weapons System Demonstrator (LWSD) from 
an LPD. In addition, the Committee is encouraged that SNLWS 
Increment 1, the High Energy Laser with Integrated Optical-
Dazzler and Surveillance (HELIOS) is on schedule to begin 
integration and land-based testing later this year. In 
addition, the Committee recognizes that both the Navy and 
industry have invested in this technology and understand the 
need to take incremental steps since there is no one-size fits 
all solution. However, the Committee is concerned with both the 
fragility of the supply base and that the protracted time 
between development, test and installation for an at-sea trial 
will cause the Navy to reprogram outyear funding to other 
needs. Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of the 
Navy to brief the committee no later than October 1, 2020 on an 
updated acquisition timeline that illustrates its path forward 
on SNLWS Increment 1 and allows for an efficient fielding of 
SNLWS Increment 2.

Transformational Reliable Acoustic Path System

    The Navy's Theatre Anti-Submarine Warfare Offset Strategy 
responds to an urgent requirement for additional maritime 
intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance capabilities. 
The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency Transformational 
Reliable Acoustic Path System (TRAPS) program was transitioned 
into a rapid prototyping program to meet this requirement. 
TRAPS is a passive, long duration, deep-sea anti-submarine 
warfare (ASW) technology that provides cost effective acoustic 
surveillance in a rapidly deployable manner. TRAPS was phased 
into the Theater ASW Initiative, as a means to provide a best 
in class sensor system deployable in deep ocean waters in areas 
previously not exploitable. The effort has advanced to a 
Program of Record with Spiral 1 underway, and anticipated 
Spiral 2 beginning at the end of fiscal year 2021. The 
committee encourages the Navy to continue fielding and 
deploying the TRAPS.

         Research, Development, Test, and Evaluation, Air Force


                       Items of Special Interest


Air Force Advanced Technology Development Report

    The committee recognizes that our service members and 
military leaders face evolving challenges that will require 
integration of the Air Force's science and technology 
development efforts in order to reassert the United States' 
competitive advantage across every warfighting domain. The 
committee is aware of the consolidation of thirteen Advanced 
Technology Development (ATD) Program Elements (PE) into five 
new PE lines within the Air Force's Research Development Test 
and Evaluation (RDT&E) funding in section 4201. The committee 
is concerned about losing insight and transparency during the 
Air Force's transition and implementation phase. Therefore, the 
committee directs the Secretary of the Air Force to submit an 
initial report to the congressional defense committees no later 
than October 30, 2021 on the amount of funding allocated to 
each Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) Directorate from the 
ATD RDT&E Budget Activity 03 (BA03) lines in Fiscal Year (FY) 
2021. For transparency and consistency, the committee directs 
the Secretary of the Air Force to submit a final report to the 
congressional defense committees no later than October 30, 2022 
on the amount of funding allocated to each AFRL Directorate 
from the ATD RDT&E BA03 lines in FY 2022.

Air Force Institute of Technology research, development, test, and 
        evaluation

    The committee recognizes the valuable contributions of the 
Air Force Institute of Technology (AFIT) to the professional 
development and technical expertise of the U.S. Air Force. The 
committee is aware of the continuing efforts of AFIT to provide 
cutting edge, specialized education to officer and enlisted 
U.S. military personnel and civilian employees in technical 
fields, including Aeronautics and Astronautics, Engineering 
Physics, and Systems Engineering. Despite the significant 
academic research that occurs at AFIT, it does not maintain a 
dedicated research, development, test, and evaluation (RDTE) 
program line. The committee is interested in understanding how 
AFIT may benefit from a dedicated RDTE line and what additional 
flexibility this may provide, including opportunities for 
expanded partnerships with other institutions of higher 
education and more influence over research topics that are of 
interest to the Department of Defense. Therefore, the committee 
directs the Secretary of the Air Force to provide a briefing to 
the House Committee on Armed Services not later than October 
30, 2020, on the benefits and drawbacks of having a dedicated 
RDTE program line for the Air Force Institute of Technology.

Air Force Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Program

    The committee is aware of the Air Force's alterations to 
its Small Business Research Innovation (SBIR) and Small 
Business Technology Transfer (STTR) program through the Air 
Force Ventures process, as well as the alignment of the program 
to the AF technology accelerator, AFWERX. The committee is 
encouraged by the Department's inclusion of the SBIR/STTR 
funding in its technology development strategy and budget 
plans, and looks forward to closer collaboration with Service 
acquisition executives to harness the innovation opportunities 
of the SBIR/STTR program.
    The committee appreciates the Air Force's continued 
engagement as it establishes performance metrics and monitors 
lessons learned from the new approach's challenges and 
successes. The committee agrees with the Air Force that this 
new approach should be assessed according to the letter and 
intent of the SBIR statute as written in Chapter 638 of title 
15, United States Code, including:
    (1) Tracking commercialization of companies by monitoring 
growth in Phase II or later funding commitments from private 
sector or non-SBIR (other Government) sources (15 U.S.C. 
638(e)(4)(b)(ii) and (iii));
    (2) Expanding SBIR access to more small businesses across 
the country by tracking the total number of companies that are 
new to government or to the SBIR program that submit proposals 
and are awarded contracts (15 U.S.C. 638(a));
    (3) Ensuring small businesses are financially secure and 
able to perform critical research quickly by reducing the time 
from solicitation to contract award (2019 NDAA Sec 
854(b)(2)(A)(ii) and (iii)); and
    (4) Expanding SBIR access to diverse businesses across the 
United States that are women owned and socially and 
economically disadvantaged (15 U.S.C. 638(j)(2)(F)), as well as 
diverse geographically and by size (15 U.S.C. 
638(jj)(4)(B)(iii)).
    The committee therefore directs the Comptroller General to 
review and assess the Air Force's Ventures Process and SBIR/
STTR effort on the above criteria. The reports shall also 
include trend analysis for no less than five years of:
    (1) Funding awarded to Open Topics versus traditional SBIR 
topics;
    (2) Entry and exit Technology Readiness Levels (TRL) for 
Phase I and II awards;
    (3) Process and capability to measure technical merit; and
    (4) Which Air Force missions are receiving SBIR funding.
    The committee directs the Comptroller General to provide a 
briefing to the congressional defense committees by March 1, 
2021 on preliminary findings and submit a final report to the 
congressional defense committees at a date agreed to at the 
time of the briefing.

Airborne Augmented Reality Systems

    The committee is concerned with the time and resources 
required to produce and develop fully qualified pilots and 
believes that airborne augmented reality systems could mitigate 
some of the resource constraints. The committee also 
acknowledges the potential cost savings and environmental 
benefit of implementing augmented reality systems. Use of 
synthetic entities reduces fuel consumption; maintenance; 
airframe degradation; and environmental impact while increasing 
training repetitions per hour and enabling pilots to fly 
against synthetic adversaries that mirror the appearance and 
performance of actual strategic rival aircraft.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Assistant Secretary of 
the Air Force for Acquisition, Technology, and Logistics to 
submit a report to congressional defense and intelligence 
committees by January 31, 2021 detailing the potential cost 
savings; maintenance benefits; environmental benefits; counter-
intelligence benefits; pilot readiness improvements; benefits 
of service life extension through reduced hours on key 
airframes; and any funding required to enable the use of 
airborne augmented reality systems by the Combat Air Forces. 
The report shall include any Air Force Program Executive Office 
efforts to take existing airborne augmented reality systems 
that have completed Phase II of the Small Business Innovative 
Research program by March 31, 2021 and explain how those 
efforts are resourced over the Fiscal Year Defense Plan to 
maximize benefit to the warfighters and taxpayers. The report 
shall be submitted in unclassified form. If necessary, a 
classified annex shall also be provided.

Assessment of the Air Force Test Center enterprise

    The committee recognizes the importance of the Air Force 
Test Center (AFTC) and the invaluable developmental test and 
evaluation of air, space, and cyber systems conducted 
throughout the AFTC enterprise. The committee understands that 
as threats evolve and the complexity of integrating technology 
increases, the AFTC faces unique and unprecedented challenges 
in fulfilling its mission. These challenges include funding for 
critical sustainment, restoration, and modernization of 
relevant test capabilities; development and growth of 
hypersonic infrastructure and sufficient testing capabilities; 
and, increasing workforce recruitment, retention and expertise. 
The committee identified several of these challenges in the 
committee report accompanying the National Defense 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2018 (H. Rept. 115-200) and 
directed an assessment of the AFTC enterprise by the Secretary 
of the Air Force. Accordingly, the committee acknowledges that 
given the current growth of requirements and advanced weapon 
system development capabilities needed, the previous AFTC 
assessment should be updated to provide relevant information on 
the challenges confronting the AFTC enterprise.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of the Air 
Force to provide a report to the congressional defense 
committees not later than December 1, 2020, that updates the 
information contained in the report submitted by the Secretary 
that was required by H. Rept. 115-200.

Briefing on Air Force Vanguard Programs

    The committee understands that the Air Force's 2019 
``Science and Technology Strategy: Strengthening USAF Science 
and Technology for 2030 and Beyond'' report designated three 
programs as ``Vanguard programs'' that are meant to quickly 
demonstrate the viability of emerging technology. Therefore, 
the committee directs the Assistant Secretary of the Air Force 
(Acquisition, Technology and Logistics) to provide a briefing 
to the House Committee on Armed Services by December 15, 2020 
with details on its Vanguard programs and how the Air Force 
plans to transition these programs to ensure proven technology 
has the best chance of successfully and expeditiously 
transitioning into hands of the warfighter.

Flight test air refueling support

    The committee recognizes the importance of air refueling to 
flight test aircraft and the many requirements for tanker 
aircraft. The committee is concerned with the impact of the Air 
Force's tanker reductions and with unintended consequences of 
insufficient tanker support for test programs, such as program 
delays and increased costs. The committee directs the Secretary 
of the Air Force to provide a briefing to the House Committee 
on Armed Services by February 1, 2021, that explains the plan 
to support flight test requirements with air refueling. The 
brief should determine the overall test requirements and 
consider the effectiveness and efficiency of tanker aircraft 
assigned to the test community versus augmenting tanker support 
with aircraft from other bases.

Report on Counter-Radar Electronic Warfare and Signal Processing 
        Capabilities

    The committee understands that advances in foreign anti-
access and electronic warfare technologies require commensurate 
advances in technologies designed to ensure the comparative 
advantage and dominance in U.S. electromagnetic spectrum 
operations capability. The committee understands there is a 
potential requirement and need to identify advanced mobile 
threats within milliseconds, to negate their operational 
effectiveness and nearly simultaneously provide technical 
electronic battle damage assessment.
    The committee is aware the Department of Defense has 
demonstrated a high fidelity open-air scene target generator 
capability. The committee understands this capability would 
provide a suite of active operations options for dominance in 
contested radio frequency spectrum environments. The committee 
notes this capability has completed initial free-space testing 
at a government range and understands that this is a unique 
capability in that it can operate within the adversary system 
sensor processing cycle and is not readily detectable as an 
electronic warfare technique.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Assistant Secretary of 
the Air Force for Acquisition, Technology and Logistics, in 
coordination with the Secretary of the Air Force, to submit to 
the congressional defense and intelligence committees a report 
by March 1, 2021 detailing the efforts required to integrate 
high fidelity open-air scene target generator capability into 
appropriate platforms and electronic warfare command and 
control systems and how integration is resourced over the 
future years defense program. The report shall be submitted in 
unclassified form, with an accompanying classified annex, if 
necessary.

University Consortium to Address Research Needs Unique to the Space 
        Force

    The committee acknowledges the importance of a strong U.S. 
presence in the space domain and the foundational role of the 
newly established U.S. Space Force in providing for our 
national security. The committee also notes the historical 
importance of academic support in the research, development, 
test, and evaluation efforts of the established military 
services. The committee supports the creation of a university 
consortium for National Space Research to provide for the 
unique research and technological needs of the Space Force. The 
committee encourages the Department to consider for inclusion 
universities with established expertise and competencies in 
relevant research and engineering disciplines. The committee 
therefore directs the Chief of Space Operations to provide a 
briefing to the committee no later than January 31, 2021 on the 
Space Force's strategy to establish a consortium of 
institutions of higher education to lead foundational research 
in areas that the Chief determines to be critical to the 
mission of the Space Force.

Wide area motion imagery

    The budget request contained $121.5 million in PE 0305206F, 
Airborne Reconnaissance Systems, but no funding for continued 
development of Gorgon Stare (GS) wide area motion imagery 
(WAMI) surveillance capabilities. The committee is aware that 
the GS WAMI system supports multiple daily orbits in the U.S. 
Central Command area of operations with critical intelligence, 
surveillance, and reconnaissance (ISR). Other combatant 
commands have requested WAMI capability, but the Air Force 
lacks enough systems to satisfy all combatant command 
requirements.
    The committee is concerned that, despite daily operational 
tasking, and despite GS WAMI having been designated as a 
program of record in 2014, there is still no budget request for 
modernization of this combat-proven ISR system. The committee 
notes that prior year congressional funding has helped GS 
develop beyond-line-of-sight communications, near vertical 
direction finding, and multi-intelligence capabilities. 
Additional funding is needed to modernize sensor tip and cue, 
sensor field of view, and to optimize machine learning in 
support of Project MAVEN.
    Therefore, the committee recommends $131.5 million, an 
increase of $10 million, in PE 0305206F for WAMI enhancements. 
The committee further directs the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs 
of Staff to provide a report to the House Committee on Armed 
Services by March 1, 2021, on the plan for apportionment of 
Gorgon Stare to meet geographic combatant commanders' 
requirements worldwide.

       Research, Development, Test, and Evaluation, Defense-Wide


                       Items of Special Interest


Alliance innovation partnerships

    The committee believes that to keep pace with competitors' 
investments in emerging technologies, the Department of Defense 
should develop deeper technology partnerships with key U.S. 
allies. The committee supports the efforts of the Foreign 
Comparative Testing program in the Office of the Under 
Secretary of Defense for Research and Engineering that 
facilitates the use of foreign allies' developed technologies 
to solve the Department's challenges and achieve the Secretary 
of Defense's priorities. The program provides a unified U.S. 
relationship with allied partner nation government 
organizations and industrial associations, and helps support 
the National Defense Strategy through leveraging allied 
technology investments and innovation to improve lethality; 
strengthening alliances and partnerships through support of 
reciprocal defense procurement; and promoting competition to 
reduce Department costs and deliver performance at the speed of 
relevance.
    Similarly, the committee supports the efforts of the Office 
of Naval Research Global, which provides worldwide science and 
technology-based solutions for current and future naval 
challenges, and reaches out to the global technical community 
and the operational fleet and force commands to foster 
cooperation in areas of mutual interest to bring the full range 
of allied possibilities to the Navy and Marine Corps.
    The committee believes the Department should expand 
existing mechanisms for international partnerships in research, 
development, test, and evaluation for emerging science and 
technology projects. The committee urges the Secretary of 
Defense to consider:
    (1) opportunities for increasing international partnerships 
in research, development, test, and evaluation for emerging 
science and technology projects;
    (2) expanding current development partnerships and 
technology scouting programs with allied partners;
    (3) leveraging U.S. Defense Attache offices in U.S. 
embassies in allied countries with robust innovation ecosystems 
to scout for technology;
    (4) internationalizing startup-focused engagements, such as 
through the Defense Innovation Unit;
    (5) improving information sharing with allied governments 
to promote broad-based awareness of competitor nations' 
actions;
    (6) building ally capacity to protect technology;
    (7) any other innovative opportunities the Secretary deems 
useful; and
    (8) what new authorities the Department would need from 
Congress to increase partnerships with allied countries.

Assessment of High-Powered Microwave Systems

    The committee recognizes that directed energy technologies 
such as high-powered microwave (HPM) systems are being 
developed by the Department in order to provide non-lethal 
alternatives in combat and to maintain pace with our 
adversaries. The committee notes that as these technologies 
transition from the laboratory to an operational environment, 
it is critical that the Department assess and prepare for the 
maturation of these capabilities. Therefore, the committee 
directs the Under Secretary of Defense for Research and 
Engineering, in consultation with the heads of the military 
departments, to provide a briefing to the House Committee on 
Armed Services no later than January 15, 2021 on the 
development plan for HPM systems including the maturity of 
current research and development efforts, conformance to 
electromagnetic environmental effects requirements such as 
military standard 464 (MIL-STD-464), the status of the test 
capabilities required for verification and validation for all 
expected operational environments, the concept of operation of 
such systems, and potential vulnerabilities of Department 
systems to a HPM attack.

Bio-engineering roadmap for the Department of Defense

    The committee notes that synthetic biology will be a 
transformative industry, providing significant opportunities 
across all economic sectors as well as national security 
benefits and defense-related applications. The committee also 
understands that large-scale strategic investments in this 
field by great power competitors, especially China, threaten to 
erode American leadership in the global bio-economy. These 
significant investments, both in funding and the development of 
high-profile national strategies, are in stark contrast to 
current U.S. efforts. Accordingly, the committee supports the 
Department of Defense's nascent efforts relating to bio-
engineering, but finds them insufficient. The committee is also 
concerned by our competitors' and adversaries' ability to 
compromise control over critical foundational technologies, 
such as DNA sequencing and DNA synthesis, through predatory 
economic practices. Further, many of the Department's lessons 
learned related to microelectronics supply-chain 
vulnerabilities are directly applicable to this new field and 
should be a proactive component of any bio-engineering related 
strategies. The committee urges the Department to include in 
its bio-engineering roadmap plans to resource and expand its 
bio-engineering efforts and collaboration with the bio-
industrial manufacturing base for defense applications.

Classified ready engineering workforce

    The committee is aware of the current challenges the 
Department of Defense experiences when recruiting and retaining 
a diverse, high-skilled science, technology, engineering, and 
math workforce. Department hiring is still constrained by 
security clearance and human resource processing delays. With 
existing workforce shortfalls and the challenges of recruiting 
and retaining scientists and engineers, the Department must 
enhance its relationships with academic institutions to promote 
and incentivize service at Department of Defense major ranges 
and test facility bases, science and technology research 
laboratories, and other related installations, especially those 
in remote and isolated locations.
    Further, the committee recognizes the Department's efforts 
to invest in science, technology, engineering, and math 
workforce outreach and education programs, not only for 
undergraduate and graduate programs but also for those in 
elementary and secondary education. However, a more systematic, 
scalable approach is needed, especially for engaging 
underrepresented populations in rural communities. Hispanic 
representation in the Department, for example, falls behind the 
rest of the civilian labor force and the Federal Government.
    Therefore, the committee urges the Secretary of Defense to 
better partner with Hispanic-serving, land-grant institutions 
to create a talent development program that provides 
experiential learning through internships and co-ops with 
Department agencies, while improving access to science, 
technology, engineering, and math education and careers for 
underrepresented populations. The committee believes the 
Department should review possible pathways to shorten security 
clearance and hiring process timelines to reduce the gap 
between education and full-time employment. The Department 
should also review how this partnership can help engage 
elementary and secondary education students to encourage 
participation in science, technology, engineering, and math 
education and prepare students for higher education and 
national security career opportunities.

Department of Defense chemical and biological emerging threats response 
        efforts

    The U.S. Government Accountability Office's December 2018 
report on Emerging Threats highlighted a range of potential 
threats and opportunities that cover a broad spectrum of 
science and technology. These threats include synthetic biology 
and bioengineering, artificial intelligence, and natural 
biological threats. The committee notes that the current 
coronavirus pandemic is precisely the kind of threat identified 
in that report that has been of concern to planners throughout 
the government for years. At a time when the United States is 
struggling to respond to the spread of a highly infectious new 
virus, the committee is concerned about the preparedness of the 
U.S. Armed Forces to respond to significant state-level weapons 
of mass destruction events.
    The committee recognizes the valuable work done by key 
elements of the defense research enterprise, such as the 
Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency. However, the 
committee remains concerned about the Department's capacity and 
planning for research on science and technology, and conversion 
to development to capitalize on opportunities, address emerging 
threats early, and respond in a flexible manner to those 
threats that materialize rapidly, such as the coronavirus 
pandemic. Ensuring that the Department's science and technology 
and research and development enterprises are coordinated is 
important in building flexibility for the broad range of 
associated capabilities to respond to emerging threats. 
Similarly, ensuring that the Department has the structure in 
place to plan and exercise for potential responses to these 
potentially catastrophic emerging threats is critical for 
military and national preparedness.
    The committee therefore directs the Comptroller General to 
assess the Department's strategy and planning for research and 
development and for emerging threats, and particularly 
biological threats, and for incorporating those threats into 
broader planning and exercise mechanisms. The assessment should 
include:
    (1) The Department's strategy and planning for research and 
development, including plans for prioritizing efforts to 
address emerging threats;
    (2) The Department's visibility and coordination of 
capabilities and capacity in all elements of the research and 
development portfolio, including:
    (a) DOD science and technology research laboratories;
    (b) the Chemical Biological Defense Program;
    (c) the Defense Threat Reduction Agency;
    (d) DOD-sponsored research in academia;
    (e) Manufacturing Innovation Institutes,
    (f) small business innovation research and technology 
transfer; and
    (g) other efforts;
    (3) The Department's coordination with other federal and 
non-governmental organizations to plan and conduct research and 
development activities;
    (4) The Department's plans, capacity, and authorities, for 
drawing upon the extensive research and development enterprise 
to respond to the coronavirus pandemic or similar rapidly 
occurring threats;
    (5) Department-wide tabletop exercises and wargames;
    (6) Medical countermeasures and stockpile completeness; and
    (7) Any other matters the Comptroller General deems 
appropriate.
    The committee directs the Comptroller General to provide a 
briefing to the congressional defense committees by March 1, 
2021, on preliminary findings and submit a final report to the 
congressional defense committees at a date agreed to at the 
time of the briefing.

Development of technology to increase the resiliency in mitigating 
        viral pandemics

    The committee commends the Department of Defense's response 
effort to COVID-19 to ensure the safety of military and 
civilian personnel in the United States and around the world. 
The committee is aware of maturing sensor capabilities that 
instantly screen and identify individuals infected with COVID-
19 that are both presymptomatic or asymptomatic. As such, the 
committee encourages the Department of Defense to engage in 
research and development of detection approaches that are 
scalable, deployable, and provide detection for pre-
symptomatic, symptomatic, and asymptomatic individuals. 
Furthermore, the committee understands that capabilities 
developed by the Department, such as infrared laser technology 
to detect trace explosives, can be applied to viral detection. 
The Department should consider a variety of technologies that 
would provide active remote viral detection capabilities and 
employ all means to fast-track research and development of 
promising technologies and approaches.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Deputy Assistant 
Secretary of Defense for Chemical and Biological Defense to 
provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services by 
March 15, 2021 on the development of technology to increase the 
resiliency in mitigating viral pandemics, including an 
assessment of the gaps in the Department's viral pandemic 
detection and surveillance capabilities, a summary of current 
viral pandemic research and development response efforts 
focused on remote or standoff testing of potentially infected 
individuals, an analysis of existing chemical or biological 
detection capabilities developed by the Chemical Biological 
Defense Program and the Defense Threat Reduction Agency to 
address gaps in viral pandemic detection and surveillance, a 
description of current advanced development efforts for 
improved disease detection, and an estimated time to delivery 
of functional capabilities for such technologies.

Enhancing research into human performance and resilience technologies 
        in support of special operations force personnel

    The budget request for fiscal year 2021 contained $42.4 
million in PE 1160401BB for special operations forces 
technology development.
    The committee is aware that high operational tempo 
deployments with little recovery time, combined with increasing 
operational load requirements affect emotional resilience and 
physical mobility, which can compound the potential for mental 
and physical health injuries. The committee notes that in 2009, 
U.S. Special Operations Command (USSOCOM) implemented a human 
performance program to enable special operations forces (SOF) 
to attain and sustain peak cognitive and physical performance 
by developing technologies that enhance psychological and 
physical recovery. The committee is encouraged by USSOCOM's use 
of machine learning and artificial intelligence to facilitate 
development of neurocognitive mapping capabilities to more 
accurately capture the psychological data of SOF, with the 
intention of aligning proper emotional care to the exquisite 
physical therapy capabilities, broadly designed to rehabilitate 
and maintain SOF as they maneuver throughout the special 
operations enterprise.
    The committee supports additional emphasis on efforts such 
as neurocognitive mapping, and recognizes that additional 
funding would augment development of capabilities to enhance 
SOF psychological and physical performance. Therefore, the 
committee recommends $47.4 million, an increase of $5.0 
million, in PE 1160401BB for SOF technology development.

Establishing a research consortium of excellence for irregular warfare 
        and advanced analytics

    The budget request contained $35.6 million in PE 0601110D8Z 
for Basic Research Initiatives.
    The committee recognizes the importance of basic research 
and academic engagement as critical to shaping the 
effectiveness of current and future national security policies 
and strategy. The committee understands that there is currently 
a wide range of social science research in the areas of 
irregular warfare that should be leveraged, including the 
better use of, and integration with, existing research by 
organizations maintaining public repositories of incidents 
related to acts of terrorism, societal responses, and trends of 
sympathies towards violent extremist ideologies. The committee 
believes that it is within the purview of the Department of 
Defense, and specifically the Under Secretary of Defense for 
Research and Engineering (USD(R&E)) to foster academically 
rigorous studies of these strategic challenges facing the 
Department.
    Academic research activities provide a foundational 
understanding for how to assess the effectiveness of strategic 
and operational irregular warfare activities and programs as 
the Department enhances non-kinetic efforts below the level of 
armed conflict to compete with near-peer adversaries, while 
balancing existing capabilities and efforts postured to counter 
violent extremist organizations. The committee therefore 
believes that the USD(R&E) Basic Research Office should 
establish a research consortium of excellence for irregular 
warfare and advanced analytics.
    The committee is aware the Department has been investing in 
the National Consortium for the Study of Terrorism and 
Responses to Terrorism (START) and is the largest consumer of 
data from this program. START is a university-based research 
and education center that provides an effective resource that 
has informed current counterterrorism policies and strategy.
    The committee therefore recommends $40.6 million, an 
increase of $5.0 million, in PE 0601110D8Z for Basic Research 
Initiatives to establish and fund the START consortium as a 
research consortium of excellence for irregular warfare and 
advanced analytics. Further, the committee directs the Under 
Secretary of Defense for Research and Engineering to provide a 
briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services by January 
29, 2021, on the processes and procedures to establish and fund 
the START consortium as a research consortium of excellence for 
irregular warfare and advanced analytics.

Evaluation of emergent technologies in support of special operations 
        forces in great power competition

    The budget request contained $137.2 million in PE 1160408BB 
for the Operational Enhancements program.
    The committee recognizes that continued investment and 
research in emerging technologies such as Machine Learning/
Artificial Intelligence (ML/AI) is critical to securing the 
competitive advantage of the United States. The committee 
remains committed to ensuring the Department of Defense 
continues to prioritize the development of such capabilities, 
and is aware of a recent Government Accountability Office 
report on long-range emerging threats facing the United States 
that highlighted the aggressive pursuit of ML/AI technologies 
by our adversaries.
    The committee appreciates the substantial efforts by the 
Joint Artificial Intelligence Center to establish standards, 
manage development, and integrate ML/AI technologies for the 
benefit of the Joint Force, and the close coordination with 
U.S. Special Operations Command (USSOCOM). The committee notes 
the importance of demonstrating the operational use of these 
capabilities in semi- and non-permissive environments, such as 
those forces deployed from USSOCOM. The committee is interested 
in better understanding the application of such capabilities in 
strategically dynamic environments with near-peer adversaries.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Director of the Joint 
Artificial Intelligence Center, in coordination with Commander, 
USSOCOM, to provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed 
Services by November 1, 2020, on an assessment of ML/AI 
technologies to enable operational maneuver, autonomous or 
otherwise, in highly-contested environments with near-peer 
adversaries.
    The committee recommends $147.2 million, an increase of 
$10.0 million, in PE 1160408BB for the Operational Enhancements 
program.

Feasibility assessment of establishing large and open defense based 
        data sets

    The committee believes that the Secretary of Defense should 
work with the Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP), 
the Office of Management and Budget (OMB), and the National 
Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) to expand the 
number of open-source, high-quality data sets within Project 
Open Data to increase the availability of open data and foster 
research and innovation in data analytics, artificial 
intelligence, and machine learning. Therefore, the committee 
directs the Secretary of the Defense, in coordination with the 
Under Secretary of Defense for Research and Engineering, to 
perform an assessment of large data sets maintained by the 
Department that could be publicly released for improved 
analytics and training of artificial intelligence and machine 
learning applications. The assessment shall include:
    (1) a survey of the data sets maintained by the Department 
of Defense, to which artificial intelligence and machine 
learning is applicable, including but not limited to, health 
records; employment records; weather data; geospatial data; 
utilities; and logistics;
    (2) necessary actions for the data sets identified in (1) 
to anonymize, sanitize, or otherwise remove sensitive 
information to make the data sets suitable for public 
consumption;
    (3) the feasibility of releasing the resulting data sets of 
(2) through a public facing webpage;
    (4) an assessment of the benefits resulting from the public 
availability of the data sets in (2), to include commercial, 
research, and government uses;
    (5) an assessment of the benefit in developing the national 
security workforce resulting from the public availability of 
the data sets in (2) for use by K-12 and university education 
programs;
    (6) a recommendation on the public release of the data sets 
in (2); and
    (7) any other matters the Secretary determines appropriate.
    The committee further directs the Secretary to submit a 
report to the Committees on Armed Services of the Senate and 
the House of Representatives not later than January 1, 2022, on 
the results of the assessment, and what engagement the 
Department has had with OSTP, OMB, and NIST on increasing the 
availability of open data.

Forecasting and modeling partnerships for countering infectious 
        diseases

    The committee believes that emerging viral threats such as 
the novel 2019 Coronavirus highlight the need for innovative 
and real-time forecasting and monitoring techniques to ensure 
our military and civilians are best positioned to respond to 
emerging public health and national security threats. The 
committee encourages the Department of Defense to leverage 
emerging infectious disease forecasting and monitoring data 
developed by institutions of higher education and private 
partners. The committee encourages the Department to prioritize 
funding and explore partnerships to improve our ability to 
respond to public health and national security threats through 
emerging infectious disease modeling and forecasting.

GPS-based precision approach and landing system

    The committee is encouraged by the Navy's success in 
procuring a global positioning system (GPS)-based, all-weather, 
precision approach and landing system for eventual deployment 
on all Navy aircraft carriers and amphibious assault ships for 
its F-35-B, F-35C, and MQ-25 aircraft. The committee 
understands that the Navy and Marine Corps are currently 
conducting feasibility studies to determine whether the F/A-
18E, F/A-18F, EA-18G, and all variants of the V-22 can also be 
integrated into its precision approach and landing system.
    The committee believes that expanding the sea-based joint 
precision approach and landing system capability to other U.S. 
military aircraft that operate in expeditionary environments 
would permit such aircraft to safely land at remote, forward-
deployed airbases, even in situations involving difficult 
terrain or extremely low visibility. The committee directs the 
Secretary of Defense to provide a report to the House Committee 
on Armed Services by February 1, 2021, on the feasibility and 
advisability of integrating a common expeditionary GPS-based, 
all-weather, precision approach and landing system capability 
into its aircraft that are most likely to serve in forward-
deployed environments, the C-130, F-16 and H-60.

High energy laser endless magazine definition

    The committee supports investments across the Department of 
Defense in directed energy systems capable of countering the 
full array of incoming threats, from unmanned air systems to 
cruise missiles. Additionally, the committee understands that 
magazine depth is but one of the system variables that need to 
be considered in delivering required mission effectiveness 
within the size and weight constraints of the platform within 
which the system is integrated or with which it is otherwise 
deployed. The committee also supports development of systems 
with endless, or near endless, magazines to ensure capability 
to counter salvos or swarms of any size. The committee is 
concerned that while the Department has included reference to a 
near endless magazine in its budget justifications for high 
energy laser systems, it has not defined the term sufficiently 
to facilitate predictable requirements development and guide 
investment by industry.
    The committee directs the Assistant Director for Directed 
Energy within the Office of the Under Secretary of Defense for 
Research and Engineering to submit a report to the House 
Committee on Armed Services by December 1, 2020, on the 
definition of an ``endless magazine'' to sufficiently 
facilitate predictable requirements development and guide 
investment by industry. The Assistant Director for Directed 
Energy shall assess whether, for high energy laser systems, an 
``endless magazine'' shall be defined as an ability to engage 
at the rate necessary to counter highly complex, nearly 
simultaneous incoming threats, of the type for which the system 
was designed to counter, without temporary cessation of fire 
for battery recharge or exchange, thermal management, or other 
predictable technical limitations. The AD for DE shall provide 
a recommendation as to whether, except in the case of airborne 
applications, an endless magazine shall be provided as a stand-
alone capability within the envelope of the platform, without 
the need for external devices or trailers.

Hydrogen safety for battery use

    The committee recognizes that the Army continues to work on 
fuel cell advancements through projects at the Ground Vehicle 
Systems Center and the Navy is continuing to make progress 
through ongoing programs within the Office of Naval Research. 
The committee is concerned that misconceptions surrounding 
hydrogen as a fuel have caused undue delays in the further 
development of this technology. The commercial industry has 
developed safe handling processes to advance fuel cell 
technology in numerous industrial applications. As the 
Department strives to enable hydrogen fuel cell technology, 
safety standards and processes must be developed 
simultaneously. Hydrogen fuel cells promise the benefits of an 
electric vehicle with the rapid refueling capability of a 
traditional diesel platform, providing extended silent 
operations without the need for battery recharging.
    The committee therefore urges the Under Secretary of 
Defense for Research and Engineering to review:
    (1) the safety concerns of hydrogen on the battlefield;
    (2) the methods to mitigate hydrogen safety concerns 
regarding generation, distribution, and use;
    (3) potential methods to field hydrogen in austere 
environments;
    (4) each military service's use case for hydrogen fuel 
cells; and
    (5) planned timelines to move from research and development 
initiatives to procurement programs of record.

Implementation of Department of Defense Inspector General 
        recommendations on additive manufacturing

    The committee is concerned with the Department of Defense's 
existing level of coordination of additive manufacturing 
efforts and encourages the use of additive manufacturing 
whenever possible to save both the Department and taxpayer 
valuable cost and time.
    In October 2019, the Department of Defense Inspector 
General produced a report titled, ``Audit of the DoD's Use of 
Additive Manufacturing for Sustainment Parts (DODIG-2020-
003),'' and provided a set of recommendations. The committee 
directs the Under Secretary of Defense for Research and 
Engineering, in coordination with the Under Secretary of 
Defense for Acquisition and Sustainment and the Service 
Acquisition Executives, to submit a report to the Committees on 
Armed Services of the Senate and the House of Representatives 
by February 15, 2021, outlining the Department's plan to 
address each of the recommendations listed in the Inspector 
General report. Further, if the Under Secretary of Defense for 
Research and Engineering decides not to implement any of the 
Inspector General recommendations, they must include the 
justification for that decision in the report, as well what 
actions the Department will take to address the conditions 
underlying the recommendation.

Infrastructure to support research, development, test, and engineering 
        at China Lake

    The committee is aware of the significant research, 
development, test, and evaluation (RDT&E) infrastructure 
requirements across the Department of Defense. Section 252 of 
the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2020 
(Public Law 116-92) requires the Secretary of Defense, in 
coordination with the Secretaries of the military departments, 
to complete a master plan of the current infrastructure needs 
of the Major Range and Test Facility Base not later than 
January 1, 2021. However, several Major Range and Test 
Facilities, including Naval Air Weapons Station (NAWS) China 
Lake, have more immediate requirements. NAWS China Lake 
performs a critical function for the Department of Defense, but 
was determined to be not mission capable after a 7.1 magnitude 
earthquake on July 5, 2019. In light of the importance of the 
mission and the investments made to date to repair NAWS China 
Lake, it is prudent that the committee fully understand the 
complete RDT&E infrastructure requirements before major 
construction commences. Therefore, the committee directs the 
Secretary of Defense to provide a briefing to the House 
Committee on Armed Services not later than October 30, 2020, on 
the RDT&E infrastructure master plan for NAWS China Lake.

Investment in research and development for decontamination technology 
        to support civilian applications

    The committee recognizes the valuable contribution of the 
Department of Defense in developing decontamination 
technologies against biological threats. In response to the 
COVID-19 pandemic, the Chemical and Biological Defense Program 
quickly funded the Joint Biological Agent Decontamination 
System Lite (JBADS Lite), which adapts biothermal 
decontamination technology from the original JBADS program of 
record to decontaminate platforms after transport of COVID-19 
positive personnel.
    The committee believes JBADS Lite is critical for the 
military to maintain operations during a pandemic while 
ensuring the safety of passengers and crew; and that this has 
applications in the civilian sector to support the 
decontamination of civilian transportation systems (i.e. rail, 
buses, aircraft). Therefore, the committee directs Office of 
the Assistant Secretary of Defense for Nuclear, Chemical, and 
Biological Defense Programs to provide a briefing to the House 
Committee on Armed Services by February 15, 2021 on how JBADS 
Lite could aid in the pandemic preparedness of civilian 
transportation systems in the United States.

Investment in research and development for technology to test 
        treatments for nuclear, chemical, and biological exposure

    As biological threats continue to advance, the committee 
encourages the Department of Defense to prioritize building on 
existing research and development to detect and model 
treatments for the potential aerosol dissemination of 
biological weapons. Areas for increased investment include, but 
are not limited to, the development of battlefield 
instrumentation and aerosol capabilities. The committee 
therefore directs the Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense for 
Chemical and Biological Defense to provide a briefing to the 
House Committee on Armed Services not later than January 15, 
2021, on the Department's assessment of organ-on-chips 
technology as a platform for threat assessment and for rapidly 
developed treatments (medical countermeasures) for biological, 
chemical, and radiological threats, and what plans the 
Department has to use this technology going forward.

Joint vaccine acquisition program

    The committee recognizes that botulism or plague have been 
identified as potential biological weapons against service 
members or the general public. The committee further recognizes 
that there are currently no available vaccines to protect 
against these threats. The committee notes that the Department 
of Defense has invested $300M in developing a plague vaccine 
and $375M in developing a botulism vaccine. The committee 
further notes the impact the current viral pandemic has had on 
national security, to include economic and military readiness, 
and that reductions to research and development of vaccines 
reduces the Department's ability to respond to pandemic 
outbreaks. The committee believes that the continuation of 
these existing projects under the Joint Vaccine Acquisition 
Program is necessary to ensure that a deployable vaccine for 
these agents is available to protect our warfighters and to 
provide continuity for capabilities under a scenario in which 
these agents are utilized in a combat environment. Therefore, 
the committee encourages the Secretary of Defense to continue 
the development of botulinum and plague vaccines and directs 
the Secretary of Defense to provide a briefing to the House 
Committee on Armed Services no later than November 1, 2020 on 
the acquisition strategy for the botulinum and plague vaccines, 
to include the status of the development, the cost to complete 
the development, and the risks if development is discontinued.

Modular Open Systems common data standards

    The committee continues to be encouraged by the 
development, demonstration, and validation of common data 
standards and implementation of the Modular Open Systems 
Approach. However, the committee is concerned that access to 
these standards by the general academic population and 
technology industry remains limited. The committee notes that 
while a subset of the components of these standards are based 
on sensitive or classified information, that the data standards 
and interfaces used by the Department are predominantly based 
on publicly available sources such as foundational science and 
engineering principles. The committee further notes that 
restricting public access to the portion of the standards based 
on public knowledge unnecessarily increases cost for the 
conversion of commercial products to defense applications and 
limits the experimentation and innovation available to the 
Department of Defense. The committee is concerned that barriers 
to accessing these standards have an outsized impact in the 
fields of artificial intelligence, autonomy, and unmanned air 
vehicles.
    Accordingly, the committee directs the Secretary of Defense 
to provide a report to the House Committee on Armed Services 
not later than February 15, 2021, on:
    (1) which components of the common data standards used by 
the Department are based on publicly available knowledge, to 
include, at a minimum: Open Mission Systems developed by the 
Air Force; the Future Airborne Capabilities Environment 
developed by the Navy; and the VICTORY Initiative, developed by 
the Army;
    (2) the applicability of these components to artificial 
intelligence-based technologies, including autonomous ground 
vehicles or unmanned air vehicles;
    (3) the feasibility of releasing a public subset of the 
data standards to reduce the barriers to research with, and 
adoption by, academia and technology companies;
    (4) an assessment of the cost savings to the Department 
attributable to the public release of a subset of the data 
standards; and
    (5) an assessment of the benefit in developing the national 
security workforce by releasing a public subset of the data 
standards.

Next generation semiconductor development and manufacturing

    The committee believes that the Department of Defense 
declaration of 5th generation (5G) communications information 
technology as a modernization priority, as well as the global 
proliferation of 5G communications technology, provides an 
opportunity to fully assess the security of all 5G components, 
to include semiconductors. The committee is aware that the 
commercial demand for 5G technology is stimulating foreign 
investment, particularly by China, to develop advanced Gallium 
Nitride (GaN) and Gallium Arsenide (GaAs) radio frequency 
integrated circuit (RFIC) technology at a pace faster than the 
U.S. industrial base can sustain. RFIC technology is a key 
enabler to high performance military radar, secure 
communication, electronic warfare platforms and 5G 
infrastructure, providing a strategic technology advantage for 
the Department of Defense to maintain national security and 
warfighter viability. Commercial volumes for next generation 
RFICs to support a 5G roll-out will far outstrip Department of 
Defense demand, providing foreign competitors with motivation 
to fund research and development and effectively establish 
themselves as global leaders in a mission-critical industry. 
The committee is concerned that if the commercial economies of 
scale for these critical technologies are lost to foreign 
competitors, the United States's ability to maintain technology 
superiority will be directly compromised. The committee 
supports the Department of Defense's efforts to prioritize the 
development and procurement of both GaN and GaAs technology 
that can deliver next generation RFIC technology supporting 
both strategic Department of Defense priorities and 5G 
commercial demands.

Nuclear micro reactors

    The budget request included $730.5 million in PE 0604250D8Z 
for Advanced Innovative Technologies.
    The committee believes energy will be a critical enabler of 
future military operations and is concerned that the 
intermittent characters of many alternative energy sources are 
unable to keep pace with the growth of the Department of 
Defense's energy needs. The committee supports the development 
of a reliable, abundant, and continuous energy source provided 
by a mobile nuclear reactor.
    The committee is aware that Project Pele is on track to 
design, build, and demonstrate a prototype mobile nuclear 
reactor capability by calendar year 2024, and that the Joint 
Requirements Oversight Council recently agreed to establish 
requirements for a mobile nuclear reactor capability. The 
committee is encouraged by this progress and encourages the 
Director of the Strategic Capabilities Office to refine the 
program's objectives and work with the Services to provide 
programmatic and transition planning in advance of the planned 
2024 initial operating testing date.
    Further, the committee directs the Secretary of Defense to 
provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services by 
January 1, 2021, on the following:
    (1) the Department's plans to employ mobile nuclear 
reactors to meet the Department's priorities in areas such as 
multi-domain operations, advanced weaponry, and force 
modernization/electrification initiatives;
    (2) the Department's strategy for deploying mobile nuclear 
reactors at domestic strategic support areas;
    (3) the Department's plan to work with the Department of 
Energy to identify and develop the procurement strategy to 
acquire feed material for microreactor fuel; and
    (4) the status of pilot programs for micro-reactors.
    The committee recommends an increase of $50.0 million in PE 
0604250D8Z, Advanced Innovative Technologies, for the Strategic 
Capabilities Office to further develop and prove out its mobile 
nuclear reactor concept through Project Pele.

Public-Private Partnerships for Product Support on software-intensive 
        government systems

    The committee notes the work of the Department of Defense 
in codifying Public-Private Partnerships for Product Support 
through Department of Defense Instruction 4151.21. This 
instruction requires that public-private partnerships (PPP) for 
depot-level maintenance be employed whenever it is cost-
effective in providing improved support to the warfighter. The 
goal is to maximize the utilization of the government's 
facilities, equipment, and personnel at Department of Defense 
depot-level maintenance activities as a way to facilitate 
innovative and creative thinking.
    However, it is evident that maintaining a conventional PPP 
as it relates to software-intensive systems further complicates 
the partnership and hinders the goal of a PPP to ``ensure 
effective and timely response to mobilization, national defense 
contingency situations, and other emergency requirements.'' 
This is because risk is induced as software crosses multiple 
subsystems and can lead to complications for a program. 
Requiring different groups to perform routine updates on 
software that may have a commercial origin can cause system 
anomalies and duplication of effort. The current requirements 
from the Department of Defense Instruction 4151.21 appear ill-
suited for application to the Department's software usage.
    The committee supports the Department's efforts to 
prioritize partnerships between public and private entities to 
achieve critical, yet cost-effective support to the warfighter. 
However, the Department should reevaluate the requirements for 
the PPP as relates to software systems. Therefore, the 
committee directs the Secretary of Defense to provide a 
briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services not later 
than August 1, 2021, on how the Department of Defense can 
adjust requirements to make these more applicable to software 
systems.

Quantum research efforts

    The committee is pleased that the Under Secretary of 
Defense for Research and Engineering has established an 
Assistant Director for Quantum Sciences with the responsibility 
of producing a technology road map aligning quantum research 
and information science across the Department of Defense and 
each of the military services. The committee urges the 
Assistant Director for Quantum Sciences to consider the 
Department's quantum workforce gaps, and what science, 
technology, engineering, and math related education is required 
to develop the necessary future quantum workforce in the 
Quantum Sciences road map for the Department.

Report on Department of Defense university research COVID-19 recovery

    The committee is aware that most academic research has been 
suspended or slowed down due to the pandemic. With these 
setbacks, the university's workforce is also impacted, 
especially postdoctoral fellows, graduate students, and 
technical support staff. Recognizing that many of the 
technologies the nation uses today were derived from Department 
of Defense-funded fundamental research, the committee directs 
the Under Secretary of Defense for Research and Engineering, in 
collaboration with the research directors of the military 
services, to submit a report to the Committees on Armed 
Services of the Senate and the House of Representatives by 
January 1, 2021, addressing research impacts due to COVID-19, 
including, at a minimum, (1) the total number of grants and 
cooperative agreements that would need cost extensions to 
complete their original award scope fully funded; (2) total 
cost of providing cost extensions for such grants and 
cooperative agreements; (3) a best estimate taken from 
information on the number of grants affected of the total 
number of Department-funded postdoctoral fellows and graduate 
students unable to reach their desired academic or professional 
level because of a lack of research funding; and (4) any other 
negative impacts to the defense science and technology program 
as determined by the Under Secretary.

Report on employing and strengthening the United States' hypersonics 
        research and development workforce

    The committee commends the Department of Defense's 
increased attention on and strong investment in hypersonic 
weapons development to rapidly achieve operational capability. 
However, the committee is concerned that the Department's 
investments focus on near-term integration of existing 
capabilities and may fail to advance next-generation 
technologies at the pace needed to sustain or extend the 
nation's hypersonics technological advantage. The committee 
directs the Under Secretary of Defense for Research and 
Engineering to brief the congressional defense committees no 
later than January 31st 2021 on lower technology readiness 
level (6.1, 6.2, 6.3, and 6.4) investments being made in next 
generation hypersonic capabilities; the lack of test facilities 
accessible to the hypersonics industrial base, and specifically 
the lack of hypersonic wind tunnels; the number and status of 
hypersonics contracts in place with small businesses; and a 
comprehensive inventory of U.S. hypersonic test assets, 
including those owned and/or operated by universities, 
government laboratories, Federally-Funded Research and 
Development Centers, and industry.

Report on waterjet demilitarization technology

    The committee remains concerned that insufficient attention 
has been placed on the development of technology to safely 
demilitarize chemical or biological weapons in situ as today 
the detonation of these weapons is not always feasible without 
dispersing the agents. The committee understands high pressure 
waterjet technology systems have proven their capability to 
safely demilitarize munitions on land and have demonstrated the 
ability to demilitarize munitions in shallow water. Despite 
this, the committee remains concerned that munitions in waters 
greater than 120 feet pose a threat that has not been 
addressed. Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of 
Defense to provide a report to the congressional defense 
committees no later than January 31, 2021 outlining a plan to 
continue the development and implementation of a fully 
integrated transportable high-pressure waterjet system for the 
demilitarization of chemical and biological weapons and to 
further fund waterjet technology systems for the removal of 
constituents in munitions located in deep water environments.

Report to Congress on High Mach and Hypersonic Aircraft Capabilities

    The committee continues to be concerned about the threats 
posed by hypersonic weapons and the imperative to develop 
offensive and defensive hypersonic weapons systems. Further, 
report language accompanying the House Department of Defense 
Appropriations Act for Fiscal Year 2020 encouraged Air Force 
research into reusable hypersonic propulsion technologies 
including high Mach turbines. The committee is aware of ongoing 
efforts to mature technologies necessary to develop aircraft 
capable of high Mach and hypersonic flight, and believes these 
aircraft have the potential to greatly expand operational 
capability and flexibility in intelligence, surveillance, and 
reconnaissance, responsive space access, payload delivery, and 
transport. Therefore, the committee directs the Under Secretary 
of Defense for Research and Engineering to provide a briefing 
to the House Committee on Armed Services no later than the 
February 1, 2021 on current capability gaps that will be filled 
by high Mach and hypersonic aircraft, the Department's 
acquisition strategy for these programs, and an updated road 
map.

Tactical training range instrumentation

    The committee understands that existing Air Force and Navy 
air combat training systems are nearing the end of their 
service-life. There exists a common requirement to develop and 
field replacement technologies that ensures combat aircrew 
training remains uninterrupted for Active, Guard, and Reserve 
Component aviation forces during the transition to next 
generation aircraft and data-relay technologies.
    The committee notes that air combat training systems and 
associated technologies provide combat air forces with the 
opportunity to improve their readiness by providing experience 
through advanced simulation techniques prior to actual combat. 
The committee believes the next generation of air combat 
training systems needs to support Department of Defense and 
foreign partner air forces with collaborative training for both 
fourth and fifth generation aircraft representing high fidelity 
combat environments. Training systems should also integrate 
capabilities that provide aircrews with real-time, threat-
representative training and efficient post-mission debriefing 
that enables aircrews to reconstruct training events in less 
time and provides higher fidelity modeling to assess weapons 
fly-out data for simulated air-to-air and air-to-ground weapons 
employed during training.
    The committee is aware that the Air Force and Navy recently 
conducted a joint assessment of future training capability 
requirements and entered into a memorandum of understanding to 
begin the design and development of a joint training system. As 
part of this ongoing collaboration, the committee encourages 
the Air Force and Navy to consider leveraging, fielding, and 
integrating new training aid systems at land or over-water 
training ranges utilized by Active, Guard, or Reserve Component 
forces with an assigned mission to provide friendly or threat 
representative training capabilities to combat air forces.

Testing of lithium ion batteries

    The committee recognizes that the Navy serves as the 
technology warrant holder for the Department of Defense on 
lithium-ion battery testing and certification. The Navy's 
Lithium Battery Safety Program establishes the safety 
guidelines for the selection, design, testing, evaluation, use, 
packaging, storage, transportation, and disposal of lithium 
batteries.
    The automotive industry is making rapid advancements in 
lithium-ion battery technologies and leading battery 
development in the commercial space. In order to innovate at 
the pace of commercial industry, the Department must streamline 
its processes for battery testing and certification. This 
streamlined approach is crucial to technology demonstration and 
prototype projects where timeline and budget are limited.
    The committee therefore urges the Secretary of the Navy to:
    (1) review the current testing of Department of Defense 
lithium-ion batteries, including the size and scale of test 
chambers, staffed personnel to run the test chambers, and the 
physical limitations of the quantity of test chambers;
    (2) examine the capacity of the lithium-ion battery 
testing, to include details on the volume of testing, and any 
limitations on the size, weight, power wattage, and voltage 
able to be tested inside Department of Defense facilities;
    (3) evaluate the overall speed of the certification process 
and note delays or impacts on current battery projects and new, 
evolving battery technologies entering the certification 
process; and
    (4) identify any commercial facilities that could 
supplement or replace current Department of Defense processes, 
and leverage commercial expertise in this field.

Use of artificial intelligence to analyze beneficial ownership of 
        defense contractors

    The Committee remains concerned with the threat of peer and 
near-peer competitors acquiring critical technology developed 
by American companies via shell corporations that hide their 
true ownership in order to circumvent review by the Committee 
on Foreign Investment in the United States. The Committee, 
therefore, directs the Director of the Defense Innovation Unit 
to provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services 
by April 30, 2021 on commercial capabilities, current 
challenges, and required resources necessary to develop 
artificial intelligence for analyzing beneficial ownership of 
defense contractors or corporations seeking Department of 
Defense contracts. The artificial intelligence and related 
capabilities reviewed should be capable of identifying 
organizations or individuals that hide ownership or investments 
in companies that contract with the Department of Defense for 
critical technology.

                         LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS


              Subtitle A--Authorization of Appropriations


              Section 201--Authorization of Appropriations

    This section would authorize appropriations for research, 
development, test, and evaluation at the levels identified in 
section 4201 of division D of this Act.

    Subtitle B--Program Requirements, Restrictions, and Limitations


  Section 211--Modification of Science, Mathematics, and Research for 
            Transformation (SMART) Defense Education Program

    This section would amend section 2192a of title 10, United 
States Code, by establishing a scholarship for service pilot 
subprogram under the Department's Science, Mathematics, and 
Research for Transformation (SMART) Defense Education Program 
for students at minority institutions to diversify and 
strengthen the national security workforce. This section would 
require the Secretary of Defense to submit an initial report to 
the congressional defense committees by December 31, 2022, on 
the establishment of the pilot subprogram, and a final report 
by September 30, 2024, on the success of the pilot program in 
recruiting individuals for scholarships under this section and 
hiring and retaining those individuals in the public sector 
workforce.
    This section would also require the Secretary to pay 
participants at a rate that is comparable to the private sector 
and include a paid internship requirement with defense 
industry, and it would require that not less than 20 percent of 
SMART program scholarship awards go to individuals pursuing 
degrees in computer science or a related field of study.

     Section 212--Enhanced Participation of Department of Defense 
   Contractors in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics 
                               Activities

    This section would amend chapter 111 of title 10, United 
States Code, to establish a new section, 2192c program to 
enhance contractor participation in science, technology, 
engineering, and mathematics activities. This section would 
also direct the Secretary of Defense to carry out a program 
under which the Secretary shall seek to enter into partnerships 
with Department of Defense contractors to carry out community 
service activities to promote interest in careers in science, 
technology, engineering, and math disciplines, and allow those 
activities to be considered as allowable costs on a government 
contract.

     Section 213--Modification of Requirements Relating to Certain 
            Cooperative Research and Development Agreements

    This section would amend section 2350a of title 10, United 
States Code, by allowing the Secretary of Defense to delegate 
his or her authority to make a determination to enter into a 
cooperative research and development project to only one party. 
It would also allow for cooperative research and development 
projects when cost sharing is unequal in cases that provide 
strategic value to the United States or partner country. This 
section would also allow the Secretary, or designee, to procure 
qualified services from the foreign entity with the requirement 
that written notice must be sent to the congressional defense 
committees, the Committee on Foreign Affairs of the House of 
Representatives, and the Committee on Foreign Relations of the 
Senate no later than 30 days before issuing a waiver.

           Section 214--Pilot Program on Talent Optimization

    This section would direct the Under Secretary of Defense 
for Research and Engineering, acting through the Director of 
the Defense Innovation Unit, to conduct a pilot program to 
develop a talent optimization marketplace for military 
personnel in the Reserve and Guard Components.

 Section 215--Codification of the National Security Innovation Network

    This section would amend chapter 139 of title 10, United 
States Code, by inserting a new section 2358c, National 
Security Innovation Network. This new section would establish a 
program office to be known as the National Security Innovation 
Network (formerly the MD5 National Security Technology 
Accelerator) as a permanent office within the Under Secretary 
of Defense for Research and Engineering or another organization 
at the discretion of the Secretary of Defense. This section 
would require the Secretary of Defense to submit a report no 
later than 180 days after the date of the enactment of this Act 
on the Department's plan to establish this office. This section 
would require the Comptroller General of the United States to 
submit a review of the report to the congressional defense 
committees not later than 180 days after the Secretary's 
implementation report. Finally, this section would require the 
Comptroller General to review and submit an evaluation of the 
program to the appropriate congressional committees not later 
than 3 years after the date of the enactment of this Act.
    Additionally, the committee notes that Hacking for Defense 
(H4D) is authorized as a National Security Innovation and 
Entrepreneurial Education Program in the National Defense 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2018 (Public Law 115-91) to 
enable Department of Defense innovation. H4D is a university 
course developed by U.S. military combat veterans and private 
sector entrepreneurs taught at universities across the United 
States in which students apply cutting-edge problem-solving 
techniques to real-world national security and defense 
problems. The committee finds that H4D supports solution 
development directly for the warfighter, improves U.S. military 
readiness, and stimulates growth within the National Security 
Innovation Base, consistent with the 2018 National Defense 
Strategy. Further, the committee believes H4D fosters the 
growth of an emerging generation of national security leaders 
and mission-driven entrepreneurs by improving and expanding the 
science, technology, engineering, and math skill sets within 
the U.S. workforce. The committee believes that the Department 
should fully resource H4D and its growing ecosystem of national 
security innovators and entrepreneurs through the provision of 
the annual funding required to enhance existing H4D university 
courses.

Section 216--Modification of Pilot Program on Enhanced Civics Education

    This section would amend section 234 of the National 
Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2020 (Public Law 116-
92) to include in the pilot program the improvement of critical 
thinking and media literacy among students. This section would 
require the Secretary of Defense to implement the pilot program 
not later than 90 days after the date of the enactment of this 
Act. This section would also require the Secretary to submit a 
report to the congressional defense committees not later than 
30 days after the date of the enactment of this Act on the 
Secretary's efforts to implement the pilot program.

 Section 217--Modification of Joint Artificial Intelligence Research, 
                 Development, and Transition Activities

    This section would amend section 238 of the John S. McCain 
National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2019 (Public 
Law 115-232) by assigning responsibility for the Joint 
Artificial Intelligence Center (JAIC) to the Deputy Secretary 
of Defense and ensure data access and visibility for the JAIC.

 Section 218--Modification of National Security Innovation Activities 
                    and Manufacturing Pilot Program

    This section would amend section 2358 of title 10, United 
States Code, by realigning the National Security Innovation 
Capital (NSIC) program under the Defense Innovation Unit and 
establishing an advisory board to provide recommendations on 
defense innovation priority investments once NSIC funding is 
available. This section would also amend section 2505 of title 
10, United States Code, by extending the Defense Manufacturing 
pilot program.

  Section 219--Extension of Pilot Program for the Enhancement of the 
 Research, Development, Test, and Evaluation Centers of the Department 
                               of Defense

    This section would extend the termination date by 5 years 
for the pilot program for the enhancement of the research, 
development, test, and evaluation centers of the Department of 
Defense established in section 233 of the National Defense 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2017 (Public Law 114-328). 
The new pilot termination date would be September 30, 2027. 
This section would require the Secretary of Defense to submit a 
report to the congressional defense committees not later than 1 
year after the date of the enactment of this Act on the status 
of the pilot program, to include: (1) which military 
departments are not participating in the program; (2) any 
issues that are preventing their participation; and (3) any 
offices or elements of the Department that may be responsible 
for their delay in implementation. This section would also 
correct the title of the Assistant Secretary of the Army for 
Acquisition, Logistics, and Technology.
    The committee believes in the importance of demonstrating 
methods for the more effective development of technology and 
management of functions at the Department's science and 
technology reinvention laboratories, test and evaluation 
centers part of the Major Range and Test Facility Base, and at 
the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency. The committee 
urges each of the military services and the Office of the 
Secretary of Defense to make the most of the extended timeframe 
for this important pilot program.

     Section 220--Digital Data Management and Analytics Capability

    This section would direct the Secretary of Defense to 
develop and implement an advanced digital data and analytics 
capability to digitally integrate all elements of the 
Department of Defense's acquisition process; digitally record 
and track all relevant data generated during the research, 
development, testing, and evaluation of systems; and maximize 
the use of such data to inform the further development and 
improvement of both acquisition systems and the acquisition 
process for those systems.
    The committee is aware that several U.S. Government 
Accountability Office reports have cited the need for improved 
data management processes surrounding the Department's overall 
management framework. While most relevant data is government 
owned and authorized for Department-wide use, there is no 
enterprise mechanism facilitating the discovery, access, 
correlation or integration, and use of acquisition-related data 
across organizational boundaries. Each functional organization 
has established and locally optimized its own data and analytic 
processes for its own needs, and in many cases even these local 
practices are highly manual and inefficient.
    To this end, this section would direct the Secretary of 
Defense to conduct a significant review of data content and 
requirements to support management functions; implement 
demonstration activities to develop lessons learned and inform 
the way forward; conduct a comparative analysis that assesses 
the risks and benefits of the digital management and analytics 
capability relative to the Department's traditional data 
collection, reporting, exposing, and analysis approaches; and 
update the Department's policy and guidance based on the 
results of the demonstration activities.
    This section would also require the Defense Innovation 
Board, in consultation with the Defense Digital Service, to 
conduct an independent assessment and submit a report to both 
the Secretary and the congressional defense committees no later 
than 180 days from enactment of this Act on recommended 
approaches for implementation of the capability. This section 
would then require the Secretary to submit an implementation 
report to the congressional defense committees not later than 
90 days after the Defense Innovation Board's assessment. 
Finally, it would require the Defense Innovation Board and the 
Defense Science Board to submit an independent joint assessment 
on the Department's progress by March 15, 2022.

   Section 221--Social Science, Management Science, and Information 
                      Science Research Activities

    This section would direct the Secretary of Defense to carry 
out a social, management, and information science research and 
development program to ensure the Department of Defense has 
access to innovation and expertise in social, management, and 
information science necessary for improving the effectiveness 
and efficiency of executing Department of Defense operational 
and management activities. This section would require the 
Secretary to submit a report by December 31, 2022, to the 
congressional defense committees on the program, in both a 
classified and unclassified format.
    The committee recognizes that all national security 
challenges facing the United States require an understanding of 
the causes and consequences of human behavior and has supported 
the Department's efforts to expand collaboration with the 
academic social science community through the Minerva Research 
Initiative since its establishment in 2008. Maintaining the 
Nation's technological superiority in the face of threats from 
great powers, state and non-state actors, and individuals 
requires not only investing in physical sciences but also the 
integration of knowledge from cross-disciplinary research that 
explores the social, cultural, behavioral, political, historic, 
and religious drivers and impacts of today's increasingly 
complex global security environment.
    At a time when peer and near-peer adversaries are 
increasingly employing elements of malign influence, 
disinformation, and predatory economics in concert with 
technological capabilities, the Department should be increasing 
its investment in social science research programs, not ending 
it. Three recent reports from the National Academies assessing 
social science programs and their impacts on national security 
and intelligence noted the ongoing contributions of Minerva, 
and recommended ways to increase outreach and dissemination of 
results to enhance the success of the program.
    The committee urges the Department of Defense to implement 
the recommendations of the National Academies to strengthen 
ties between grantees and potential users of their research and 
increase visibility, tracking, and dissemination of the 
research results to the broader national security community. 
All military services should participate in the program and 
highlight their specific plans and outcomes in annual budget 
documentation, further increasing visibility of Minerva-funded 
research to the user community.

    Section 222--Measuring and Incentivizing Programming Proficiency

    This section would direct the Secretary of Defense to 
leverage existing civilian software development and software 
architecture certification programs to implement coding 
language proficiency and artificial intelligence competency 
tests within the Department of Defense. This would measure an 
individual's competency in using machine learning tools, in a 
manner similar to the way the Defense Language Proficiency Test 
measures competency in foreign language skills, and enable the 
identification of members of the Armed Forces and civilian 
employees of the Department of Defense who have varying levels 
of quantified coding comprehension and skills and a propensity 
to learn new programming paradigms, algorithms, and data 
analytics.

 Section 223--Information Technology Modernization and Security Efforts

    This section would direct an interagency information 
technology spectrum modernization effort, led by the Assistant 
Secretary of Commerce for Communications and Infrastructure and 
the National Telecommunications and Information Administration, 
to synchronize development and coordination of standards and 
Federal spectrum management. This section would also require 
the Secretary of Defense to establish a program to identify and 
mitigate vulnerabilities in the telecommunications 
infrastructure of the Department of Defense.

 Section 224--Board of Directors for the Joint Artificial Intelligence 
                                 Center

    This section would direct the Secretary of Defense to 
create and resource a Board of Directors for the Joint 
Artificial Intelligence Center (JAIC), comprised of senior 
Department of Defense officials, as well as civilian directors 
not employed by the Department of Defense. The objective would 
be to have a standing body over the JAIC that can bring 
governmental and non-governmental experts together for the 
purpose of assisting the Department of Defense in correctly 
integrating and operationalizing artificial intelligence 
technologies.

               Section 225--Directed Energy Working Group

    This section would establish a Directed Energy Working 
Group inside the Department of Defense to coordinate directed 
energy efforts across the military services, leverage shared 
research and development, eliminate redundant efforts, and 
expedite the operationalization of directed energy programs.

          Section 226--Program Executive Officer for Autonomy

    This section would create a Program Executive Officer for 
autonomy within the Navy.

 Section 227--Accountability Measures Relating to the Advanced Battle 
                           Management System

    This section would require the Secretary of the Air Force 
to provide additional information on the Advanced Battle 
Management System (ABMS) family of systems. This section would 
amend section 147(g) of the John S. McCain National Defense 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2019 (Public Law 115-232) to 
include as part of the quarterly briefings a detailed briefing 
on each on-ramp demonstration conducted during that quarter, to 
encompass: objectives achieved; the realism of the exercise, 
including which portions were scripted and which were not, and 
the technical workarounds or substitute technologies employed; 
composition of and sustainment plan for leave-behind interim 
capabilities provided to a combatant commander; and the costs 
spent on technology solutions, range access and testing 
resources, personnel, and logistics, including travel costs.
    This section would also require the Secretary to report on 
planned ABMS capabilities, technologies needed to implement and 
achieve these capabilities, and a timeline for technology 
maturation and notional fielding schedule across the future 
years defense program. The committee expects this report to 
outline how ABMS intends to transition demonstrated 
capabilities into sustainable Programs of Record. This section 
would further require reports on ABMS acquisition authorities, 
coordination between the ABMS Architect Office and the Common 
Mission Control Center, and the ABMS security plan. Finally, 
this section would require the Director of Cost Assessment and 
Program Evaluation to conduct an independent cost estimate of 
any ABMS cost estimate prepared by the Air Force.

        Section 228--Measures to Address Foreign Talent Programs

    This section would direct the Secretary of Defense to 
maintain a list of foreign talent recruitment programs that 
present a threat to the United States, and publish the list in 
the Federal Registrar for not less than 60 days.

Section 229--Disclosure of Foreign Funding Sources in Applications for 
                        Federal Research Awards

    This section would require Federal research agencies to 
require any principal investigator or co-principal investigator 
under a grant or cooperative agreement to disclose all current 
and pending support and the sources of such support at the time 
of the application.

Section 230--Limitations Relating to Large Unmanned Surface Vessels and 
                  Associated Offensive Weapon Systems

    This section would prohibit the procurement of any large 
unmanned surface vessels in fiscal year 2021 until a 
certification regarding technology maturity has been submitted 
to Congress. This section also includes a prohibition on the 
inclusion of offensive weapons systems until the Secretary of 
Defense certifies how these systems will comply with the Law of 
Armed Conflict.

  Section 231--Limitation on Availability of Funds Pending Review and 
          Report on Next Generation Air Dominance Capabilities

    This section would limit the Secretary of the Air Force and 
the Secretary of the Navy from obligating more than 85 percent 
of funding authorized to be appropriated for fiscal year 2021 
for the Next Generation Air Dominance capabilities until the 
Director, Cost Assessment and Program Evaluation performs a 
non-advocate review and submits a report to the congressional 
defense committees that assesses the separate efforts of the 
U.S. Air Force and the U.S. Navy regarding the Next Generation 
Air Dominance portfolio of capabilities being developed by each 
Secretary.

  Subtitle C--Emerging Technology and Artificial Intelligence Matters


         Section 241--Steering Committee on Emerging Technology

    This section would establish a steering committee on 
emerging technology and national security threats.

   Section 242--Training for Human Resources Personnel in Artificial 
                    Intelligence and Related Topics

    This section would direct the Secretary of Defense to 
develop and implement a program to provide human resources 
personnel with training in the fields of software development, 
data science, and artificial intelligence, as such fields 
relate to the duties of such personnel, not later 1 year after 
the date of the enactment of this Act.

    Section 243--Unclassified Workspaces for Personnel with Pending 
                          Security Clearances

    This section would direct the Secretary of Defense to issue 
guidance not later than 180 days after the date of the 
enactment of this Act to ensure, to the extent practicable, 
that all Department of Defense facilities have unclassified 
workspaces for employees who have applied for, but have not yet 
received, a security clearance.

   Section 244--Pilot Program on the Use of Electronic Portfolios to 
          Evaluate Applicants for Certain Technical Positions

    This section would direct the Secretary of Defense to carry 
out a pilot program to evaluate applicants for technical 
positions within the Department of Defense, in part, on 
electronic portfolios of the applicant's work.

     Section 245--Self-Directed Training in Artificial Intelligence

    This section would direct the Secretary of Defense to 
provide a list of approved online courses relating to 
artificial intelligence that may be taken by employees and 
military members on a voluntary basis outside work hours not 
later than 180 days after the date of the enactment of this 
Act. The section would also require the Secretary to develop a 
system to reward those who complete the courses.

Section 246--Part-Time and Term Employment of University Professors and 
       Students in the Defense Science and Technology Enterprise

    This section would direct the Secretary of Defense to 
establish a program under which qualified professors and 
students may be employed on a part-time or term basis in an 
organization of the Defense science and technology enterprise 
for the purpose of conducting a research project. This section 
would require the Secretary to submit to the congressional 
defense committees not later than 30 days after the completion 
of each of the first 3 years of the program a report on the 
status of the program.

          Section 247--Microelectronics and National Security

    This section would amend section 231 of the National 
Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2017 (Public Law 114-
328) directing a strategy for assured access to trusted 
microelectronics by extending the report deadline to December 
30, 2020, and adding new requirements to the strategy and 
implementation pan.
    This section would also establish an Advisory Panel on 
Microelectronics Leadership and Competitiveness to develop a 
national strategy to accelerate the development and deployment 
of state-of-the-art microelectronics and ensure that the United 
States is a global leader in the field. This section would 
direct the Secretary of Defense and the Assistant to the 
President for National Security Affairs to provide briefings to 
the congressional defense committees within 90 days after the 
date of the enactment of this Act on the progress of the 
Secretary in developing the strategy and implementation plan 
required, and the progress of the Advisory Panel in developing 
its strategy, respectively.

    Section 248--Acquisition of Ethically and Responsibly Developed 
                   Artificial Intelligence Technology

    This section would direct the Secretary of Defense, acting 
through the Board of Directors of the Joint Artificial 
Intelligence Center, to conduct an assessment to determine 
whether the Department of Defense has the ability to ensure 
that any artificial intelligence technology acquired by the 
Department is ethically and responsibly developed.

Section 249--Enhancement of Public-Private Talent Exchange Programs in 
                       the Department of Defense

    This section would amend the Public-Private Talent Exchange 
agreement requirements of section 1599g of title 10, United 
States Code, and would direct the Secretary of Defense to take 
steps to ensure that the authority for the Department of 
Defense to operate a public-private talent exchange program 
pursuant to section 1599g of title 10, United States Code, is 
used to exchange personnel with private sector entities working 
on artificial intelligence applications. The section would 
direct the Secretary to provide a briefing to the Committees on 
Armed Services of the Senate and the House of Representatives 
not later than 180 days after the date of the enactment of this 
Act, and annually thereafter, on the efforts undertaken to 
expand existing public-private exchange programs of the 
Department of Defense.

       Subtitle D--Sustainable Chemistry Research and Development


                        Section 251--Short Title

    This section would establish the title of this subtitle as 
the Sustainable Chemistry Research and Development Act of 2020.

                         Section 252--Findings

    This section would describe the findings of the Act.

  Section 253--National Coordinating Entity for Sustainable Chemistry

    This section would direct the Director of the Office of 
Science and Technology Policy to convene an inter-agency entity 
under the National Science and Technology Council not later 
than 180 days after the date of the enactment of this Act to 
coordinate Federal programs and activities in support of 
sustainable chemistry.

         Section 254--Strategic Plan for Sustainable Chemistry

    This section would direct the interagency entity to develop 
a strategic plan in support of sustainable chemistry, and would 
direct the entity to submit a report to the Committee on 
Environment and Public Works, the Committee on Commerce, 
Science, and Transportation, and the Committee on 
Appropriations of the Senate, and the Committee on Science, 
Space, and Technology, the Committee on Energy and Commerce, 
the Committee on Appropriations of the House of 
Representatives, and to the Government Accountability Office 
not later than 2 years after enactment and every 3 years 
thereafter assessing Federal investments in sustainable 
chemistry.

   Section 255--Agency Activities in Support of Sustainable Chemistry

    This section would direct participating agencies to carry 
out activities in support of sustainable chemistry, as 
appropriate to the specific mission and program of each agency.

           Section 256--Partnerships in Sustainable Chemistry

    This section would authorize participating agencies to 
facilitate and support the creation of partnerships that must 
include one private sector organization to aid in sustainable 
chemistry research, development, demonstration, technology 
transfer, education, and job training.

                      Section 257--Prioritization

    This section would direct the interagency entity to focus 
on activities that achieve the goals outlined in the Act.

                   Section 258--Rule of Construction

    This section would direct that nothing in this Act shall be 
construed to alter or amend any State law or action with regard 
to sustainable chemistry or green chemistry, as defined by the 
State.

        Section 259--Major Multi-User Research Facility Project

    This section would amend chapter 16 of title 42, United 
States Code, to update the definition of the term ``Major 
multi-user research facility project.''

             Subtitle E--Plans, Reports, and Other Matters


     Section 261--Modification to Annual Report of the Director of 
                    Operational Test and Evaluation

    This section would amend section 139(h)(2) of title 10, 
United States Code, by removing the sunset date for the annual 
report submitted by the Director of Operational Test and 
Evaluation. This section does not change or alter any 
authorities of the Director of Operational Test and Evaluation.

   Section 262--Repeal of Quarterly Updates on the Optionally Manned 
                        Fighting Vehicle Program

    This section would repeal section 261 of the National 
Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2020 (Public Law 116-
92). The committee notes that the Optionally Manned Fighting 
Vehicle (OMFV) Program is delayed and the Army's original 
solicitation has been cancelled making quarterly updates on the 
program unnecessary.
    The committee appreciates the Army's efforts over the last 
20 years and current commitment to develop a next generation 
combat vehicle to replace the M2 Bradley Infantry Fighting 
Vehicle in armored formations today. Although the committee 
shares the Army's disappointment with the recent cancellation 
of the solicitation for the OMFV, the committee is nonetheless 
encouraged that the Army appears better positioned to take a 
thoughtful, measured, and realistic approach to development of 
next generation armored fighting vehicle technology. This is 
evident in the Army's efforts at this time to learn up-front 
from industry what new technologies could make a next 
generation combat vehicle significantly more capable than the 
M2 Bradley, and at the same time, achievable and affordable.
    In this regard, the committee understands the Army's new 
development concept includes three or more phases, of which the 
first is solicitation of digital engineering designs from up to 
five commercial vendors for production design review by a 
source selection evaluation board, followed by a down-select to 
three vendors for an engineering and manufacturing development, 
critical design review, and production prototyping phase, and 
finally down-select to two offerors or possibly a single 
awardee for low-rate initial production. The committee is 
interested to see if this process, while taking somewhat 
longer, will attract the widest competitive field of offerors 
with the widest technological diversity, and at the same time 
achieve the benefits of such competition including enhanced 
technology, lower cost, and potentially an expanded armored 
vehicle industrial capacity.
    Although this section would repeal the requirement for a 
quarterly update on the OMFV program, the committee expects 
that the Secretary of the Army or designee will, upon request, 
provide the committee with briefings that address the elements 
of the update as originally enacted in section 261 of Public 
Law 116-92.

    Section 263--Independent Evaluation of Personal Protective and 
                      Diagnostic Testing Equipment

    This section would direct the Director of Operational Test 
and Evaluation to independently evaluate any processes used to 
test the effectiveness of covered personal protective and 
diagnostic testing equipment and the results of such tests. 
This section would require the Director to submit to the 
congressional defense committees a report not later than 30 
days after the completion of each evaluation on the results of 
the evaluation.

  Section 264--Reports on F-35 Physiological Episodes and Mitigation 
                                Efforts

    This section would require the Under Secretary of Defense 
for Acquisition and Sustainment to conduct a root cause 
analysis study of all physiological episodes (PEs) that have 
been reported by F-35 pilots as of the date of the enactment of 
this Act, and to provide a report to the congressional defense 
committees not later than 180 days after the date of the 
enactment of this Act. The report would describe:
    (1) all reported instances of F-35 PEs;
    (2) all findings and recommendations of the root cause 
analysis study; and
    (3) resources required to resolve issues contributing to F-
35 PEs.
    Finally, this section would require the Under Secretary to 
describe in the annual report required by section 224(d) of the 
National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2017 (Public 
Law 114-328) what funding and corrective actions are being 
implemented to mitigate F-35 PEs.

  Section 265--Study on Mechanisms for Attracting and Retaining High 
        Quality Talent in the National Security Innovation Base

    This section would direct the Secretary of Defense to 
conduct a study to determine the feasibility of establishing a 
program to attract and retain covered individuals for 
employment in the national security innovation base. This 
section would require the Secretary to submit a report to the 
congressional defense committees not later than February 1, 
2021, on the results of the study.

                  TITLE III--OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE

                       ITEMS OF SPECIAL INTEREST


                     Energy and Environment Issues


 Application of Geological Survey Information Related to Red Hill Bulk 
                         Fuel Storage Facility

    The committee notes that since the January 2014 fuel 
release from the Red Hill Bulk Fuel Storage Facility in Hawaii, 
there have been significant concerns about the impact of fuel 
releases on drinking water quality. The committee further notes 
that the Red Hill Administrative Order on Consent process as 
administered by the Environmental Protection Agency and Hawaii 
Department of Health through a negotiated agreement with the 
Department of the Navy and Defense Logistics Agency is the 
primary mechanism through which environmental investigation and 
remediation and tank infrastructure improvements are being 
managed. The committee understands the considerable work that 
has been done by the Red Hill Groundwater Modeling Workgroup, 
made up of State and Federal stakeholders and subject-matter 
experts, to improve understanding of the fuel release's impact 
on the aquifer and the manner in which fuel is transported 
through the basalt layer. Accordingly, the committee directs 
the Secretary of the Navy to provide a briefing to the House 
Committee on Armed Services by January 15, 2021, summarizing 
the work to date on the geological and hydrological mechanisms 
that impact how a release of fuel from the Red Hill facility 
would impact the drinking water supply. The briefing shall also 
include any areas requiring further study and the Navy's plan 
to ensure subsequent studies fill these knowledge gaps.

                   Aviation Ground Support Equipment

    The committee is concerned that existing Air Force Aviation 
Ground Support Equipment may be inefficient, expensive to 
operate, and requires frequent repairs. The committee is aware 
of alternatives, such as Electrical Ground Power Units, that 
utilize batteries to power an electronics package and can be 
integrated onto a self-propelled cart, eliminating the emission 
of greenhouse gasses and providing nearly silent operation. 
These technologies may increase overall system efficiency, 
provide flexible power solutions, reduce the level of required 
maintenance, and decrease the total ownership costs of the 
units to the Air Force. Therefore, the committee directs the 
Secretary of the Air Force to provide a briefing to the House 
Committee on Armed Services, not later than December 31, 2020, 
on the readiness of current Air Force Aviation Ground Support 
Equipment and the feasibility of utilizing alternatives to 
current Air Force Aviation Ground Support Equipment. At a 
minimum, the report shall address the following elements:
    (1) the readiness status of current Air Force Aviation 
Ground Support Equipment;
    (2) the overall operations, maintenance, and sustainment 
costs of current Air Force Aviation Ground Support Equipment;
    (3) an assessment of environmental impact of current Air 
Force Aviation Ground Support Equipment to include noise and 
air pollution;
    (4) a review of alternate sources of Air Force Aviation 
Ground Support Equipment to provide flight-line power to Air 
Force aircraft and an overview of any Air Force plans to pursue 
such alternatives; and
    (5) an assessment of total lifecycle cost savings of 
replacing current diesel-powered flight-line Air Force Aviation 
Ground Support Equipment with alternate solutions.

           Biomass Support of Installation Energy Resiliency

    The committee notes that biomass is an attractive option 
for the production of secure, renewable electricity. Biomass 
has the attribute of providing reliable electricity independent 
of atmospheric variability. The committee believes that the 
energy security and resiliency provided by an on-post biomass 
facility has value and should serve as a model for other 
military installations located in parts of the country having a 
ready supply of biomass material. The committee further 
believes that the Secretary of Defense should place a monetary 
value on the value of energy security and include biomass as 
one of the alternatives when studying energy resiliency on 
specific installations. Therefore, the committee directs the 
Under Secretary of Defense for Acquisition and Sustainment to 
provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services by 
February 1, 2021, as to military installations where biomass 
will be considered during analysis of alternatives for 
achieving additional installation energy resiliency.

           Defense Energy Resilience Authorities and Programs

    The committee commends the Department of Defense for making 
energy resilience the central tenet of its energy program. The 
committee recognizes that the Department has a variety of 
policies, programs, statutory authorities, and tools to 
implement energy resilience and maintain critical missions and 
readiness. The committee applauds the efforts of the Department 
of Defense to strengthen the resilience of energy and utility 
systems, and to integrate different contracting authorities and 
sources of funding to deploy energy resilience technologies and 
projects. In particular, the committee commends the 
Environmental Security Technology Certification Program (ESTCP) 
for sponsoring the Military Energy Resilience Catalyst (MERC) 
program to accelerate the development of military energy 
resilience professionals, disseminate key best practices and 
lessons learned, and transition successful energy technologies 
across the Department of Defense enterprise.
    Accordingly, the committee directs the Secretary of Defense 
to provide a briefing to the committee no later than October 1, 
2020, on initiatives that integrate existing utility and energy 
authorities to support installation resilience projects to 
upgrade infrastructure, deploy emerging technologies, and 
strengthen mission assurance. This briefing shall also include 
potential opportunities to better leverage existing 
authorities, and improve information sharing by installation 
managers and contracting officers.

          Execution of the Military Munitions Response Program

    The committee is concerned about the chronic under-
execution of the Military Munitions Response Program (MMRP). 
The committee notes that beginning in 2016, after the 
Environmental Protection Agency published Lifetime Health 
Advisories (LHA) for per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances 
(PFAS), the Department of Defense has used the MMRP as a bill-
payer for environmental response to PFAS. The committee further 
notes that while this was an appropriate response to the 
initial PFAS crisis, there has been adequate time to adjust 
environmental remediation budget requests to ensure that both 
MMRP and PFAS response are adequately funded, especially given 
congressional adds for both PFAS and MMRP. Accordingly, the 
committee directs the Secretary of Defense to provide a 
briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services by March 1, 
2021, that includes, at a minimum, a plan to increase execution 
of the MMRP program and a funding plan for addressing both PFAS 
remediation and MMRP across the Future Years Defense Program.

     Expanding the Scope of and Partners for DOD PFAS Research and 
                              Development

    The Committee recognizes the initial investment the 
Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program 
(SERDP) and the Environmental Security Technology Certification 
Program (ESTCP) have made in research and development to 
identify an alternative to AFFF and safe clean-up and disposal 
mechanisms for PFAS contaminating groundwater and drinking 
water. SERDP and ESTCP investments have not yet yielded the 
results they are seeking. The Committee supports the 
authorization of additional funding to both of these programs. 
As DoD works to identify an alternative to AFFF, safe and 
effective clean-up and disposal mechanisms for PFAS chemicals, 
and to better understand how to mitigate the health and 
environmental impacts of PFAS contamination, the Committee 
directs the Office of the Assistant Secretary of Defense for 
Sustainment, through ESTCP, SERDP and other relevant programs, 
to report to the committee by December 1, 2020, on efforts or 
plans to solicit additional academic partners for PFAS research 
and development challenges, particularly those with 
institutional focus and expertise on the health and 
environmental hazards related to PFAS chemicals.

 Federal-State Partnerships and the Readiness Environmental Protection 
                          Integration Program

    The committee commends the military departments for their 
extensive use of the Readiness Environmental Protection 
Integration Program as a tool for limiting encroachment and 
land-use conflicts, while also promoting key land conservation 
and environmental restoration goals. The committee encourages 
the military departments to leverage Federal-State partnerships 
to collaboratively employ best management practices and to 
enhance resilience and conserve culturally and ecologically 
important landscapes and watersheds for the benefit of 
surrounding military communities and local economies.

           Implementation of Operational Energy Cost Savings

    The committee notes that considerable operational energy 
cost savings can be achieved through changes in service member 
behavior. The committee further notes that these changes can be 
hard to achieve due to long-standing practices and habits. In 
the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2020 
(Public Law 116-92), the committee sought to incentivize these 
changes in behavior through the amendment of section 2912 of 
title 10, United States Code, allowing one-half of any 
operational energy cost savings to be used by the commander of 
the installation at which these savings were achieved. 
Therefore, the committee directs the Under Secretary of Defense 
for Acquisition and Sustainment to provide a briefing to the 
House Committee on Armed Services by December 1, 2020, 
regarding the implementation of this amendment by the military 
departments. At a minimum, the briefing should include how each 
military department has informed installation commanders and 
their tenants about this authority, and what guidance has been 
provided to aid implementation.

     Increased Resiliency and Lethality through Operational Energy 
                               Investment

    The committee commends the Department of Defense and the 
military departments for their work to date on initiatives that 
increase lethality and resiliency through the reduction of the 
Department's dependence on fossil fuels. Noting that over 70 
percent of the casualties in the Iraq and Afghanistan wars 
resulted from attacks on fuel and resupply convoys, the 
committee notes that a failure to adequately address this issue 
will be paid in service member lives and a reduced ability to 
challenge our adversaries. The committee remains concerned 
that, while recent joint exercises have begun to bring the 
problem of overreliance on fossil fuels into focus, the 
military services have largely failed to address these issues 
by incorporating technologies that reduce fossil fuel use into 
their existing equipment inventories. In addition, the 
committee is concerned that the military departments are not 
including these technologies as they invest in future 
platforms. Accordingly, the committee directs the Secretary of 
Defense to provide a report to the House Committee on Armed 
Services by August 1, 2021, on how it will increase lethality 
and reduce casualties by reducing its dependence on fossil 
fuels. The report shall include at a minimum a plan for the 
following:
    (1) integrating Department of Defense and military 
department operational energy personnel into planning, posture, 
and programming entities to ensure fuel consumption, fuel 
distribution, and logistics are considered across the 
Department;
    (2) how the military departments are prioritizing 
reductions in fuel consumption by current platforms during 
planned upgrades and depot maintenance;
    (3) options for reducing the Department's consumption of 
fossil fuels by not less than 10 percent in 10 years and 30 
percent in 25 years;
    (4) options for reducing the number of resupply convoys and 
oilers required in contested environments; and
    (5) leveraging existing technologies and the Operational 
Energy Capability Improvement Fund to demonstrate capabilities 
to achieve the aforementioned goals.

            Report on Department of Defense Fuel Contracting

    The committee is interested in the Department of Defense's 
use of lowest price technically acceptable source selection 
criteria for fuel purchases. The committee recognizes that 
contingency operations present unique challenges and require 
specialized skills. Therefore, the committee directs the 
Department of Defense Inspector General to brief the House 
Committee on Armed Services by March 1, 2021 on the following:
    (1) A list of all solicitations and awards greater than 
$250,000 for fuel in all areas of contingency operations issued 
since January 1, 2016, including method of source selection, 
authorities used, and the estimated value of the awarded 
contracts;
    (2) An assessment of whether the awardees successfully 
fulfilled the requirements of such contract and corrective 
actions taken by the Defense Logistics Agency if the contracts 
were not successfully fulfilled; and
    (3) An assessment of whether the Defense Logistics Agency's 
has an adequate system in place to conduct due diligence to 
ensure its fuel contractors and subcontractors are meeting 
contractual obligations and abide by required anticorruption 
practices.

       Water and Sewage Resiliency Gaps at Military Installations

    The committee commends the Department of Defense for its 
efforts in identifying and addressing energy resiliency gaps at 
its military installations. The committee notes that water and 
sewage systems share many of the same characteristics as 
electrical utilities. The committee further notes that there 
may be opportunities for partnerships that facilitate system 
improvements for both cost avoidance and to address resiliency 
gaps that degrade readiness. Accordingly, the committee directs 
the Under Secretary of Defense for Acquisition and Sustainment 
to provide a report to the House Committee on Armed Services by 
February 1, 2021, on water and sewage resiliency at military 
installations. The report shall include at a minimum the 
following:
    (1) the degree to which the Department has assessed 
resiliency of these systems at military installations;
    (2) a plan for phasing in these assessments at military 
installations;
    (3) opportunities for public-private partnerships to 
address any resiliency gaps; and
    (4) an assessment of barriers to addressing water and 
sewage resiliency gaps in both statute and the Department's 
instructions and policies.

                    Logistics and Sustainment Issues


Air Force Undergraduate Pilot Training and T-7A Redhawk Transition Plan

    The committee understands that the Air Force plans to 
eventually transition all undergraduate pilot training from the 
T-38C to the T-7A at five locations: Columbus Air Force Base, 
Mississippi; Laughlin Air Force Base, Texas; Randolph Air Force 
Base, Texas; Sheppard Air Force Base, Texas; and Vance Air 
Force Base, Oklahoma. The committee is concerned about 
potential impacts this transition may have on the Air Force's 
undergraduate pilot training pipeline, which could further 
exacerbate its pilot shortage. Therefore, the committee directs 
the Secretary of the Air Force to provide a briefing to the 
House Committee on Armed Services, not later than December 1, 
2020, on the plan to transition undergraduate pilot training 
from the T-38C to the T-7A. At minimum, the briefing shall 
include the following elements:
    (1) a schedule for the delivery of T-7A aircraft and 
retirement of T-38C aircraft by location;
    (2) the plan and schedule for the stand-up of T-7A 
instructor pilot cadre;
    (3) the plan and schedule for the stand-up of simulators, 
simulator operators, and maintenance personnel;
    (4) the plan and schedule for transitioning to the new 
training syllabus; and
    (5) an assessment of Air Force's ability to execute the 
transition plan without creating impacts in the undergraduate 
pilot training pipeline.

                    Army Combat Aviation Sustainment

    The committee notes that Army combat aviation formations 
are in constant high demand. In addition, the Army's helicopter 
fleet is aging, can be challenging to sustain, and is expensive 
to operate. Over the next decade, the Army plans to modernize 
its current helicopter fleet with new engines and, beginning in 
2030, plans to field new helicopters to replace legacy 
platforms. The committee is concerned that the existing UH-60 
and AH-64 helicopter fleets face numerous sustainment 
challenges as the Army continues flying these legacy systems 
until fielding new helicopters. Therefore, the committee 
directs the Comptroller General of the United States to review 
the sustainment plans for the Army's current helicopter fleet. 
The review should address the following elements:
    (1) to what extent the Army has equipped its combat 
aviation formations with fully mission capable aircraft to meet 
training requirements and warfighting demands over the past 5 
years;
    (2) to what extent the Army has identified and addressed 
challenges in sustaining its helicopter fleet at the depot- and 
unit-level over the past 5 years;
    (3) to what extent the material condition of helicopters in 
Army combat aviation formations inhibit the ability to meet 
monthly flight hour standards for Army aviators;
    (4) the Army's plans to sustain its helicopter fleet in 
order to meet expected demands for combat aviation formations 
over the next 5 years; and (5) any other matter the Comptroller 
General determines appropriate.
    The committee further directs the Comptroller General to 
provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services not 
later than March 1, 2021, on the Comptroller General's 
preliminary findings and present final results in a format and 
timeframe agreed to at the time of the briefing.

            Department of Defense Warehouse Space Management

    The committee is aware that in 2017, the Government 
Accountability Office (GAO-17-449) found that opportunities 
exist to reduce the Department of Defense's warehousing and 
distribution costs by streamlining the infrastructure footprint 
of the current network. As a result of this study, the Office 
of the Secretary of Defense, as part of the Defense Reform 
Initiative, established the Non-Tactical Warehouse Initiative 
to evaluate those opportunities and provide recommendations. 
The resulting study found that the Department of Defense 
maintains excess warehouse network capacity and redundant 
commercial warehouses. Additionally, the study found warehouse 
utilization rates well below industry averages and that 
multiple Department of Defense and military department process 
owners have poor visibility of billions of dollars in inventory 
as a result of inconsistent reporting and incomplete data.
    Therefore, the committee directs that not later than March 
1, 2021, the Undersecretary for Acquisition and Sustainment, in 
coordination with the military departments and Defense 
Logistics Agency, shall submit a report to the congressional 
defense committees discussing its plan to create increased 
shared awareness of warehouse space across the Department of 
Defense, and how it plans to institute policies, procedures, 
and metrics that will increase warehouse utilization rates 
across the military departments. Additionally, the report 
should include a discussion of technologies that will provide-
real-time information to warehouse users and operators, improve 
global inventory visibility, and supply chain planning.

                            Depot Carryover

    Department of Defense regulations describe the process for 
calculating carryover and allowable carryover at the military 
depots at the end of a fiscal year. These regulations require 
that carryover be calculated in a way that allows certain 
workload to be exempted. Even after exemptions, the Army has 
routinely exceeded allowable carryover ceilings, resulting in 
decrements to appropriations. While the committee believes 
there should be limits on the amount of carryover workload held 
by a depot, the committee is concerned that the current 
calculation of allowable carryover has indirectly affected 
military readiness and the ability of the depots to sustain 
core workload as required by section 2464 of title 10, United 
States Code.
    In 2019, the Comptroller General of the United States 
reviewed three options that the Department of Defense proposed 
for calculating and determining allowable carryover and 
concluded that none fully met all the key attributes required 
for providing quality information to decision makers. The 
Comptroller General recommended that the Under Secretary of 
Defense for Acquisition and Sustainment develop and adopt a 
depot carryover metric for use by all the military departments 
that provides reliable, complete, consistent, and appropriate 
information. In commenting on the Comptroller General's report, 
the Department of Defense stated that it would promulgate 
regulations implementing the Government Accountability Office's 
recommendation and design a new budget exhibit to serve as a 
plan to establish workload carryover upper and lower operating 
ranges to ensure uninterrupted workload necessary to optimize 
production efficiency.
    The committee directs the Under Secretary of Defense for 
Acquisition and Sustainment, in coordination with the Under 
Secretary of Defense (Comptroller), to provide a briefing to 
the House Committee on Armed Services not later than August 30, 
2020, on plans to promulgate a new carryover metric to the 
military departments and establish a carryover budgetary 
exhibit to coincide with the fiscal year 2022 budget estimate 
submission.

                 Domestically Sourced Corrosion Control

    The impact of corrosion on the Department of Defense 
amounts to nearly $20 billion per year. Unfortunately, many of 
the chemicals typically used to treat corrosion are harmful to 
the environment. In addition, most phosphates are produced in 
China, making the United States dependent on foreign producers 
to maintain vital weapons systems and military equipment. 
Through advancements in synthetic biology, cleaner alternatives 
exist and are in use by the oil and gas industry. Therefore, 
the committee directs the Secretary of Defense to provide a 
briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services by December 
1, 2020, on bio-based corrosion control systems. At a minimum, 
the report shall contain:
    (1) historical cost data for the preceding 5 years on 
corrosion impact to military systems;
    (2) an assessment of the impact to military readiness from 
corrosion;
    (3) an assessment of the effectiveness of commercially 
available bio-based corrosion control solutions compared to 
solutions currently in use by the military departments;
    (4) an assessment of the environmental impact of 
commercially available bio-based corrosion control solutions 
compared to solutions currently in use by the military 
departments; and
    (5) a cost assessment of commercially available bio-based 
corrosion control solutions compared to solutions currently in 
use by the military departments.

                            F-35 Sustainment

    The committee recognizes the importance of the F-35 
Lightning II program to U.S. national defense and its foreign 
partners. The committee is concerned that the program faces 
sustainment challenges in areas including repair capability, 
global spare parts availability and capability, mission 
capability, and functionality of its Autonomic Logistics 
Information System. Affordability concerns have led the 
services to identify a need to reduce total operation and 
sustainment costs.
    Given the significance of the F-35 program to the future of 
tactical air for the military, the Department's need to operate 
and deploy the F-35 on a widespread basis in the coming years, 
the involvement of international partners and foreign military 
sales customers, and the importance of maintaining 
affordability, the committee directs the Comptroller General of 
the United States to review the sustainment efforts related to 
the F-35. At minimum, the review shall address the following 
elements:
    (1) assess the status of the sustainment support strategy 
for the F-35, and to what extent is the program facing 
sustainment-related challenges;
    (2) assess efforts to reduce costs and meet affordability 
targets related to F-35 fleet sustainment;
    (3) assess military department efforts to transition to 
organic repair capability by standing up repair capability in 
their existing depots;
    (4) assess the effects of F-35 engine challenges on 
sustainment, including engine overhauls for fielded aircraft, 
engine spare parts reliability, and effects of engine 
production quality/timeliness on sustainment;
    (5) identify and assess issues contributing to higher than 
expected maintenance rates for the F-35, and options to 
increase unit-level maintenance capabilities and associated 
cost/readiness implications;
    (6) assess the extent to which the concerns of allied 
partners inform the Department's decision making related to F-
35 sustainment; and
    (7) other items the Comptroller General determines 
appropriate.
    The committee further directs the Comptroller General to 
provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services not 
later than March 1, 2021, on the Comptroller General's 
preliminary findings and to present final results in a format 
and timeframe agreed to at the time of the briefing.

     Navy and Air Force Fixed-Wing Aviation Field-Level Maintenance

    The committee notes that a number of recent Government 
Accountability Office reports have highlighted the military 
services' challenges with completing field-level maintenance, 
which includes organizational-level and intermediate-level 
maintenance performed by an operational unit or at an 
intermediate maintenance facility. Repairs that are not 
conducted at the field level must eventually be completed at 
the depot level, which can result in slower depot maintenance 
times, increased costs, and reduced readiness of weapon 
systems.
    The ability of the depots to complete fixed-wing aviation 
maintenance on time directly affects military readiness, as 
maintenance delays reduce the amount of time during which 
aircraft are available for training and operations. The amount 
of work that the depots must perform is a direct result of the 
condition of equipment entering the depots. Depot officials 
have stated that they believe the amount and quality of work 
performed by field-level maintainers has decreased as 
organizations focus on straightforward repairs while sending 
more work to the depots, which reduces the depots' overall 
throughput.
    Given these issues, and the critical importance fixed-wing 
aircraft play in supporting readiness during both peacetime and 
conflict, the committee directs the Comptroller General of the 
United States to assess the following:
    (1) the extent to which the Department of Defense's 
sustainment strategy for fixed-wing aviation weapon systems has 
relied on the use of field-level versus depot-level 
maintenance;
    (2) the extent to which field-level maintenance is 
completed as required;
    (3) the extent to which the tasks, skills, equipment, 
training, or output of field-level maintainers has changed over 
the past 10 years;
    (4) the extent to which the Department or service policies 
ensure that field-level maintenance activities are conducted at 
the field level and not at the depot level;
    (5) the extent to which the Department or service policies 
ensure that depot-level maintenance activities are conducted at 
the depot level and not transferred back to the field level; 
and
    (6) any other related matters the Comptroller General 
considers appropriate.
    The committee further directs the Comptroller General to 
provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services, 
not later than March 1, 2021, on the Comptroller General's 
preliminary findings and present final results in a format and 
timeframe agreed to at the time of the briefing.

                       Navy Deferred Maintenance

    The committee notes that completing required maintenance is 
vital for Navy aircraft carriers, ships, and submarines to 
reach their expected service lives and to do so economically. 
Deferring ship maintenance increases the costs and time 
required to complete maintenance in the future, straining 
maintenance budgets and stressing public and private shipyard 
capacity. In December 2019, the Comptroller General of the 
United States reported that the Navy continues to experience 
persistent and substantial maintenance delays that reduce ship 
availability for training and operations, hindering warfighting 
readiness. Further, Navy reports show that the service 
continues to defer essential maintenance on some ship classes, 
which decreases the likelihood that these vessels will reach 
their full service lives.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Comptroller General to 
review deferred Navy maintenance. The review should address the 
following elements:
    (1) the extent to which the Navy is deferring necessary 
depot maintenance for aircraft carriers, surface ships, and 
submarines, and what costs, if any, are associated with these 
deferrals;
    (2) the extent to which the Navy has developed mitigation 
plans to address challenges relating to deferred maintenance;
    (3) the extent, if any, to which deferred maintenance 
increases the risk that ships and submarines will be unable to 
meet their expected service lives and the potential effects 
this would have on future force structure; and
    (4) any other matter the Comptroller General determines 
appropriate.
    The committee further directs the Comptroller General to 
provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services, 
not later than March 1, 2021, on the Comptroller General's 
preliminary findings and present final results in a format and 
timeframe agreed to at the time of the briefing.

                   Navy Ship Field-Level Maintenance

    The committee notes that a number of recent Government 
Accountability Office reports have found that high operational 
tempo, reductions to crew size, and organizational changes have 
impacted the Navy's ability to complete timely field-level 
maintenance, which is generally performed either by a ship's 
crew or at an intermediate maintenance facility. The ability of 
shipyards to complete maintenance on time is affected by the 
quality and quantity of maintenance accomplished by field-level 
maintainers and the amount of maintenance tasks that are 
deferred to the depot level. Navy officials have stated that 
the amount of work performed by field-level maintainers has 
decreased as organizations focus on straightforward repairs 
while sending more work to the depots, reducing their overall 
throughput.
    The committee is concerned that the ability of ships' crews 
to perform and assist with maintenance at all levels has not 
been sufficiently retained among enlisted personnel and that 
maintenance is not being completed in a timely fashion at 
intermediate maintenance facilities. These delays directly 
affect military readiness by reducing the amount of time ships 
are available for training and operations.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Comptroller General of 
the United States to review Navy ship field-level maintenance. 
The review should address the following elements:
    (1) the extent to which Navy ship maintenance is performed 
on time and in full at the organizational and intermediate 
levels;
    (2) the factors that contribute to maintenance delays and 
deferrals at the organizational and intermediate levels;
    (3) the extent to which sailor training and skill 
proficiency is impacting organizational and intermediate-level 
maintenance;
    (4) the extent to which operational demand contributes to 
the deferment of organizational and intermediate-level 
maintenance;
    (5) the extent to which Navy mitigation plans address 
challenges to the full and timely performance of organizational 
and intermediate-level maintenance; and
    (6) any other related matters the Comptroller General 
considers appropriate.
    The committee further directs the Comptroller General to 
provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services not 
later than March 1, 2021, on the Comptroller General's 
preliminary findings and present final results in a format and 
timeframe agreed to at the time of the briefing.

 Pilot Program for Enhancing Ship Readiness Through Digital Techniques

    The committee supports the ongoing pilot program that the 
American Bureau of Shipping and the Military Sealift Command 
(MSC) have developed to enhance the readiness of MSC vessels 
through a condition-based approach. This pilot program has 
already shown positive results in improving the availability 
and readiness of MSC vessels, with potential long-term cost 
avoidance in maintenance and repair of such vessels. The 
committee encourages MSC to further expand the program to other 
vessels under its control.
    The committee also believes that the readiness of our 
nation's surface naval and auxiliary fleet is a critical issue 
that deserves enhanced attention. The committee directs the 
Secretary of the Navy to evaluate the use of a similar 
condition-based approach to cover the surface vessel fleet 
through a partnership with an organization that has experience 
classing Navy vessels. The committee further directs the 
Secretary of the Navy to provide a report to the Committees on 
Armed Services of the Senate and the House of Representatives, 
not later than February 1, 2021, on the steps being taken to 
improve the availability and readiness of surface naval and 
auxiliary vessels using a condition-based approach and 
commercial best practices for digital methods for ship 
condition monitoring, vessel readiness, and maintenance 
planning.

         Transparency in Food Ingredient Policies and Standards

    The committee notes that in 2017, the Defense Logistics 
Agency attempted to prohibit certain ingredients from being 
included in food and beverages served in military food 
services. This prohibition was attempted without meaningful 
engagement with industry stakeholders or a public comment 
period. The committee notes that the Fiscal Year 2018 
Consolidated Appropriations Act (Public Law 115-141) prohibited 
the Defense Logistics Agency from implementing its proposal and 
also required the Defense Logistics Agency to seek input from a 
broad group of stakeholders on all future proposed nutrition, 
food, or ingredient changes.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Commander, Defense 
Logistics Agency to provide a briefing to the House Committee 
on Armed Services, not later than December 1, 2020, on the 
process it will use for proposing and enacting limitations or 
prohibitions on any food or beverage ingredients. At minimum, 
the briefing shall:
    (1) provide details regarding the governing statutes, 
regulations, and policies governing ingredient prohibition 
determinations;
    (2) provide detail regarding processes for scientific 
community engagement, to include solicitation of scientifically 
derived recommendations, prior to making an ingredient 
prohibition determination; and
    (3) provide details on the process and timeline for 
ingredient prohibition determinations, highlighting key areas 
where industry stakeholders are provided the opportunity to 
comment and make recommendations.

            United States Air Force Academy Mission Network

    The committee is aware of the requirement of the U.S. Air 
Force Academy to upgrade its legacy information technology (IT) 
infrastructure. The committee understands that a robust and 
effective campus enterprise network is vital to the academic 
and military training missions of the Academy and central to 
its ability to develop future leaders for the nation's air and 
space forces. The committee also observes that, unlike other 
commands in the Department of the Air Force, the Academy has 
unique IT requirements requiring close collaboration with other 
accredited colleges, universities, research institutions, the 
National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA), and other 
public and private organizations. The committee recognizes that 
the mission of the Academy includes unique requirements not 
supported by existing Air Force IT enterprise services. 
However, the committee is concerned that Air Force investment 
in modernizing the Academy's legacy IT network infrastructure 
has fallen short of need, resulting in project delays and 
mission impacts recently exacerbated by COVID-19 social 
distance requirements. Therefore, the committee directs the 
Secretary of the Air Force to provide a briefing to the House 
Committee on Armed Services, no later than December 1, 2020, on 
the Air Force strategy to complete the modernization of the 
Academy's IT infrastructure within a reasonable period of time 
and how it plans to provide for its long term operation and 
sustainment.

                            Readiness Issues


           Air Force T-38C Transition and Formation Landings

    The United States Air Force has utilized the T-38 aircraft 
for almost 60 years in support of undergraduate pilot training. 
This aircraft has been utilized well beyond its intended 
service life and is due to be replaced by the T-7 aircraft 
beginning in 2023. The committee is aware of five T-38 mishaps 
over the last 3 years, including a recent mishap during an 
attempted formation landing that resulted in the deaths of both 
the student pilot and the instructor pilot. Subsequent to this 
fatal mishap, Air Education Training Command temporarily ceased 
conducting formation landings in the T-38 aircraft, and 
ultimately removed T-38 formation landings from the pilot 
training syllabus. The committee supports the decision to 
remove T-38 formation landings from the pilot training 
syllabus, and strongly recommends that the Air Force develops 
an accelerated plan to transition from the T-38 to the T-7 
aircraft. Accordingly, the committee directs the Secretary of 
the Air Force to provide a report to the House Committee on 
Armed Services, not later than March 1, 2021, on Air Force's 
plan to accelerate transition from the T-38 aircraft to the T-7 
aircraft. At a minimum, the report should include:
    (1) Assessment of potential to accelerate procurement of 
the T-7 aircraft, including cost and timeline;
    (2) Assessment of the supporting pilot training system to 
absorb additional T-7 aircraft, taking into consideration 
simulators, manpower, support equipment, and pilot training 
syllabus development;
    (3) Detailed background information on why Air Education 
Training Command removed T-38 formation landings from the pilot 
training syllabus, and an assessment as to whether formation 
landings will be included in the T-7 pilot training syllabus.

                     Air Support Service Contracts

    The committee notes the Department of Defense's increased 
use of air support contracts to help train service members and 
improve flexibility in meeting training requirements, while 
potentially reducing costs. Moreover, recent testimony by the 
Commander of U.S. Transportation Command and the Vice Chief of 
Staff of the Air Force highlights an aerial refueling tanker 
capacity shortfall that is exacerbated by delays with the KC-
46A tanker program. The committee believes that aerial 
refueling tanker and tactical aviation shortfalls could 
potentially be mitigated through the use of contract air 
support services toward training missions. Therefore, the 
committee directs the Comptroller General of the United States 
to review the Department of Defense's use of contract aerial 
refueling and tactical aviation services. The review should 
address the following elements:
    (1) assess to what extent the Air Force and other services 
currently utilize contract aerial refueling services for 
training missions; historical costs associated with contract 
aerial refueling services for training as compared to costs 
associated with organic support; ability of industry to 
increase capacity for aerial refueling services for training 
missions to free up organic aerial refueling capacity that 
would otherwise be unavailable for operational missions;
    (2) assess the total tanker support required for training 
missions by contract aerial refueling providers based on the 
Air Force's current assumption for the timeline of fielding a 
fully operational KC-46A;
    (3) assess the extent to which the military departments and 
U.S. Special Operations Command utilize contracts for air 
support services for adversary air and close air support, and 
associated costs compared with other options for providing 
these services;
    (4) assess the extent to which the Department of Defense 
evaluated the use and effectiveness of air support contracts to 
meet established training requirements;
    (5) assess opportunities to gain greater efficiencies in 
the use of contracts for air support services across the 
Department to achieve training requirements; and
    (6) any other matter the Comptroller General determines 
appropriate.
    The committee further directs the Comptroller General to 
provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services, 
not later than March 1, 2021, on the Comptroller General's 
preliminary findings and to submit a final report on a date 
agreed to at the time of the briefing.

   Army Briefing on Static-Line Parachuting Proficiency Requirements

    The United States Army maintains a robust airborne force 
structure resident in both the Active Army and Army National 
Guard. Capable of deploying rapidly in a crisis and conducting 
forced entry operations by parachute assault, these forces 
provide the United States with a competitive military advantage 
in a dynamic national security environment. Soldiers assigned 
to these units complete a three week Basic Airborne Course at 
Ft. Benning, Georgia where, in their third and final week, they 
conduct five successful parachute jumps, are awarded their 
basic airborne wings, and are then qualified for assignment to 
airborne units. Since 1950, in order to maintain proficiency 
and to qualify for Parachute Duty-Hazardous Duty Incentive Pay, 
soldiers have been required to jump at a minimum once every 
three months. In 2018, the Department of Defense modified this 
requirement, enabling commanders in the grade of Lieutenant 
Colonel or higher to waive one of these four annual proficiency 
jumps in special circumstances to account for factors such as 
deployment on extended operations where it might not be 
possible to get all four jumps in, lack of jump equipment or 
aircraft, or attendance of military education or training. Even 
with this new authority, the vast majority of airborne soldiers 
are still required to conduct one jump every three months to 
maintain proficiency and to qualify for monthly jump pay.
    With advances in military parachuting equipment, 
procedures, and methods of training, it only seems appropriate 
that the Army reevaluate its 70 year-old basic airborne 
proficiency standards.
    The committee directs the Secretary of the Army to brief 
the Committees on Armed Services of the Senate and the House of 
Representatives no later than December 1, 2020 on Army Static-
Line Parachuting Proficiency Requirements. Elements of the 
briefing shall include but are not limited to:
    (1) How many soldiers are currently on jump status and 
receiving jump pay?
    (2) Of this number, how many soldiers make only four jumps 
a year to maintain basic proficiency?
    (3) For those soldiers making more than the required four 
annual proficiency jumps, what is the average of annual jumps 
by military occupational specialty (MOS)?
    (4) Recent statistics on the numbers and types of parachute 
accidents and injuries based on a soldier's military 
occupational specialty (MOS), unit of assignment, or overall 
parachute proficiency (i.e., number of jumps or months/years on 
jump status).
    (5) How does the Army review its basic airborne proficiency 
requirements and when was the last time a comprehensive 
evaluation was conducted? What were the recommendations from 
the last evaluation?
    (6) What are the basic airborne proficiency requirements 
for Navy, Marine Corps, and Air Force non-special operations 
service members assigned to airborne billets?
    (7) What are the advantages and disadvantages of conducting 
proficiency jumps in a shorter time period other than the 
current quarterly requirement?
    (8) What are the cost and resource implications (including 
aircraft availability and usage) if the Army adopted a shorter 
time-frame for proficiency jumps or if the number of required 
proficiency jumps were reduced?
    (9) With the advances in simulations, virtual training 
environments and systems, and the promise of artificial 
intelligence, how practical would it be to replace some of the 
required proficiency jumps with some form of simulation or 
virtual training device?
    (10) Are there any plans for the Army to re-evaluate the 
requirement for five airborne infantry brigade combat teams 
(IBCTs) and supporting forces? How do parachute assaults fit 
into the Army's doctrine for fighting in the current strategic 
environment against near-peer competitors with sophisticated, 
layered air-defense architectures.
    (11) Operationally, how often have static-line airborne 
operations been used in the last decade.
    (12) Have there been any recent studies on the numbers and 
types of parachute injuries based on a soldier's military 
occupational specialty (MOS), unit of assignment, or overall 
parachute proficiency (i.e., number of jumps or months/years on 
jump status)?
    (13) What are the costs and injury rates of West Point and 
ROTC cadets permitted to attend Airborne School? Over the last 
10 years, what is the rate of these cadets that go on to serve 
in airborne units?
    (14) Are there instances where we send officers and 
soldiers to airborne school who are not on orders assigning 
them to an airborne unit or position that requires airborne 
qualification? If so, how many of these officers and soldiers 
fall into this category on an annual basis?

                    Army Sustainable Readiness Model

    The Sustainable Readiness Model is the Army's force 
generation concept to build and maintain readiness across the 
total force while meeting global requirements. Under the 
Sustainable Readiness Model, the Army's objective is to 
maintain 66 percent of Active Duty brigade combat teams and 33 
percent of Reserve Component brigade combat teams in a combat-
ready status to respond to any global contingency. The 
committee is concerned that training requirements needed to 
maintain high levels of readiness for a large portion of the 
Army may not be sustainable and could place an unnecessary 
strain on the force. Senior Army civilian and military leaders 
may share this concern and the committee is aware that the 
Commander of U.S. Army Forces Command is currently conducting a 
review of the Sustainable Readiness Model and the training 
requirements associated with this force generation model.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Chief of Staff of the 
Army to provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed 
Services, not later than March 1, 2021, on changes to the 
Sustainable Readiness Model. At a minimum, the briefing shall 
include the following elements:
    (1) a summary of the findings and recommendations from the 
U.S. Army Forces Command review of the Sustainable Readiness 
Model and training requirements;
    (2) an overview of changes being made to the Sustainable 
Readiness Model, or the training requirements associated with 
this force generation model, and a timeline for the 
implementation of these changes;
    (3) an assessment for how these changes may impact budget, 
materiel, and manpower requirements; and
    (4) an assessment for how these changes will affect the 
overall readiness of the Army.

Briefing on Deployment of Next Generation 911 on Military Installations

    The committee recognizes the benefits of Next Generation 
911 systems that allow Public Safety Answering Points (PSAPs) 
to accept text messages, images, and videos, as well as voice 
calls. These additional means of communicating with 911 could 
help dispatchers to more quickly understand and respond to an 
emergency situation and would provide important alternatives 
for emergency reporting by individuals experiencing intimate 
partner violence. The committee is concerned that none of the 
205 PSAPs operated by the military services support Next 
Generation 911 service.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of Defense 
to provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services 
by January 1, 2021, on plans for updating 911 services at 
military installations located in the United States, including 
the feasibility, cost, and benefits of implementing Next 
Generation 911 services.

      Department of Defense Law Enforcement Training and Standards

    The committee recognizes the important role that Department 
of Defense military police, civilian police, and security 
guards play in maintaining the security of military 
installations and safety for military and civilian personnel 
and their families. With the exception of service-unique 
requirements, the committee believes these Department of 
Defense law enforcement professionals strongly benefit from 
developing and maintaining common training courses, 
certification requirements, and professional standards. The 
committee recognizes that Department of Defense Instruction 
(DODI) 5525.15, updated on June 18, 2019, established policy, 
assigned responsibility, and provided procedures for law 
enforcement standards and training, physical fitness standards, 
and certification for investigative analysts. The committee 
directs the Under Secretary of Defense for Intelligence to 
provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services, 
not later than March 1, 2021, on the implementation of DODI 
5525.15. At minimum, the briefing shall include the following 
elements:
    (1) the status of the Department of Defense Peace Officer 
Standards and Training (POST) Commission developing and 
certifying law enforcement training standards to meet 
proficiency requirements for Department of Defense law 
enforcement professionals;
    (2) how existing military and civilian law enforcement 
training courses, schools, and programs are being updated to 
adopt common training standards;
    (3) the status of certifying all basic level law 
enforcement officer training by the Federal Law Enforcement 
Training Accreditation Organization;
    (4) the unique service-specific training requirements and 
standards that will be maintained beyond the common training 
standards; and
    (5) an assessment of whether the consolidation of law 
enforcement training courses, schools, and programs would 
benefit or detract from efforts to implement DODI 5525.15.

           Directed Readiness Tables and Readiness Reporting

    The committee has appreciated the opportunity to work with 
the Department of Defense to revise section 482 of title 10, 
United States Code, to update the statutory requirements for 
the Readiness Report to Congress. The committee notes that the 
Readiness Report to Congress is one of the foundational 
documents that supports congressional oversight of the current 
state of military readiness, the contributing factors to 
specific readiness challenges, and the mitigations to these 
challenges. The committee notes that in recent reports, the 
Department of Defense has shifted away from reporting readiness 
based on the C-ratings of major force elements and has started 
measuring readiness based on the ability of the military 
services to meet the force requirements of the Directed 
Readiness Tables.
    The committee notes that the Directed Readiness Tables 
serve as a good force planning construct to manage the steady-
state demands of geographic combatant commanders on an annual 
basis. However, the committee is concerned that readiness 
reporting based on the Directed Readiness Tables does not allow 
for measurement of progress towards the readiness recovery 
goals of the military services, does not align with how the 
military services track and report readiness, and does not 
provide a holistic picture of military readiness, especially in 
the context of preparedness to conduct a major contingency 
operation. Therefore, the committee encourages the Department 
of Defense to return to reporting based on C-ratings of major 
force elements in the Readiness Report to Congress required by 
section 482 of title 10, United States Code.

                        Dynamic Force Employment

    The 2018 National Defense Strategy states that defeating or 
deterring long-term strategic competitors is a different 
challenge than regional adversaries that were the focus of 
prior strategies. In order to meet this changing environment, 
the strategy stated that the Department of Defense will adopt a 
new concept known as Dynamic Force Employment, using scalable 
options and quick deployments rather than traditional 
rotational deployments to introduce unpredictability for 
potential adversaries. However, the committee notes that there 
is not a common framework by which all of the services describe 
Dynamic Force Employment, resource Dynamic Force Employment in 
budget requests, or address Dynamic Force Employment in force 
generation and sustainment models. Therefore, the committee 
directs the Comptroller General of the United States to review 
the Dynamic Force Employment construct. The review should 
address the following elements:
    (1) to what extent Dynamic Force Employment is aligned with 
the Department of Defense's readiness rebuilding efforts;
    (2) to what extent each service defines and considers 
Dynamic Force Employment in force generation and sustainment 
models;
    (3) to what extent Dynamic Force Employment is utilized in 
the Global Force Management process and resources Dynamic Force 
Employment in the budget request;
    (4) to what extent the services and combatant commands are 
prepared to execute Dynamic Force Employment and how this new 
concept will impact readiness across the services and combatant 
commands; and
    (5) any other matter the Comptroller General determines 
appropriate.
    The committee further directs the Comptroller General to 
provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services, 
not later than March 1, 2021, on the Comptroller General's 
preliminary findings and present final results in a format and 
timeframe agreed to at the time of the briefing.

                        Exercise Northern Strike

    The committee notes that Northern Strike is an accredited 
21-day exercise sponsored by the National Guard Bureau. This 
Joint Combined Arms Live Fire Exercise brings together nearly 
7,000 participants annually from the United States and North 
Atlantic Treaty Organization partner countries. In the 
committee report accompanying the National Defense 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2020 (H. Rept. 116-120), the 
committee directed the Chief of the National Guard Bureau to 
provide a report and the cost of Exercise Northern Strike and 
the anticipated funding programmed for the exercise over the 
Future Years Defense Program (FYDP). According to the report 
provided to the committee on October 2, 2019, anticipated 
funding for future Northern Strike exercises was $20.7 million 
per year over the FYDP. Furthermore, the committee notes that 
the budget request for fiscal year 2021 includes funding for 
Exercise Northern Strike. The committee is supportive of 
exercises, such as Northern Strike, that bring together United 
States and international partners to train together and build 
readiness and interoperability.

           High-Speed Test Track Infrastructure Requirements

    The committee recognizes the importance of maintaining 
high-speed test track capability to facilitate the transition 
from laboratory developmental work to operational employment. 
The committee notes the need for highly accurate, realistic 
testing environments to bring new technologies online. The 
committee is concerned about the adequacy of existing 
facilities to ensure continued access to this type of testing. 
Accordingly, the committee directs the Secretary of Defense to 
provide a report to the House Committee on Armed Services by 
February 1, 2021, on the adequacy of its high-speed test track 
infrastructure both for current requirements and for future 
testing of next-generation systems. At a minimum the report 
shall survey current high-speed test track infrastructure and 
provide an overview of necessary infrastructure and technology 
investments to ensure viability into the future.

            Marine Corps Aviation Readiness and Sustainment

    The committee notes the age of several rotary wing 
airframes in the Marine Corps fleet, which are experiencing 
long-term downtime and readiness issues. The committee 
encourages the Marine Corps to embark upon additional reset 
programs, as necessary, to revitalize and refresh the fleet. 
The committee notes the success of similar resets, including 
the ongoing CH-53 reset and resets conducted by the U.S. Army, 
which have improved reliability and readiness. The committee 
directs the Commandant of the United States Marine Corps to 
brief the committee, not later than September 30, 2020, on the 
status of the Marine Corps rotary wing fleet and all planned 
reset programs for the fleet. In particular, the briefing shall 
address:
    (1) the state of the UH-1 Iroquois and AH-1 Cobra fleets;
    (2) funding needs for reset activities;
    (3) strategies to maintain reset throughput in a timely 
manner; and
    (4) an acquisition strategy to maintain cost, schedule, and 
performance in the reset program.

           Personnel Parachute and Cargo Inventory Management

    The Committee directs the Secretary of the Army to submit a 
report to the House Armed Services Committee by December 1, 
2020 assessing the system used by U.S. Army Parachute Riggers 
to record their activities with respect to the use, inspection, 
inventory, maintenance, and repair of personnel parachutes, 
cargo parachutes and other airdrop equipment throughout a 
system's life-cycle. The report shall address the following 
elements:
    (1) The current record keeping, tracking, reporting and 
information retrieval system employed by Parachute Riggers with 
regard to personnel parachutes and airdrop equipment;
    (2) An assessment of the adequacy of the tracking system 
and a history of efforts to update the tracking system;
    (3) A market assessment of automated programs currently 
available for parachute system tracking by Parachute Riggers;
    (4) A statement of the Army's current plans, if any, to 
upgrade the tracking system used by Parachute Riggers;
    (5) A schedule associated with the activities set forth in 
(4).

         Readiness of Firefighting Infrastructure and Equipment

    The committee is concerned that the firefighting 
infrastructure of the military departments is aging, in poor 
condition, and may not be properly sized or configured to 
support firefighting personnel and equipment. To help address 
this issue, the John S. McCain National Defense Authorization 
Act for Fiscal Year 2019 (Public Law 115-232) contained a 
provision authorizing the Secretaries of the military 
departments to carry out military construction projects, to 
include the construction of new fire stations, to enhance force 
protection and safety on military installations. With only 
three fire stations being constructed through this authority, 
and the Future Years Defense Program (FYDP) submitted with the 
budget request only including funding for the construction of 
four additional fire stations, the committee is concerned that 
the military departments continue to assume risk in this area. 
In addition to the age, condition, and configuration of 
firefighting infrastructure, the committee is concerned that 
the condition and readiness of firefighting vehicles and 
equipment may also adversely impact fire, crash, and rescue 
operations at military installations.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretaries of the 
military departments to each submit a report to the House 
Committee on Armed Services, not later than March 1, 2021, 
regarding the condition, capacity, and readiness of their 
firefighting infrastructure, vehicles, and equipment. At 
minimum, the report shall include the following elements:
    (1) an assessment of the current condition, capacity, and 
configuration of firefighting infrastructure, vehicles, and 
equipment across the enterprise;
    (2) an assessment of the risk to firefighting operations 
and readiness due to the current state of firefighting 
infrastructure, vehicles, and equipment across the enterprise;
    (3) an overview of planned investments across the FYDP to 
mitigate identified issues and risks associated with 
firefighting infrastructure, vehicles, and equipment; and
    (4) how the required phase-out by 2024 of firefighting foam 
containing per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances is impacting the 
investment strategy, particularly with respect to firefighting 
vehicles.

  Report on the Air Force's Use of Executive Decision Model Analytics

    The committee supports the Air Force Education and Training 
Command's (AETC) use of the Executive Decision Model (EDM) in 
F-16 Formal Training Units (FTU) for predictive analytics to 
achieve improvements in aircrew training production, aircraft 
readiness, and energy conservation. The committee believes EDM 
has provided important advantages to help address AETC 
production challenges and the USAF pilot shortage. Therefore, 
the committee directs the Secretary of the Air Force provide a 
briefing to the House Armed Services Committee by January 31, 
2021 on the Air Force's strategy to expand EDM predictive 
analytics for use in other USAF Mission Design Series aircraft 
to include the F-35.

             Surface Navy Seamanship and Skills Assessment

    The committee recognizes that the Navy has made some 
significant improvements to the training curriculum for surface 
warfare officers. However, the committee continues to have 
concerns that enlisted training has not seen the same emphasis. 
In an effort to fully understand the impact of recent changes 
to officer surface warfare training and the current state of 
enlisted training, the committee believes a holistic assessment 
should be conducted. The goal of the assessment would be to 
conduct a top-to-bottom review of how the surface Navy 
qualifies its topside watchstanders involved in seamanship and 
navigation. The assessment should include Personal 
Qualification Standards, Watch Team Replacement Plans methods 
of simulator training at various officer and enlisted 
milestones, as well as at-sea assessments evaluating all 
Mobility Navigation/Seamanship evolutions as outlined in the 
current surface force training and readiness manual with 
attention to special evolutions while restricted maneuvering 
doctrine is in effect. Of particular interest is an objective 
assessment of how we qualify/requalify officers of the deck 
underway, as well as the master shiphandling skills expected of 
commanding officers and executive officers at sea. The goal of 
this study is to obtain an accurate, objective outside 
assessment of the status of seamanship skills in the surface 
Navy.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of the Navy 
to contract with a federally funded research and development 
center to provide a report to the congressional defense 
committees not later than February 1, 2022, on a top-down 
assessment of Navy surface warfare training. The assessment 
should review both officer and enlisted training.

                             Other Matters


                  Civilian Participation in War Games

    The committee notes the important role that war games play 
in testing concepts, identifying capability gaps, and informing 
strategic and tactical decisions for contingency operations and 
other scenarios. War games help inform senior leadership of the 
Department of Defense on investment requirements and policy 
decisions related to the national security of the United 
States. However, the committee is concerned that war games 
organized by the Joint Staff, combatant commands, and military 
departments do not adequately include senior Department of 
Defense civilian leadership or representatives from other 
departments and agencies of the Federal Government that may 
influence policies or actions in the war game. Therefore, the 
committee directs the Secretary of Defense to provide a 
briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services, not later 
than March 1, 2021, on the involvement of relevant departments 
and agencies of the Federal Government. At minimum, the 
briefing shall address:
    (1) a list of formal war games conducted by the Joint 
Staff, combatant commands, and military departments in calendar 
year 2020;
    (2) a list of senior Department of Defense civilians and 
representatives from other departments and agencies of the 
Federal Government that participated in each formal war game 
conducted in calendar year 2020; and
    (3) plans for inclusion of senior Department of Defense 
civilians and representatives from other departments and 
agencies of the Federal Government in formal war games planned 
for fiscal year 2021.

                     Community Integration Programs

    The committee encourages the military departments to create 
and maintain strong community outreach programs at military 
installations to ensure installations and ranges remain good 
neighbors through strong relationships. The committee notes 
that where the installation takes a proactive, collaborative 
approach to informing the community about its programs and 
addresses local stakeholder concerns in a timely fashion, 
positive outcomes that preserve the installation's ability to 
carry out its missions are more likely. The committee further 
notes that the more complex the issues, the more early, active 
engagement is critical to ensuring a positive outcome and 
avoiding negative readiness impacts. As such, the committee 
encourages the Department of Defense to make every effort to 
identify and share best practices such as the Honorary 
Commanders Program across service lines. These programs promote 
community involvement with their military installation 
neighbors and promote effective consultation and collaboration 
between the installation and the surrounding community.

                   Counter Drone Center of Excellence

    The Committee notes that the threat posed by small drones 
to our warfighters and civilian population has grown 
exponentially over the past several years. Current requirements 
across the military services demonstrate a need for 
comprehensive counter UAS capabilities. Concurrently, the 
nation faces a shortage of engineering graduates with the 
skills, clearances and education necessary in these specialized 
fields. Each military service is pursuing counter UAS research, 
development, test and engineering activities that are 
independent of each other creating a need to coordinate efforts 
across industry, academia and government agencies.
    The Committee directs the Under Secretary of Defense for 
Research and Engineering to provide a briefing to the House 
Committee on Armed Services not later than October 1, 2020 on 
the advisability and feasibility of establishing a Counter 
Drone Center of Excellence. At minimum, the briefing shall 
include information on the degree to which the military 
services are coordinating efforts to rapidly develop and test 
counter drone capabilities and the ability of the military 
services to attract a skilled, cleared and trained workforce to 
develop and test this technology. The briefing shall also 
include an evaluation of whether a Counter Drone Center of 
Excellence would enable better coordination of effort and more 
efficient use of resources across the services to develop, test 
and field counter drone technology.

                         Military Working Dogs

    The committee recognizes that the Department of Defense 
Military Working Dog programs, carried out by the Air Force as 
executive agent, are in need of a dedicated line of accounting 
and therefore supports Department of Defense efforts to 
establish one. A dedicated line of accounting will more 
accurately capture the facility and resource requirements 
necessary to successfully and efficiently provide military 
working dogs to all services.

                   Mishap Reporting and Data Analysis

    The committee notes that the Government Accountability 
Office (GAO) has identified areas for improvement and made 
recommendations regarding the Department of Defense's approach 
for collecting, reporting, and analyzing tactical combat 
vehicle mishap data. The GAO reported that the mishap data 
collected by the military departments' safety centers is not 
standardized, which inhibits the Department from conducting a 
department-wide analysis of mishap trends. The GAO also 
reported that the military departments have conducted limited 
data analysis of the factors that contribute to mishaps, due to 
issues such as incomplete mishap investigation data, inadequate 
mishap databases, and limited personnel to examine the mishap 
data more completely. Further, each of the military departments 
is responsible for the notification, investigation, and 
reporting of mishaps. The Office of the Secretary of Defense 
(OSD) is responsible for collecting and analyzing mishap data 
from the safety centers, and providing the Secretary of Defense 
and other Department of Defense leaders with information on 
risks, recommendations for mitigation strategies, and lessons 
learned. However, GAO has reported that the military 
departments' safety centers are not reporting mishap causal 
factors as required.
    Given concerns about the recent instances of training 
mishaps involving both military aircraft and tactical ground 
vehicles, the committee directs the Secretary of Defense to 
provide a report to the House Committee on Armed Services, not 
later than December 1, 2020, that includes the following 
elements:
    (1) a detailed description of OSD and military department 
responsibilities for collecting and analyzing mishap data, 
including responsibilities for aircraft and tactical vehicle 
mishap data;
    (2) the steps taken to assess whether the data elements 
collected during mishap investigations are sufficient for 
conducting analyses to identify mishap trends;
    (3) the actions taken to ensure standardized data is 
collected during the investigations and reported within the 
Department; and
    (4) other steps taken or planned to improve the accuracy 
and completeness of mishap record-keeping and analysis of any 
contributing factors, to include any actions taken to address 
GAO's prior recommendations.

                  Navy Museum and Historical Exchanges

    The committee notes the authority granted to the Department 
of Defense to conduct historical exchanges under section 2572 
of title 10, United States Code. The committee also recognizes 
that the Secretary of the Navy promulgated the latest set of 
museum exchange guidelines through Secretary of the Navy 
Instruction 5755.2B on April 1, 2019. The committee believes 
proper and effective utilization of this authority can be a 
tremendous benefit to the Navy's museum system. Furthermore, it 
gives the American public an opportunity to honor the men and 
women who sacrificed to protect our freedom. Additionally, the 
committee recognizes the successful private sector effort to 
recover, restore, and present artifacts under section 2572 of 
title 10, United States Code, particularly aircraft, to the 
American public.
    The committee is concerned about the length of time 
required by the Naval Heritage and History Command to consider 
historical exchange proposals and that these delays 
disincentivize potential private sector partners. Therefore, 
the committee directs the Secretary of the Navy to provide a 
briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services, not later 
than September 30, 2020, to discuss the issue of historical 
exchanges under section 2572 of title 10, United States Code. 
At minimum, the briefing shall address the following:
    (1) an overview of the approval and oversight process for 
private sector historical exchange proposals;
    (2) the number of exchanges approved by Navy during the 
last 5 fiscal years, the number currently under consideration, 
metrics for the timeliness of processing requests, and the 
average time from submission to adjudication for the data 
elements above;
    (3) the Secretary's plan to oversee implementation of the 
guidelines in Secretary of the Navy Instruction 5755.2B as they 
relate to the authority granted under section 2572 of title 10, 
United States Code;
    (4) the Navy's manpower plan to review and approve 
historical exchange proposals;
    (5) an assessment of the feasibility of providing a public 
portal for submission of historical exchange proposals;
    (6) an assessment of the feasibility of creating a publicly 
accessible list of available Navy inventory eligible for the 
historical exchange program; and
    (7) an assessment of the feasibility and advisability of 
returning the responsibility for historical exchanges to Naval 
Air Systems Command.

    United States Coast Guard Defense Readiness Resource Allocation

    The committee notes that the United States Coast Guard is 
not reimbursed by the Department of Defense for its defense 
readiness mission activities, and that its annual appropriation 
for non-emergency defense-related activities has not changed 
since 2001. Given the importance of the Coast Guard to defense 
operations and global combatant command priorities, the 
committee notes the importance of understanding the Coast 
Guard's expenditures to support Department of Defense 
activities. Therefore, the committee directs the Comptroller 
General of the United States to review the allocation of 
resources by the Coast Guard to support its defense readiness 
mission. The review should address the following elements:
    (1) an estimate of all expenses related to the Coast 
Guard's coordination, training, and execution of defense 
readiness mission activities in its capacity as an armed force 
in support of Department of Defense national security 
operations and activities;
    (2) an assessment of how the Coast Guard's defense 
readiness mission activities are generated;
    (3) funding levels transferred by the Department of Defense 
or otherwise provided to the Coast Guard in support of the 
Coast Guard's defense readiness mission for each of the past 10 
fiscal years;
    (4) the number of Coast Guard detachments assigned in 
support of the Coast Guard's defense readiness mission for each 
of the past 10 fiscal years;
    (5) an assessment of the extent to which Department of 
Defense reimbursements for defense readiness enable the Coast 
Guard to maintain its non-defense mission readiness and 
operational capabilities; and
    (6) an assessment of the extent to which the Coast Guard 
direction of resources to support the Department of Defense 
mission impacts its non-defense mission readiness and 
operational capabilities.
    The committee further directs the Comptroller General to 
provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services not 
later than March 1, 2021, on the Comptroller General's 
preliminary findings and present final results in a format and 
timeframe agreed to at the time of the briefing.

                         LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS


              Subtitle A--Authorization of Appropriations


              Section 301--Authorization of Appropriations

    This section would authorize appropriations for operation 
and maintenance activities at the levels identified in section 
4301 of division D of this Act.

                   Subtitle B--Energy and Environment


Section 311--Military Aviation and Installation Assurance Clearinghouse 
                   for Review of Mission Obstructions

    This section would amend the procedures for Department of 
Defense review of proposed wind energy projects by requiring 
the Department of Defense to issue a notification to an 
applicant and the applicable Governor of a finding of no 
adverse impact when appropriate. This section also strikes 
references to Massachusetts Institute of Technology's role in 
determining project offset distances.

Section 312--Military Aviation and Installation Assurance Clearinghouse 
                   for Review of Mission Obstructions

    This section would amend the procedures for Department of 
Defense review of proposed wind energy projects by requiring 
the Department of Defense to issue a notification to an 
applicant and the applicable Governor of a finding of no 
adverse impact when appropriate.

Section 313--Agreements to Limit Encroachments and Other Constraints on 
               Military Training, Testing, and Operations

    This section would amend section 2684a of title 10, United 
States Code, to provide a technical amendment to the Readiness 
and Environmental Protection Integration Program that clarifies 
eligible entity participation.

   Section 314--Modification of Department of Defense Environmental 
 Restoration Authorities to Include Federal Government Facilities Used 
                           by National Guard

    This section would amend section 2707(e) of title 10, 
United States Code, to modify defense environmental restoration 
authorities to allow them to be used by the National Guard.

  Section 315--Increased Transparency through Reporting on Usage and 
     Spills of Aqueous Film-Forming Foam at Military Installations

    This section would amend chapter 160 of title 10, United 
States Code, to require the Department of Defense to provide 
congressional notification of all releases of PFOS- and PFOA-
containing fire-fighting foam.

 Section 316--Replacement of Non-Tactical Motor Vehicles at the End of 
          Service Life with Electric or Hybrid Motor Vehicles

    This section would amend section 2922g of title 10, United 
States Code, to require the Department of Defense to maximize 
to the extent practicable its use of hybrid, plug-in hybrid, 
and fully electric vehicles for non-combat uses through 
replacement of vehicles at the end of their lease or service 
period.

Section 317--Budgeting of Department of Defense Relating to Operational 
                           Energy Improvement

    This section would create a budget line for operational 
energy requirements.

  Section 318--Assessment of Department of Defense Operational Energy 
                                 Usage

    This section would require the Secretary of Defense to 
enter into an agreement with a federally funded research and 
development center to conduct an assessment of Department of 
Defense operational energy usage.

     Section 319--Improvement of the Operational Energy Capability 
             Improvement Fund of the Department of Defense

    This section would realign the Operational Energy 
Capability Improvement Fund under the Under Secretary of 
Defense for Acquisition and Sustainment.

Section 320--Five-Year Reviews of Containment Technologies Relating to 
                  Red Hill Bulk Fuel Storage Facility

    This section would require the Department of the Navy to 
conduct 5-year reviews of the best available technologies for 
containment at Red Hill Bulk Fuel Storage Facility.

 Section 321--Limitation on Use of Funds for Acquisition of Furnished 
         Energy for Rhine Ordnance Barracks Army Medical Center

    This section would require the Secretary of Defense to 
submit a certification that none of the energy used by Rhine 
Ordnance Barracks Army Medical Center was sourced from the 
Russian Federation.

Section 322--Requirement to Update Department of Defense Climate Change 
                                Roadmap

    This section would require the Department of Defense to 
update the 2014 Department of Defense Climate Change Roadmap by 
February 1, 2022.

   Section 323--Comptroller General Report on Department of Defense 
                          Installation Energy

    This section would require the Comptroller General of the 
United States to submit a report to the House Committee on 
Armed Services on Department of Defense progress toward meeting 
net zero installation energy goals.

     Section 324--Department of Defense Report on Emissions Levels

    This section would require the Secretary of Defense to 
submit a report on its total emissions levels for the last 10 
fiscal years.

Section 325--Objectives, Performance Standards, and Criteria for Use of 
                 Wildlife Conservation Banking Programs

    This section would require the Secretary of the Interior to 
work through the United States Fish and Wildlife Service to 
issue regulations related to wildlife conservation banking.

  Section 326--Offshore Wind Energy Development, Morro Bay, California

    This section would require all interaction on behalf of the 
Navy with the California Energy Commission, Federal agencies, 
State and local governments, and potential energy developers 
regarding proposed offshore wind energy off the Central Coast 
of California to be performed through the Office of the Under 
Secretary of Defense for Acquisition and Sustainment. In 
addition, this section would prohibit the Secretary of Defense 
from issuing a final offshore wind assessment that proposes 
wind exclusion areas or objecting to an offshore energy project 
in the Central Coast of California that has filed for review by 
the Military Aviation and Installations Assurance Clearinghouse 
until providing a required briefing.

 Section 327--Long-Duration Demonstration Initiative and Joint Program

    This section would authorize the Director of the 
Environmental Security Technology Certification Program of the 
Department of Defense to establish a demonstration initiative 
composed of demonstration projects focused on the development 
of long-duration energy storage technologies.

    Section 328--Prizes for Development of Non-PFAS-Containing Fire-
                             Fighting Agent

    This section would create a prize program to incentivize 
innovation in development of a non-PFAS-containing fire-
fighting agent.

     Section 329--Survey of Technologies for Department of Defense 
Application in Phasing Out the Use of Fluorinated Aqueous Film-Forming 
                                  Foam

    This section would require the Department of Defense to 
survey non-firefighting agent technologies that could 
facilitate execution of the required 2024 phase-out of 
fluorinated aqueous film-forming foam.

     Section 330--Interagency Body on Research Related to Per- and 
                       Polyfluoroalkyl Substances

    The section would establish an interagency working group to 
coordinate Federal research and development activities related 
to per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances.

Section 331--Restriction on Procurement by Defense Logistics Agency of 
Certain Items Containing Perfluoroalkyl Substances and Polyfluoroalkyl 
                               Substances

    This section would prohibit the Director of the Defense 
Logistics Agency from procuring certain items containing 
perfluoroalkyl and polyfluoroalkyl substances effective one 
year after the date of the enactment of this Act.

Section 332--Standards for Removal or Remedial Actions with Respect to 
                       PFOS or PFOA Contamination

    This section would require the Secretary of Defense to meet 
or exceed the most stringent standards between an enforceable 
State standard under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, 
Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA), an 
enforceable Federal standard under CERCLA, or a health advisory 
under the Safe Drinking Water Act when performing removal or 
remediation actions of PFOS or PFOA contamination from 
Department of Defense or National Guard activities found in 
drinking water or in groundwater that is not currently used for 
drinking water.

 Section 333--Research and Development of Alternative to Aqueous Film-
                              Forming Foam

    This section would require the Secretary of Defense, acting 
through the National Institute of Standards and Technology and 
in consultation with other stakeholders and Federal agencies, 
to award grants and carry out other activities related to 
fluorine-free alternatives to aqueous film-forming foam.

 Section 334--Notification to Agricultural Operations Located in Areas 
               Exposed to Department of Defense PFAS Use

    This section would require the Secretary of Defense, in 
consultation with the Secretary of Agriculture, to provide 
notifications to any agricultural operation located within 10 
square miles of a location where covered PFAS has been detected 
in groundwater, hydrologically linked to a local water source, 
and is suspected to be, or due to a positive test known to be, 
the result of the use of PFAS at any installation of the 
Department of Defense located in the United States or any 
State-owned facility of the National Guard.

  Section 335--Public Disclosure of Results of Department of Defense 
        Testing for Perfluoroalkyl or Polyfluoroalkyl Substances

    This section would require the Secretary of Defense to 
publicly disclose the results of any testing for perfluoroalkyl 
or polyfluoroalkyl substances conducted on military 
installations or formerly used defense sites.

                 Subtitle C--Logistics and Sustainment


     Section 351--National Defense Sustainment and Logistics Review

    This section would require the Secretary of Defense to 
conduct a comprehensive examination and submit a report on the 
sustainment and logistics requirements necessary to support the 
national military strategy.

Section 352--Extension of Sunset Relating to Charter Air Transportation 
                                Services

    This section would amend section 9515(k) of title 10, 
United States Code, to extend the minimum business guarantee 
for air carriers participating in the Civil Reserve Air Fleet 
program from December 31, 2020, to December 31, 2025.

   Section 353--Additional Elements for Inclusion in Navy Ship Depot 
                       Maintenance Budget Report

    This section would modify the Navy Ship Depot Maintenance 
Report required by section 363(b) of the National Defense 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2020 (Public Law 116-92) to 
include the execution of the planned schedule categorized by 
class of ship and to require a report on the Secretary's 
progress implementing the recommendations of GAO Report 20-370.

 Section 354--Modification to Limitation on Length of Overseas Forward 
                      Deployment of Naval Vessels

    This section would make technical changes to limitations on 
the length of time a ship can be in a forward deployed naval 
forces status.

  Section 355--Independent Advisory Panel on Weapon System Sustainment

    This section would require the Secretary of Defense to 
establish an independent advisory panel to conduct a review and 
make recommendations related to the weapon system sustainment 
ecosystem.

 Section 356--Biannual Briefings on Status of Shipyard Infrastructure 
                           Optimization Plan

    This section would direct the Secretary of the Navy to 
provide a briefing to the congressional defense committees 
every 6 months on the status of implementation of the Shipyard 
Infrastructure Optimization Plan.

Section 357--Materiel Readiness Metrics and Objectives for Major Weapon 
                                Systems

    This section would amend section 118 of title 10, United 
States Code, to require the Department of Defense to develop 
materiel readiness metrics and objectives for major weapon 
systems, to regularly review and update the metrics and 
objectives, and report on them with the annual budget request.

               Subtitle D--Munitions Safety and Oversight


   Section 361--Chair of Department of Defense Explosive Safety Board

    This section would amend section 172 of title 10, United 
States Code, to codify the responsibilities of the Department 
of Defense Explosive Safety Board chairman, executive director, 
and staff. It also requires the Under Secretary of Defense to 
certify that the board positions, including the chairman, have 
been filled by military officers before more than 75 percent of 
authorized funding may be obligated or expended by the Office 
of the Under Secretary of Defense for Acquisition and 
Sustainment.

        Section 362--Explosive Ordnance Disposal Defense Program

    This section would amend section 2284 of title 10, United 
States Code, to clarify that the Assistant Secretary of Defense 
for Special Operations and Low Intensity Conflict shall be 
responsible for the direction, coordination, and integration of 
the Explosive Ordnance Disposal Defense Program, and to specify 
which organizations within the Department of Defense the 
Assistant Secretary shall coordinate with on specific 
activities. In addition, this section would require the 
Secretary of Defense to submit a report on the establishment 
and organization of the Explosive Ordnance Disposal Defense 
Program.

    Section 363--Assessment of Resilience of Department of Defense 
                          Munitions Enterprise

    This section would require the Secretary of Defense to 
enter into an agreement with a federally funded research and 
development center to conduct an assessment of the resilience 
of the Department of Defense munitions enterprise.

  Section 364--Report on Safety Waivers and Mishaps in Department of 
                      Defense Munitions Enterprise

    This section would require the Secretary of Defense to 
include with the President's budget a report on safety waivers 
and mishaps in the Department of Defense munitions enterprise.

                       Subtitle E--Other Matters


Section 371--Pilot Program for Temporary Issuance of Maternity-Related 
                             Uniform Items

    This section would authorize the Defense Logistics Agency 
to create a pilot program to issue maternity uniforms to 
pregnant service members at no cost to the service member. The 
authority to carry out the pilot program would terminate on 
September 30, 2026.

         Section 372--Servicewomen's Commemorative Partnerships

    This section would authorize the Secretary of the Army to 
enter into a contract, partnership, or grant with a non-profit 
organization for the purpose of providing financial support for 
the maintenance and sustainment of infrastructure and 
facilities at military service memorials and museums that 
highlight the role of women in the military.

         Section 373--Biodefense Analysis and Budget Submission

    This section would require the Director of the Office of 
Management and Budget to conduct a comprehensive analysis of 
Federal biodefense programs and to develop and submit to 
Congress annually with the President's budget request an 
integrated biodefense budget submission and its supporting 
analysis.

              TITLE IV--MILITARY PERSONNEL AUTHORIZATIONS

                       ITEMS OF SPECIAL INTEREST


   Impact of U.S. Population Trends on National Guard Force Structure

    The committee notes the implementation guidance for the 
National Guard's National Defense Strategy states, 
``Demographic and economic trends within the U.S. will 
challenge our ability to recruit and retain quality Guardsmen 
over the next several years. Meeting this challenge is 
fundamental to our long-term success . . . However, we must 
also be prepared to reposition National Guard force structure 
to the parts of the nation where we can successfully recruit to 
fill it.'' Therefore, the committee directs the Chief of the 
National Guard Bureau to submit a report to the Committees on 
Armed Services of the Senate and the House of Representatives 
not later than December 1, 2020, to determine if population, 
demographic, and economic trends are impacting the ability of 
the National Guard to recruit and retain qualified individuals 
to fulfill mission requirements as well as support the citizens 
of States with respect to title 32 National Guard civil support 
missions. The report shall include recommendations to address 
these concerns as well as force structure changes to address 
these vulnerabilities. The study should include Air and Army 
National Guard units and historical and projected population 
growth.

                         LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS


                       Subtitle A--Active Forces


              Section 401--End Strengths for Active Forces

    This section would authorize the following end strengths 
for Active Duty personnel of the Armed Forces as of September 
30, 2021:

Sec. 401.




----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                       FY 2021                 Change from
                                                             ---------------------------------------------------
                    Service                        FY 2020                  Committee
                                                  Authorized    Request       Recom-      FY 2021      FY 2020
                                                                            mendation     Request     Authorized
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Army...........................................      480,000      485,900      485,900            0        5,900
Navy...........................................      340,500      347,800      347,800            0        7,300
USMC...........................................      186,200      184,100      184,100            0       -2,100
Air Force......................................      332,800      327,266      327,266            0       -5,534
Space Force....................................            0        6,434        6,434            0        6,434
                                                ----------------------------------------------------------------
  DOD Total....................................    1,339,500    1,351,500    1,351,500            0       12,000
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

 Section 402--Revisions in Permanent Active Duty End Strength Minimum 
                                 Levels

    This section would establish new minimum Active Duty end 
strengths for the Army, Navy, Marine Corps, Air Force, and 
Space Force as of September 30, 2021. The committee recommends 
485,900 as the minimum Active Duty end strength for the Army, 
347,800 as the minimum Active Duty end strength for the Navy, 
184,100 as the minimum Active Duty end strength for the Marine 
Corps, 327,266 as the minimum Active Duty end strength for the 
Air Force, and 6,434 as the minimum Active Duty end strength 
for the Space Force.

   Section 403--Modification of the Authorized Number and Accounting 
                  Method for Senior Enlisted Personnel

    This section would amend section 517 of title 10, United 
States Code, to change the method of calculating the authorized 
number of senior enlisted members in the grades of E-8 and E-9 
from the daily average to an authorized end strength, and would 
increase the authorized number of members in the grade of E-8 
from 2.5 percent to 3 percent of the total number of enlisted 
members.

                       Subtitle B--Reserve Forces


            Section 411--End Strengths for Selected Reserve

    This section would authorize the following end strengths 
for Selected Reserve personnel, including the end strength for 
Reserves on Active Duty in support of the Reserves, as of 
September 30, 2021:

Sec. 411.




----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                       FY 2021                 Change from
                                                             ---------------------------------------------------
                    Service                        FY 2020                  Committee
                                                  Authorized    Request       Recom-      FY 2021      FY 2020
                                                                            mendation     Request     Authorized
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Army National Guard............................      336,000      336,500      336,500            0          500
Army Reserve...................................      189,500      189,800      189,800            0          300
Navy Reserve...................................       59,000       58,800       58,800            0         -200
Marine Corps Reserve...........................       38,500       38,500       38,500            0            0
Air National Guard.............................      107,700      108,100      108,100            0          400
Air Force Reserve..............................       70,100       70,300       70,300            0          200
                                                ----------------------------------------------------------------
  DOD Total....................................      800,800      802,000      802,000            0        1,200
Coast Guard Reserve............................        7,000        7,000        7,000            0            0
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

 Section 412--End Strengths for Reserves on Active Duty in Support of 
                              the Reserves

    This section would authorize the following end strengths 
for Reserves on Active Duty in support of the Reserves as of 
September 30, 2021:

Sec. 412.




----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                       FY 2021                 Change from
                                                             ---------------------------------------------------
                    Service                        FY 2020                  Committee
                                                  Authorized    Request       Recom-      FY 2021      FY 2020
                                                                            mendation     Request     Authorized
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Army National Guard............................       30,595       30,595       30,595            0            0
Army Reserve...................................       16,511       16,511       16,511            0            0
Navy Reserve...................................       10,155       10,215       10,215            0           60
Marine Corps Reserve...........................        2,386        2,386        2,386            0            0
Air National Guard.............................       22,637       25,333       25,333            0        2,696
Air Force Reserve..............................        4,431        5,256        5,256            0          825
                                                ----------------------------------------------------------------
  DOD Total....................................       86,715       90,296       90,296            0        3,581
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

   Section 413--End Strengths for Military Technicians (Dual Status)

    This section would authorize the following end strengths 
for military technicians (dual status) as of September 30, 
2021:

Sec. 413.




----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                       FY 2021                 Change from
                                                             ---------------------------------------------------
                    Service                        FY 2020                  Committee
                                                  Authorized    Request       Recom-      FY 2021      FY 2020
                                                                            mendation     Request     Authorized
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Army National Guard............................       22,294       22,294       22,294            0            0
Army Reserve...................................        6,492        6,492        6,492            0            0
Air National Guard.............................       13,569       10,994       10,994            0       -2,575
Air Force Reserve..............................        8,938        7,947        7,947            0         -991
                                                ----------------------------------------------------------------
  DOD Total....................................       51,293       47,727       47,727            0       -3,566
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

 Section 414--Maximum Number of Reserve Personnel Authorized To Be on 
                  Active Duty for Operational Support

    This section would authorize, as required by section 115(b) 
of title 10, United States Code, the maximum number of Reserve 
Component personnel who may be on Active Duty or full-time 
National Guard duty during fiscal year 2021 to provide 
operational support. The personnel authorized here do not count 
against the end strengths authorized by section 401 or section 
412 of this Act unless the duration on Active Duty exceeds the 
limitations in section 115(b)(2) of title 10, United States 
Code.

Sec. 414.




----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                       FY 2021                 Change from
                                                             ---------------------------------------------------
                    Service                        FY 2020                  Committee
                                                  Authorized    Request       Recom-      FY 2021      FY 2020
                                                                            mendation     Request     Authorized
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Army National Guard............................       17,000       17,000       17,000            0            0
Army Reserve...................................       13,000       13,000       13,000            0            0
Navy Reserve...................................        6,200        6,200        6,200            0            0
Marine Corps Reserve...........................        3,000        3,000        3,000            0            0
Air National Guard.............................       16,000       16,000       16,000            0            0
Air Force Reserve..............................       14,000       14,000       14,000            0            0
                                                ----------------------------------------------------------------
  DOD Total....................................       69,200       69,200       69,200            0            0
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

              Subtitle C--Authorization of Appropriations


                    Section 421--Military Personnel

    This section would authorize appropriations for military 
personnel at the levels identified in the funding table in 
section 4401 of division D of this Act.

                   TITLE V--MILITARY PERSONNEL POLICY

                       ITEMS OF SPECIAL INTEREST


 A Report on the Military Lending Act and the Effects of High Interest 
                           Rates on Readiness

    The Committee directs the Secretary of Defense, in 
consultation with the Secretary of the Treasury, to submit a 
report to the House Committee on Armed Services, no later than 
February 15th, 2021, on a Military Annual Percentage Rate lower 
than 30% and its impact on military readiness and servicemember 
retention.

      Air Force Institute of Technology and Space Education Study

    For more than a century, the Air Force Institute of 
Technology (AFIT), has continuously supported the aeronautics 
and aviation-focused technical education needs of our nation's 
military. Today AFIT is the Air Force's leader for advanced, 
multidisciplinary academic education, as well as its 
institution for technical professional continuing education. As 
our defense needs have shifted to incorporate space as a 
contested warfighting domain, AFIT has responded by creating 
new educational programs and research institutions. For 
example, AFIT's Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics 
produces graduates and research to meet the military's needs 
for future spacecraft. AFIT's Center for Space Research and 
Assurance delivers highly valued resilient, responsive, and 
reliable space capabilities to the defense and intelligence 
community through executing cutting-edge space technology 
development, science, and space experiments. AFIT's School of 
Strategic Force Studies manages execution of space and nuclear 
continuing education. Space is now integral to AFIT's numerous 
research and graduate and continuing education programs. With 
the establishment of the U.S. Space Force within the Department 
of the Air Force, the committee anticipates the requirements 
for AFIT to expand to meet the new challenges of a greater 
department mission.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of the Air 
Force to submit a report to the congressional defense 
committees not later than February 1, 2021, on a study of the 
Air Force Institute of Technology future role in space 
education. The study shall include each of the following 
elements at a minimum:
    (1) an overview of AFIT's existing space-focused education 
and research capabilities, programs, products, and outputs;
    (2) an identification and evaluation of new space-focused 
educational requirements that can be met by AFIT resulting from 
the establishment of the U.S. Space Force and based on future 
space-related defense needs;
    (3) a roadmap for meeting the requirements described in 
element (2), as well as a description of anticipated additional 
resources necessary for AFIT to meet the education and research 
space requirements of the Department of the Air Force in the 
next 5 fiscal years; and
    (4) a recommendation whether to change the name of AFIT to 
``Air and Space Force Institute of Technology'' or other name 
to reflect its future role in air and space defense-focused 
education.

               Concerns about Uncharacterized Discharges

    The committee is concerned by reports of inappropriate use 
of uncharacterized discharges for tenured military members who 
have served for more than six months but less than 8 years. The 
committee directs the Secretary of the Navy, Secretary of the 
Army, Secretary of the Air Force, and Commandant of the Marine 
Corps to report to the committees on Armed Services of the 
Senate and the House of Representatives by February 21, 2021 on 
how many uncharacterized discharges have been issued to service 
members in the last ten years, including the breakdown by 
gender, race/ethnicity, and grade. The report should also 
explain why an uncharacterized discharge was used instead of 
any of the other discharge statuses.

   Disinformation Training Incorporated into Pre-deployment Training

    The committee is aware that U.S. forces deployed overseas 
are being directly targeted by our adversaries with 
disinformation through social media, text messages, and other 
means. The committee supports the goal of ensuring U.S. troops 
are appropriately trained to think critically to distinguish 
between legitimate news and unreliable information, including 
fake URLs and headlines. The committee also expects the 
Secretaries of the military departments to incorporate into 
pre-deployment training a new component on media literacy to 
prepare troops to think critically and identify disinformation.

               Effectiveness of Military Justice Reforms

    The committee understands the importance of ongoing 
military justice reforms throughout the Department of Defense. 
Additionally, successive National Defense Authorization Acts 
have required a wide range of reforms to the Uniform Code of 
Military Justice and other military legal matters. The 
committee wants to ensure it remains abreast of the 
effectiveness of these military justice reforms. Therefore, the 
committee directs the Secretary of Defense to provide a 
briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services not later 
than January 1, 2021, on the results of the review and 
assessment conducted under section 946(f)(1) of title 10, 
United States Code (article 3 146(f)(1) of the Uniform Code of 
Military Justice). This briefing shall include recommendations 
for improvements to the Uniform Code of Military Justice based 
on the results of such review and assessment.

 Expanding World Language Program to Offer Strategic Language Training 
                       to DODEA Students Earlier

    The committee notes that the Host Nation Program provides 
Department of Defense Education Activity (DODEA) elementary 
school students with a cross-cultural and language acquisition 
focus to develop an appreciation and understanding of the 
culture and language of the country in which they are located. 
The committee also notes that the World Language Program 
curriculum is offered at DODEA's schools outside the United 
States, in middle through high school, and is designed to 
provide students with an introduction to host nation languages, 
taught by host nation teachers. The students also participate 
in activities building appreciation and understanding of the 
country in which they are located. Considering that earlier 
exposure to language training generally increases foreign 
language proficiency, the committee directs the Secretary of 
Defense to submit a report to the Committees on Armed Services 
of the Senate and the House of Representatives not later than 
March 1, 2021, consisting of the following elements:
    (1) the feasibility of beginning strategic language 
instruction in the kindergarten through 6th grade level where 
applicable, and
    (2) the cost, resources, and, impediments to beginning 
strategic language instruction per element (1).

           Gender Integration at Marine Corps Recruit Depots

    The committee commends the United States Marine Corps for 
working to achieve the requirements in section 565 of the 
National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2020 (Public 
Law 116-92) to gender integrate training at Marine Corps 
Recruit Depots. The committee believes transparency is crucial 
to ensuring the intent of Congress is met. Therefore, the 
committee directs the Commandant of the Marine Corps to provide 
a briefing to the Committee on Armed Services of the House of 
Representatives not later than March 1, 2021, describing the 
plan to integrate the Marine Recruit Depots. The briefing 
should include projected costs for the resiliency of the bases 
and infrastructure, for construction to modify facilities, any 
land lease issues, any surplus property identified, any impacts 
to local infrastructure surrounding the Depots, any changes for 
training, and challenges the Commandant believes would prevent 
the Marine Corps from achieving the requirement.

          Improvements to the Special Victims' Counsel Program

    The committee acknowledges the benefits of the Special 
Victims' Counsel Program and supports the military services' 
consistent efforts to strengthen the program. The committee 
believes that compliance with recent efforts to expand and 
improve the Special Victims' Counsel Program is critical to the 
program's success. Therefore, the committee directs the Judge 
Advocates General of the Army, the Navy, and the Air Force, and 
the Staff Judge Advocate to the Commandant of the Marine Corps, 
to provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services 
by January 1, 2021, on the Special Victims' Counsel Program. 
Such briefing shall include the following:
    (1) an assessment of whether the service is in compliance 
with the provisions of the National Defense Authorization Act 
for Fiscal Year 2020 (Public Law 116-92) relating to the 
Special Victims' Counsel Program and, if not, what steps have 
been taken to achieve compliance with such provisions. Such 
provisions include, but are not limited to: the requirement 
that a military installation provide an alleged victim with 
access to a Special Victims' Counsel, not later than 72 hours 
after such request is made, if a Special Victims' Counsel is 
not available at the military installation; the requirement 
that Special Victims' Counsel receive appropriate training on 
criminal laws and policies of the State(s) in which they are 
located; and the requirement that Special Victims' Counsel 
provide alleged victims with legal consultation and assistance 
related to incidents of retaliation.
    (2) a description of any staffing constraints on the 
Special Victims' Counsel program or other programs of the 
service resulting from the additional responsibilities required 
of the Special Victims' Counsel Program under Public Law 116-
92.
    (3) an assessment of the feasibility of providing cross-
service Special Victims' Counsel representation in instances 
where a Special Victims' Counsel from a different service is 
co-located with a victim at a remote base.

              Military Judge Advocate General End Strength

    The committee applauds the military services for diligently 
reviewing the manning requirements for the Judge Advocate 
General (JAG) Corps to ensure achievement of the requirements 
of section 541 of the National Defense Authorization Act for 
Fiscal Year 2020 (Public Law 116-92). The committee notes these 
reviews are critical for the success of the military legal 
community to ensure the appropriate number of JAGs are accessed 
and trained to sufficiently execute the increasing number of 
JAG requirements in the military. Therefore, the committee 
expects each military service will have a programmed increase 
in the number of JAG billets to meet the requirements of Public 
Law 116-92.

                 Military Spouse Licensure Reciprocity

    The committee applauds the work done by the Department of 
Defense to ease licensing burdens for military spouses 
relocating from other States or territories. The committee 
supports comments made by the service secretaries touting the 
importance of professional licensure reciprocity for military 
families and the consideration this will be given when 
evaluating future basing decisions. The committee notes that 
while some progress has been made, with more than 1,100 various 
occupational licensing requirements across the United States, 
such regulations continue to directly impact the welfare and 
morale of service members and their families, and Department of 
Defense staffing may not be at the level required to speed the 
development of State compacts. Therefore, the committee directs 
the Secretary of Defense to provide a report to the Committees 
on Armed Services of the Senate and the House of 
Representatives not later than June 1, 2021, that includes:
    (1) an action plan on the status of licensure reciprocity 
actions being taken in each State to include the use of 
interstate compacts and exemption status;
    (2) the measurement of the average number of days to 
spousal licensure in each State grouped by occupational 
specialty;
    (3) the development of a framework assessing the status of 
State spousal licensure reciprocity agreements when considering 
future basing decisions within the Department of Defense; and
    (4) the additional number of Department of Defense Defense-
State Liaisons required to further facilitate State compacts.

    Morale, Welfare, and Recreation Reservation System Modernization

    The committee understands that a robust Morale, Welfare, 
and Recreation program across the Armed Forces is a critical 
component of retention. However, most online resources are not 
available through an online portal and reservations must be 
made by phone. This sometimes exacerbates a situation with long 
beneficiary wait times and inconsistent booking practices 
across Morale, Welfare, and Recreation programs. Therefore, the 
committee directs the Secretary of Defense to provide a report 
to the Committees on Armed Services of the Senate and the House 
of Representatives not later than June 1, 2021, analyzing 
ongoing challenges with the existing system and providing 
recommendations that would improve and modernize the Morale, 
Welfare, and Recreation reservation system.

               Officer and Enlisted Qualification Testing

    The committee believes that relevant qualification testing 
is a critical component of accessing quality officers and 
warrant officers and enlisting exceptional personnel into the 
military services. However, the committee is concerned that 
outdated qualification testing requirements may be adversely 
affecting the recruitment of otherwise qualified applicants and 
may also be unnecessarily inhibiting their entry into specific 
occupational specialties. While the unique requirements of the 
individual services and their numerous specialties are 
recognized, the lack of uniformity even across the 
commissioning sources of a single service cause concern for the 
efficacy of current testing. Presently, there is no single test 
or instrument used as an aptitude requirement for appointment 
of officers and warrant officers within the military 
departments and the Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery 
(ASVAB) test required for enlistment is antiquated, failing to 
target the critical aspects of a changing force.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of Defense 
to provide a report to the Committees on Armed Services of the 
Senate and the House of Representatives not later than March 1, 
2021, on the following:
    (1) An analysis of the various forms of qualification 
testing required for entrance into military service, the 
officer or warrant officer corps, or a specific occupational 
specialty, broken out by military service
    (2) the frequency with which the Department of Defense 
reviews the qualification tests of the services to include 
those tests required for entrance into specific occupations
    (3) the number of potential accessions that have been 
denied entry into the officer or warrant officer corps due to 
their performance on a service-directed qualification test, 
broken out by military service
    (4) the number of potential enlistments that have been 
denied entry into the armed services due to their performance 
on the Armed Services Vocational Battery Aptitude (ASVAB) Test, 
broken out by military service
    (5) the number of service members denied entrance into an 
aviation specific occupation due to performance on an aviation 
qualification test, broken out by military service
    (6) a plan of action to update current qualification 
testing standards and requirements to ensure optimal 
recruitment of prospective applicants.

                  Parental Leave Parity for Reservists

    The Committee believes there should be a consistent policy 
that allows servicemembers in the Reserve Component flexibility 
in their drill schedule to be able to take parental leave after 
the birth or adoption of child. The Committee directs the Under 
Secretary of Defense for Personnel and Readiness to provide a 
briefing to the House Armed Services Committee no later than 
July 1, 2021 regarding the current Reserve Component policies 
relating to parental leave and the feasibility of establishing 
a policy that allows for flexible drill for twelve weeks after 
the birth or adoption of a child, to include maximizing the use 
of telework if appropriate. This briefing should include an 
assessment of ways to minimize impact of the servicemember's 
parental leave on their individual and unit readiness and 
ensure that no servicemember faces corrective action, including 
administrative separation or transfer to the individual ready 
reserve, for failure to meet administrative requirements during 
their period of parental leave.

  Participation in Transition Assistance Programs at Small and Remote 
                         Military Installations

    The committee remains concerned that all service members 
are receiving quality transition assistance and access to 
transitional resources through the Transition Assistance 
Program, especially access and availability of resources at 
small and remote bases. The goal is to ensure all service 
members, even those transitioning out of small or remote bases, 
are not overlooked and receive the resources required. 
Therefore, the committee directs the Comptroller General of the 
United States to submit a report to the Committees on Armed 
Services of the Senate and the House of Representatives, not 
later than June 1, 2021, on a review of the participation in 
formal Transition Assistance Programs of members of the Armed 
Forces assigned to small military installations and remote 
military installations in the United States. Small military 
installations and remote military installations for purposes of 
this report are defined as follows:
    (1) a small military installation is an installation at 
which are assigned not more than 10,000 members of the Armed 
Forces.
    (2) a remote military installation is an installation that 
is located more than 50 miles from any city with a population 
of 50,000 people or more (as determined by the Office of 
Management and Budget).

                 Professional Military Education Reform

    The committee believes that Professional Military Education 
remains the foundation of joint integration and the Goldwater-
Nichols Act. However, the committee is concerned that Congress 
is not being consulted on significant changes to the 
Professional Military Education system now under consideration 
by the Department of Defense. Therefore, the committee directs 
the Secretary of Defense to provide a report to the Committees 
on Armed Services of the Senate and the House of 
Representatives not later than March 1, 2021, on the following:
    (1) the status of the recommendations made to the 
Department of Defense in Government Accountability Office 
Report 20-323;
    (2) a review of recommended improvements to the 
Professional Military Education enterprise in support of the 
National Defense Strategy, to include the cost of implementing 
these improvements; and
    (3) an assessment and value statement of the contributions 
of each of the senior service colleges as it relates to Joint 
Professional Military Education, Phase II education.

 Report on Feasibility of Implementation of Flexible Spending Account 
    Options for Members of the Uniformed Services and Their Families

    The committee directs the Secretary of Defense to submit a 
report to the Committees on Armed Services of the Senate and 
the House of Representatives by January 1, 2021, on the 
feasibility of implementing flexible spending account options 
that allow pre-tax payment of dependent care expenses, health 
and dental insurance premiums, and out-of-pocket health care 
expenses for members of the uniformed services and their family 
members. The report required shall include the following 
elements:
    (1) identification of any legislative or administrative 
barriers to achieving the implementation of such options;
    (2) recommendations on contribution limits; and
    (3) an assessment on tax incentives when using flexible 
spending accounts in conjunction with or instead of other 
annual tax credits and what financial advantages or 
disadvantages there may be for servicemembers and their 
families.

         Reserve Component General and Flag Officer Development

    The committee believes that the professional development of 
Reserve Component general and flag officers is imperative to 
executing national security objectives. The military services 
are challenged to provide Reserve Component officers with 
sufficient experience via the assignments process and to work 
diligently to sustain a wide array of opportunities that ensure 
an adequate pool of qualified senior leaders. Reductions in 
general and flag officer requirements or authorizations that 
disproportionally affect those positions that are viewed as 
developmentally vital should be avoided in order to achieve 
optimal performance and total force integration. Further, 
careful consideration must be given to maintain an appropriate 
diversity of positions that balance command, staff, and joint 
opportunities. It is the feeling of the committee that more 
needs to be done to ensure senior leaders within the Reserve 
Component are afforded continued professional growth 
opportunities and a clear path for progression.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of Defense 
to provide a report to the Committees on Armed Services of the 
Senate and the House of Representatives not later than March 1, 
2021, on the following:
    (1) a comprehensive analysis of the current Reserve 
Component general and flag officer command positions, broken 
out by service
    (2) a general assessment of current joint and staff 
opportunities available to Reserve Component general and flag 
officers, to include any areas of opportunity expansion
    (3) the impact of limited reserve officer exemptions on 
career progression for the Reserve Component
    (4) an outline of any legislative or policy driven guidance 
that impedes progression of Reserve Component general and flag 
officers
    (5) ongoing or planned efforts to further integrate the 
Reserve Component with Active Duty at the general and flag 
officer level
    (6) other information relevant to the enhanced career path 
for Reserve Component general and flag officers

                  Reserve Component Record of Service

    The committee recognizes the Department of Defense is 
beginning to implement changes from the National Defense 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2020 (Public Law 116-92) on 
the record of service for the Reserves. The Department has been 
provided great flexibility to fully explore what information 
should be on the record of service and when the record of 
service should be issued. The Department should also explore 
different options for conveying the record of service for the 
Reserves. Therefore, the Committee encourages the Department of 
Defense to consider the feasibility of an electronic option 
that includes a mechanism for validation of cumulative service 
for the conveyance of benefits.

Review of Medical Accessions Standards for Appointment, Enlistment, or 
                    Induction into Military Services

    The committee understands the Department of Defense 
evaluates hundreds of thousands of applicants to determine 
their eligibility to serve, including their medical fitness. 
The Department of Defense Instruction 6130.03, ``Medical 
Standards for Appointment, Enlistment, or Induction into the 
Military Services,'' ensures that medical standards are 
implemented across the Department of Defense for all service 
member accessions. Additionally, there is a medical waiver 
process administered by the Secretaries of the military 
services to allow for individuals with some previous conditions 
to still access into the military if it is determined the 
condition does not hinder the ability to deploy worldwide, 
regardless of military occupation. The committee notes that the 
frequency with which the Department of Defense Instruction 
6130.03 is updated to include information from the civilian 
community is every 3 to 5 years and based on a variety of 
medical factors. The committee is concerned as to whether there 
is actual uniformity in the determination of waivers across the 
military services and if data on waivers is reviewed on a 
reoccurring basis as well. Therefore, the committee directs the 
Secretary of Defense to provide a briefing to the House 
Committee on Armed Services, not later than February 1, 2021, 
specifying the following:
    (1) the frequency with which the Department of Defense 
consults with the civilian medical community to determine 
whether best practices across the medical disciplines 
referenced in Department of Defense Instruction 6130.03 are 
considered when promulgating and updating medical standards for 
potential accessions;
    (2) the number of potential accessions across the military 
services that have been denied entry due to a notation related 
to mental health conditions like anxiety and depressive 
disorders that are no longer undergoing treatment and are 
considered stable;
    (3) the number of potential accessions across the military 
services that have been denied entry due to a notation of 
attention deficit hyperactivity disorder medication usage 
(current usage or within the past 24 months); and
    (4) the impact of decentralizing the medical waivers 
process to a lower level within the chain of command.

Review of the Preservation of the Force and Family Program for Special 
                           Operations Forces

    The committee recognizes the importance of the Preservation 
of the Force and Family (POTFF) program to support the 
personnel and dependents of U.S. Special Operations Command 
(USSOCOM), and is supportive of the command's initiatives to 
broaden focus across the pillars of POTFF to more 
comprehensively address the stressors and needs of those 
special operations forces (SOF) and their families.
    While POTFF has historically focused on rehabilitating and 
maintaining the operator through physical therapy initiatives, 
the committee maintains interest in ensuring balance of 
investment throughout POTFF to wholly address the mental, 
physical, spiritual, and familial needs of SOF. The committee 
notes the additional investments for the other pillars of 
POTFF, and is encouraged by the use of emergent technologies 
such as machine learning/artificial intelligence (ML/AI) to 
facilitate development of neurocognitive mapping capabilities 
to more accurately capture the psychological data of SOF, with 
the intention of aligning proper emotional care as they 
maneuver throughout the special operations enterprise.
    The committee also notes the recent effort to establish 
Smartabase as the preferred program to virtually track SOF 
participating in the POTFF program. The committee understands 
the intent to have Smartabase implemented at each Service 
Component and Theater Special Operations Command element of 
USSOCOM. The committee is also aware that Smartabase is 
intended to manage data associated with USSOCOM's SOF 
Assessment Baseline and Reassessment System.
    However, with these concerns in mind, and to ensure that 
the command is honoring SOF truth number one, ``Humans are more 
important than hardware,'' the committee directs the 
Comptroller General of the United States to provide a report to 
the House Committee on Armed Services by January 29, 2021, on 
the history, current use, and future intent for the POTFF 
program. The report shall include:
    (1) observations regarding the balance of emphasis put on 
the four pillars of the program;
    (2) the use of ML/AI to accurately capture and track the 
neurocognitive data of SOF and virtual connectivity to ensure 
that data is easily shared as SOF move across the enterprise;
    (3) an assessment of the interoperability and scalability 
of the Smartabase system; and
    (4) opportunities to enhance the POTFF program, especially 
considering transitioning and retired SOF who might still 
require the specialty care as provided by the POTFF program.

              Sexual Assault Information Management System

    The committee is aware of the Army Sexual Harassment/
Assault Response and Prevention Program Office's use of the 
Army's Strategic Management System (SMS) performance management 
tool to report data from the Department of Defense's Sexual 
Assault Information Database (DSAID). The committee further 
recognizes that the use of SMS allows Army leaders at all 
levels of command to create uniform, centrally managed reports 
that allow for visibility into sexual harassment/assault 
conditions across the force. However, the committee is 
concerned that across the other military departments and the 
Office of the Secretary of Defense, no system of record is used 
to report data emanating from DSAID. Therefore, the committee 
encourages the Secretary of Defense to review the Department's 
and each military service's system for utilizing information 
from DSAID and how a common operating system may improve 
commanders' ability to monitor and tailor prevention programs 
across the Department.

                         Space Force Personnel

    The committee commends the Department of Defense for the 
establishment of the Space Force within the Department of the 
Air Force. The mission of the Space Force is critical to 
ensuring unfettered access to, and freedom to operate in, 
space, and to providing vital capabilities to joint and 
coalition forces in peacetime and across the spectrum of 
conflict. However, the current planning seems to lack some 
specificity and details that may be needed to help ensure the 
timely and successful execution of the force structure plan for 
the Space Force. Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary 
of Defense to submit a report to the Committees on Armed 
Services of the Senate and the House of Representatives, not 
later than February 1, 2021, specifying the following elements:
    (1) the number of personnel, grades, and specialties of 
voluntary transfers that will be transferred into the Space 
Force from the Department of the Army, Department of the Navy, 
and Department of the Air Force;
    (2) any new civilian personnel authorities and hiring 
initiatives needed by the Department of the Air Force to ensure 
the Space Force has the agility to acquire and retain the 
required civilian workforce;
    (3) any changes to the physical and medical standards for 
appointment, enlistment, or induction into the Space Force, to 
include any new initiatives that would consider the broadening 
of waiver authorities to facilitate a holistic approach to the 
accession and retention of Space Force personnel; and
    (4) a plan of action and milestones that highlights force 
structure actions to be completed, resource allocation, and 
personnel transfers.

            United States Space Force Commissioning Programs

    The committee affirms that the recent establishment of the 
United States Space Force requires the congressional defense 
committees and the Department of Defense to work closely to 
identify the policy and resources needed to ensure the U.S. 
Space Force can effectively fulfill its mission as an 
independent branch of the armed forces. The committee observes 
that earlier this year the United States Air Force Academy 
graduated the first eighty-six officers to be directly 
commissioned into the U.S. Space Force. The committee also 
recognizes that, like the other military services, officers 
commissioned into the Space Force will require pre-
commissioning training programs tailored to the unique aspects 
of the Space Force mission and service culture. The committee 
is aware that the Department of the Air Force is developing a 
strategy to address Space Force officer commissioning programs 
and desires greater understanding of these requirements. 
Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of the Air Force 
to provide the congressional defense committees with a 
briefing, no later than March 1, 2021, on its strategy to 
establish Space Force officer commissioning programs and the 
resources required to implement this strategy. Additionally, 
the committee urges the Department of the Air Force to complete 
its review of Space Force officer commissioning programs in 
time to include its resource requirements in the Department's 
Fiscal Year 2022 budget request.

                         LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS


                  Subtitle A--Officer Personnel Policy


Section 501--Authorized Strength: Exclusion of Certain General and Flag 
           Officers of the Reserve Components on Active Duty

    This section would amend section 526a(b) of title 10, 
United States Code, to reinstate the exclusions of certain 
reserve officers from limitations of section 526a(b).

               Section 502--Diversity in Selection Boards

    This section would amend section 612(a)(1), section 573(b), 
and section 14102(b) of title 10, United States Code, to 
require that the members of a selection board shall represent 
the diversity of the Armed Forces to the extent practicable.

  Section 503--Redaction of Personally Identifiable Information from 
                 Records Furnished to a Promotion Board

    This section would require the redaction of personally 
identifiable information from records furnished to a promotion 
board.

                Subtitle B--Reserve Component Management


  Section 511--Grants to Support STEM Education in the Junior Reserve 
                        Officers' Training Corps

    This section would authorize the Secretary of Defense to 
establish a grant program for science, technology, engineering, 
and mathematics education in Junior Reserve Officers' Training 
Corps units at the Secretary's discretion.

   Section 512--Modification of Education Loan Repayment Program for 
                      Members of Selected Reserve

    This section would increase the amount which may be paid to 
members of the Selected Reserve under the education loan 
repayment program.

Section 513--Requirement of Consent of the Chief Executive Officer for 
Certain Full-Time National Guard Duty Performed in a State, Territory, 
                      or the District of Columbia

    This section would amend section 502(f)(2)(A) of title 32, 
United States Code, to require the consent of the chief 
executives of both the sending State and the receiving State 
should the President deploy National Guard members under title 
32, United States Code, authority.

  Section 514--Constructive Credit for Certain Members of the Reserve 
Components Who Cannot Complete Minimum Annual Training Requirements as 
                   a Result of the COVID-19 Pandemic

    This section would authorize the Secretary of Defense to 
prescribe regulations that grant constructive credit towards 
retirement for a member of the Reserve Components who cannot 
complete minimum annual training requirements due to the COVID-
19 pandemic.

   Section 515--Guidance for Use of Unmanned Aircraft Systems by the 
                             National Guard

    This section would require the Secretary of Defense to 
issue new guidance that provides for the expedited review of 
requests for the use of unmanned aircraft systems by the 
National Guard for covered activities within the United States.

Section 516--Direct Employment Pilot Program for Certain Members of the 
                           Reserve Components

    This section would enable the Secretary of Defense to 
create a pilot program that would allow States to establish or 
expand job placement programs, and related employment services, 
for unemployed guardsmen or reservists.

 Section 517--Temporary Limitation on Authority to Transfer, Relocate, 
    or Dissolve Elements of the Reserve Components of the Air Force

    This section would prohibit the Secretary of the Air Force 
from transferring or relocating any personnel or asset, or 
dissolving any unit, of the Air National Guard or Air Force 
Reserve until 180 days after the Secretary submits the required 
report.

  Section 518--Pilot Programs in Connection with SROTC Units and CSPI 
 Programs at Historically Black Colleges and Universities and Minority 
                              Institutions

    This section would require the Secretary of Defense to 
create pilot programs that support ROTC units at historically 
black colleges, to include creating partnerships between 
military bases and institutions and providing financial 
assistance for pilot training.

  Subtitle C--General Service Authorities and Correction of Military 
                                Records


  Section 521--Temporary Authority to Order Retired Members to Active 
  Duty in High-Demand, Low-Density Assignments During War or National 
                               Emergency

    This section would amend section 688a of title 10, United 
States Code, to allow the Secretary of a military department to 
recall more than 1,000 retirees to Active Duty during a war or 
national emergency.

Section 522--Reenlistment Waivers for Persons Separated from the Armed 
           Forces Who Commit One Misdemeanor Cannabis Offense

    This section would require the Secretary of Defense to 
prescribe regulations that permit any Secretary of a military 
department to grant a reenlistment waiver to a covered person 
who has separated from the Armed Forces and has admitted to or 
been convicted by a court of competent jurisdiction of a single 
violation relating to the use or possession of cannabis.

  Section 523--Review of Seaman to Admiral-21 Program; Credit Towards 
                               Retirement

    This section would require the Secretary of the Navy to 
review the records of participants in the Seaman to Admiral-21 
program from fiscal year 2010 through fiscal year 2014 as it 
relates to service credits.

          Subtitle D--Military Justice and Other Legal Matters


           Section 531--Punitive Article on Violent Extremism

    This section would amend chapter 47 of title 10, United 
States Code, by establishing an article on violent extremism in 
the Uniform Code of Military Justice.

           Section 532--Preservation of Court-Martial Records

    This section would amend section 940a of title 10, United 
States Code (article 140a of the Uniform Code of Military 
Justice), to require the preservation of special and general 
court-martial records regardless of outcome for not less than 
15 years.

  Section 533--Electronic Notarization for Members of the Armed Forces

    This section would amend section 1044a of title 10, United 
States Code, to authorize electronic notarization.

     Section 534--Clarifications regarding Scope of Employment and 
        Reemployment Rights of Members of the Uniformed Services

    This section would protect service members from forced 
arbitration in Uniformed Services Employment and Reemployment 
Act cases.

             Section 535--Absentee Ballot Tracking Program

    This section would amend section 102(h) of the Uniformed 
and Overseas Citizens Absentee Voting Act (52 U.S.C. 20302(h)) 
to require the chief State election official, in coordination 
with local election jurisdictions, to establish and operate an 
absentee ballot tracking program.

    Section 536--Tracking Mechanism and Reporting Requirements for 
 Supremacist, Extremist, and Criminal Gang Activity in the Armed Forces

    This section would require the Secretary of Defense to 
develop and implement a process to track investigations, 
criminal and administrative actions, and final determinations 
with respect to conduct of members of the Armed Forces that is 
prohibited under Department of Defense Instruction 1325.06, 
titled Handling Dissident and Protest Activities Among Members 
of the Armed Forces.'' This section would also require the 
Secretary of Defense to submit to the Committees on Armed 
Services of the Senate and the House of Representatives not 
later than December 1 of each year, beginning after the date of 
the enactment of this Act, a report on the process implemented 
by the Secretary.

  Section 537--Military-Civilian Task Force on Domestic Violence and 
               Related Information Collection Activities

    This section would require the Secretary of Defense to 
establish a military-civilian task force on domestic violence 
with experts from within the Department of Defense, Department 
of Justice, Department of Health and Human Services, and 
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, as well as civilian 
experts. This section would also require an initial report from 
the task force to the Secretary one year after the Secretary 
establishes the task force, as well as an annual report to 
Congress until the task force is terminated. This section would 
also require the Secretary of Defense to collect information on 
prevalence of domestic violence involving members of the Armed 
Forces, their intimate partners, and immediate family members. 
This section would also require an annual report to the 
congressional defense committees on domestic violence in the 
Armed Forces.

     Section 538--Actions to Address Military-Connected Child Abuse

    This section would require the Secretary of Defense to 
carry out activities to improve the ability of the Department 
of Defense to effectively prevent, track, and respond to 
military-connected child abuse.

    Section 539--Multidisciplinary Board to Evaluate Suicide Events

    This section would require the Secretary of Defense to 
issue guidance that requires each suicide event involving a 
member of a covered Armed Force to be reviewed by a 
multidisciplinary board established at the command or 
installation level. This section would also require the 
Secretary to submit a report to the congressional defense 
committees not later than 180 days after the date of the 
enactment of this Act on the progress on implementation.

                       Subtitle E--Sexual Assault


 Section 541--Protection of Attorney-Client Privilege between Victims 
                      and Special Victims' Counsel

    This section would amend subsection (c) of section 1044e of 
title 10, United States Code, by defining the relationship 
between the Special Victims' Counsel and the victim in the 
provision of legal advice as the relationship between an 
attorney and a client. During any criminal legal proceeding in 
which a Special Victims' Counsel is asked to testify or give 
evidence, the Special Victims' Counsel shall be given the same 
consideration as counsel for the Government and counsel for the 
accused. This section would also require, not later than 180 
days after the date of the enactment of this Act, Rule 502 of 
the Military Rules of Evidence to be modified to provide that 
the privilege between a Special Victims' Counsel and a client 
shall be the same as lawyer-client privilege.

 Section 542--Authority of Military Judges and Military Magistrates to 
                 Issue Military Court Protective Orders

    This section would authorize military magistrates and 
military judges to issue Military Court Protective Orders for 
the purpose of protecting a victim of an alleged sex or 
domestic violence offense, or a family member or associate of 
the victim, from a person subject to the Uniform Code of 
Military Justice.

 Section 543--Additional Bases for Provision of Advice by the Defense 
       Advisory Committee for the Prevention of Sexual Misconduct

    This section would amend section 550B(c)(2) of the National 
Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2020 (Public Law 116-
92) to add additional bases for the provision of advice from 
the Defense Advisory Committee for the Prevention of Sexual 
Misconduct.

 Section 544--Modification of Reporting and Data Collection on Victims 
                           of Sexual Offenses

    This section would amend section 547 of the John S. McCain 
National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2019 (Public 
Law 115-232) to modify data collection and reporting on victims 
of sexual assault.

 Section 545--Modification of Annual Report regarding Sexual Assaults 
                 Involving Members of the Armed Forces

    This section would amend section 1631(d) of the Ike Skelton 
National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2011 (Public 
Law 111-383; 10 U.S.C. 1561 note) to include the Committees on 
Veterans Affairs of the Senate and the House of 
Representatives.

  Section 546--Coordination of Support for Survivors of Sexual Trauma

    This section would require the Secretaries of Defense and 
Veterans Affairs to jointly develop, implement, and maintain a 
standard of coordinated care for members of the Armed Forces 
who are survivors of sexual trauma. Such standard shall include 
information provided to members of the Armed Forces and 
coordination between the staff of the Departments. This section 
would also require the Secretaries of Defense and Veterans 
Affairs to provide a report to the appropriate committees of 
Congress not later than 180 days after the date of the 
enactment of this Act regarding the availability of residential 
treatment programs for survivors of sexual trauma, including 
barriers to access for such programs and resources required to 
reduce such barriers.

  Section 547--Policy on Separation of Victim and Accused at Military 
                           Service Academies

    This section would require the Secretary of Defense, the 
Secretaries of the military departments, and the Superintendent 
of each military service academy, to prescribe in regulations a 
policy that minimizes contact between a cadet or midshipman who 
is an alleged sexual assault victim and a cadet or midshipman 
who is an alleged perpetrator of sexual assault, to the extent 
practicable, while allowing both individuals to complete their 
course of study with minimal disruption and privacy protections 
in place. This section would also require the Secretary of 
Defense ensure that the policy developed under subsection (a) 
does the following: protects the alleged victim; allows both 
the victim and accused to complete their course of study with 
minimal disruption; protects the privacy of the accused and 
victim; and, minimizes the burden on the alleged victim when 
separating the victim and accused.

 Section 548--Safe-to-Report Policy Applicable across the Armed Forces

    This section would require the Secretary of Defense, in 
consultation with the Secretaries of the military departments, 
to prescribe regulations for a safe-to-report policy that would 
allow alleged victims of sexual assault who may have committed 
minor collateral misconduct to report sexual assault without 
fear of receipt of discipline for such collateral misconduct, 
absent aggravating circumstance.
    This section would also require the Secretary of Defense to 
develop and implement a process to track incidents of minor 
collateral misconduct that are subject to the safe-to-report 
policy.

    Section 549--Question in Workplace and Gender Relations Surveys 
                regarding Prosecutions of Sexual Assault

    This section would require the Secretary of Defense to 
include, not later than 90 days after the date of the enactment 
of this Act, in the covered surveys a question regarding 
whether a member of the Armed Forces would be more willing to 
report a sexual assault if prosecution decisions were made by 
lawyers and not commanders.

 Section 549A--Pilot Program on Prosecution of Special Victim Offenses 
          Committed by Attendees of Military Service Academies

    This section would direct the Secretary of Defense to 
create a pilot program for the prosecution of attendees at the 
military service academies who are charged with special victim 
offenses no later than January 1, 2021. The pilot program 
creates an Office of the Chief Prosecutor located within the 
Office of the Secretary of Defense, and the Chief Prosecutor 
will make binding recommendations on the convening authority 
for all special victim charges preferred against an attendee of 
the military service academies.

Section 549B--Report on Status of Investigations of Alleged Sex-Related 
                                Offenses

    This section would require that a report be provided to the 
congressional defense committees not later than one year after 
the date of the enactment of this Act on the status of 
investigations of alleged sex-related offenses.

         Subtitle F--Member Education, Training, and Transition


Section 551--Counseling in the Transition Assistance Program regarding 
   Sexual Assault, Sexual or Gender Harassment, and Intimate Partner 
                                Violence

    This section would require Transition Assistance Program 
classes to contain information on care provided by the 
Department of Veterans Affairs for survivors of sexual assault, 
sexual or gender harassment, and intimate partner violence.

 Section 552--Establishment of Mentoring and Career Counseling Program

    This section would amend chapter 107 of title 10, United 
States Code, by adding a new section that would require the 
Secretary of Defense to establish a mentoring and career 
counseling program with evaluation metrics. The section also 
would require an interim report to be submitted not later than 
120 days after the date of the enactment of this Act describing 
the program, and a report to be submitted on October 1, 2021, 
and annually thereafter for 3 years, on the evaluation of the 
program.

    Section 553--Defense Language Institute Foreign Language Center

    This section would amend section 2168 of title 10, United 
States Code, to permit the Defense Language Institute to confer 
Bachelor degrees, in addition to Associate degrees, to 
graduates that meet the appropriate requirements for that 
degree.

    Section 554--Defense Language Institute Foreign Language Center

    This section would authorize the Defense Language Institute 
Foreign Language Center to confer a Bachelor of Arts degree in 
foreign language upon any graduate who fulfills the degree 
requirements.

 Section 555--Increase in Number of Permanent Professors at the United 
                        States Air Force Academy

    This section would increase permanent professors at the 
United States Air Force Academy from 23 to 25.

 Section 556--Information on Nominations and Applications for Military 
                           Service Academies

    This section would require the Secretary of Defense to 
standardize, collect, and analyze information on the 
demographics of applicants to military service academies.

  Section 557--Transformation of the Professional Military Education 
                               Enterprise

    This section would require the Secretary of Defense to 
provide a comprehensive assessment on the Department's 
Professional Military Education enterprise with recommendations 
to ensure alignment with the National Defense Strategy.

Section 558--College of International Security Affairs of the National 
                           Defense University

    This section would prohibit the Secretary of Defense from 
eliminating the College of International Security Affairs, nor 
the Joint Special Operations Master of Arts, without providing 
Congress an assessment of the impact such action would have on 
United States interests related to counterterrorism and 
asymmetric warfare.

Section 559--Public-Private Consortium to Improve Professional Military 
                               Education

    This section would establish a private-public partnership 
and collaboration to enhance and expand Professional Military 
Education.

    Subtitle G--Military Family Readiness and Dependents' Education


  Section 561--Family Readiness: Definitions; Communication Strategy; 
                                 Report

    This section would require the Secretary of Defense, in 
coordination with the Secretaries of the military departments, 
to define ``military family readiness'' and ``military family 
resiliency'' as well as implement a communication strategy to 
communicate with military families. This section would also 
require a report on implementing:
    (1) chapter 3 of the report of the Inspector General of the 
Department of Defense for fiscal year 2020, ``Ensuring Wellness 
and Wellbeing of Service-Members and their Families''; and
    (2) the report, dated July 2019, of the National Academies 
of Science, Engineering and Medicine, titled ``Strengthening 
the Military Family Readiness System for a Changing American 
Society.''

Section 562--Support Services for Members of Special Operations Forces 
                      and Immediate Family Members

    This section would modify the care and recipients of the 
family support services provided by U.S. Special Operations 
Command's Preservation of the Force and Family program under 
section 1788a of title 10, United States Code. Eligibility is 
expanded beyond immediate family members of the special 
operations forces member receiving support services, as well as 
extended to members of the Reserve Components of the Armed 
Forces. Covered family support services will include 
psychological support and spiritual support services.

 Section 563--Authority to Provide Assistance to Certain In-Home Child 
Care Providers for Members of the Armed Forces and Survivors of Members 
                 Who Die in Combat in the Line of Duty

    This section would expand the Financial Assistance Program 
to include in-home child care providers.

    Section 564--Expansion of Financial Assistance under My Career 
                      Advancement Account Program

    This section would amend the My Career Advancement Account 
Scholarship Program to allow for required continuing education 
courses to be reimbursable.

                        Section 565--Child Care

    This section would direct the Secretary of Defense to 
provide child care services to members of the Armed Forces or 
employees if working on a rotating shift at a military 
installation.

  Section 566--Continuation of Paid Parental Leave upon Death of Child

    This section would amend current leave policy for Active 
Duty service members so that pre-approved parental leave is not 
terminated in the tragic event of a child's death.

 Section 567--Study and Report on the Performance of the Department of 
                       Defense Education Activity

    This section would require the Secretary of Defense to 
conduct a study on the performance of the Department of Defense 
Education Activity, including a review of the curriculum 
relating to health, resiliency, and nutrition, and the 
performance of students on the National Assessment of 
Educational Progress.

  Section 568--Comptroller General of the United States Report on the 
   Structural Condition of Department of Defense Education Activity 
                                Schools

    This section would require the Comptroller General of the 
United States to conduct a study on the structural condition of 
Department of Defense Education Activity facilities and virtual 
infrastructure.

  Section 569--Pilot Program to Expand Eligibility for Enrollment at 
          Domestic Dependent Elementary and Secondary Schools

    This section would authorize the establishment of a pilot 
program to expand eligibility for enrollment at domestic 
dependent elementary and secondary schools.

Section 569A--Continued Assistance to Schools with Significant Numbers 
                     of Military Dependent Students

    This section would authorize $40.0 million for the purpose 
of providing assistance to local educational agencies with 
military dependent students, and $10.0 million for local 
educational agencies eligible to receive a payment for children 
with severe disabilities.

 Section 569B--Standardization of the Exceptional Family Member Program

    This section would direct the Secretary of Defense, in 
coordination with the Secretaries of the military departments, 
to standardize the Exceptional Family Program across the 
military services. It would also require the Comptroller 
General of the United States to submit a report to the 
Committees on Armed Services of the Senate and the House of 
Representatives on whether military families have higher rates 
of disputes and loss of free and appropriate public education 
under section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 (Public Law 
93-112; 29 U.S.C. 794) than civilian counterparts.

                  Subtitle H--Diversity and Inclusion


      Section 571--Diversity and Inclusion Reporting Requirements

    This section would amend section 113 of title 10, United 
States Code, requiring the Secretary of Defense to establish 
and maintain a standard set of strategic metrics and benchmarks 
toward objectives to increase diversity in the Armed Forces. 
This section also requires the Secretary to include to include 
as a part of the National Defense Strategy data on 
demographics.

Section 572--Establishment of Diversity and Inclusion Advisory Council 
                      of the Department of Defense

    This section would amend chapter 7 of title 10, United 
States Code, by adding a new section that would require the 
Secretary of Defense to establish a council to be known as the 
``Diversity and Inclusion Advisory Council of the Department of 
Defense.''

Section 573--Establishment of Special Inspector General for Racial and 
Ethnic Disparities in the Armed Forces; Amendments to Inspector General 
                                  Act

    This section would establish a Special Inspector General 
for Racial and Ethnic Disparities in the Armed Forces to 
provide for independent and objective conduct and supervision 
of audits and investigations relating to racial and ethnic 
disparities in military personnel and military justice, and to 
make recommendations to the Secretary of Defense and to 
Congress on actions necessary to eliminate such racial and 
ethnic disparities. This section would also require the 
Inspector General to submit an annual report to the Secretary 
of Defense and the congressional defense committees as well as 
quarterly reports to the Secretary of Defense and congressional 
defense committees due 30 days after the end of each fiscal-
year quarter.

Section 574--Questions regarding Racism, Anti-Semitism, and Supremacism 
     in Workplace Surveys Administered by the Secretary of Defense

    This section would amend section 593 of the National 
Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2020 (Public Law 116-
92), in paragraph (1), by inserting ``, racist, anti-Semitic, 
or supremacist'' after ``extremist''.

 Section 575--Report on Demographics of Officers Appointed to Certain 
                                 Grades

    This section would require each Secretary of a military 
department to submit annually a report summarizing the gender 
and race of each officer who was recommended on a list for 
promotion to the United States Senate for the grades of 0-4 and 
above.

 Section 576--Plans to Increase Female and Minority Representation in 
                            the Armed Forces

    This section would require the Secretary of Defense and 
each Secretary of a military department to develop plans to 
increase, with respect to female and minority members of the 
Armed Forces under the jurisdiction of that Secretary, the 
recruitment, retention, and representation in grades above E-7. 
This section would also require that a copy of each plan 
developed by each Secretary, not later than 180 days after the 
date of the enactment of this Act, be submitted to the 
Committees on Armed Services of the Senate and the House of 
Representatives.

   Section 577--Evaluation of Barriers to Minority Participation in 
                   Certain Units of the Armed Forces

    This section would require the Under Secretary of Defense 
for Personnel and Readiness, not later than 30 days after the 
date of the enactment of this Act, to seek to enter into an 
agreement with a federally funded research and development 
center with relevant expertise to conduct an evaluation of the 
barriers to minority participation in special operations units. 
This section would also require a report on the results of the 
study to be submitted to the congressional defense committees 
not later than January 1, 2022.

                   Subtitle I--Decorations and Awards


    Section 581--Establishment of the Atomic Veterans Service Medal

    This section would authorize the creation of the Atomic 
Veterans Service Medal, to be awarded to radiation-exposed 
veterans.

Section 582--Authorization for Award of the Distinguished-Service Cross 
      for Ramiro F. Olivo for Acts of Valor during the Vietnam War

    This section would waive the time limitations in section 
7274 of title 10, United States Code, to authorize the 
President of the United States to award the Distinguished-
Service Cross to Ramiro F. Olivo for acts of valor during the 
Vietnam War.

          Subtitle J--Miscellaneous Reports and Other Matters


    Section 591--Expansion of Department of Defense STARBASE Program

    This section would allow arts and design thinking, for 
example robotics, to be included in the STARBASE curriculum.

 Section 592--Inclusion of Certain Outlying Areas in the Department of 
                        Defense STARBASE Program

    This section would expand STARBASE funding to the 
Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands and American 
Samoa.

 Section 593--Prohibition on Charging for or Counting Certain Acronyms 
  on Headstones of Individuals Interred at Arlington National Cemetery

    This section would require the Secretary of the Army to 
prescribe regulations or establish policies that, with regards 
to the headstone for an individual interred at Arlington 
National Cemetery, prohibit the charging of a fee for, or 
counting towards character or line count, KIA, MIA, or POW.

  Section 594--Report on Placement of Members of the Armed Forces in 
   Academic Status Who Are Victims of Sexual Assault onto Non-Rated 
                                Periods

    This section would require a report, not later than 90 days 
after the date of the enactment of this Act, on the feasibility 
and advisability, and current practice (if any), of the 
Department of Defense granting requests by members of the Armed 
Forces who are in academic status and who are victims of sexual 
assault to be placed in a Non-Rated Period for their 
performance report.

Section 595--Sense of Congress regarding Advertising Recruiting Efforts

    This section would express the sense of Congress that the 
Chiefs of the Armed Forces, in coordination with the Recruiting 
Commands of the Armed Forces, should give all due consideration 
to the use of local broadcasting and traditional news 
publishers when advertising.

          TITLE VI--COMPENSATION AND OTHER PERSONNEL BENEFITS

                       ITEMS OF SPECIAL INTEREST


            Department of Defense Impact Aid Program Report

    The Committee is concerned that the self-reporting system 
used by the Department of Education Impact Aid Program and 
relied on by the Department of Defense Impact Aid Program, to 
count eligible students, leads to the systematic underreporting 
of military connected students. The underreporting may stem 
from both a lack of knowledge about the Impact Aid programs 
administered by each agency as well as various privacy 
concerns, which may be present in certain military communities 
like Special Operations. In some instances, underreporting may 
be causing the funding challenges that certain communities are 
experiencing.
    Therefore, the Committee directs the Secretary of Defense 
to submit a report to the Congressional Defense Committees by 
March 1, 2021 on the process the Department of Defense uses to 
determine student eligibility numbers, the effects of 
underreporting, the aggregating of student numbers while 
protecting personally identifiable information, the process 
used to obtain student eligibility numbers, and recommendations 
for improvements to the program to include potential changes to 
legislative authority that would further strengthen the 
program.

             Disabled Service Member Transition Assistance

    The committee recognizes the Department of Defense's 
progress toward implementing reforms to the Transition 
Assistance Program, but the committee remains concerned that 
transition assistance information for service-connected 
disabled service members in the process of being medically 
retired, separated, or discharged could be improved. To date, 
the Department of Defense does not provide information on the 
Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (42 U.S.C. 12102), 
including assessing services and support at schools and places 
of employment, or a Social Security Disability Insurance 
orientation. The committee therefore directs the Under 
Secretary of Defense for Personnel and Readiness to provide a 
briefing to the Committee on Armed Services of the House of 
Representatives not later than December 15, 2020, on the 
information currently provided to service-connected disabled 
service members in process to be medically retired, separated, 
or discharged and the feasibility of providing the following 
service elements:
    (1) processing of Vocational Rehabilitation and Employment 
benefits;
    (2) Americans with Disabilities Act orientation, including 
accessing services and support at school and place of 
employment;
    (3) Social Security Disability Insurance orientation, 
including the Social Security Act Wounded Warrior expedited 
claims process; and
    (4) information on national Veteran and Military Service 
Organizations' employment programs that serve veterans with 
disabilities.

                       Military Spouse Employment

    The committee remains concerned with the challenges 
military spouses encounter when seeking employment while 
supporting a service member's military career. In 2019, the 
Government Accountability Office Report (GAO-19-320R) 
``Military Spouse Employment: Participation in and Efforts to 
Promote the My Career Advancement Account Program'' found that 
the number of military spouses receiving tuition assistance 
through the My Career Advancement Account (MyCAA) program 
declined more than 40 percent in recent years, from about 
38,000 spouses in fiscal year 2011 to about 21,000 in fiscal 
year 2017. The committee also understands that many military 
spouses are in part-time and seasonal work when they would 
prefer to be fully employed, and that military spouses with 
degrees face significant challenges finding meaningful work. 
Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of Defense to 
provide a briefing to the Committee on Armed Services of the 
House of Representatives not later than February 1, 2021, on 
the following:
    (1) the communication strategy the Department of Defense is 
using to ensure military spouses are receiving information 
about military spouse employment programs;
    (2) the analysis used to determine that the modes of 
communication with military spouses are effectively meeting the 
target audience; and
    (3) a taxonomy of jobs that military spouses could be 
employed in and whether there is a central database that tracks 
and stores this information.

Operation of Commissaries during Period of Expiration of Appropriations

    The Committee recognizes that military commissaries provide 
a reliable source of high-quality food and subsistence for 
military personnel and their families. The committee further 
recognizes that disruptions of these operations due to Federal 
shutdowns prompted by the expiration of appropriations may 
deprive families of this vital subsistence source at the very 
time that it is most needed. As substantiated by recent 
surveys, some military men and women rely upon food stamps, 
and, as food insecurity was cited as an increasing concern by 
the Committee in the Fiscal Year 2020 National Defense 
Authorization Bill, it is critically important that the 
commissaries remain open during government shutdowns. Further, 
the committee recognizes that due to the perishable nature of 
products sold, there are major logistical and administrative 
matters that arise when retail operations at the end of the 
supply chain precipitously cease to include disruption of 
logistical synergy between major stateside locations and 
operations at remote and overseas areas.
    Due to the unique nature of these operations, the Committee 
believes that the Department of Defense should consider 
including these operations as excepted programs during the 
period of expiration of appropriations. Additionally, the 
Committee directs the Secretary of Defense to provide a report 
to the House Committee on Armed Services by March 15, 2021, 
that would examine the feasibility of commissaries being 
provided excepted status. This report should include the 
advisability and feasibility of continued operations using 
excess balances in working capital funds to finance continued 
operations. The report should also examine the feasibility and 
advisability of using commissary surcharge trust funds or 
nonappropriated funds generated from implementation of business 
practices and procedures and validity of commitments to 
replenish or reimburse these sources immediately upon 
restoration of appropriations by Congress. The report should 
also examine the financial impact on military men and women and 
their families losing this benefit during any Federal shutdown.

              Private Sector Wage Verification Assessment

    The committee understands that some service members and 
families may be experiencing challenges in navigating the 
Department of Defense internal verification system when 
applying for a loan. The challenges may be resulting in a more 
burdensome experience for processing of loan applications for 
some service members and families. Therefore the Committee 
directs the Secretary of Defense, to submit to the Committees 
on Armed Services of the Senate and the House of 
Representatives a report by March 1, 2021, on the feasibility 
and advisability of the use of an outside commercial wage 
verification company by the Defense Finance Accounting Service 
to provide verifications of the employment status and income of 
personnel and retirees. The report shall include an assessment 
of--(i) whether the use of the private sector in the area of 
verifications would result in potentially faster and better 
financial outcomes for services members and their families when 
applying for a mortgage or loan and lead to fewer 
administrative burdens placed on the service member; -- (ii) a 
review in the manner in which at least three other federal 
agencies are already using the private sector in the area of 
verifications of employment and income; and --(iii) whether the 
use of the private sector would lead to better operational 
efficiencies, data security and integrity, and cost savings at 
the Defense Finance Accounting Service.

  Report on the Advisability of Permitting Military Personnel to Use 
 Education Benefits for Nontraditional Cyber-Related Education Programs

    The committee understands that new and innovative 
educational opportunities exist for service members through 
non-traditional forms of schooling such as technology boot 
camps or massive online open courses (MOOC's). Such courses are 
particularly useful for service members in geographically 
remote areas who are hoping to continue their education. While 
the committee understands and appreciates the need for 
verification and certification of educational programs prior to 
approving government funds, such as tuition assistance, to pay 
for such programs, the committee believes that such standards 
should be mindful of the rapidly evolving nature of modern 
educational services.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of Defense 
to provide a briefing to the Committee on Armed Services of the 
House of Representatives no later than February 1, 2021, 
outlining the Department of Defense's procedures for 
determining the educational institutions and resources eligible 
for tuition assistance. The report should include:
    (1) Standards the educational resource or institution must 
meet for military personnel to receive assistance from DoD.
    (2) A description of the steps taken to ensure a broad 
variety of STEM-focused programs are eligible for tuition 
assistance, including non-traditional cyber-related learning 
alternatives.
    (3) Steps that have been taken to account for the changes 
in modern learning platforms.
    (4) Recommendations for expanding the educational 
opportunities available to military personnel.

                       Transitional Compensation

    The committee notes that when considering the eligibility 
to receive transitional compensation for abused dependents, the 
dependent must have been married to the service member at the 
time the incident of abuse occurred and the service member must 
have been separated from Active Duty under a court-martial 
conviction resulting from a dependent-abuse offense, or have 
been separated from Active Duty for administrative reasons that 
include a dependent-abuse offense. However, in some cases where 
the commanding officer decides to wait to initiate 
administrative separation proceedings until the conclusion of 
criminal action against the service member in civilian courts, 
there exists a possibility that the abused spouse will finalize 
divorce proceedings prior to the conclusion of criminal 
proceedings related to the incident of spousal abuse, and 
therefore before any administrative separation action has been 
taken against the service member. Abused former spouses who 
fall into this gap are not currently eligible for transitional 
compensation. Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of 
Defense to provide a report to the Committees on Armed Services 
of the Senate and the House of Representatives not later than 
December 31, 2020, on the length of time it takes for Incident 
Determination Committees to make a determination; the number of 
cases where an abused spouse finalizes divorce proceedings 
before administrative separation, resulting in the loss of 
transitional compensation for a victim; the number and type of 
final disposition of physical abuse cases of spouses where a 
service member was the offender; the average length of time 
from unrestricted report of physical domestic violence of a 
spouse by a service member to final disposition, by service and 
by rank, and by type of disposition; and any recommendations on 
policy changes to the transitional compensation for abused 
dependents program.

                         LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS


                     Subtitle A--Pay and Allowances


                   Section 601--Increase in Basic Pay

    This section would increase military basic pay by 3.0 
percent.

   Section 602--Basic Needs Allowance for Low-Income Regular Members

    This section would amend section 402 of title 37, United 
States Code, to authorize the Secretary of Defense to pay a 
basic needs allowance to a qualified service member.

Section 603--Reorganization of Certain Allowances Other Than Travel and 
                       Transportation Allowances

    This section would make two technical amendments to title 
37, United States Code, enabling the Department of Defense to 
transfer these two provisions from chapter 8 of that title back 
to chapter 7 of title 37.

             Subtitle B--Bonuses and Special Incentive Pays


 Section 611--One-Year Extension of Certain Expiring Bonus and Special 
                            Pay Authorities

    This section would extend, through December 31, 2021, 
income replacement payments for Reserve Component members 
experiencing extended and frequent mobilization for Active Duty 
service; would extend two critical recruitment and retention 
incentive programs for Reserve Component healthcare 
professionals; would extend accession and retention incentives 
for nuclear-qualified officers; and would extend the 
consolidated special and incentive pay authorities.

   Section 612--Increase in Certain Hazardous Duty Incentive Pay for 
                   Members of the Uniformed Services

    This section would increase certain hazardous duty pay for 
members of the uniformed services from $250 to $275.

Section 613--Standardization of Payment of Hazardous Duty Incentive Pay 
                 for Members of the Uniformed Services

    This section would amend title 37, United States Code, to 
standardize payment of hazardous duty incentive pay for members 
of the Guard and Reserve Components of the Armed Forces.

  Section 614--Clarification of 30 Days of Continuous Duty on Board a 
   Ship Required for Family Separation Allowance for Members of the 
                           Uniformed Services

    This section would authorize the extension of Family 
Separation Allowance eligibility to service members and their 
families while they are under orders to quarantine onboard a 
ship prior to deployment.

      Section 615--Expansion of Reimbursable State Licensure and 
   Certification Costs for a Military Spouse Arising from Relocation

    This section would allow the Department of Defense to 
reimburse military spouses for expenses incurred for continuing 
education courses in order to work in the spouse's profession 
at the next duty station.

                Subtitle C--Family and Survivor Benefits


Section 621--Expansion of Authority to Provide Financial Assistance to 
Civilian Providers of Child Care Services or Youth Program Services for 
  Survivors of Members of the Armed Forces Who Die in the Line of Duty

    This section would amend section 1798 of title 10, United 
States Code, to authorize financial assistance to civilian 
providers of child care services or youth program services to 
survivors of members of the Armed Forces who die in the line of 
duty or Active Duty for training.

      Section 622--Expansion of Death Gratuity for ROTC Graduates

    This section would modify the effective date of Section 
623(b) of the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal 
Year 2020 (Public Law 116-92).

  Section 623--Recalculation of Financial Assistance for Providers of 
     Child Care Services and Youth Program Services for Dependents

    This section would direct the Secretary of Defense to 
develop a new calculation for financial assistance in 
accordance with section 1798 of title 10, United States Code, 
based on local variations in cost for childcare services.

 Section 624--Priority for Certain Military Family Housing to a Member 
of the Armed Forces Whose Spouse Agrees to Provide Family Home Day Care 
                                Services

    This section would allow a service secretary to make 
available an on-base housing preference for military families 
with a spouse who is a licensed Family Care Coordinator and 
agrees to provide family home day care services.

  Section 625--Study on Feasibility of TSP Contributions by Military 
                                Spouses

    This section would direct the Secretary of Defense to study 
the feasibility of authorizing a spouse to contribute to the 
Thrift Savings Plan account of their service member spouse.

                   Subtitle D--Defense Resale Matters


     Section 631--Base Responders Essential Needs and Dining Access

    This section would allow civilian Department of Defense 
emergency and protection workers stationed on a military base 
access to the commissary and exchanges.

        Section 632--First Responder Access to Mobile Exchanges

    This section would authorize first responders to access and 
make purchases at mobile exchange and commissary locations 
deployed during a declared disaster.

 Section 633--Updated Business Case Analysis for Consolidation of the 
                         Defense Resale System

    This section would require the Secretary of Defense to 
reassess and re-baseline the defense resale reform business 
case analysis.

                  Subtitle E--Other Personnel Benefits


       Section 641--Maintenance of Funding for Stars and Stripes

    This section would maintain the enacted fiscal year 2020 
funding levels for Stars and Stripes, and would require the 
Secretary of Defense to submit a report to the Committee on 
Armed Services of the House of Representatives detailing a 
business case analysis to maintain Stars and Stripes as an 
information benefit to service members.

                   TITLE VII--HEALTH CARE PROVISIONS

                       ITEMS OF SPECIAL INTEREST


            Adult Residential Treatment for Eating Disorders

    The committee is concerned that eating disorders are a 
significant problem in society as well as in military 
beneficiaries. Treatment of eating disorders is challenging and 
usually requires a multidisciplinary, long-term approach that 
includes treatment in a variety of settings, like residential 
treatment for adults with eating disorders, which is currently 
not covered by TRICARE for beneficiaries over the age of 18. 
The committee notes there is a growing body of evidence 
depicting the effectiveness of residential treatment for eating 
disorders. The inclusion of residential treatment for adults 
under TRICARE would provide an additional avenue of treatment 
for this challenging group of mental illnesses. Eating 
disorders often co-occur with other disorders, both mental 
health and physical, thus facilitating treatment even if the 
eating disorder is not the primary disorder is consistent with 
high-quality health care. Unfortunately, the failure to treat a 
co-occurring eating disorder can reduce the effectiveness of 
treatment for the other, primary disorder.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of Defense 
to submit a letter to the Committees on Armed Services of the 
Senate and the House of Representatives, not later than 
December 1, 2020, on the feasibility of including residential 
treatment for adults with eating disorders as a TRICARE 
benefit, similar to the Department of Defense's actions for 
residential substance abuse treatment for adults, and the 
projected cost to the Department as well as prohibited 
authorities precluding the Secretary from including this 
benefit under TRICARE.

      Behavioral Health Requirements of the Department of Defense

    The committee recognizes the shortage of behavioral health 
providers nationwide and continues to be concerned with the 
impact on the military. The committee believes the ability to 
address the behavioral health demands of the military has a 
major impact on readiness, whether it is through the military 
treatment facility, the TRICARE network, or through telehealth. 
The committee notes that the ability for the Department of 
Defense to properly fill its force structure requirements is 
tied to resources and not necessarily the demand for behavioral 
health services for all impacted by the rigors of a military 
lifestyle. Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of 
Defense to submit a report to the Committees on Armed Services 
of the Senate and the House of Representatives, not later than 
March 1, 2021, that:
    (1) identifies the number and types of military, civilian, 
direct contract, and managed care support contract behavioral 
health professionals required to treat members of the Armed 
Forces and covered beneficiaries (as defined in section 1072 of 
title 10, United States Code), unconstrained by force structure 
documents;
    (2) contains specific information on the amount of funding 
needed to hire and retain behavioral health professionals to 
treat such individuals;
    (3) contains a plan to provide behavioral health treatment 
to such individuals using telehealth services and other 
technologies, including any recommendations of the Secretary 
regarding legislation;
    (4) includes a plan to inculcate behavioral health 
treatment as a form of overall service member readiness in the 
same capacity as an annual periodic health assessment;
    (5) includes a strategy to increase the number of 
behavioral health providers for the Department and to 
standardize the credentialing requirements across the services;
    (6) include a strategy for the use of Chaplain programs to 
promote spiritual fitness as part of the holistic approach to 
reducing service member suicide and improving behavioral health 
care for military service-members and their families;
    (7) include a strategy to incorporate nonprofit post-
traumatic growth programs as an alternate approach to 
traditional models of mental healthcare; and
    (8) include an analysis of Department's utilization of Eye 
Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR) as a 
behavioral health treatment. Analysis shall include how many 
EMDR certified providers are in the direct care system, 
relative frequency of EMDR application compared to more 
traditional treatment options and the level of effectiveness 
EMDR has shown in treating beneficiaries experiencing 
Depression, Post Traumatic Stress, Traumatic Brain Injury, or 
Suicidal Ideation; and whether EDMR should be covered as a 
TRICARE benefit.

            Cardiac Arterial Disease Diagnostic Improvements

    In response to the Committee's direction in the FY2019 
NDAA, (H. Rept. 115-676, p. 137) the Defense Health Agency 
completed its study of the significant health advantages of new 
technology for non-invasive diagnosis of cardiac artery disease 
(CAD) through cardiac CT angiography (CTA) and fractional flow 
reserve computed tomography (FFRct). On October 2, 2019 the 
Director of DHA issued his Determination of Medical Benefits. 
DHA amended its TRICARE Policy Manual dated November 12, 2019 
to cover the use of FFRct and is making contract adjustments 
with Managed Care Support Contractors in light of that DMB. The 
Committee endorses DHA's efforts to bring the benefits of this 
new technology to DOD personnel and their beneficiaries. 
However, the DHA Report did not contain an analysis of the cost 
savings that would accrue from making CTA followed by FFRct (as 
indicated) the primary pathway for the diagnosis of CAD.
    The Committee directs the Director to provide a report to 
the House Committee on Armed Services no later than March 1, 
2021, analyzing the cost savings (including avoidance of 
transport from theater for diagnosis) of the new, non-invasive 
pathway as contrasted with the old, invasive pathway of stress 
testing followed by invasive cardiac angiogram. The Committee 
directs that the report outline necessary steps to move to the 
new, non-invasive pathway and a plan of action for 
accomplishing that move.

                        Creative Arts Therapies

    The Committee recognizes that the use of creative arts 
therapies shows potential in treating servicemembers with 
traumatic brain injuries and psychological health conditions. 
The Committee supports Department of Defense efforts to include 
creative arts therapies as part of an interdisciplinary 
treatment model at the National Intrepid Centers and encourages 
the Department to continue collaboration with the National 
Endowment for Arts Creative Forces. The committee believes that 
expanding this program could be beneficial to servicemembers 
and families; therefore the committee directs the Secretary of 
Defense to submit a report to the House and Senate Armed 
Services Committees not later than 90 days after the enactment 
of this Act on the feasibility of expanding the creative arts 
therapies program. The report shall include:
    (1) The current funding and investment in creative art 
therapies at the National Intrepid Centers;
    (2) The projected cost to expand creative arts therapies;
    (3) The number of locations the program could be expanded 
to.

  Financial Management of U.S. Army Medical Research and Development 
                                Command

    The committee notes that the U.S. Army Medical Research and 
Development Command (USAMRDC) receives funding for research 
from several Department of Defense agencies as well as through 
direct appropriation for the Congressional Directed Medical 
Research Program. The committee is aware the USAMRDC funds a 
certain percentage of the command's operational costs and 
administrative costs, to include civilian pay, from the 
research funds. The committee recognizes that although this 
financial management model has been in practice for several 
decades, it is not a fiscally responsible or sustainable model. 
Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of the Army to 
develop a more sustainable financial management model, and 
further directs the Secretary of the Army to provide a report 
to the Committees on Armed Services of the Senate and the House 
of Representatives not later than December 1, 2020, describing 
the implementation of the new financial model. The report shall 
include the full operational and administrative cost of USAMRDC 
to include civilian pay and facilities sustainment.

   Improving Health Care Choices for Severely Injured Service Members

    The committee seeks to better serve severely disabled 
veterans who are entitled to hospital insurance benefits under 
part A of title XVIII of the Social Security Act. Therefore, 
the committee directs the Secretary of Defense, in coordination 
with the Secretary of Human Health Services and the 
Commissioner of Social Security, to report on regulatory or 
legislative changes that would equitably address servicemembers 
who are retired from the Armed Services under chapter 61 of 
title 10, United States Code; entitled to hospital insurance 
benefits under part A of title XVIII of the Social Security Act 
pursuant to receiving benefits for 24 months as described in 
subparagraph (A) or (C) of section 226(b)(2) of such Act (42 
U.S.C. 426(b)(2)); and because of such entitlement, are no 
longer enrolled in TRICARE Prime or TRICARE Select (as those 
terms are defined in section 1072 of title 10, United States 
Code) under chapter 55 of title 10, United States Code. The 
committee further directs the Secretary to submit the results 
of the report to the House Committee on Armed Services by 
December 1, 2020.

              Military Medical Surge Capacity Partnerships

    The committee is concerned with the preparedness and 
capacity of the military health system to respond to a complex 
national medical emergency resulting either from a large-scale 
conflict overseas, a direct attack on the homeland, or from 
other causes such as a natural disaster or an infectious 
disease outbreak. For this reason, Section 740 of the National 
Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2020 authorized a 
pilot program on civilian and military partnerships to enhance 
interoperability and medical surge capability and capacity of 
the National Disaster Medical System (NDMS). The committee 
observes that elsewhere in this bill is a provision directing 
the Secretary of Defense to accelerate commencement of this 
pilot program and identification of the initial pilot 
locations.
    The committee directs the Secretary of Defense to work 
expeditiously and collaboratively with National Disaster 
Medical System, other federal agencies and private partners to 
develop a plan to establish interoperable medical surge 
capacity and to identify the initial candidate locations for 
the pilot program. The committee believes that subsequent funds 
provided for implementation of the pilot program should support 
the work of the agencies in the NDMS and include an allocation 
to private partners to assure they can move quickly to achieve 
the determined goals of Section 740. The committee urges the 
Department to complete its initial report with recommendations 
in time to include its resource requirements in the 
Department's Fiscal Year 2022 budget request.

                         Rare Cancer Treatment

    The committee recognizes the Department of Defense has 
started to address potential differences between the U.S. 
population and TRICARE beneficiaries when it comes to the 
identification of cancer risk factors that may be considered 
rare. Moreover, the committee is concerned with how care and 
treatment are provided to service members following diagnosis 
of cancer. Over 60 cancers disproportionately impact those who 
have served in the military and most are rare cancers, defined 
as fewer than 6 new cases per 100,000 Americans per year. Few 
targeted treatments are being developed and made available for 
service members. The committee notes that understanding 
specific molecular drivers for each patient's cancer and 
sharing data are key to providing the most effective treatments 
and to advancing research that will lead to new treatments. 
Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of Defense to 
submit a report to the Committees on Armed Services of the 
Senate and the House of Representatives not later than December 
1, 2020, describing the specific types of molecular 
diagnostics, such as micro-array, whole exome, and RNA-Seq, 
that the Department is providing to cancer patients. The report 
shall include the frequency of use, cost of treatment, 
recommendations on providing molecular diagnostic testing for 
all service members with cancer at first diagnosis, and 
outlining data-sharing practices across the services and with 
the Department of Veterans Affairs and the National Institute 
of Health for cancer cell lines and models with the external 
research community.

    Report on Force Plate Technology Utilizing Machine Learning for 
                       Improving Combat Readiness

    The committee notes the Senate report [S. Rept. 115-262] 
language accompanying the National Defense Authorization Act 
for Fiscal Year 2019 (Public Law 115-232) encouraging the 
Military Services to develop a tool to validate the physical 
fitness of warfighters and to aid in the determination of 
combat readiness. The Committee recognizes that technology 
using machine learning and force plate measurements to develop 
personalized, evidence-based training programs to prevent 
injuries in athletes may be used by the Department of Defense 
to prevent musculoskeletal injuries in servicemembers.
    Furthermore, these technologies could provide accurate, 
actionable insights regarding the physical condition of each 
servicemember and customized fitness programs for each 
servicemember to help minimize injuries during combat; thereby 
increasing the medical readiness and the military lifecycle of 
servicemembers. The committee notes that there have been some 
elements of the military services that have previously used 
this technology to increase readiness, decrease injuries and 
avoid a significant amount of expenses related to unnecessary 
injuries. Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of 
Defense, in collaboration with the military service 
secretaries, to submit a report to the Committees on Armed 
Services of the Senate and the House of Representatives by 
September 1, 2021, assessing how force plate technology and 
machine learning could be leveraged to improve the medical 
readiness of individual servicemembers.
    This report shall include the following elements: (1) a 
list of units currently using this technology and the impact it 
has had on unit readiness, (2) an analysis of how this 
technology could be leveraged to create a more deployable, 
resilient and sustainable combat force, (3) a determination of 
servicemember attrition and injury reduction from using Force 
Plate Machine Learning Technology, (4) a determination of the 
appropriate component within each military service that would 
be the responsible entity for implementing customized training 
regimens for new recruits, active duty and reserve forces, (5) 
a determination of the feasibility of a customized fitness 
program for each warfighter to minimize musculoskeletal 
injuries during both home station and deployed status, (6) the 
projected cost of employing this technology versus the cost of 
lost man days due to injuries or attrition, and (7) the 
projected potential savings from injury avoidance.

  Reporting of Data Related to Accession Standards and Mental Health 
                                History

    The committee is concerned about the potentially 
disqualifying nature of a history of mental health care for 
those seeking accession in the Armed Forces. At a time when the 
Armed Forces are working to eliminate persistent stigma against 
those seeking mental health care, it is imperative that 
accession standards be assessed to ensure they appropriately 
account for risk and do not adversely impact these efforts. The 
committee also notes the Secretary's recent public expression 
of concern regarding military accession standards to include 
medical criteria that may inappropriately disqualify recruits.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of Defense, 
to submit a report to the committees on Armed Services of the 
Senate and the House of Representatives, not later than January 
31, 2021, detailing for the preceding five years, and broken 
out by year and the nature of the condition: the number of 
recruits disqualified for a medical condition involving mental 
health; the number of waivers requested and the number provided 
for a mental health condition; the number of recruits 
discharged after a history of a medical condition relating to 
mental health which was not previously disclosed became 
apparent, and an indication of whether the condition impacted 
performance during training. The report should also specify the 
overall number of enlistees who were military dependents and 
the number of each of the above categories who were military 
dependents.

 Review on the Existing Department of Defense Capabilities to Operate, 
 Maintain, and Transport Sterile Clinical, Surgical, and Resuscitative 
                              Capabilities

    The committee directs the Secretary of Defense to submit a 
report to the House Committee on Armed Services by December 31, 
2020, including a review on the existing Department of Defense 
capabilities to operate, maintain, and transport sterile 
clinical, surgical, and resuscitative capability assets. The 
review should include:
    1. An assessment of the Department's assets can be 
transported by existing land, sea, air capabilities anywhere in 
the United States or the world;
    2. An assessment of whether the Department's assets have an 
integrated power solution that does not require location-based 
fuel or sourcing;
    3. An assessment on if the Department can provide 
Geographic Combatant Commands and US Special Operations Command 
with transportable capabilities to train, equip and support 
Host Nation and friendly medical forces through regular Medical 
Exercises and Humanitarian Assistance;
    4. An assessment of whether the Department can provide 
National Guard and Reserve units the capability to respond to 
domestic Acts of God'' or man consistent with the Department's 
Active, Reserve and/or National Guard authorities; and
    5. An assessment of whether the Department's treatment and 
recovery capabilities can allow multiple patients to be 
stabilized and transported while providing continuous treatment 
and recovery in a temperature controlled and noise resistant 
environment.

      Status of Implementation of Guidance for Ensuring Access to 
                   Contraception for Service Members

    The committee notes that the Director of the Defense Health 
Agency issued Procedural Instruction 6200.02 on Comprehensive 
Contraceptive Counseling and Access to the Full Range of 
Methods of Contraception on May 13, 2019. The Committee 
recognizes the importance of this guidance for ensuring access 
to contraception for service members, including while they 
deploy for long periods of time. Therefore, the committee 
directs the Secretary of Defense to submit a report to the 
Committees on Armed Services of the Senate and the House of 
Representatives by January 1, 2021, on the status of 
implementation of the Defense Health Agency Procedural 
Instruction (DHA PI 6200.02). The report should address any 
barriers to full implementation, and include (1) Data on how 
many women have obtained contraception sufficient for the 
duration of their deployments and which methods they accessed; 
(2) Data on service members' ability to obtain the full range 
of contraceptive methods during deployment. Data should include 
any service member complaints received regarding a lack of 
ability to obtain the preferred method of contraception during 
deployment and reasons why the preferred method was not able to 
be obtained; (3) Any identified barriers to implementing the 
requirement that providers ensure access to prescription 
contraceptives for the duration of service members' 
deployments, dispensed prior to the service members' 
deployment; (4) A description of how each military service is 
implementing the requirement to provide the information to all 
members attending initial officer or enlisted training; (5) The 
status of implementation of the clinical counseling 
requirements; (6) A description of how service members are 
being made aware of the policies, including their ability to 
secure the method they need for the duration of deployment and 
that they may receive up to 12 months' supply; and (7) A 
description of how each military service is implementing the 
responsibilities outlined regarding provider objections to 
provide comprehensive contraceptive care and counseling while 
also still ensuring patients receive counseling and timely 
access to care in the event that a healthcare provider has 
moral objections.

        Supply Chain Resilience and Critical Supplies Stockpile

    The Department of Defense has significant experience and 
expertise managing complex, expeditionary, and global logistics 
operations and emergency rapid acquisitions and contract 
support. This expertise has been central to the whole of 
government response to COVID-19, and we commend the Department 
for its support. It will be critical to learn lessons from the 
experience of COVID-19 and build readiness and preparedness for 
a next global health crisis, whenever and wherever it may 
strike. This includes having effective processes in place, 
stocks on hand, as well as being able to anticipate 
requirements for even the most extreme scenarios. The 
Department of Defense is adept at planning for two simultaneous 
wars in two theaters; working within the Whole of Government 
framework it must be able to do the same when it comes to 
global health crises or natural disasters--events we may not be 
able to prevent from occurring simultaneously. The committee 
directs the Secretary of Defense to report to the House Armed 
Services Committee within 120 days of enactment, based on 
lessons learned from COVID-19 response:
    (1) What medical /health supplies do you now deem critical 
to have in DoD and National Stockpiles?
    (2) In what amounts should these supplies be maintained?
    (3) What is the process for determining requirements for 
those items?
    (4) What percentage of the production of each of those 
items is domestic vs foreign based on today's industrial base?
    (5) What is the current surge ramp capacity for each of 
those items? If it is not currently sufficient, what should it 
be?
    (6) What is needed to ensure there is sufficient capability 
within the surge ramp capacity for the items on the critical 
list?
    (7) Provide recommendations as to whether certain 
industrial activities should be funded for warm base surge 
capability.
    (8) Are any of these items capable of being additively 
manufactured? If so, what impact does that have on 
recommendations for possible industrial activities?
    (9) What scenarios do you plan against to ensure 
preparedness?
    (10) In FY2019 and FY2020, with what frequency do you 
convene DoD components or other agencies for exercises to 
prepare for global health crises?
    (11) Would DoD be capable of sustaining medical/health 
supplies deemed critical for National stockpiles, in addition 
to DoD stockpiles? Would DoD be capable of managing stockpiles 
for a Whole of Government response to a national emergency?
    (12) Should DoD have prescripted missions or capabilities 
to sustain and provide critical items for the Whole of 
Government response in a national emergency?

              Traumatic Brain Injury Preventative Devices

    The committee continues to fully support the U.S. Army 
Medical Research and Development Command's efforts to combat 
Traumatic Brain Injuries (TBI) within the force. However, the 
committee remains concerned that the Defense Health Agency and 
the Army are disproportionately addressing the diagnosis and 
treatment of TBIs, at the expense of projects focused on TBI 
prevention. As such, the committee appreciates the Army's 
recent efforts to explore innovate TBI preventative devices, as 
outlined in the briefing provided pursuant to the committee 
report accompanying the National Defense Authorization Act for 
Fiscal Year 2020 (H. Rept. 116-120). The committee encourages 
Army MRDC, in coordination with the Defense Health Agency, to 
continue prioritizing TBI prevention research and development 
and resource these efforts to the maximum extent practicable.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of the Army, 
in coordination with the Assistant Secretary of Defense (Health 
Affairs) and the Director of the Defense Health Agency, to 
provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services, no 
later than February 1, 2021, an update to the briefing provided 
pursuant to the committee report accompanying the National 
Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2020 (H. Rept. 116-
120) on innovative TBI preventative devices. This briefing 
shall include an overview of research and development projects 
for TBI preventative devices, and an assessment of possible 
fielding paths for such devices.

 Ultrasound Technology to Identify Subdermal Injuries in Strangulation 
                                Victims

    The committee notes that strangulation is a common method 
of intimate partner and domestic violence and is a significant 
indicator of future lethal violence. A strangulation victim of 
intimate partner and domestic violence has a 10 times higher 
risk of being killed in the future. Physical signs of 
strangulation may not be immediately visible and without 
treatment can result in serious bodily injury. The committee is 
concerned that the Military Health System (MHS) does not have 
the capability to diagnose strangulation injuries in its 
emergency rooms, such as ultrasound technology that can detect 
subdermal injuries in strangulation victims, in order to treat 
victims properly and produce evidence for military criminal 
investigators. Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary 
of Defense to provide a report to the Committees on Armed 
Services of the Senate and the House of Representatives not 
later than December 1, 2020, on the number and types of devices 
available in the MHS to evaluate strangulation victims in 
emergency rooms, the cost of each device, and the numbers 
required to provide the capability in each emergency room in 
the MHS.

                  Women's Comprehensive Health Clinics

    The committee commends Naval Medical Center San Diego for 
establishing the Comprehensive Women's Healthcare Clinic aimed 
at serving the unique health needs of Active Duty female 
sailors and Marines. The committee notes the ability of this 
clinic to address a wide range of women's health issues 
including migraines, gender-specific musculoskeletal concerns, 
contraception and family planning, that are positively 
impacting the readiness, retention, and morale of women in the 
military. The committee believes women's health is a readiness 
issue and promoting programs and initiatives responding to the 
unique health needs of women in the military is in the best 
interest of the Department of Defense. Therefore, the committee 
encourages the Secretary of Defense to expand and establish 
comprehensive women's health clinics as the Defense Health 
Agency assumes ownership of all military treatment facilities.

                         LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS


           Subtitle A--TRICARE and Other Health Care Benefits


Section 701--Expansion of Mental Health Assessments for Members of the 
                              Armed Forces

    This section would amend section 1074m of title 10, United 
States Code, by adding a new section that would require the 
Secretary of Defense to provide a member who participated in 
warfighting activities that had a direct and immediate impact 
on a combat operation or other military operation a mental 
health assessment at a practical frequency that the Secretary 
determines.

      Section 702--Mandatory Referral for Mental Health Evaluation

    This section would amend section 1090a of title 10, United 
States Code, to require regulations to establish a phrase that 
enables a member of the Armed Forces to trigger a referral of 
the member by a commanding officer or supervisor for a mental 
health evaluation. This section would also require a commanding 
officer or supervisor to make such referral as soon as 
practicable following disclosure by the member to the 
commanding officer or supervisor of the phrase established.

     Section 703--Assessments and Testing Relating to Exposure to 
             Perfluoroalkyl and Polyfluoroalkyl Substances

    This section would require the Secretary of Defense to 
ensure that any periodic health assessment provided to a member 
of the Armed Forces includes an evaluation of whether the 
member has been stationed at an installation or exposed to 
suspected release of perfluoroalkyl substances or 
polyfluoroalkyl substances. This section would also amend 
section 1145(a)(5) of title 10, United States Code, to ensure 
that each physical examination includes and assessment of 
whether the member has been stationed at an installation or 
exposed to suspected release of perfluoroalkyl substances or 
polyfluoroalkyl substances. This section would also amend 
section 1074f(b)(2) of title 10, United States Code, adding the 
above questions to the deployment assessment as well as ensure 
that a member of the Armed Forces is provided a blood test and 
it is included in the health records of the individual.

          Section 704--Improvement to Breast Cancer Screening

    This section would amend sections 1074d(b)(2) of title 10, 
United States Code, to include the use of digital breast 
tomosynthesis.

                 Subtitle B--Health Care Administration


  Section 711--Protection of the Armed Forces from Infectious Diseases

    This section would amend chapter 55 of title 10, United 
States Code, by inserting a new section after 1073d that would 
require the Secretary of Defense to ensure that the Armed 
Forces have the diagnostic equipment, testing capabilities, and 
personal protective equipment necessary to protect members of 
the Armed Forces from the threat of infectious diseases and to 
treat members who contract infectious diseases. This section 
would also require the Secretary to include with the defense 
budget materials for a fiscal year a plan to research and 
develop vaccines for infectious diseases and to ensure that the 
medical laboratories of the Department of Defense are equipped 
with the technology needed to facilitate rapid research in the 
case of a pandemic.

  Section 712--Inclusion of Drugs, Biological Products, and Critical 
Medical Supplies in National Security Strategy for National Technology 
                          and Industrial Base

    This section would amend section 2501(a) of title 10, 
United States Code, by adding a new paragraph to include 
providing for the provision of drugs, biological products, 
vaccines, and critical medical supplies (including personal 
protective equipment, diagnostic and testing capabilities, and 
lifesaving breathing apparatuses required for the treatment of 
severe respiratory illness and respiratory distress) required 
to enable combat readiness and protect the health of the Armed 
Forces in the national security strategy for the national 
technology and industrial base. This section would also require 
the Secretary of Defense to submit a report to the 
congressional defense committees, not later than 1 year after 
the date of the enactment of this Act, on the vulnerabilities 
to the medicine supply chain of the United States.

Section 713--Contract Authority of the Uniformed Services University of 
                          the Health Sciences

    This section would amend section 2113(g)(1) of title 10, 
United States Code, to clarify the authority to partner in sole 
source fashion with the Henry Jackson Foundation or other non-
profit organizations to facilitate and implement medical 
research.

Section 714--Extension of Organization Requirements for Defense Health 
                                 Agency

    This section would amend section 1073c(e) of title 10, 
United States Code, to extend the date of consolidation of all 
military research underneath the Defense Health Agency from 
September 30, 2022, to September 30, 2025.

Section 715--Modification to Limitation on the Realignment or Reduction 
                of Military Medical Manning End Strength

    This section would amend section 719 of the National 
Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2020 (Public Law 116-
92) to prohibit the realignment or reduction of authorized 
military medical end strength for 1 year after the date of the 
enactment of this Act. The section would also add to the 
required review of medical manpower requirements scenarios to 
include homeland defense missions and pandemic influenza.

 Section 716--Modifications to Implementation Plan for Restructure or 
          Realignment of Military Medical Treatment Facilities

    This section would amend section 703(d) of the National 
Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2017 (Public Law 114-
328) by striking subparagraph (D) of paragraph (2) and 
inserting a new paragraph that specifies requirements for the 
implementation plan; and by requiring a notice and wait 
preventing the Secretary from implementing the plan until the 
plan is submitted to Congress and a 1-year period elapses 
following the later of the date of such submission or the date 
of the enactment of this Act.

  Section 717--Policy to Address Opioid Prescription Abuse Prevention

    This section would require the Secretary of Defense to 
develop a policy and tracking mechanism for opioids that 
monitors and prohibits the overprescribing of opioids to ensure 
compliance with clinical practice guidelines.

  Section 718--Addition of Burn Pit Registration to Electronic Health 
          Records of Members of the Armed Forces and Veterans

    This section would require, not later than 1 year after the 
date of the enactment of this Act, the Secretary of Defense to 
ensure that the electronic health record maintained by such 
Secretary of a member of the Armed Forces registered with the 
burn pit registry is updated with any information contained in 
such registry, and the Secretary of Veterans Affairs shall 
ensure that the electronic health record maintained by such 
Secretary of a veteran registered with the burn pit registry is 
updated with any information contained in such registry.

                Subtitle C--Matters Relating to COVID-19


       Section 721--COVID-19 Military Health System Review Panel

    This section would require the Secretary of Defense to 
establish a panel to be known as the ``COVID-19 Military Health 
System Review Panel'' to review the response of the military 
health system to the coronavirus disease 2019. The Secretary 
shall submit a report with the findings of the review panel not 
later than June 1, 2021.

             Section 722--COVID-19 Global War on Pandemics

    This section would require the Secretary of Defense to 
develop a strategy for pandemic preparedness and response. This 
section would also require the Secretary to conduct a study on 
the response of the military health system to the coronavirus 
disease 2019. The Secretary shall submit a report on the 
strategy and the study by June 1, 2021.

 Section 723--Registry of TRICARE Beneficiaries Diagnosed with COVID-19

    This section would require the Secretary of Defense to 
establish and maintain a registry of TRICARE beneficiaries who 
have been diagnosed with COVID-19 not later than June 1, 2021. 
This section would also require the Secretary to submit to the 
Committees on Armed Services of the Senate and the House of 
Representatives a report on establishing the registry not later 
than 180 days after the date of the enactment of this Act.

                 Subtitle D--Reports and Other Matters


 Section 731--Modifications to Pilot Program on Civilian and Military 
 Partnerships to Enhance Interoperability and Medical Surge Capability 
            and Capacity of National Disaster Medical System

    This section would amend section 740 of the National 
Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2020 (Public Law 116-
92) to require the Secretary of Defense, not later than 180 
days after the date of the enactment of the National Defense 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2021, to carry out the pilot 
program that was authorized. This section would also require 
the Secretary to collaborate with the Administrator of the 
Federal Emergency Management Agency.

 Section 732--Reports on Suicide among Members of the Armed Forces and 
Suicide Prevention Programs and Activities of the Department of Defense

    This section would amend section 741(a)(2) of the National 
Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2020 (Public Law 116-
92) by including a requirement in the report to determine if a 
member was deployed within 1 year of the suicide, as well as 
the number of suicides where the member was prescribed a 
medication to treat a mental health or behavioral health 
diagnosis during the 1-year period preceding the death. This 
section also would add a new requirement to describe programs 
carried out by the military departments to reduce stigma 
associated with seeking assistance for mental health or 
suicidal thoughts.

Section 733--Clarification of Research under Joint Trauma Education and 
      Training Directorate and Inclusion of Military Working Dogs

    This section would amend subsection (b) of section 708 of 
the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2017 
(Public Law 114-328; 10 U.S.C. 1071 note) to include military 
working dogs to inform and advise the conduct of research on 
the leading causes of morbidity and mortality of members of the 
Armed Forces and military working dogs in combat.

Section 734--Extension of the Joint Department of Defense-Department of 
        Veterans Affairs Medical Facility Demonstration Project

    This section would authorize the extension of the Joint 
Department of Defense-Department of Veterans Affairs Medical 
Facility Demonstration Fund established by section 1704 of the 
National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2010 (Public 
Law 111-84) and most recently amended by section 732 of the 
National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2020 (Public 
Law 116-92).

  Section 735--Information Sharing by Secretary of Defense regarding 
              Prevention of Infant and Maternal Mortality

    This section would authorize the Secretary of Defense to 
enter into memoranda of understanding with State and local 
health authorities to share the practices of, and lessons 
learned by, the military health system for the prevention of 
infant and maternal mortality.

Section 736--Grant Program for Increased Cooperation on Post-Traumatic 
       Stress Disorder Research between United States and Israel

    This section would require the Secretary of Defense, in 
coordination with the Secretary of Veterans Affairs and the 
Secretary of State, to award grants to eligible entities to 
carry out collaborative research between the United States and 
Israel with respect to post-traumatic stress disorders.

       Section 737--Pilot Program on Cryopreservation and Storage

    This section would require the Secretary of Defense to 
establish a pilot program to provide not more than 1,000 
members of the Armed Forces serving on Active Duty with the 
opportunity to cryopreserve and store their gametes prior to 
deployment to a combat zone.

  Section 738--Pilot Program on Parents Serving as Certified Nursing 
             Assistants for Children under TRICARE Program

    This section would authorize the Director of the Defense 
Health Agency to carry out a pilot program under which an 
eligible parent serves as a certified nursing assistant under 
the TRICARE program with respect to providing personal care 
services to a covered child.

Section 739--Study on Incidence of Cancer Diagnosis and Mortality among 
                       Pilots in the Armed Forces

    This section would require the Secretary of Defense to seek 
to enter into an agreement with the National Academies of 
Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine to conduct a study to 
determine the incidence of cancer diagnosis and mortality among 
members, and former members, of the Armed Forces who serve as 
pilots compared to members who do not serve as pilots. This 
section would also require the Secretary of Defense to submit a 
report to the Committees on Armed Services and Veterans' 
Affairs of the Senate and the House of Representatives on the 
findings of the study not later than 2 years after entering 
into an agreement.

   Section 740--Report on Diet and Nutrition of Members of the Armed 
                                 Forces

    This section would require the Secretary of Defense, not 
later than 180 days after the date of the enactment of this 
Act, to submit to the congressional defense committees a report 
on the diet and nutrition of members of the Armed Forces.

 Section 741--Report on Costs and Benefits of Allowing Retired Members 
      of the Armed Forces to Contribute to Health Savings Accounts

    This section would require the Assistant Secretary of 
Defense for Health Affairs to submit a report to the 
congressional defense committees not later than 180 days after 
the date of the enactment of this Act on the costs and benefits 
of allowing retired members of the Armed Forces to make 
contributions to a health savings account.

   Section 742--Study on Toxic Exposure at Karshi-Khanabad Air Base, 
                               Uzbekistan

    This section would require the Secretary of Defense to 
conduct a study on toxic exposure by members of the Armed 
Forces deployed to Karshi-Khanabad Air Base, Uzbekistan, at any 
time during the period beginning October 1, 2001, and ending 
December 31, 2005. The Secretary shall submit a report not 
later than 180 days after the date of the enactment of this Act 
to the Committees on Armed Services of the Senate and the House 
of Representatives.

   Section 743--Audit of Medical Conditions of Tenants in Privatized 
                            Military Housing

    This section would require the Inspector General of the 
Department of Defense, not later than 90 days after the date of 
the enactment of this Act, to commence the conduct of an audit 
of the medical conditions of eligible individuals and the 
association between adverse exposures of such individuals in 
unsafe or unhealthy housing units and the health of such 
individuals. The Inspector General shall submit, one year after 
commencement of the audit, to the Secretary of Defense and the 
Committees on Armed Services of the Senate and the House of 
Representatives a report on the results of the audit.

     Section 744--Report on Integrated Disability Evaluation System

    This section would require the Secretary of Defense to 
submit to Congress a report, not later than one year after the 
date of the enactment of this Act, on the findings of a study 
conducted by the Secretary on the implementation and 
application of the Integrated Disability Evaluation System.

 Section 745--Review and Report on Prevention of Suicide among Members 
   of the Armed Forces Stationed at Remote Installations outside the 
                        Contiguous United States

    This section would require the Comptroller General of the 
United States to conduct a review of efforts by the Department 
of Defense to prevent suicide among members of the Armed Forces 
stationed at covered installations. This section would also 
require a briefing on preliminary observations to the 
Committees on Armed Services of the Senate and the House of 
Representatives not later than October 1, 2021, and a final 
report submitted not later than March 1, 2022.

Subtitle E--Mental Health Services From Department of Veterans Affairs 
                   for Members of Reserve Components


                        Section 751--Short Title

    This section would allow for the subtitle to be cited as 
the ``Care and Readiness Enhancement for Reservists Act of 
2020'' or the ``CARE for Reservists Act of 2020.''

 Section 752--Expansion of Eligibility for Readjustment Counseling and 
  related Outpatient Services from Department of Veterans Affairs to 
       Include Members of Reserve Components of the Armed Forces

    This section would amend section 1712A of title 38, United 
States Code, to authorize the Secretary of Veterans Affairs, in 
consultation with the Secretary of Defense, to furnish to any 
member of the Reserve Components of the Armed Forces who has a 
behavioral health condition or psychological trauma, counseling 
to a member of the Reserve Components of the Armed Forces.

  Section 753--Provision of Mental Health Services from Department of 
 Veterans Affairs to Members of Reserve Components of the Armed Forces

    This section would add a new section to subchapter VIII of 
chapter 17 title 38, United States Code, to authorize the 
Secretary of Veterans Affairs, in consultation with the 
Secretary of Defense, to furnish mental health services to 
members of the Reserve Components of the Armed Forces.

   Section 754--Inclusion of Members of Reserve Components in Mental 
           Health Programs of Department of Veterans Affairs

    This section would amend section 1720f of title 38, United 
States Code, to include in the term `covered individual' a 
member of the Reserve Components of the Armed Forces. The 
section would also amend 1720h of title 38, United States Code, 
to include treatment for individuals who served in classified 
missions.

 Section 755--Report on Mental Health and Related Services Provided by 
     Department of Veterans Affairs to Members of the Armed Forces

    This section would require the Secretary of Veterans 
Affairs, not later than 1 year after the date of the enactment 
of this Act, to submit to the congressional defense committees 
and the Committees on Veterans' Affairs of the Senate and the 
House of Representatives a report on the increase of members of 
the Armed Forces seen by the Department of Veterans Affairs.

  TITLE VIII--ACQUISITION POLICY, ACQUISITION MANAGEMENT, AND RELATED 
                                MATTERS

                       ITEMS OF SPECIAL INTEREST


Assessment of Section 889 of the National Defense Authorization Act for 
                            Fiscal Year 2019

    The committee directs the Comptroller General of the United 
States to submit a report to the congressional defense 
committees not later than August 13, 2026, on an assessment of 
the implementation of section 889 of the National Defense 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2019 (Public Law 115-232). 
The assessment shall examine:
    (1) the extent to which agencies have assessed 
applicability of section 889 to their activities to include: 
identifying whether and how they use the prohibited equipment, 
components, or services, to include those on Federal property; 
inventory of active contracts or other agreements with an 
entity that uses prohibited equipment, components, or services;
    (2) the steps agencies have taken to implement section 889, 
to include: contract actions or changes to agreements; removal 
of equipment or components from programs and activities; 
description of waivers agencies have requested, associated 
rationales, and their dispositions; and
    (3) the challenges agencies face in implementing section 
889 and recommendations for improvement.
    The committee further directs the Comptroller General to 
submit an interim report to the congressional defense 
committees not later than August 13, 2021.

 Briefing on Section 889 of the National Defense Authorization Act for 
                            Fiscal Year 2019

    The committee reaffirms its ongoing national security 
concerns about proliferation of video surveillance or 
telecommunications equipment in the Federal and commercial 
space produced by Huawei, ZTE, Hytera, Hikvision, or Dahua, as 
defined in section 889 of the National Defense Authorization 
Act for Fiscal Year 2019 (Public Law 115-232). Consistent with 
draft regulation issued in November 2019, and the anticipated 
August 2020 regulation related to this statute, the committee 
directs the Secretary of Defense, in coordination with the 
Secretary of Commerce, to provide a briefing to the House 
Committee on Armed Services not later than December 1, 2020, on 
the implementation status of the full requirements in section 
889. This briefing should address the following:
    (1) whether the final implementing regulation has been 
issued and, if not, why;
    (2) whether the interim rule prohibits ``covered'' 
equipment/services only if they are a ``substantial or 
essential component of any system'', or as ``critical 
technology as part of any system'';
    (3) clarify how the Departments interpret ``substantial or 
essential'' as well as ``critical'';
    (4) how the Department of Commerce determines which 
``affiliates and subsidiaries'' are on the covered list;
    (5) the amount and type of exceptions and waivers that have 
been granted to date, as allowed in section 889;
    (6) whether the Departments plan to seek a delay to the 
August 2020 mandate, which bans agencies from contracting with 
a company that uses covered equipment and services;
    (7) how the Secretary of Defense, in consultation with the 
Director of National Intelligence and the Director of the 
Federal Bureau of Investigation, would designate additional 
entities believed to be owned or controlled by a foreign 
government as authorized; and
    (8) whether the Departments plan to make funds available 
for the replacement of the prohibited covered equipment.

              Commercial Airlift Review Board Requirements

    The committee is interested in the Department of Defense 
Commercial Airlift Review Board processes and procedures. 
Therefore, the committee directs the Under Secretary of Defense 
for Acquisition and Sustainment to provide a briefing to the 
Committee on House Armed Services no later than January 31, 
2021 on the processes and procedures of the Commercial Airlift 
Review Board as well as historical information from 2015-2020 
with the following:
    (1) List of currently approved air carriers;
    (2) List of the approval or disapproval of air carriers 
seeking initial approval to provide air transportation service 
to DOD;
    (3) List of the approval or disapproval of air carriers in 
the program that do not meet DOD quality and safety 
requirements;
    (4) List of the approval or disapproval of air carriers in 
the program seeking to provide a class of service different 
from that which they are currently approved;
    (5) List of the action taken to suspend, reinstate, or 
place into temporary nonuse or extended temporary nonuse, DOD-
approved carriers;
    (6) List of the action taken to review, suspend, reinstate, 
or place into temporary nonuse or extended temporary nonuse, an 
air carrier providing operational support services to DOD; and
    (7) List of any appeals to the decisions of the Commercial 
Airlift Review Board and the resulting decision of those 
appeals.

  Commercial Items Group Supporting Procuring Contracting Officers in 
                 Making Commercial Item Determinations

    Congress established the Commercial Items Group (CIG) under 
section 831(b)(2) of the National Defense Authorization Act for 
Fiscal Year 2013, to support procuring contracting officers 
(PCOs) in making commercial item determinations (CIDs) and 
under section 873 of the National Defense Authorization Act for 
Fiscal Year 2017, directed the Department of Defense to 
centralize the expertise and analysis necessary for the use and 
development of CIDs. Since then, the CIG has served in this 
capacity within the Defense Contract Management Agency (DCMA). 
However, in its Fiscal Year 2021 budget submission, the 
Department proposed divesting DCMA of the CIG without offering 
an alternative that would meet its statutory requirement. 
Further, the Department's long-term strategy for commercial 
item and price reasonableness analysis remains unclear. Without 
a clear approach to procuring commercial items, including 
understanding how commercial item determinations have been 
made, the Department foregoes an opportunity to streamline and 
strengthen its acquisition processes.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Under Secretary of 
Defense for Acquisition and Sustainment to, not later than 
October 1, 2020, brief the House Armed Services Committee on 
their proposed way forward to continue to comply with statutory 
requirements as well as meet the intent of centralizing the 
process of commercial item determinations as well as the 
decisions, and providing expertise and assistance to 
acquisition staff in commercial item acquisitions.

                        Commercial Supply Stores

    The committee believes the Department of Defense should 
compete all requirements for the operation of civil engineering 
and industrial supply stores through fair and open competition 
not sole- or direct-source, unless allowed under the Small 
Business Act (Public Law 85-536).
    The committee notes that several private companies have 
operated supply stores on military installations with the 
purpose of providing commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) parts and 
supplies to military customers. Because these storefronts serve 
a function that is not inherently governmental, Congress 
recognized the private sector's preferred role in managing and 
operating them in the committee reports accompanying the 
National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 1998 (H. 
Rept. 105-132) and the National Defense Authorization Act for 
Fiscal Year 2020 (H. Rept. 116-120).
    The committee urges the Department to reverse a recent 
trend of entering into agreements with the General Services 
Administration (GSA) to replace existing competitively awarded 
supply stores on military bases with stores administered 
through GSA's fourth-party logistics program. These actions, 
conducted without the competition that underpins Federal 
procurement policy, run counter to the Competition in 
Contracting Act of 1984 (41 U.S.C. 253) and result in less 
small business participation in government contracting. 
Therefore, the committee urges the Department to restore 
competitive acquisition practices and afford small business 
prime contractor opportunities through the award of contracts 
to administer these important stores at the nation's military 
facilities.

Compliance with Contract Services Planning, Programming, and Budgeting 
 Requirements and Statutory Limitations on Outsourcing Government Jobs

    The committee notes that contract services spending 
comprises at least one-quarter of the Department of Defense 
topline but is not currently subjected to the validation and 
funding offset drills currently applied to the Department of 
Defense civilian workforce. Further, according to the 
Government Accountability Office, spending on service contracts 
has increased significantly in recent years. It is therefore 
critical that appropriate and sufficiently detailed data are 
collected and analyzed to support the validation of 
requirements for service contracts, avoid duplication with 
other requirements, and properly inform the planning, 
programming, budgeting and execution process of the Department 
of Defense. Further, the committee notes that statutory 
limitations regarding the privatization and outsourcing of 
Department of Defense civilian jobs are not universally applied 
throughout the Department. As a result, there are insufficient 
management controls in place to ensure compliance within the 
Department.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of Defense 
to provide a report to the House Committee on Armed Services 
not later than January 1, 2021, on the Department's current 
compliance with the contractor inventory requirements in 
section 2330a of title 10; the specification of amounts 
required under section 235 of title 10; the data analysis and 
requirements validation required under section 2329 of title 
10; and any guidelines established pursuant to section 852 of 
the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2018 or 
any other guidance published by the Department of Defense 
relating to solicitations for contracts.

  Consistency in the Management and Execution of Audits of Contractor 
 Business System Reviews Conducted by the Defense Contract Audit Agency

    The committee notes that the Department of Defense is 
planning to significantly increase the number of audits 
performed on contractor business systems (CBS) during the next 
few fiscal years, particularly those audits for which the 
Defense Contract Audit Agency (DCAA) has primary 
responsibility. The Defense Contract Management Agency (DCMA) 
and DCAA generally conduct their respective CBS reviews on a 3-
year cycle. However, DCAA has fallen far short of maintaining 
this schedule during fiscal years 2013 through 2018 and the 
Government Accountability Office (GAO) recently reported that 
DCAA completed only 9 of 76 planned CBS audits during fiscal 
year 2017. In order to ``catch up,'' DCAA plans to 
significantly increase its annual pace and conduct almost 300 
CBS audits between fiscal years 2019 and 2022. In their report, 
the GAO also noted that DCAA's ability to meet its goal was 
dependent upon three factors, including:
    (1) the ability to shift resources from conducting incurred 
cost audits to business systems audits;
    (2) the use of independent public accounting firms (IPAs) 
to perform a portion of the incurred cost audits; and
    (3) the ability of DCAA auditors to use new audit plans and 
complete the required business system audits in a timely 
manner.
    Further, the committee is aware of concerns about how DCAA 
contracted for and oversaw the work of IPAs. The committee 
believes it is essential that DCAA and DCMA improve their 
execution, management, and oversight of contractor business 
systems reviews, including their use of IPAs.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Comptroller General of 
the United States to assess:
    (1) whether DCAA and DCMA have improved their visibility 
into the number of reviews needed to be conducted and the 
length of time it takes to resolve issues identified during 
these reviews;
    (2) the progress made and challenges encountered, if any, 
by DCAA toward achieving its goal of becoming current on all of 
its contractor business systems audits by fiscal year 2022;
    (3) the extent to which DCAA has used IPAs to help conduct 
incurred cost audits; and
    (4) the extent to which DCAA is collecting and using the 
lessons learned from its initial use of IPAs to facilitate 
their use.
    The committee further directs the Comptroller General to 
provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services by 
March 1, 2021, on preliminary observations and submit a report 
to the congressional defense committees at a date agreed upon 
at that time.

        COVID-19 Uniformed Mask Distribution to Service Members

    The committee understands the urgency for the Department of 
Defense to deliver uniformed masks to service members during 
the COVID-19 public health emergency. The committee wants to 
ensure it remains abreast of the effectiveness of uniformed 
mask distribution of masks to service members. Therefore, the 
committee directs the Secretary of Defense to provide a report 
to the Committees on Armed Services of the Senate and the House 
of Representatives not later than January 1, 2021, that 
defines:
    (1) The requirement for the total number of masks, 
specifically when and how many are needed for garrison and 
field use; and
    (2) The contracting and procurement plan to meet the 
requirement.

Department of Defense Proposal for Reports on Acquisition Programs and 
                               Activities

    The committee notes that the Comptroller General of the 
United States annual assessment of the Department of Defense's 
acquisition programs plays an important role in enabling the 
congressional defense committees' detailed oversight of the 
Defense Acquisition System.
    Section 830(b) of the National Defense Authorization Act 
for Fiscal Year 2020 (Public Law 116-92) required the Secretary 
of Defense to submit to the congressional defense committees 
not later than October 15, 2020, a proposal for an alternative 
methodology for reporting on all acquisition programs that 
includes, among other things, the reporting requirements for 
Selected Acquisition Reports. The committee is aware that the 
Comptroller General's annual assessment of acquisition programs 
relies extensively on data included in Selected Acquisition 
Reports. Therefore, the committee directs the Comptroller 
General to assess the Secretary of Defense's proposal for an 
alternative methodology. At a minimum, the review shall 
address:
    (1) potential benefits and challenges associated with the 
Department's proposed methodology as they relate to Comptroller 
General and congressional oversight of the Defense Acquisition 
System, including the ability to report on trends in 
acquisition program performance over time; and
    (2) the extent to which the proposal includes reporting on 
elements of program performance that align with acquisition 
best practices.
    The committee further directs the Comptroller General to 
provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services not 
later than 120 days after the submission of the Secretary of 
Defense's report on the Comptroller General's preliminary 
findings and to submit a final report to the congressional 
defense committees on a date agreed to at the time of the 
briefing.

     Efforts to Improve the Domestic Nonavailability Waiver Process

    The committee notes that there continues to be 
congressional interest in how the Department of Defense 
executes its domestic nonavailability waiver process, including 
how the Department communicates with private industry and 
determines whether there are new domestic sources available to 
meet the Department's needs. Therefore, the committee directs 
the Assistant Secretary of Defense for Sustainment to provide a 
briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services not later 
than December 1, 2020, on the Department's domestic 
nonavailability waiver process. The briefing shall address 
recent actions taken by the Department, including waivers 
granted under sections 2533a and 2533b of title 10, United 
States Code, since the related briefing required by the 
National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2020 (Public 
Law 116-92), and new efforts to develop domestic supplies.

  Efforts to Streamline the Internal Control Audit Framework Used to 
                  Evaluate Contractor Business Systems

    The committee recognizes that consistent with a 
recommendation of the Section 809 Panel Report, streamlining 
the Department of Defense's 18 government-unique criteria used 
to assess contractor business systems is anticipated to result 
in more efficient, effective, objective, and material audits. 
The committee urges the Department to review the system 
criteria used to audit contractor systems (Cost Estimating 
Systems, Earned Value Management Systems, Material Management 
and Accounting Systems, Purchasing Systems, and Property 
Management Systems) to determine whether an internal control 
audit framework consistent with private sector auditing 
standards would provide a more efficient and effective approach 
to auditing these systems as compared to the current 
government-unique system criteria set forth in the Defense 
Federal Acquisition Regulation Supplement. The committee 
directs the Secretary of Defense to provide a briefing to the 
House Committee on Armed Services not later than February 1, 
2021, on how the Department plans to improve its audit 
framework and its timeline for doing so.

 Evaluating Possibility of Conflicts of Interest for Federally Funded 
                    Research and Development Centers

    The committee recognizes the valuable research conducted by 
Federally Funded Research and Development Centers (FFRDCs). The 
committee also notes that if an FFRDC conducts market research, 
they are given keen insights into potentially sensitive and 
advantageous market information. As a result, care must be 
taken to ensure that that market research conducted by FFRDCs 
on behalf of the Department of Defense provides an impartial 
view of the market.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of Defense 
to submit a report, no later than December 15, 2020, evaluating 
the possibility of FFRDCs gaining and utilizing an unfair 
advantage as a result of conducting market research. At a 
minimum, this report shall include the number of instances in 
which an FFRDC won a contract in which it conducted market 
research on behalf of the Department and the dollar amounts of 
the contracts.

             GAO Report on GSA E-commerce Portal Data Usage

    The House Armed Services Committee directs the Comptroller 
General to submit a report to the committee by January 31st, 
2021 on compliance with subsection (h) of section 846 of the 
National Defense Authorization Act of Fiscal Year 2018 (Public 
Law 115-91; 41 U.S.C. 1901 note). The report shall describe how 
platform providers within the General Service Administration's 
(GSA) e-commerce program are complying with subsection (h) and 
GSA's ability to monitor providers' activities and data uses 
for compliance with subsection (h).

       GAO Report on Time-and-Materials and Labor-Hour Contracts

    The committee is concerned about the Department of 
Defense's use of time-and-materials and labor-hour contracts 
and the use of labor category minimums within these contracts. 
The committee recognizes that a time-and-materials contract is 
generally a riskier contract type for the government as it 
provides little incentive for the contractor to control costs. 
The committee notes that technologies such as artificial 
intelligence, smart devices, and other innovations are changing 
the consideration of such contracts in certain sectors, such as 
information technology, and that the current federal statute 
and regulations on their use and the associated requirement to 
use labor category minimums can restrict the ability of 
industry to offer the best value to the Department.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Comptroller General of 
the United States to provide preliminary observations to the 
Committees on Armed Services of the Senate and the House of 
Representatives by February 28, 2021, on trends on the 
Department of Defense's use of time-and-material and labor-hour 
contracts, including the types of services acquired and the 
extent to which these contracts were awarded using procedures 
authorized under Part 12 of the Federal Acquisition Regulation.
    The committee further directs the Comptroller General to 
submit a more comprehensive report to the congressional defense 
committees on a date agreed to at the time of the briefing. The 
report should include:
    (1) a description of the federal and defense policies 
governing the use of time-and-material and labor-hour 
contracts, including the extent to which labor category 
minimums are required to be used in such contracts;
    (2) an assessment as to whether and under what conditions 
the private sector uses time-and-material or labor-hour 
contracts in such areas as information technology services, 
cybersecurity services, audit or audit readiness services, 
health care services and records, telecommunications devices 
and services, or other knowledge-based professional services;
    (3) an assessment on the feasibility of substituting 
private sector experience for educational requirements in 
Department of Defense contracts and any other improvements that 
can be made to the minimum requirements in labor categories;
    (4) recommendations, as appropriate, on whether changes to 
Department of Defense policy regarding time-and-materials and 
labor-hour contracts, including actions to limit or restrict 
award of such contracts, especially when utilizing Federal 
Acquisition Regulation Part 12 procedures, are warranted; and
    (5) any other matters determined by the Comptroller General 
as appropriate.

               Incremental Funding of Services Contracts

    The committee is concerned about the use of incremental 
funding in services contracts and its potential impact on 
contractor performance and outcomes at the Department of 
Defense. The committee acknowledges that the frequent use of 
continuing resolutions has forced the Department to operate 
with less or uncertain funding for longer periods of time and 
may be incrementally funding contracted work, even when the 
services under contract are non-severable. However, the 
committee also recognizes that this may create an 
administrative burden, particularly on small businesses, and 
further, could result in suboptimal contractor performance.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Comptroller General of 
the United States to:
    (1) assess whether buying activities in the Department of 
Defense incrementally funded work required under contracts for 
services awarded during the fiscal years 2017, 2018, 2019;
    (2) describe whether the regulations applicable to 
procurement or fiscal law permits or facilitates such 
incremental funding;
    (3) describe the processes by which the buying activities 
justify, approve, and monitor the use of incremental funding of 
services contracts; and
    (4) describe whether the use of incremental funding on 
contracts for services poses administrative burdens, financial 
risks, or performance challenges to either the Department or 
its contractors.
    The committee further directs the Comptroller General to 
provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services by 
March 1, 2021, on the Comptroller General's preliminary 
findings and to submit a final report on a date agreed to at 
the time of the briefing.

         Plan To Address Obsolete MIL-PRF-19500 Discrete Parts

    The committee recognizes the important role that military 
specification semiconductor devices perform in a broad array of 
space, satellite, and strategic defense applications. These 
components form the backbone of critical defense and space 
designs by providing power and control to satellite, aircraft, 
and missiles and must be able to withstand environmental stress 
such as extreme temperature, radiation, shock, and vibration. 
The committee is aware of possible disruptions to the supply of 
over three thousand critical components that meet MIL-PRF-19500 
specifications as production ceases or domestic fabrication is 
relocated outside of the United States. Therefore, the 
committee directs the Under Secretary of Defense for 
Acquisition and Sustainment to provide a report to the House 
Committee on Armed Services no later than January 31, 2021 on 
the status of the domestic supply chain for MIL-PRF-19500 
qualified discrete parts and the sustainment plan for 
maintaining access to these qualified parts. The committee 
further notes that the report called for with similar Directive 
Report Language in the National Defense Authorization Act for 
Fiscal Year 2020 has yet to be produced. A single report, as 
outlined above, will suffice to fulfill both requirements.

   Procurement Technical Assistance Program Management and Oversight

    The committee remains supportive of the Procurement 
Technical Assistance Program and its critical role in 
strengthening the defense industrial base--particularly during 
the economic disruptions caused by the COVID-19 pandemic.
    The committee directs the Undersecretary of Defense for 
Acquisition and Sustainment and the Deputy Assistant Secretary 
of Defense for Industrial Policy to submit a report to the 
House Committee on Armed Services by December 1, 2020 on 
Department of Defense compliance with the Section 852 of the 
FY2020 National Defense Authorization Act (P.L. 116-92) 
requirement to move the management and oversight of the 
Procurement Technical Assistance Program from the Defense 
Logistics Agency to the Under Secretary of Defense for 
Acquisition and Sustainment and to the Office of the Deputy 
Assistant Secretary of Defense for Industrial Policy in order 
to:
    (1) Better align the Procurement Technical Assistance 
Program's visibility and mission with Department of Defense 
efforts, and
    (2) To strengthen the defense industrial base.

          Report on Cybersecurity Maturity Model Certification

    The committee acknowledges that the Department of Defense 
has taken initial steps to ensure that its contractors are 
aware of the actions necessary to protect the government's data 
and networks from cybersecurity threats. However, the committee 
is concerned that there remain key unanswered questions about 
how it will implement its cybersecurity framework, especially 
given the level of collaboration necessary between industry and 
government for its success.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Under Secretary of 
Defense for Acquisition and Sustainment to submit a report to 
the congressional defense committees by January 15, 2021, 
regarding the Cybersecurity Maturity Model Certification (CMMC) 
program. The report shall address the following:
    (1) the estimated annual costs to the Department to 
implement CMMC and the estimated annual costs to the Department 
for CMMC expenses that will be considered an allowable cost on 
a government contract for each of fiscal years 2020 through 
2024;
    (2) the estimated costs for compliance and certification 
for each category of small, medium-sized, and large businesses, 
by CMMC tier;
    (3) the status of Department efforts to revise regulations, 
issues related to current contract clauses, the timelines 
proposed for each step in the regulatory process, and the 
planned applicability to contracts once a final regulation is 
implemented;
    (4) the efforts of the Department to incorporate CMMC 
training into the Department's and Defense Acquisition 
University's training requirements;
    (5) the efforts of the Department to address issues 
surrounding exclusivity of the standard and the certification 
across the enterprise;
    (6) a discussion of the roles, responsibilities, and 
liabilities for the prime contractors and subcontractors with 
regard to the assigning of the CMMC tier;
    (7) a discussion of the plan for the CMMC Accreditation 
Board to engage and train the appropriate resources to conduct 
certifications for the defense industrial base as it pertains 
to the timelines included in the Department's rollout of CMMC;
    (8) a plan for the Department to obtain and retain the CMMC 
Accreditation Board as the exclusive provider of CMMC 
certifications; and
    (9) a discussion of how the CMMC Accreditation Board will 
prioritize the requests for CMMC certification and the factors 
used to determine priority, if any, specifically with regard to 
company size, sole source contracting, and the timelines 
included in the Department's rollout of CMMC.

    Report on Source Content Supplier for Major Defense Acquisition 
                                Programs

    The committee believes the Department of Defense's 
acquisition processes should be in line with the standards of 
the Buy American Act of 1933 (Public Law 72-428). The committee 
also believes the Department should set a goal to acquire and 
procure American-made equipment and products where possible to 
ensure a strong national industrial base to support warfighters 
in time of need.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of Defense 
to submit a report to the congressional defense committees not 
later than March 1, 2021, assessing the source content of 
procurement carried out in connection with major defense 
acquisition programs (as defined in section 2430 of title 10, 
United States Code). The report shall include the proportion of 
items procured in connection with a major defense acquisition 
program that are manufactured in the United States which are 
substantially all from articles, materials, or supplies mined, 
produced, or manufactured in the United States.
    The report shall also include a detailed description of 
which components of major defense acquisition programs are 
sole-sourced from a foreign supplier, including those sourced 
from a member of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization or a 
country that otherwise qualifies for a waiver under the Buy 
American Act. The report should be organized by major defense 
acquisition program and may contain a classified annex, but 
should be unclassified to the extent practicable.

                    Secure Supply Chain for Niobium

    Niobium oxides are important for defense and commercial 
applications. Recognizing this, the Department of Interior 
deemed niobium as one of 35 critical minerals vulnerable to 
supply chain disruption, the ``absence of which would have 
significant consequences for our economy or our national 
security.'' The U.S. imports niobium from nations subject to 
political pressures and instability, which creates risk for 
supply chain disruption.
    Accordingly, the committee directs the Secretary of Defense 
to brief the House Committee on Armed Services by February 15, 
2021 detailing the actions necessary in order to establish a 
domestic processing capability for niobium oxides. The 
Secretary should consider leveraging established critical 
mineral supply chains, including niobium's twin element 
tantalum, to provide needed supply chain security.

   Sensor Open Systems Architecture and C4ISR Modular Open Suite of 
                Standards Military Standards Initiative

    The committee is encouraged by the military services 
supporting Modular Open Systems Architectures (MOSA) on all 
future programs and platform modernization efforts. For 
example, the Army's C4ISR Modular Open Suite of Standards 
(CMOSS), and the Air Force's Sensor Open Systems Architecture 
(SOSA) standards are significant advances.
    The committee appreciates the efforts to increase 
capabilities, speed development, speed technology refresh, 
lower costs for the Government, and increase competition in the 
industry. The committee is aware of marked progress made by the 
Army's PEO (Program Executive Office) C3T (Command, Control, 
and Communications-Tactical), PEO IEW&S (Intelligence, 
Electronic Warfare and Sensors), and Network-CFT (Cross-
Functional Team). The committee commends such forward thinking 
and movement to unify around these standards.
    Furthermore, the committee recommends that CMOSS and SOSA 
military electronics standards be more tightly connected to use 
the same hardware pinout standards and, more importantly, the 
same software data transport protocols, such as the Modular 
Open RF Architecture (MORA), to further solidify a common 
Department of Defense-wide technical approach to create an open 
systems architecture standard by which small businesses and 
large primes can compete. To achieve a more effective economy 
of scale, the CMOSS and SOSA standards must both be a unified 
hardware and software ecosystem. The committee believes CMOSS 
is more established at this time and should lead.
    Finally, the committee believes the military services 
should begin to combine missions to enable CMOSS and SOSA for 
multi-mission tactical communications, EW (electronic warfare), 
SIGINT (signals intelligence), and battlefield computing in one 
system. Such an effort will reduce the SWaP (size, weight, and 
power) on various platforms for the military electronics, and 
unify the industry around common military hardware, as well as 
software, standards.
    The committee looks forward to further efforts by the 
Department of Defense to standardize procurement of modular 
cards and software according to the CMOSS and/or SOSA 
standards, for all future modernization and new weapons 
systems. These efforts will increase competition rather than 
have the classical single vendors drive their proprietary 
solutions which will cost the Government much higher 
modernization costs and decrease innovation.

       Status of Implementing Regulations Related to Procurement 
                       Administrative Lead Times

    The committee notes that section 886 of the National 
Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2018 (Public Law 115-
91) and section 878 of the National Defense Authorization Act 
for Fiscal Year 2019 (Public Law 115-232) required the 
Department of Defense and Administrator of the Office of 
Federal Procurement Policy, respectively, to define, track, and 
publicly report on Procurement Administrative Lead Times (PALT) 
within 180 days of the date of the enactment of the Acts. The 
committee understands that the Department and the Administrator 
have taken positive steps to implement requirements to define, 
track, and report on PALT but, to date, have not met the 
statutorily imposed deadlines for implementation. Therefore, 
the committee directs the Secretary of Defense and the 
Administrator to increase the priority of these regulations and 
to each provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed 
Services by November 1, 2020, on progress in finalizing the 
implementation of these regulations.

 Strategic and Critical Materials in Department of Defense Industrial 
                                  Base

    The committee supports the Department of Defense's recent 
investments in upgrading domestic manufacturing through the 
Industrial Base Analysis and Sustainment (IBAS) program. The 
committee is encouraged by the Department's latest effort to 
mitigate supply chain vulnerabilities and address strategic 
material gaps. The IBAS program is an effective tool to support 
the domestic defense industrial base and can be further 
utilized to strengthen the critical materials industry, often 
metals such as tungsten, neodymium iron boron magnets, niobium, 
indium, gallium, germanium, and tin. The committee notes these 
materials are economically important, enabling emerging 
technologies as a result of their unique properties. These 
metals are essential in United States military applications as 
well as medical, electronics, 5G, automobile, aerospace, and 
solar industries, supporting both national security and 
sustainable living. Rare earth minerals and elements are 
necessary components of technology and defense tools, including 
smartphones, computer chips, radar sensors, and other 
electronics.
    The Strategic and Critical Materials Stockpiling Act of 
1939 provides for the acquisition and retention of certain 
strategic and critical materials. It is in the Defense 
Logistics Agency's (DLA) mission to foster the conservation and 
development of domestic sources within the United States 
thereby abating dangerous and costly dependence on foreign 
sources and single points of failure. Despite the act, the 
United States import of these metals amounted to 392 thousand 
metric tons (mt) between 2014 and 2018 whereby the consumption 
amounted to 89 percent. Additionally, the United States has no 
stockpile for these critical metals except 4mt of 95 percent 
contaminated tin. Per World Mine Productions and Reserves (2017 
Estimates), the United States is one of the five countries that 
does not produce rare earth metals and has only 1.17 percent of 
the world's total.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of Defense 
to include in the submission of the Annual Industrial 
Capabilities Report to Congress not later than March 1, 2021, 
as required by section 2504 of title 10, United States Code, a 
report on the state of the domestic supply chain, economic 
importance, risks associated, and availability of rare earth 
metals, including tungsten, neodymium iron boron magnets, 
niobium, indium, gallium, germanium, and tin. The assessment 
shall evaluate the need to stockpile these elements along with 
others the Department identifies due to their critical role for 
national security and sourcing from foreign entities.

                         LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS


             Subtitle A--Acquisition Policy and Management


Section 801--Congressional Notification of Termination of a Middle Tier 
                          Acquisition Program

    This section would modify section 804 of the National 
Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2016 (2302 note of 
title 10, United States Code) to direct the Secretary of 
Defense to provide notification to the congressional defense 
committees 30 days after a program is terminated that used the 
``middle tier'' of acquisition authority.

 Section 802--Modification to the Definition of Nontraditional Defense 
                               Contractor

    This section would amend section 2302(9) of title 10, 
United States Code, by adding to the term ``nontraditional 
defense contractor'' under the Other Transaction Authority an 
entity that is owned entirely by an employee stock ownership 
plan.

     Section 803--Major Weapon Systems: Life-Cycle Sustainment Plan

    This section would require the submission of a life-cycle 
sustainment plan for a major weapon system prior to granting 
Milestone C approval. The plan, which shall be reviewed 5 years 
after the receipt of Milestone C approval and every 10 years 
thereafter, shall include metrics to measure the readiness and 
availability of the major weapon system, a schedule for 
maintenance and overhaul activities, and a baseline cost 
estimate for the life-cycle sustainment of a major weapon 
system. In the case of a significant and critical breach of a 
baseline cost estimate, this section would require the 
Secretary of Defense to notify the congressional defense 
committees of such breach and certify a remediation plan or 
endorsement that the cost growth is justified.

                Section 804--Contractor Business Systems

    This section would amend section 893 of the Ike Skelton 
National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2011 (Public 
Law 111-383; note 2302 of title 10, United States Code) by 
replacing ``significant deficiency'' with the term ``material 
weakness.'' The committee notes that the proposed revised 
definition will better align review and approval of contractor 
business systems with generally accepted commercial and 
government auditing standards.

    Section 805--Acquisition Authority of the Director of the Joint 
                     Artificial Intelligence Center

    This section would authorize the Director of the Joint 
Artificial Intelligence Center with responsibility for the 
development, acquisition, and sustainment of artificial 
intelligence technologies, services, and capabilities through 
fiscal year 2025.

            Section 806--Reforming the Department of Defense

    This section would require the Secretary of Defense and the 
Secretaries of the military departments to put in place and 
report on defense reform initiatives intended to provide more 
effective, efficient, and economical administration and 
operations of the Department, while also eliminating 
duplication. The National Defense Strategy, Defense Planning 
Guidance, and annual budget request are required to provide 
additional details on such reform efforts. The section would 
also require the combatant commanders to provide the Secretary 
of Defense reform recommendations for the same purposes.

Section 807--Alternative Space Acquisition System for the United States 
                              Space Force

    This section would authorize the Secretary of Defense to 
take actions to develop an acquisition pathway within the 
Department of Defense that is tailored for space systems and 
programs and would require a report on an ``Alternative Space 
Acquisition System.'' This section would also authorize the 
Secretary of the Air Force to assign an appropriate program 
executive as the milestone decision authority for major defense 
acquisition programs of the United States Space Force.

Subtitle B--Amendments to General Contracting Authorities, Procedures, 
                            and Limitations


     Section 811--Sustainment Reform for the Department of Defense

    This section would amend section 113 of title 10, United 
States Code, to add a requirement to develop a strategic 
framework for prioritizing and integrating activities relating 
to sustainment of major defense acquisition programs. This 
section would also clarify additional responsibilities of the 
Under Secretary of Defense for Acquisition and Sustainment.

    Section 812--Modifications to Comptroller General Assessment of 
              Acquisition Programs and Related Initiatives

    This section would amend section 2229b(b)(2) of title 10, 
United States Code, to allow the Comptroller General of the 
United States to include key analysis of organizational, 
policy, and legislative changes at the Department of Defense 
that predate its most recent annual assessment.

     Section 813--Contractor Whistleblower Protections Relating to 
                        Nondisclosure Agreements

    This section would amend section 2409 of title 10, United 
States Code, and section 4712 of title 41, United States Code, 
to clarify that contractors, subcontractors, or grantees are 
protected from reprisal for disclosure of certain information, 
including gross mismanagement of a Federal contract or grant or 
an abuse of authority relating to a Federal contract or grant.

Section 814--Competition Requirements for Purchases from Federal Prison 
                               Industries

    This section would amend section 2410n of title 10, United 
States Code, and eliminate the federal marketshare 
determination requirement for the purchase of products from 
Federal Prison Industries.

 Section 815--Disclosure of Beneficial Owners in Database for Federal 
                   Agency Contract and Grant Officers

    This section would amend section 2313 of title 41, United 
States Code, and require the database used by Federal agency 
contract and grant officers for contractor responsibility 
determinations to reflect information about contractors' 
beneficial owners.

   Section 816--Inclusion of Optical Transmission Components in the 
              Analytical Framework for Supply Chain Risks

    This section would amend section 2509(b)(2)(A)(ii) of title 
10, United States Code, by striking the phrase ``(other than 
optical transmission components)''.

      Section 817--Amendment to Definition of Qualified Apprentice

    This section would strike paragraph three (3) of section 
2870(d) of title 10, United States Code, as added by section 
865 of the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 
2020 (Public Law 116-92).

    Section 818--Contract Closeout Authority for Services Contracts

    This section would amend section 836 of the National 
Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2017 (Public Law 114-
328) by reducing the contract closeout period from the current 
17 years to 7 years for service contracts, but no less than the 
Federal Acquisition Regulation's record retention requirements. 
This section would also direct the Secretary of Defense, acting 
through the Director of the Defense Contract Management Agency, 
to establish and maintain a centralized capability with 
necessary expertise and resources to provide oversight of the 
closeout of a contract or group of contracts covered by this 
section.

Section 819--Plan to Improve Department-wide Management of Investments 
                           in Weapon Systems

    This section would require the Under Secretary of Defense 
for Acquisition and Sustainment, in coordination with the 
Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, and the Director of Cost 
Assessment and Program Evaluation, to develop a plan to 
identify, develop, and acquire databases, analytical and 
financial tools, and workforce skills to improve the Department 
of Defense-wide assessment, management, and optimization of the 
investments in weapon systems of the Department, including 
through consolidation of duplicate or similar weapon system 
programs.

                  Subtitle C--Industrial Base Matters


    Section 821--Quarterly National Technology and Industrial Base 
                               Briefings

    This section would amend section 2504 of title 10, United 
States Code, to require quarterly briefings to monitor progress 
toward eliminating gaps or vulnerabilities in the industrial 
base as identified in the Annual Industrial Capabilities Report 
to Congress, as required by section 2504 of title 10, United 
States Code.

 Section 822--Expansion on the Prohibition on Acquiring Certain Metal 
                                Products

    This section would amend section 2533c of title 10, United 
States Code, by striking ``material melted'' and inserting 
``material mined, refined, separated, melted,'' in subsection 
(a)(1) and striking ``tungsten'' and inserting ``covered 
material'' in subsection (c)(3)(A)(i) with an effective date 3 
years after the date of the enactment of this Act.

 Section 823--Requirement that Certain Ship Components Be Manufactured 
             in the National Technology and Industrial Base

    This section would require that certain shipboard 
components be manufactured in the National Technology and 
Industrial Base.

  Section 824--Preference for Sourcing Rare Earth Materials from the 
                National Technology and Industrial Base

    This section would require the Secretary of Defense, to the 
maximum extent possible, to acquire materials that are 
determined to be strategic and critical materials required to 
meet the defense industrial, and essential civilian needs of 
the United States first from sources located within the United 
States and then from sources located in the national technology 
and industrial base, as defined in section 2500 of title 10, 
United States Code.

 Section 825--Enhanced Domestic Content Requirement for Major Defense 
                          Acquisition Programs

    This section would require the interpretation of 
``substantially all'' under the Buy American Act, as defined by 
chapter 83 of title 41, United States Code, related to the 
percentage of components of a defense end item required to be 
of materials mined, produced, or manufactured in the United 
States to be considered domestic to be increased from 50 
percent to 100 percent.

  Section 826--Additional Requirements Pertaining to Printed Circuit 
                                 Boards

    This section would require the Secretary of Defense to 
mandate that contractors and subcontractors that provide 
printed circuit boards to the Department of Defense must 
certify that set percentages of the boards were manufactured 
and assembled within approved countries. The Secretary may 
waive the requirement if the Secretary determines there are no 
significant national security concerns, and the contractor is 
otherwise in compliance with relevant cybersecurity provisions 
including section 224 of the National Defense Authorization Act 
for Fiscal Year 2020 (Public Law 116-92).

 Section 827--Report on Use of Domestic Nonavailability Determinations

    This section would require a report describing the use of 
any waiver or exception by the Department of Defense to the 
requirements of chapter 83 of title 41, United States Code, or 
section 2533a of title 10, United States Code, relating to 
domestic nonavailability determinations. The committee notes 
that a similar briefing on domestic nonavailability 
determinations was required in the committee report 
accompanying the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal 
Year 2020 (H. Rept. 116-120) and has yet to be produced by the 
Department. The report, as outlined above, will suffice to 
fulfill both requirements.

     Section 828--Sense of Congress on the Prohibition on Certain 
    Telecommunications and Video Surveillance Services or Equipment

    This section would express the sense of Congress regarding 
implementation of section 889 of the John S. McCain National 
Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2019 (Public Law 115-
232; 41 U.S.C. note prec. 3901).

                   Subtitle D--Small Business Matters


Section 831--Transfer of Verification of Small Business Concerns Owned 
 and Controlled by Veterans or Service-Disabled Veterans to the Small 
                        Business Administration

    This section would amend section 8127 of title 38, United 
States Code, and transfer the verification of small business 
concerns owned and controlled by veterans or service-disabled 
veterans from the Department of Veterans Affairs to the Small 
Business Administration.

  Section 832--Equitable Adjustments to Certain Construction Contracts

    This section would amend the Small Business Act (15 U.S.C. 
631) to allow a small business performing a construction 
contract to submit a request for equitable adjustment to an 
agency if the contracting officer directs a change in the work 
within the general scope of the contract without the agreement 
of the small business.

 Section 833--Exemption of Certain Contracts Awarded to Small Business 
             Concerns from Category Management Requirements

    This section would amend the Small Business Act to exempt 
contracts awarded to certain small business from the Category 
Management (CM) program. This section would also require the 
Director of the Office of Management and Budget to develop a 
plan to ensure small businesses can compete for contracts under 
CM.

 Section 834--Report on Accelerated Payments to Certain Small Business 
                                Concerns

    This section would require the head of each Federal agency 
(as defined by section 551(a) of title 5, United States Code) 
to submit to Congress a report on the timeliness of accelerated 
payments made to certain small business concerns.

                       Subtitle E--Other Matters


    Section 841--Modifications to Supervision and Award of Certain 
                               Contracts

    This section would amend section 2851 of title 10, United 
States Code, to direct the Department of Defense to publicly 
post identifying information on military construction contracts 
once awarded in the Federal Register and require prime 
contractors for military construction projects to publicly post 
all available subcontracting work of $250,000 or more on 
relevant websites of the Small Business Administration and 
General Services Administration. This section would also amend 
section 644 of title 15, United States Code, to allow Federal 
agencies to award additional small business credit toward 
meeting subcontracting goals for awarding a contract to a local 
business.

Section 842--Amendments to Submissions to Congress Relating to Certain 
                         Foreign Military Sales

    This section would amend section 887(b)(1) and section 
887(b)(2) of the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal 
Year 2018 (Public Law 115-91) to revise the reporting 
requirements and to extend the sunsets of the quarterly and 
annual reports to December 31, 2024.

Section 843--Revisions to Requirement to Use Firm Fixed-Price Contracts 
                       for Foreign Military Sales

    This section would amend section 830 of the National 
Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2017 (Public Law 114-
328) by applying the requirement for firm, fixed-price type 
contract vehicles exclusively to production contracts for 
foreign military sales cases whether on a stand-alone contract, 
on a mixed contract for both domestic and foreign military 
sales production, or on a mixed contract for both international 
cooperative program and foreign military sales production.

     Section 844--Small Business Industrial Base Resiliency Program

    This section would establish the Small Business Industrial 
Base Resiliency Program and would authorize the Assistant 
Secretary of Defense Industrial Base Policy to enter into 
transactions to purchase or make a commitment to purchase goods 
or services from small business concerns in response to the 
COVID-19 pandemic. These transactions are intended to support 
the monitoring and assessment of small businesses in the 
defense industrial base by addressing critical issues in the 
small business industrial base relating to urgent operational 
needs in response to the pandemic, supporting efforts to expand 
the small business industrial base in response to the pandemic, 
and addressing supply chain vulnerabilities related to the 
pandemic for small businesses.

 Section 845--Requirements Relating to Reports and Limitations on the 
                         Availability of Funds

    This section would require the Secretary of Defense, the 
Under Secretary of Defense for Personnel and Readiness, the 
Under Secretary of Defense for Research and Engineering, and 
the Under Secretary of Defense for Acquisition and Sustainment 
to provide reports related to defense reform initiatives 
required by the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal 
Year 2020 (Public Law 116-92). If the required reports are not 
provided on time, the section places limitations on the 
obligation or expenditure of some of the fiscal year 2021 
funding authorized to be appropriated for the offices of the 
specified officials.

 Section 846--Assessment of the Requirements Processes of the Military 
                              Departments

    This section would require the Secretary of each military 
department to conduct an assessment of the requirements process 
and to each submit a report by March 31, 2021, with 
recommendations to improve the agility and timeliness of such 
requirements process for acquisition programs of the military 
department.
    The committee notes that recent reforms to shift authority 
for acquisition and requirements decisions to the military 
departments have placed increasing importance on the efficiency 
and effectiveness of the military departments' requirements 
processes. However, the committee is concerned that the 
military departments' requirements processes, including the 
extent to which they are aligned with the acquisition system 
and the budget process, continue to hinder the development of 
timely, realistic, and achievable requirements. Moreover, the 
committee believes that recent efforts of the Department of 
Defense to implement its adaptive acquisition framework call 
for a new look at how requirements are generated within each of 
the acquisition pathways in this framework (including major 
capability acquisition, middle tier of acquisition, software 
acquisition, and the acquisition of services, among others) to 
the benefit of the defense acquisition system.

 Section 847--Report on Transfer and Consolidation of Certain Defense 
                          Acquisition Statutes

    This section would require the Secretary of Defense to 
submit a report to the congressional defense committees with a 
proposal for the transfer and consolidation of certain defense 
acquisition statutes within the framework of part V of subtitle 
A of title 10, United States Code (as enacted by section 801 of 
the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2019 
(Public Law 115-232)) by February 21, 2021.

      TITLE IX--DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE ORGANIZATION AND MANAGEMENT

                       ITEMS OF SPECIAL INTEREST


   Assistant Secretary of Defense for Space and Strategic Deterrence

    The committee notes the benefit and importance of 
establishing an Assistant Secretary of Defense for policy with 
responsibility for space, nuclear deterrence and missile 
defense policy in order to realign policy on strategic 
deterrence. The committee directs the Secretary of Defense to 
provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services by 
October 30, 2020, on realigning nuclear deterrence, missile 
defense, and space policy under one assistant secretary in 
order to streamline deterrence policy development and to 
adequately inform acquisition of capabilities to support 
strategic deterrence.

   Implementation of the Directed Roles and Responsibilities of the 
Assistant Secretary of Defense for Special Operations and Low-Intensity 
                                Conflict

    The committee acknowledges the Department of Defense's 
recent efforts to accelerate implementation of the roles and 
responsibilities of the office of the Assistant Secretary of 
Defense for Special Operations and Low-Intensity Conflict (ASD 
SO/LIC) pursuant to section 922 of the National Defense 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2017 (Public Law 114-328). 
The committee appreciates the Secretary of Defense's commitment 
to establishing measures to augment the office of ASD SO/LIC, 
including the consolidation of ASD SO/LIC personnel at the 
Pentagon.
    The committee is aware that the Secretary of Defense 
intends to issue a memo to the Department reaffirming the 
overall responsibilities of ASD SO/LIC for special operations 
administrative matters and reinforcing the administrative chain 
of command as delineated in sections 138 and 167 of title 10, 
United States Code, and is aware of efforts by the office of 
ASD SO/LIC to revise and to publish the SO/LIC charter 
(Department of Defense Directive (DODD) 5111.10). The committee 
supports the investment by the Secretary of Defense in the 
Office of ASD SO/LIC to ensure comprehensive civilian oversight 
for the planning, resourcing, and employment of special 
operations forces (SOF).
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of Defense 
to provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services 
by October 30, 2020, on the implementation of those roles and 
responsibilities as directed by section 922. The briefing shall 
include:
    (1) a timeline and milestones for moving SO/LIC staff back 
into the Pentagon from the Mark Center;
    (2) a timeline and milestones for revising and publishing 
the SO/LIC charter (DODD 5111.10); and
    (3) an assessment of the Department's efforts to enhance 
objective civilian oversight of SOF.

    U.S. Special Operations Command Force Structure and Organization

    The committee recognizes that the threat environment 
continues to evolve, driving strategic and operational force 
posture deliberations across the Department of Defense. The 
2018 National Defense Strategy highlighted the need for the 
Department to reconsider whether and to what extent the forces 
historically applied against the countering violent extremist 
(CVE) mission, such as those from U.S. Special Operations 
Command (USSOCOM), should be utilized to confront great power 
competition (GPC).
    The committee understands that USSOCOM has seen record 
growth with investments in information operations and cyber, 
with end strength now in excess of 73,000. While the committee 
is aware of ongoing efforts by USSOCOM to optimize special 
operations forces (SOF) resourcing and investments to meet 
demand of the CVE and GPC missions, the committee is concerned 
with the command's expanding force structure, to include the 
size and influence of the theater special operations commands 
(TSOCs).
    Therefore, the committee directs the Comptroller General of 
the United States to conduct a review of USSOCOM's structure 
and organization of those forces aligned or assigned to the 
command. The review shall evaluate:
    (1) the extent to which the Department or USSOCOM 
established guidance regarding how and when joint task forces 
(JTFs), including special operations joint task forces, should 
be established;
    (2) the extent to which the Department or USSOCOM defined 
roles and responsibilities of TSOCs versus JTFs with regard to 
planning for and conducting operations;
    (3) the extent to which the Department or USSOCOM 
established guidance regarding the size, structure, 
composition, and resourcing of JTFs;
    (4) the extent to which USSOCOM or its components 
established a JTF in support of a global combatant command 
(GCC) requirement, and what command, control, or communication 
challenges, if any, those efforts created; and
    (5) any other issues the Comptroller General deems 
appropriate with respect to the establishment and resourcing of 
JTFs as they relate to USSOCOM or SOF applied against GCC 
requirements.
    The committee further directs the Comptroller General to 
provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services by 
November 27, 2020, on the preliminary findings and to submit a 
final report on a date agreed to at the time of the briefing.

                         LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS


   Subtitle A--Office of the Secretary of Defense and Related Matters


      Section 901--Repeal of Position of Chief Management Officer

    This section would repeal, effective 30 days after the date 
of the enactment of this Act, section 132a of title 10, United 
States Code, which has the effect of eliminating the position 
of the Chief Management Officer of the Department of Defense. 
The section would also require the Secretary of Defense to 
reassign the position's responsibilities and provide a 
legislative proposal within 180 days of enactment necessary to 
make any conforming changes in law required by the elimination 
of the position.

 Section 902--Assistant Secretary of Defense for Industrial Base Policy

    This section would amend section 138 of title 10, United 
States Code, to require one of the Assistant Secretaries to be 
the Assistant Secretary of Defense for Industrial Base Policy, 
whose principal duty would be the overall supervision of policy 
of the Department of Defense for developing and maintaining the 
defense industrial base of the United States and ensuring a 
secure supply of materials critical to national security. This 
section would also make conforming changes.

  Subtitle B--Other Department of Defense Organization and Management 
                                Matters


       Section 911--Limitation on Reduction of Civilian Workforce

    This section would prohibit the Secretary of Defense from 
reducing the civilian workforce unless the Department assesses 
the impact of such a reduction on workload, military force 
structure, lethality, readiness, operational effectiveness, 
stress on the military force, and costs.

                 Section 912--Chief Diversity Officers

    This section would amend chapter 4 of title 10, United 
States Code, to create a Chief Diversity Officer of the 
Department of Defense; chapter 703 of title 10, United States 
Code, to create a Chief Diversity Officer of the Department of 
the Army; chapter 803 of title 10, United States Code, to 
create a Chief Diversity Officer of the Department of the Navy; 
chapter 903 of title 10, United States Code, to create a Chief 
Diversity Officer of the Air Force; and chapter 3 of title 14, 
United States Code, to create a Chief Diversity Officer of the 
Coast Guard.

    Section 913--Establishment of Deputy Assistant Secretaries for 
                              Sustainment

    This section would require the military departments to each 
establish a position of a Deputy Assistant Secretary for 
Sustainment and would outline the responsibilities of each 
position.

   Section 914--Office of Defense Community Cooperation and Economic 
                               Adjustment

    This section would codify the existing Department of 
Defense Office of Economic Adjustment and emphasize its current 
primary mission of community cooperation through management of 
programs such as the Defense Critical Infrastructure Program, 
Defense Access Roads Program, and Joint Land Use Studies to 
address encroachment around military installations and 
compatible land use, and support of military families through 
schools and manufacturing programs.

  Section 915--Input from Chief of National Guard Bureau to the Joint 
                     Requirements Oversight Council

    This section would amend section 181 of title 10, United 
States Code, to require the Joint Requirements Oversight 
Council to seek the views of the Chief of the National Guard 
Bureau regarding non-Federalized National Guard capabilities in 
support of homeland defense and civil support missions.

      Section 916--Redesignation of the Joint Forces Staff College

    This section would rename the Joint Forces Staff College to 
the Joint Forces War College.

                       Subtitle C--Space Matters


  Section 921--Assistant Secretary of Defense for Space and Strategic 
                           Deterrence Policy

    This section would amend paragraph (5) of section 138(b) of 
title 10, United States Code, to require one of the Assistant 
Secretaries to be the Assistant Secretary of Defense for Space 
and Strategic Deterrence Policy, whose principal duty would be 
the overall supervision of policy of the Department of Defense 
for space, nuclear deterrence, and missile defense. This 
section would also make conforming changes.

          Section 922--Office of the Chief of Space Operations

    This section would establish the Office of the Chief of 
Space Operations and assign certain general duties to that 
office.

                     Section 923--Space Force Medal

    This section would allow the President to award a 
decoration to any person who, while serving in any capacity 
with the Space Force, distinguishes himself or herself by 
heroism not involving actual conflict with an enemy.

   Section 924--Clarification of Procurement of Commercial Satellite 
                        Communications Services

    This section would amend chapter 963 of title 10, United 
States Code, by inserting a section requiring that the Chief of 
Space Operations shall be responsible for the procurement of 
commercial satellite communications services for the Department 
of Defense.

   Section 925--Temporary Exemption from Authorized Daily Average of 
                    Members in Pay Grade E-8 and E-9

    This section would exempt the Space Force from section 517 
of title 10, United States Code, until October 1, 2023.

Section 926--One-Time Uniform Allowance for Members Transferred to the 
                              Space Force

    This section would authorize a one-time uniform allowance 
for service members transferred to the United States Space 
Force.

                      TITLE X--GENERAL PROVISIONS

                       ITEMS OF SPECIAL INTEREST


                             Other Matters


            Airfield Capabilities in GPS Denied Environments

    The committee supports the ongoing efforts by the 
Department of Defense to ensure military forces are trained and 
equipped to conduct combat operations across the range of 
potential threat environments identified in the National 
Defense Strategy. As the Department works to prepare military 
forces to conduct operations in non-permissive and denied 
threat environments, the committee seeks to ensure that the 
Department can conduct all-weather, day-night airfield flight 
operations in scenarios where the global positioning system 
(GPS) signal is denied or degraded. Therefore, the committee 
directs the Secretary of Defense to provide a briefing to the 
House Committee on Armed Services not later than February 1, 
2021 containing an assessment of the Department's ability to 
conduct all-weather, day-night flight operations in GPS-denied 
environments at military airfields overseas. This assessment 
will include: (1) a description of air traffic control and 
landing systems that utilize GPS at existing Department of 
Defense airfields and contingency airfields in the U.S. Indo-
Pacific Command and U.S. European Command areas of operation; 
(2) an assessment of the Department's ability to conduct all-
weather, day and night flight operations, including aircraft 
tracking and precision landing, at such airfields in a scenario 
where GPS is degraded or denied; and (3) a description of the 
Department's actions to improve aircrew training and other 
measures to mitigate risk at such airfields.

                          Audit Accountability

    The Department of Defense has made large strides in 
increasing accountability and ownership of audit processes and 
the committee wants to encourage the Department to continue 
this and ensure this practice is adopted across the Department, 
agencies, and military services. The committee has long 
maintained that a central factor of the Department's audit 
progress has been clear leadership and accountability across 
the Department. The committee is encouraged by the steps taken 
by the Department to ensure that senior leaders are responsible 
for leading the business process and system transformation of 
the financial processes required to support the goal of 
auditable financial statements. The committee continues to 
encourage the Department of Defense to pursue this policy 
across the Department, agencies, and military services.

                            Audit Innovation

    The committee continues to be interested in the Department 
of Defense's efforts to incorporate commercial digital 
technologies, such as robotic process automation, cognitive and 
artificial intelligence to improve the quality and richness of 
financial data, and eliminate manual process and complex 
financial reconciliations, and accelerate the Department's goal 
of auditable financial statements. Furthermore, the committee 
is interested in the Department's leveraging of data gleaned 
from these systems and utilized beyond the financial statement 
audit to derive meaningful insights and inform strategic and 
operational decisions.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of Defense 
to submit a report to the House Committee on Armed Services by 
January 31, 2021, on the adoption of advanced analytics in the 
execution of the Financial Improvement and Audit Remediation 
Plan and how they may be used to improve mission analytics, 
measuring and improving audit performance, identifying 
inefficiencies, redundancies and news risks, and preventing 
fraud, waste, and abuse. In addition, the report should include 
an understanding of the Department's efforts to standardize and 
improve data fidelity across the enterprise. Finally, an 
understanding on how the Department is implementing key 
initiatives to address future financial management workforce 
needs in data and technology skill sets.

                   Close Combat Lethality Task Force

    The committee understands the Secretary of Defense 
established the Close Combat Lethality Task Force (CCLTF) in 
order to improve the readiness of combat capabilities of 
infantry and squad formations. The committee notes the CCLTF 
has focused its efforts on reforming manpower policy, improving 
training and overall military wellness, human performance 
initiatives, as well as ensuring the fielding of advanced 
equipment and weapons systems for these formations. These 
efforts are particularly noteworthy as technology proliferation 
has eroded the comparative advantage of these forces, and, with 
renewed great power competition, the committee believes the 
Department of Defense should continue to focus on investments 
that support improving the lethality of close combat formations 
that historically account for the majority of U.S. casualties. 
The committee is aware the Secretary of Defense has recently 
designated the Secretary of the Army as the lead for the CCLTF 
and that the CCLTF would transition to the Department of the 
Army.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of the Army 
to provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services 
by December 1, 2020 on the transition plan for the CCLTF to 
include organizational and governance changes that may occur, 
planned resources across of the future years defense program 
for the CCLTF, and overall coordination efforts with the United 
States Marine Corps and United States Special Operations 
Command.

Implementation of Findings and Recommendations of the 2020 U.S. Special 
                Operations Command Comprehensive Review

    The committee appreciates the substantial efforts 
undertaken by the Commander, U.S. Special Operations Command 
(USSOCOM) in recent years to address the concerns regarding the 
ethics and professionalism of the special operations forces 
(SOF). The committee is aware of multiple incidents across 
USSOCOM in 2018 and 2019, and appreciates the Command's ongoing 
focus to address congressional concerns related to alleged 
incidents of unethical and unprofessional behavior by SOF.
    The Command's most recent effort to review and report on 
the culture and ethics of SOF is a welcome development in 
better understanding the Command's challenges and intended 
mitigation efforts to re-calibrate the force to SOF core 
values. The release of USSOCOM's Comprehensive Review indicated 
that the Command had established conditions for the 
normalization of an organizational culture overly focused on 
SOF employment and mission accomplishment, which created the 
contexts or situations allowing for misconduct and unethical 
behavior to develop within the SOF enterprise, not just at 
individual and team level, but also throughout the chain of 
command.
    The committee notes that the Comprehensive Review Team 
posited a number of findings and recommendations for action to 
mitigate such challenges, ranging from an internal review of 
Theater Special Operations Command elements to self-validate 
SOF requirements to re-calibrating the incentives and promotion 
criteria for SOF officers and enlisted personnel. As with prior 
reviews, the committee understands that implementation of 
sustainable change is often more difficult than identifying 
problems, and is encouraged by the establishment of a 
Comprehensive Review Implementation Team to action the 
recommendations from the Comprehensive Review (CR).
    Therefore, the committee directs the Commander, USSOCOM, to 
provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services by 
October 30, 2020, on the implementation strategy of the CR 
findings. The briefing shall include:
    (1) prioritization of implementation of proposed actions;
    (2) status of implementation of proposed actions;
    (3) any challenges to implementing the proposed actions; 
and
    (4) funding or resource impacts resulting from 
implementation of proposed actions.

                Presentation of Defense Budget Materials

    The committee believes that a clear and accurate 
presentation of service budget proposals is essential to 
assisting the Secretary of Defense in analyzing the requests 
prepared by each military department and each proposal's 
relevance to meeting the objectives of the National Defense 
Strategy. However, the committee notes that current budget 
practices may obscure how requested funds are executed. To 
facilitate the extent to which the Office of the Secretary of 
Defense ensures clarity and accuracy in the presentation of 
defense budget materials, the committee requires that the 
Secretary of Defense include in any budget overview documents 
provided to Congress a description of the amounts and shares of 
the defense budget recommended to each of the military services 
or departments, the defense-wide accounts, and any other or 
miscellaneous recipients of Department of Defense budget 
requests. The committee additionally believes that the amounts 
and shares for each military service or department reported 
pursuant to this direction should reflect the budget 
requirements of such service or department, and funding for 
general defense-wide needs or for other national security 
purposes be should reflected in defense wide accounts. The 
committee directs the Secretary of Defense to provide a 
briefing on options to implement more accurate budget overview 
documents that reflect these changes to the congressional 
defense committees. This briefing should be delivered no later 
than December 1, 2020.

                    Prioritizing Material Weaknesses

    While the committee is encouraged by the continued progress 
the Department has made in moving towards a clean, unmodified 
audit opinion, there are concerns that the current approach in 
closure of Notice of Findings and Recommendations (NFR) does 
not fully prioritize addressing material weaknesses. The 
committee believes that by prioritizing material weaknesses 
will more effectively move the Department towards the goal of a 
clean audit opinion.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of Defense 
to submit a report to the House Armed Services Committee by 
January 31, 2021 on the Department's strategy to identify and 
prioritize NFRs that would have a direct tie to downgrading or 
remediating material weaknesses and move the Department towards 
the goal of an unmodified audit opinion. Included in this 
report the Department should explore options to modify the 
online dashboard to better illustrate the prioritization of 
material weaknesses.

           Report on Audit Expertise in Remediation Services

    As the Department continues to make strides in its audit 
readiness efforts, the committee seeks to ensure that 
appropriate staffing ratios for the audit remediation services 
used by the department are reflected in 10 U.S. Code Sec. 240b. 
Currently, the statute recommends that the Department have at 
least half of such services performed by individuals possessing 
certain expertise and qualifications. The committee is 
interested in examining whether this staffing ratio provides 
the Department with adequate ability to minimize risks to 
sustained audit progress while maintaining needed flexibility.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of Defense 
to submit a report to the congressional defense committees not 
later than February 1, 2021 evaluating the effectiveness of the 
staffing ratios recommended for audit remediation services 
under 10 U.S. Code Sec. 240b. This report should include an 
assessment of current staffing ratios across the all services 
and agencies in the department, and should indicate whether 
such ratios pose advantages or risks to sustained progress on 
the audit. Furthermore, the report should indicate any 
potential advantages or risks to audit progress and 
sustainability created by eliminating or altering existing 
statutory ratios.

Report on Service Consolidation of General Ledger Financial Management 
                                Systems

    The committee recognizes the progress made by the 
Department of Defense towards an unmodified audit opinion, but 
remains aware that audit readiness and remediation efforts must 
lead to and be aligned with further efficiencies and process 
improvements if the investment of time and effort into the 
audit is to be fully leveraged. In particular, the committee 
recognizes the significant efforts made to date by the military 
services to consolidate enterprise software and general ledger 
financial management systems in their business operations, and 
encourages the military services to continue to reduce the 
number of such systems. The committee directs the Secretaries 
of the Army, Air Force, and Navy each to provide a report to 
the House Committee on Armed Services not later than January 
31, 2021, specifying the date by which each military service 
will achieve consolidation to a single general ledger financial 
management system, detailing efforts and funding critical to 
achieving consolidation, possible ways to accelerate 
consolidation, and such additional information as each 
Secretary deems appropriate.

    Reserve Components and National Guard Units Supporting Special 
        Operations Command Operational and Training Requirements

    The committee notes U.S. Special Operations Command 
(USSOCOM) continues to make strides in identifying causes of 
and establishing mitigation strategies for high operational 
tempo, impacts on air and ground platforms, and the resulting 
readiness challenges affecting special operations forces (SOF). 
The January 2020 release of USSOCOM's Comprehensive Review of 
SOF Culture and Ethics indicated that USSOCOM has established 
conditions for a culture focused on SOF employment and mission 
accomplishment, which in some instances occurs at the expense 
of disciplined, predictable, and reliable SOF force generation. 
The committee is concerned that the heavy emphasis on SOF 
employment in support of geographic combatant command and joint 
force requirements places excessive burden on Active Duty 
military personnel and capabilities assigned to USSOCOM.
    The committee is aware the Services' Reserve Components and 
Air and Army National Guard units provide support to the 
operational and training requirements of USSOCOM. The committee 
believes that as processes and procedures are implemented to 
improve readiness and increase dwell time for Active Duty SOF 
personnel, regular and transparent dialog with the chiefs of 
the armed services, the National Guard Bureau, and service 
components of USSOCOM is critical to ensure that all associated 
elements of the Reserve Components and National Guard are 
considered for relevant operational and training opportunities.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Commander, USSOCOM, to 
submit a report to the House Committee on Armed Services by 
December 1, 2020, on the current utilization strategy of the 
Services' Reserve Component and Air and Army National Guard 
units in support of USSOCOM. The report shall include:
    (1) for units, the type and associated component, including 
numbers of personnel and associated occupational specialties;
    (2) for individual personnel, the occupational specialty, 
parent organization, and associated component;
    (3) associated air or ground platforms, capabilities, and 
maintenance status;
    (4) dates of utilization for operational or training 
requirements in the past 5 years;
    (5) location where each unit or individual supported 
USSOCOM;
    (6) training to validate the operational capability and 
readiness of the supporting unit or individual; and
    (7) intent for future utilization of each unit.

         United Service Organizations and Identification Cards

    The committee recognizes the unique and invaluable role 
that the United Service Organizations (USO) plays in supporting 
the morale and welfare of service members and families around 
the world. During the past several years, USO employees have 
encountered numerous logistical challenges stemming from a 
credentialing issue. This is particularly problematic for USO 
employees who live and work alongside U.S. military personnel 
in remote regions such as the CENTCOM and AFRICOM areas of 
responsibility and require assured access to military 
installations in order to provide vital support to service 
members. The committee is concerned that Department of Defense 
implementation of Homeland Security Presidential Directive 12, 
which created a policy for common identification standard for 
federal employees and contractors, may be creating access 
issues, particularly at overseas installations, for employees 
of the USO and other non-federal entities who provide essential 
support to service members and their families.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of Defense 
to submit a report to the Committees on Armed Services of the 
Senate and the House of Representatives by not later than 
February 1, 2021 regarding the following:
    (1) the Department's implementation plan and timeline for 
the Next Generation Uniformed Services Identification Card;
    (2) the Department's plan to ensure that policies governing 
nonfederal entities requiring recurring access to military 
facilities and amenities are applied consistently for all 
organizations within the Department; and
    (3) the Department's plan to comply with federal 
credentialing policy in fielding the Next Generation Uniform 
Services Identification Card.

                         LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS


                     Subtitle A--Financial Matters


                Section 1001--General Transfer Authority

    This section would allow the Secretary of Defense, with 
certain limitations, to make transfers between amounts 
authorized for fiscal year 2020 in division A of this Act. This 
section would limit the total amount transferred under this 
authority to $4.00 billion.

            Section 1002--Determination of Budgetary Effects

    This section would state the budgetary effects of this Act 
for the purpose of complying with the Statutory Pay-As-You-Go 
Act of 2010.

 Section 1003--Pandemic Preparedness and Resilience National Security 
                                  Fund

    This section would provide limitations and additional 
authorities for the amounts authorized to be appropriated for 
Research and Development, Defense-Wide, Pandemic Preparedness 
and Resilience National Security Fund. It would also establish 
a notice requirement for transfers from the Fund, and would 
exempt transfers under this section from counting towards the 
dollar amount limitation under section 1001.

      Section 1004--Budget Materials for Special Operations Forces

    This section would modify section 226 of title 10, United 
States Code, by expanding the budgetary information required 
for special operations forces to include detail by 
appropriation and line item, as well as identifying any changes 
to the amount or type of budgetary support provided and an 
assessment of any effects on the military services due to 
adjustments in special operations forces manpower or force 
structure for fiscal year covered by the display and future 
fiscal years.

                   Subtitle B--Counterdrug Activities


  Section 1011--Support for Counterdrug Activities and Activities to 
Counter Transnational Organized Crime Affecting Flow of Drugs into the 
                             United States

    This section would modify the authority to provide support 
to other agencies for counterdrug activities and activities to 
counter transnational organized crime.

Section 1012--Congressional Notification with Respect to Department of 
     Defense Support Provided to Other United States Agencies for 
    Counterdrug Activities and Activities to Counter Transnational 
                            Organized Crime

    This section would clarify notification requirements for 
subsection (b) of the authority to provide support to other 
agencies for counterdrug activities and activities to counter 
transnational organized crime.

                       Subtitle C--Naval Vessels


Section 1021--Limitation on Availability of Certain Funds without Naval 
                     Vessels Plan and Certification

    This section would amend section 231(e) of title 10, United 
States Code, by restricting 75 percent of the operation and 
maintenance funds for the Secretary of Defense until the 30-
year shipbuilding plan of the Navy has been delivered to 
Congress.

   Section 1022--Limitations on Use of Funds in the National Defense 
        Sealift Fund for Purchase of Foreign Constructed Vessels

    This section would amend section 2218 of title 10, United 
States Code, by authorizing the purchase of a total of nine 
used foreign-built ships and four used foreign-built ships 
prior to the Navy initiating an acquisition strategy for a 
sealift recapitalization plan.

      Section 1023--Use of National Sea-Based Deterrence Fund for 
  Incrementally Funded Contracts to Provide Full Funding for Columbia 
                            Class Submarines

    This section would amend section 2218a(h)(1) of title 10, 
United States Code, by authorizing the use of incremental 
funding for the full funding of the first two Columbia class 
submarines.

  Section 1024--Preference for United States Vessels in Transporting 
                            Supplies by Sea

    This section would amend section 2631 of title 10, United 
States Code, to increase compliance with military cargo 
preference requirements.

 Section 1025--Restrictions on Overhaul, Repair, etc. of Naval Vessels 
                          in Foreign Shipyards

    This section would provide limited exceptions for the 
repair of Navy vessels in shipyards outside the United States 
when damage occurred by hostile actions. This section would 
also provide limited authority for maintenance work to be 
performed by foreign workers if U.S. personnel cannot perform 
the work for health or safety reasons.

 Section 1026--Biannual Report on Shipbuilder Training and the Defense 
                            Industrial Base

    This section would amend chapter 863 of title 10, United 
States Code, to require the Secretary of Defense, in 
coordination with the Secretary of Labor, to submit a report to 
Congress on the state of defense industrial base training, 
hiring, and the ability to meet the requirements of the 30-year 
shipbuilding plan.

  Section 1027--Prohibition on Use of Funds for Retirement of Certain 
                         Littoral Combat Ships

    This section would prohibit the Secretary of the Navy from 
retiring LCS-3 and LCS-4 until the Secretary has submitted a 
certification that all operational tests have been completed on 
all mission modules.

    Section 1028--Report on Implementation of Commandant's Planning 
                                Guidance

     This section would require the Secretary of Defense to 
submit a report regarding the implementation of the Commandant 
of the Marine Corps's planning guidance.

       Section 1029--Limitation on Naval Force Structure Changes

    This section would prohibit the retirement of any Navy ship 
in fiscal year 2021 until 30 days after the Secretary of 
Defense has delivered the Integrated Navy Force Structure 
Assessment to the congressional defense committees.

                      Subtitle D--Counterterrorism


 Section 1031--Prohibition on Use of Funds for Transfer or Release of 
 Individuals Detained at United States Naval Station, Guantanamo Bay, 
                       Cuba, to Certain Countries

    This section would prohibit the use of funding authorized 
to be appropriated or otherwise made available for the 
Department of Defense during the period beginning on the date 
of the enactment of this Act and ending on December 31, 2021, 
to transfer, release, or assist in the transfer or release of 
any individual detained at U.S. Naval Station, Guantanamo Bay, 
Cuba, to Libya, Somalia, Syria, and Yemen.

         Subtitle E--Miscellaneous Authorities and Limitations


    Section 1041--Support of Special Operations to Combat Terrorism

    This section would modify section 127e of title 10, United 
States Code, by establishing procedural requirements for the 
planning, development, and cessation of activities under such 
authority, and clarifying notification requirements for both 
the modification of and termination of extant activities under 
such authority.

  Section 1042--Prohibition on Retirement of Nuclear Powered Aircraft 
                    Carriers before First Refueling

    This section would amend section 8062 of title 10, United 
States Code, by prohibiting the retirement of any aircraft 
carrier prior to its first reactor refueling.

 Section 1043--Required Minimum Inventory of Tactical Airlift Aircraft

    This section would amend section 9062 of title 10, United 
States Code, by setting a minimum number of tactical airlift in 
the tactical airlift inventory.

 Section 1044--Modification and Technical Correction to Department of 
Defense Authority to Provide Assistance along the Southern Land Border 
                          of the United States

    This section would modify the authority under section 1059 
of the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2016 
(Public Law 114-92) to require the Secretary of Defense to 
fully consider readiness, mission, and task alignment to 
requested support from Custom and Border Protection, when 
determining the Department of Defense's ability to provide 
assistance to secure the United States southern land border. 
Additionally, this section would add reporting requirements.

 Section 1045--Battlefield Airborne Communications Node Certification 
                              Requirement

    This section would prohibit the Secretary of the Air Force 
from divesting the EQ-4 aircraft until the Chairman of the 
Joint Requirements Oversight Council and the Commander, U.S. 
Central Command, certify in writing to the congressional 
defense committees that the replacement capability to be 
fielded in place of the EQ-4 would result in equal or greater 
capability available to the combatant commanders of the 
combatant commands and would not result in less airborne 
capacity or on-station time. This section would also require 
the Under Secretary of Defense for Acquisition and Sustainment 
to certify to the congressional defense committees that the 
validated operating and sustainment costs of the capability 
developed or fielded to replace an equivalent capacity the EQ-4 
aircraft currently provides is less than the validated 
operating and sustainment costs for the EQ-4 aircraft on a 
comparable flight-hour cost basis.

 Section 1046--Requirements Relating to Newest Generations of Personal 
                          Protective Equipment

    This section would require the Secretaries of the military 
departments to each submit a report on the fielding of the 
newest generations of personal protective equipment to the 
Armed Forces, to include: the numbers (aggregated by total 
number and by sex) of Modular Scaleable Vests and Marine Corps 
Plate Carrier Generation III; and a description and assessment 
of the barriers, if any, to the development and fielding of 
such generations of equipment, including cost overruns, 
contractor delays, and other challenges. This section would 
also require the Director of the Defense Health Agency to 
develop and maintain a system for tracking data on injuries 
among service members and for the Periodic Health Assessment of 
members of the Armed Forces to include one or more questions on 
whether members incurred an injury in connection with ill-
fitting or malfunctioning personal protective equipment.

    Section 1047--Mandatory Criteria for Strategic Basing Decisions

    This section would require the Secretary of the Air Force 
to modify Air Force Instruction 10-503 to include comparative 
analyses of community support, joint training, and all-domain 
training capabilities as part of the strategic basing process 
for an aircraft.

   Section 1047--Prohibition on Use of Funds for Retirement of A-10 
                                Aircraft

    This section would prohibit the Secretary of the Air Force 
from implementing any actions during fiscal year 2021 that 
would retire, prepare to retire, or place into storage or back-
up aircraft inventory any A-10 aircraft unless the Secretary 
determines on a case-by-case basis an aircraft is no longer 
mission capable due to a mishap or damage that is uneconomical 
to repair.

Section 1048--Limitation on Use of Funds Pending Public Availability of 
        Top-Line Numbers of Deployed Members of the Armed Forces

    This section would prohibit the Department of Defense from 
obligating or expending more than 75 percent of travel funds 
for the Office of the Secretary of Defense until the Secretary 
of Defense has made available the top-line numbers of deployed 
troops, as described in Section 595 of the John S. McCain 
National Defense Authorization Act of Fiscal Year 2019 (Public 
Law 115-232).

 Section 1049--Limitation on Physical Move, Integration, Reassignment, 
      or Shift in Responsibility of Marine Forces Northern Command

    This section would prohibit any action execute to the 
physical move, integration, reassignment, or shift in 
responsibility of Marine Forces Northern Command until 60 days 
after a report is submitted to Congress.

Section 1050--Conditions for Permanently Basing United States Equipment 
or Additional Forces in Host Countries with At-Risk Vendors in 5G or 6G 
                                Networks

    This section would require the Secretary of Defense, prior 
to basing a major weapons system or additional permanently 
assigned forces to a host country with at-risk 5th generation 
(5G) or sixth generation (6G) wireless network equipment, 
software, and services, to notify the congressional defense 
committees of steps being taken by the host country to mitigate 
potential risks, steps being taken by the U.S. Government to 
mitigate potential risks, and any defense mutual agreements 
between the host country and the United States intended to 
allay the costs of risk mitigation. It would also require the 
Secretary of Defense to provide the congressional defense 
committees an assessment of the risks posed by the current or 
intended 5G or 6G telecommunications architecture in host 
countries and measures required to mitigate such risks.

                  TITLE XI--CIVILIAN PERSONNEL MATTERS

                       ITEMS OF SPECIAL INTEREST


                 Defense Finance and Accounting Service

     The committee notes that the Defense Finance and 
Accounting Service (DFAS) was established in 1991 to 
consolidate and improve the Department of Defense's various 
finance and accounting functions distributed across nearly 
3,500 posts, camps, and stations. After capitalizing 19,608 
personnel and activities costing $1.83 billion annually by 
1998, DFAS proceeded to reduce its workforce to 12,000 
employees while accounting for significantly larger obligation 
authority during a period of budget uncertainty and high 
operational tempo.
    The committee notes that section 926 of the John S. McCain 
National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2019 (Public 
Law 115-232) required the Chief Management Officer and Under 
Secretary of Defense (Comptroller) to conduct a joint review of 
DFAS activities, to include a validation of its missions and 
functions and an assessment of potential changes to its 
workforce and functions. That review concluded that major 
finance and accounting products and services performed by DFAS 
are effective within the current business environment. In 
addition, the Department found that the economics of 
contracting additional commercial sources for finance and 
accounting services was not a significant value proposition. 
Based on the review's findings, the Department stated that it 
is not considering or recommending any combinations of 
functions involving DFAS or other defense agencies, nor any use 
of commercial providers for DFAS services.
    Considering the importance of the DFAS mission, the 
committee encourages the Department to adhere to the findings 
of this report. In addition, the committee requests close 
communication and collaboration with Congress should the 
Department consider reducing the DFAS workforce. The committee 
encourages Department leadership to ensure that any such change 
be rigorously evaluated to demonstrate that it would yield 
significant cost savings and not result in degraded capability.

                 General Schedule Locality Pay Program

    The committee is aware that section 5304 of title 5, United 
States Code, authorizes locality pay for General Schedule 
employees with duty stations in the United States and its 
territories and possessions. Section 5304(f) of title 5, United 
States Code, authorizes the President's Pay Agent (the 
Secretary of Labor, the Director of the Office of Management 
and Budget (OMB), and the Director of the Office of Personnel 
Management) to determine locality pay areas. Locality areas 
have traditionally been based on the OMB-defined Metropolitan 
Statistical Areas (MSAs) and Combined Statistical Areas (CSAs). 
OMB recently revised the definitions of MSAs and CSAs, but 
these new definitions are not currently being used for locality 
pay. In May 2019, the Federal Salary Council recommended to the 
President's Pay Agent not to adopt these revised MSAs and CSAs 
until the Council could study them further. The President's Pay 
Agent agreed in its December 2019 report to the President and 
stated that it would wait for the Council's recommendation 
before taking any action with respect to the updated MSA and 
CSA delineations. According to the Federal Salary Council 2018 
Report to the President's Pay Agent, setting forth 
recommendations to the Pay Agent for calendar year 2020, and 
other matters, there appears to be considerable opportunity for 
both process and legislative improvements to the administration 
and implementation of the locality pay program.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Comptroller General of 
the United States to review the process for administering the 
locality pay program, including the process for establishing or 
modifying boundaries for locality pay areas and the time 
required for such changes. The committee further directs the 
Comptroller General to provide a briefing to the House 
Committee on Armed Services by March 1, 2021, on the 
Comptroller General's preliminary findings and to submit a 
final report on a date agreed to at the time of the briefing.

                Report on Denial of Security Clearances

    The Committee is aware that vetting applicants for access 
or a security clearance is an important safeguard that reduces 
risks and mitigates harm to United States national security. 
Related to this process, the Committee requires a greater 
understanding of decisions to not grant applicants or employees 
access or a security clearance based on the Adjudicative 
Guideline ``concern'' in either Security Executive Agent 
Directive 4 for guideline ``H'' (Drug Involvement and Substance 
Misuse) or ``I'' (Psychological Conditions), or Intelligence 
Community Policy Guidance 704.2 for guideline ``H'' (Drug 
Involvement) or ``I'' (Psychological Conditions). The Committee 
directs the Undersecretary of Defense for Intelligence and 
Security, in coordination with the Director of National 
Intelligence, to submit a report to the House Committee on 
Armed Services by December 1, 2020 with data and information 
for the previous five fiscal years on the denial or revocation 
by any Department of Defense component or intelligence 
community element of access or a security clearance under 
guidelines ``H'' or ``I'' of either Security Executive Agent 
Directive 4 or Intelligence Community Policy Guidance 704.2. 
The report shall show the number of access or security 
clearance denials or revocations broken down by the Defense 
component or intelligence element, type of access or level of 
security clearance denied or revoked, and the age, sex and race 
of each applicant or employee.

   Report on Improving Equal Employment Opportunity Processes in the 
                         Department of Defense

    The committee is concerned about the effectiveness and 
efficiency of the Department of Defense's Equal Employment 
Opportunity (EEO) complaint resolution processes for civilian 
employees. EEO investigations are typically required to be 
completed within 180 days of the date on which the complaint 
was filed. Yet, from Fiscal Year (FY) 2014 through FY 2018, the 
average number of days in investigation for EEO complaints in 
the Army, Air Force, and Navy exceeded 180 days. During FY 
2018, the average number of days in investigation was 212 days 
for the Army and 256 days for the Air Force. During the first 9 
months of FY 2018, the average number of days in investigation 
was 211 days for the Navy.
    The committee acknowledges the Department of Defense's 
intention to improve the EEO process by convening the Defense 
Equal Opportunity Reform Group (DEORG). Therefore, the 
committee directs the Under Secretary of Defense for Personnel 
& Readiness, in consultation with the DEORG, to submit a report 
to the Committees on Armed Services of the Senate and the House 
of Representatives by January 1, 2021, with recommendations to 
improve the informal and formal EEO processes, including ways 
to improve the timeliness of investigations and other EEO 
process, maintain a high standard of quality for investigations 
whether conducted by Department of Defense employees or 
contractors, ensure that sufficient disciplinary action is 
taken when complaints are founded, and inform complainants of 
all available options to resolve EEO complaints.

                         LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS

    Subtitle A--General Provisions

           Section 1101--Family and Medical Leave Amendments

    This section would make technical corrections relating to 
parental leave for Federal employees.

Section 1102--Limitation on Authority to Exclude Employees from Chapter 
                             71 of Title 5

    This section would prohibit the use of funds to exclude the 
Department of Defense or any agency thereof from collective 
bargaining rights in fiscal year 2021.

Section 1103--Authority to Provide Travel and Transportation Allowances 
  in Connection with Transfer Ceremonies of Department of Defense and 
            Coast Guard Civilian Employees Who Die Overseas

    This section would allow the Secretary of the military 
department concerned, the agency head of a Defense Agency or 
Department of Defense Field Activity, or the Secretary of 
Homeland Security to provide round-trip travel and 
transportation allowances and accompaniment services in 
connection with ceremonies for the transfer of a Department of 
Defense or Coast Guard civilian employee who dies while located 
or serving overseas.

     Section 1104--One-Year Extension of Authority to Waive Annual 
 Limitation on Premium Pay and Aggregate Limitation on Pay for Federal 
                  Civilian Employees Working Overseas

    This section would amend section 1101 of the Duncan Hunter 
National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2009 (Public 
Law 110-417) by extending premium pay for Federal civilian 
employees working overseas until the end of 2021.

   Section 1105--One-Year Extension of Temporary Authority to Grant 
Allowances, Benefits, and Gratuities to Civilian Personnel on Official 
                         Duty in a Combat Zone

    This section would amend section 1115 of the John S. McCain 
National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2019 (Public 
Law 115-232) by extending the temporary authority granting 
allowances, benefits, and gratuities to civilian personnel on 
official duty in a combat zone by 1 year.

Section 1106--Limiting the Number of Local Wage Areas Defined within a 
                              Pay Locality

    This section would amend section 5343 of title 5, United 
States Code, to prohibit the Office of Personnel Management 
from including more than one local wage area within a General 
Schedule pay locality in order to align Federal Wage System 
Areas with General Schedule locality pay areas.

  Section 1107--Civilian Faculty at the Defense Security Cooperation 
            University and Institute of Security Governance

    This section would amend section 1595(c) of title 10, 
United States Code, to add the Defense Security Cooperation 
University and the Defense Institute for Security Governance to 
the list of covered institutions for which the Secretary of 
Defense may employ and compensate civilian faculty as the 
Secretary considers necessary.

   Section 1108--Expansion of Authority for Appointment of Recently-
Retired Members of the Armed Forces to Positions at Certain Industrial 
                            Base Facilities

    This section would reinstate the waiver to allow retiring 
or separating servicemembers to accept an appointment at any 
industrial base facility within 180 days of retirement if this 
position is certified by the Secretary concerned as lacking 
sufficient numbers of qualified applicants.

  Section 1109--Fire Fighters Alternative Work Schedule Demonstration 
                                Project

    This section would create a 5-year demonstration project 
for an alternative work schedule for firefighters across Navy 
Region Mid-Atlantic.

 Section 1110--Special Rules for Certain Monthly Workers' Compensation 
  Payments and Other Payments for Federal Government Personnel under 
                       Chief of Mission Authority

    This section would provide long-term benefits to U.S. 
Government employees who suffer brain injuries from their 
service in Cuba or China.

Subtitle B--Elijah E. Cummings Federal Employee Antidiscrimination Act 
                                of 2020


                       Section 1121--Short Title

    This section would establish that this subtitle may be 
cited as the ``Elijah E. Cummings Federal Employee 
Antidiscrimination Act of 2020.''

                    Section 1122--Sense of Congress

    This section would establish the sense of Congress that 
accountability in the enforcement of the rights of Federal 
employees is furthered when Federal agencies agree to take 
appropriate disciplinary action against Federal employees who 
are found to have committed discriminatory acts.

                Section 1123--Notification of Violation

    This section would amend the Notification and Federal 
Employee Antidiscrimination and Retaliation Act of 2002 to 
require agencies to publish notices of final agency actions or 
Equal Employment Opportunity Commission findings.

                  Section 1124--Reporting Requirements

    This section would amend the Notification and Federal 
Employee Antidiscrimination and Retaliation Act of 2002 to 
require that each agency report certain data with respect to 
specified equal opportunity complaints.

     Section 1125--Data To Be Posted by Employing Federal Agencies

    This section would amend the Notification and Federal 
Employee Antidiscrimination and Retaliation Act of 2002 to 
specify the types of data that agencies must post with respect 
to specified equal opportunity complaints.

  Section 1126--Data To Be Posted by the Equal Employment Opportunity 
                               Commission

    This section would make a conforming change to the 
Notification and Federal Employee Antidiscrimination and 
Retaliation Act of 2002.

Section 1127--Notification and Federal Employee Antidiscrimination and 
                   Retaliation Act of 2002 Amendments

    This section would amend the Notification and Federal 
Employee Antidiscrimination and Retaliation Act of 2002 by 
adding sections relating to discrimination complaint tracking, 
personnel records, processing and resolution of complaints, 
referrals to the Office of Special Counsel, and other matters.

            Section 1128--Nondisclosure Agreement Limitation

    This section would amend section 2302(b)(13) of title 5, 
United States Code, to establish that an employee who has 
authority to take, recommend, or approve any personnel action 
shall not implement or enforce a nondisclosure policy that 
prohibits or restricts an employee from disclosing information 
relating to (1) a violation of any law, rule, or regulation; 
(2) mismanagement, gross waste of funds, or abuse of authority; 
(3) a substantial and specific danger to public health or 
safety; or (4) any other whistle-blower protection.

             TITLE XII--MATTERS RELATING TO FOREIGN NATIONS

                       ITEMS OF SPECIAL INTEREST


 Assessment on Acceding to United Nations Convention on Law of the Seas

    The committee is concerned that revisionist states seek to 
undermine and reshape the rules-based international order. The 
United States efforts to counter and deter such activities may 
be impacted by the U.S.' status as a non-party to the United 
Nations Convention on Law of the Seas (UNCLOS). Though the 
United States abides by the rules of UNCLOS, the United States 
currently relies on customary international law and U.S. 
military presence to assert the principles of UNCLOS. 
Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of Defense, in 
coordination with the Secretary of State, to submit an 
assessment on the impact of U.S. accession to UNCLOS to the 
congressional defense committees, the House Committee on 
Foreign Affairs, and the Senate Committee on Foreign Relations 
by February 1, 2021. The report shall be unclassified but may 
contain a classified annex. At a minimum, the report shall 
include:
    (1) U.S. national security interests that would be affected 
by U.S. accession to UNCLOS;
    (2) an assessment on the impact U.S. accession to UNCLOS 
would have on the ability of the U.S. military to peacefully 
deter conflict;
    (3) an assessment on the impact U.S. accession to UNCLOS 
would have on U.S. military posture and operations in the 
maritime domain;
    (4) the impact U.S. accession to UNCLOS would have in 
maintaining freedom of navigation in international seas and 
securing navigational freedoms and global access for military 
and commercial ships, aircraft, and undersea fiber optic 
cables;
    (5) the impact U.S. accession to UNCLOS would have in 
buttressing a rules-based international order;
    (6) an assessment of the impact U.S. accession to UNCLOS 
would have on the U.S. to counter efforts by nations seeking to 
reshape internationally accepted rules;
    (7) an assessment of the impact U.S. accession to UNCLOS 
would have on U.S. leadership in the maritime domain, the 
credibility of U.S. support for a rules-based approach, and 
U.S. influence on maritime disputes;
    (8) the impact U.S. accession to UNCLOS would have on the 
United States ability to work with allies and partners on 
maritime security issues; and
    (9) any other relevant matters that the Secretary 
determines should be included.

            Authorities for U.S. Military Personnel in Syria

    The committee remains concerned that the United States 
Strategy for Syria expresses objectives that cannot be achieved 
with the means identified. Furthermore, the committee is 
concerned about the stated purpose of U.S. military forces 
serving in Syria and tasks assigned to those forces. The 
committee directs the Secretary of Defense to provide a 
briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services not later 
than October 30, 2020, on the applicable domestic and 
international legal authorities that would authorize the U.S. 
military presence in oilfields in northeast Syria and to deny 
the Government of Syria access to them.

  Briefing from the United States-China Economic and Security Review 
Commission on Cooperation with Similar Organizations among U.S. Allies 
                              and Partners

    The committee recognizes the importance and value of the 
United States-China Economic and Security Review Commission--
created in the FY2001 National Defense Authorization Act to 
monitor, investigate, and report to Congress on the national 
security implications of the bilateral trade and economic 
relationship between the United States and the People's 
Republic of China--and the policy and legislative 
recommendations it provides to the Congress. The committee 
believes the global nature of competition with China requires 
the United States to work with partners and allies, and that 
the advice the Commission provides to the Congress would be 
enhanced if the Commission were to engage and cooperate with 
similar entities and policymakers from allied and partner 
nations.
    Accordingly, the committee encourages the United States-
China Economic and Security Review Commission to cooperate, 
coordinate, and converse with similar organizations and 
legislative bodies in allied and partner nations, such as the 
Security Experts at the European Commission of the European 
Union, on economic and security challenges posed by China and 
to jointly study and make coordinated suggestions, as 
appropriate, to their respective governments on how to respond 
to such challenges . The committee believes that constructive 
engagement with allies and partners sends a positive message of 
cooperation on these national security issues. Therefore, the 
committee directs the Commission to provide a briefing to the 
House Committee on Armed Services, not later than November 30, 
2020, on any plans, opportunities, and challenges the 
Commission has for sharing its expertise and cooperation with 
similar organizations and legislative bodies in allied and 
partner nations.

         Briefing on Nation-State Election Interference Efforts

    The committee notes that the administration has yet to 
deliver the interim reports that were directed as report 
language in the FY2020 National Defense Authorization Act on 
Russian and Chinese influence operations and active measures 
campaigns targeting democratic elections and military alliances 
and partnerships of which the United States is a member. The 
Secretary of Defense was directed to provide interim reports 
not later than November 5, 2019, and final reports not later 
than September 30, 2020, which shall be unclassified and 
appropriate for release to the public but may include a 
classified annex. Such information is vitally important to the 
Congress' ability to provide resources for and conduct 
oversight of election security efforts and to inform the 
general public of such influence operations and campaigns by 
adversaries.
    The committee directs the Secretary of Defense to provide 
the reports as directed. The committee also directs the 
Secretary of Defense, in coordination with the Director of 
National Intelligence, the Secretary of State, and the 
Secretary of Homeland Security, to provide a briefing to the 
House Armed Services Committee, no later than October 9, 2020, 
on nation-state election interference efforts, influence 
operations and campaigns targeting democratic elections, and 
campaigns targeting military alliances and partnerships that 
may impact U.S. defense and security equities.
    The briefing shall include:
    (1) an overview of nation-states that are employing 
influence operations and campaigns targeting United States 
elections, and how such campaigns relate to the strategic 
objective of each such nation-state.
    (2) an identification of the tactics, techniques, and 
procedures employed.
    (3) the United States' strategy and capabilities for 
detecting, deterring, countering, and disrupting such influence 
operations and campaigns.
    (4) a summary of United States support requested by and 
provided to state, local, and nongovernmental stakeholders to 
assist in their ability to detect, deter, counter, and disrupt 
such influence operations and campaigns.
    (5) an assessment of impediments to providing support 
requested by state, local, and nongovernmental stakeholders.
    (6) any other matters the Secretary deems appropriate.

  Briefing on the Consequences of Capping the Number of U.S. Service 
                 Members Stationed in Germany at 25,000

    The committee is gravely concerned that the President has 
stated he intends to significantly reduce U.S. troops in Europe 
and cap the number of permanently stationed U.S. military 
personnel in Germany at 25,000, but has provided no 
notification, assessment, or explanation of this decision 
directly to Congress. The committee strongly supports U.S. 
efforts to deter Russian aggression alongside NATO allies and 
European partners, and believes a cap on U.S. forces in Germany 
would have major implications for U.S. force posture, training 
and readiness, and deterrent capabilities.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of Defense 
to provide the congressional defense committees with a 
briefing, no later than September 1, 2020, on the impact that a 
cap of 25,000 on the total number of members of the Armed 
Forces serving on active duty who are deployed to or stationed 
in Germany, would have on U.S. national security, to include:
    1. Whether such a cap is being implemented, along with the 
details, rationale, and circumstances of its implementation.
    2. Whether the cap and reduction of forces envisions 
further reductions of forces in Europe, and the terms, 
rationale, and national security implications of any further 
envisioned reductions.
    3. A determination of whether such a cap would be in the 
national security interest of the United States and whether it 
would significantly undermine the security of United States' 
allies in the region.
    4. Whether the Secretary has appropriately consulted with 
allies and partners of the United States, including all members 
of NATO, regarding such a cap,
    5. A detailed analysis of the impact such a cap would have 
on the security of U.S. allies and partners in Europe and on 
interoperability and joint activities with U.S. allies and 
partners in Europe.
    6. A detailed analysis of where the forces will be moved 
and stationed as a consequence of the cap.
    7. A detailed plan for how a cap would be implemented.
    8. A detailed analysis of the cost implications of such a 
cap.
    9. A detailed analysis of the impact the cap would have on 
servicemembers and their families stationed in Europe.
    10. A detailed analysis of the impact the cap would have on 
Joint Force Planning.
    11. A detailed explanation of the impact the cap would have 
on implementation of the National Defense Strategy and a 
certification that the cap would not negatively affect 
implementation of the National Defense Strategy.

                    Briefing on the New START Treaty

    The Committee is concerned that the Secretary of Defense 
and Secretary of State have not completed the briefings 
required by the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal 
Year 2020, Section 1237, regarding arms control negotiations 
and the New START Treaty. The Committee emphasizes the 
importance of legally binding, verifiable limits on Russian 
strategic nuclear forces on the United States' national 
security, and strongly urges the both the Secretary of Defense 
and the Secretary of State to comply with the timeline laid out 
by Section 1237. The Committee further notes the importance of 
keeping Congress informed with regard to the Administration's 
nuclear arms control policies. Therefore, the Committee directs 
the Secretary of Defense, in coordination with the Secretary of 
State, to provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed 
Services, not later than September 1, 2020 on the status of 
nuclear arms control negotiations with Russia.

    Co-Development of Next Generation Ground-Based Anti-Ship Missile

    The committee supports the successful U.S.-Japanese co-
development of the SM-3 Block IIA ballistic missile interceptor 
as well as the need for ground-based anti-ship cruise missiles 
to defend United States and allied forces in the Indo- Pacific 
against growing threats in the region. The committee continues 
to strongly support efforts to expand defense industrial 
cooperation with the Government of Japan. Therefore, the 
committee directs the Secretary of Defense to submit to the 
congressional defense committees a report by January 1, 2021, 
on the desirability and feasibility of: (a) co-developing a 
next generation ground-based anti-ship missile with the 
Government of Japan; and (b) technology transfer options to 
enhance joint missile development.

   Department of Defense Involvement in Embassy China Working Groups

    The committee recognizes the global and regional challenges 
posed by activities of the People's Republic of China (PRC), 
including under the Belt and Road Initiative (BRI). The PRC 
utilizes its officials, diplomats, and State-owned and State-
directed companies to maintain strong ties in countries with 
BRI projects. PRC officials use this influence to undermine 
United States military, diplomatic, and economic objectives, 
including through coercion and corruption. The committee 
directs the Secretary of Defense to submit a report to the 
congressional defense committees by February 15, 2021, on the 
Department of Defense's involvement in the Department of State 
working groups on China, including at the regional and Embassy 
level.

 Efforts to Implement the Foreign Investment Risk Review Modernization 
                                  Act

    The committee recognizes the United States' status as the 
world's largest recipient of foreign direct investment. The 
committee understands the importance of balancing the many 
benefits of foreign direct investment to the U.S. economy with 
the associated risks to U.S. national security. The committee 
supports the Department of Defense's collaborative efforts and 
innovative measures to protect the defense industrial base and 
the U.S. critical infrastructure and critical technology 
sectors from such national security risks. The committee 
recognizes the Department of Defense's essential role, as a 
frequent co-lead agency and voting member of the Committee on 
Foreign Investment in the United States (CFIUS), in preventing 
and mitigating national security threats related to foreign 
direct investment. The committee is aware that the Foreign 
Investment Risk Review Modernization Act of 2018 (FIRRMA), 
which was signed into law as part of the John S. McCain 
National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2019 (Public 
Law 115-232), significantly strengthened and expanded CFIUS' 
jurisdiction to address emerging threats to U.S. national 
security.
    To better understand the initial impacts of FIRRMA 
implementation on the Department of Defense, the committee 
directs the Under Secretary of Defense for Acquisition and 
Sustainment to provide a briefing to the House Committee on 
Armed Services, not later than January 1, 2021. Such briefing 
shall include an assessment of the following:
    (1) the Department's ability to monitor and enforce 
compliance with mitigation agreements;
    (2) the Department's efforts to incorporate findings and 
recommendations from the ``Protecting Critical Technology Task 
Force'' in its review and mitigation processes;
    (3) the Department's efforts to assist allies and partners 
with establishing foreign direct investment screening processes 
that are similar to CFIUS;
    (4) the impact on the Department's ability to attract and 
work with startup companies producing emerging technologies 
that receive funding from venture capital companies; and
    (5) any other impacts to the Department associated with 
FIRRMA implementation.

                  Indo-Pacific Reassurance Initiative

    The Department of Defense has identified the Indo-Pacific 
region as a priority theater. Like the European theater, the 
committee believes assuring partners and allies in the Indo-
Pacific region demonstrates the United States' enduring 
commitment and believes the Department must better identify 
efforts to accomplish this objective. The committee notes that 
section 1251 of the National Defense Authorization Act for 
Fiscal Year 2018 (Public Law 115-91), as amended by section 
1253 of the John S. McCain National Defense Authorization Act 
for Fiscal Year 2019 (Public Law 115-232), authorized the Indo-
Pacific Stability Initiative to enhance the security and 
stability of the Indo-Pacific region and required the 
Department of Defense to provide a future years plan for the 
activities, capabilities, and resources necessary enhance U.S. 
presence, improve military infrastructure, logistics, and 
prepositioning of equipment, and increase bilateral and 
multilateral military training and exercises but the Department 
of Defense did not align resources to meet the objectives of 
the initiative.
    Therefore, the committee has identified and authorized not 
less than $3.58 billion in steady-state activities to serve as 
the basis for the Indo-Pacific Reassurance Initiative described 
in a provision elsewhere in this Act, intended to serve a 
similar construct to the European Deterrence Initiative. These 
activities include: (1) $1.39 billion towards optimizing the 
presence of U.S. Armed Forces in the region, including $403.9 
million for Operation & Maintenance, Navy, $106.0 million for 
Operation & Maintenance, Marine Corps, $388.7 million for 
Operation & Maintenance, Army, $5.8 million for Operation & 
Maintenance, Air Force, $87.3 million for Operation & 
Maintenance, Defense Wide, $388.5 million for Research, 
Development, Test & Evaluation, Defense Wide, and $13.7 million 
for Procurement, Marine Corps for combatant command core 
operations, direct mission support, military information 
support operations, cyber activities, theater special 
operations commands, intelligence programs, missile defense 
programs, rotational units, ground and flying hour programs, 
transportation costs, and other activities; (2) $573.7 million 
towards strengthening and maintaining bilateral and 
multilateral military exercises and training with United States 
allies and partner countries in the region, including $302.0 
million for Operation & Maintenance, Navy, $50.3 million for 
Operation & Maintenance, Marine Corps, $62.6 million for 
Operation & Maintenance, Army, $30.4 million for Operation & 
Maintenance, Air Force, and $128.2 million for Operation & 
Maintenance, Defense Wide, for support to service component 
training and exercise programs, and the Joint Staff's Combatant 
Commander Exercise Engagement and Training Transformation 
Program (CE2T2), and other activities; (3) $750.2 million 
towards improving infrastructure in the region to enhance the 
responsiveness of U.S. Armed Forces, including $600.2 million 
of Military Construction, Navy, $89.0 million of Military 
Construction, Army, and $61.0 million of Military Construction, 
Air Force, for military construction projects that directly 
support U.S. Indo-Pacific Command priorities, and planning and 
design for U.S. Indo-Pacific Command posture initiatives; (4) 
$654.7 million towards enhancing the prepositioning of 
equipment and materiel of the U.S. Armed Forces in the region, 
including $553.9 million of Operation & Maintenance, Navy, 
$87.2 million of Operation & Maintenance, Marine Corps, $10.0 
million of Operation & Maintenance, Army, and $3.6 million of 
Operation & Maintenance, Air Force for prepositioning of forces 
and capabilities, and other activities; and (5) $205.8 million 
towards building the defense and security capabilities, 
capacity, and cooperation of allies and partner nations in the 
region, including $193.8 million of Operation & Maintenance, 
Defense Wide, for security cooperation, $5.8 million of 
Operation & Maintenance, Navy, for Pacific Partnership, and 
$6.1 million for the State Partnership Program.
    While the committee considers these activities as the basis 
of the Indo-Pacific Reassurance Initiative, the committee 
expects the Department of Defense to review and further 
identify activities to meet the Initiative's objectives, as 
appropriate. The committee also expects the Department's 
efforts to be guided by a whole-of-government strategy that 
informs resource requirements. To ensure continued 
transparency, the committee will require regularized reports 
and briefings to allow the committee to conduct oversight of 
the Department's progress in expanding the Indo-Pacific 
Reassurance Initiative and ensure the Department is meeting the 
Initiative's objectives.

Military Exchanges between Senior Officers and Officials of the United 
                           States and Taiwan

    The committee endeavors to fully understand the extent of 
the exchange of officials between the United States and Taiwan 
at all levels and the impact of the exchanges on military-to-
military relations and Taiwan's self-defense capabilities. 
Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of Defense to 
provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services not 
later than December 1, 2020, on exchanges between senior 
military officers and senior officials of the United States and 
Taiwan. At a minimum, the briefing shall cover:
    (1) the objectives of military exchanges between senior 
officers and officials of the United States and Taiwan;
    (2) the number of exchanges in the two previous calendar 
years;
    (3) the primary focus of each such exchange;
    (4) a summary of exchanges that were focused on threat 
analysis, military doctrine, force planning, logistical 
support, intelligence collection and analysis, operational 
tactics, techniques, and procedures, and humanitarian and 
disaster relief;
    (5) the number and primary focus of exchanges planned for 
the following calendar year; and
    (6) any other relevant matters the Secretary of Defense 
determines should be included.

          Modernized Operational Concepts and the Indo-Pacific

    The committee recognizes the importance of modernizing 
operational concepts, which the 2018 National Defense Strategy 
describes as the manner in which the United States organizes 
and employs forces to address new technologies and challenges 
anticipated in future conflict to ensure effective deterrence, 
defeat adversary's theories of victory, and, if necessary, 
prevail in conflict. As the National Defense Strategy notes, 
operational concepts are often best developed when the Joint 
Force is able to identify key problems and work to resolve 
them.
    The committee recognizes that the services, U.S. Indo-
Pacific Command, and the Joint Chiefs of Staff are developing 
operational concepts to address challenges in the Indo-Pacific, 
and that the Department is working to provide the committee 
with a report on joint operational concepts and National 
Defense Strategy implementation, as required by Sec. 1708 of 
the FY2020 National Defense Authorization Act. Considering the 
People Liberation Army's extensive military modernization and 
increasingly aggressive behavior, the committee believes the 
Department should ensure that the committee remains apprised of 
the Department's progress in developing joint operational 
concepts for the Indo-Pacific and the application of these 
concepts in specific, critical warfighting scenarios.
    The committee therefore directs the Secretary of Defense to 
provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services by 
December 15, 2020, that assesses the Joint Force's performance 
against strategic competitors and adversaries in a conflict in 
the Western Pacific. This briefing shall address: (1) metrics 
the Department would use to measure success in such a 
contingency, (2) the specific adversary operational concepts 
and capabilities that the Joint Force anticipates are likely to 
create a future military challenge, (3) how these operational 
concepts and capabilities were coordinated and deconflicted 
between the services, (4) current and future capability gaps 
that emerged during the Department's assessments, including 
counter-satellite capabilities, offensive cyber operations, 
undersea warfare capabilities, tiered and layered air defenses, 
intermediate-range missile capabilities, and long-range strike 
capabilities, (5) Department efforts to redress those 
shortfalls, including the development and validation of new 
joint operational concepts, and (6) the anticipated impact 
validated joint operational concepts will have on the measures 
of success discussed in (1) above.

       North Korea's Chemical and Biological Weapons Capabilities

    The committee notes that the Department of Defense has 
acknowledged the threat North Korea poses to national security. 
The committee believes the Department of Defense should work to 
ensure adequate attention is given to North Korea's chemical 
and biological weapons capabilities and assess readiness of the 
United States to combat these emerging threats.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of Defense 
to provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services 
not later than October 30, 2020, on North Korea's chemical and 
biological weapons capabilities and an assessment of the 
Department's readiness to combat these emerging threats. The 
briefing shall include:
    (1) an assessment of relationships North Korea has, and may 
have, that would aid in their procurement or development of 
chemical and biological weapons;
    (2) an assessment of North Korean investments or projects 
likely, or with significant potential, to be converted into 
military assets;
    (3) an assessment of North Korean investments or projects 
of greatest concern with respect to United States national 
security interests;
    (4) a description of any North Korean investments or 
projects located in another country that is linked to military 
cooperation with such country;
    (5) a summary of the North Korean chemical and biological 
weapons program, including research, development, production, 
weaponization, and delivery capabilities; and
    (6) an assessment of the Department's current readiness, or 
deficiencies thereof, to counter a North Korean chemical or 
biological attack on the Korean Peninsula.

Report on Activities and Resources Necessary to Achieve the Objectives 
               of the Indo-Pacific Reassurance Initiative

    The committee believes that the Department of Defense's 
resource requirements should be forward-looking and driven by 
strategy. Additionally, the committee requires a detailed 
summary of those requirements in order to meet its oversight 
responsibilities. Therefore, the committee is including a 
complimentary requirement, similar to a requirement appearing 
elsewhere in this Act, to inform the committee's deliberations 
in fiscal year 2022.
    The committee directs the Secretary of Defense, in 
consultation with the Commander of U.S. Indo-Pacific Command, 
to submit a report to the congressional defense committees not 
later than February 1, 2021, on the activities and resources 
necessary to achieve the objectives of the Indo-Pacific 
Reassurance Initiative. The report shall be unclassified but 
may contain a classified annex. At a minimum, the report shall 
include:
    (1) a summary of progress made towards meeting the 
objectives of the Indo-Pacific Reassurance Initiative.
    (2) an assessment of resource requirements to achieve the 
objectives of the Indo-Pacific Reassurance Initiative.
    (3) an assessment of capabilities requirements to achieve 
the objectives of the Indo-Pacific Reassurance Initiative.
    (4) an assessment of logistics requirements, including 
force enablers, equipment, supplies, storage, and maintenance 
requirements, to achieve the objectives of the initiative.
    (5) the intended force structure and posture of the 
assigned and allocated forces within the area of responsibility 
of the U.S. Indo-Pacific Command for the last fiscal year of 
the plan and the manner in which such force structure and 
posture support the objectives of the Initiative.
    (6) an assessment of logistics requirements, including 
force enablers, equipment, supplies, storage, fuel storage and 
distribution, and maintenance requirements, to achieve the 
objectives of the Indo-Pacific Reassurance Initiative.
    (7) an analysis of the challenges to the ability of the 
United States to deploy necessary forces from the continental 
United States to the Indo-Pacific theater in the event of a 
major contingency, and a description of the plans of the 
Department of Defense, including military exercises, to address 
such challenges.
    (8) an assessment and plan for security cooperation 
investments to enhance the objectives of the Indo-Pacific 
Reassurance Initiative.
    (9) a plan to resource U.S. force posture and capabilities, 
including: (a) the infrastructure capacity of existing 
locations and their ability to accommodate additional U.S. 
forces in the Indo-Pacific; (b) the potential new locations for 
additional U.S. forces in the Indo-Pacific, including an 
assessment of infrastructure and military construction 
resources necessary to accommodate additional U.S. forces in 
the Indo-Pacific; (c) a detailed timeline to achieve desired 
posture requirements; (d) a detailed assessment of the 
resources necessary to achieve the requirements of the plan, 
including specific cost estimates for each project under the 
Indo-Pacific Reassurance Initiative to support optimized 
presence, exercises and training, enhanced prepositioning, 
improved infrastructure, and building partnership capacity; and 
(e) a detailed timeline to achieve the force posture and 
capabilities, including force requirements.
    (10) any other matters the Secretary of Defense determines 
should be included.

  Report on Department of Defense Strategy for Competition below the 
                      Threshold of Armed Conflict

    The committee notes that the 2018 National Defense Strategy 
concludes strategic competition with revisionist states is now 
the primary concern in U.S. national security. The committee 
recognizes that these states employ tactics deliberately 
calibrated to advance their strategic objectives while falling 
below the threshold of armed conflict. For example, China 
employs so-called ``gray zone'' tactics to coerce regional 
actors, undermine the rules-based international order, and 
change the status quo while avoiding conflict.
    The committee also recognizes that responding to such 
tactics is neither solely nor primarily the responsibility of 
the Department of Defense. Rather, the Department's strategy 
should be nested within a broader, unified whole-of government 
strategy to deter such behavior. However, the committee expects 
that a significant proportion of strategic competition with 
revisionist states will occur below the threshold for armed 
conflict.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of Defense 
to submit a report to the House Committee on Armed Services by 
December 1, 2020, on the Department's strategy for competition 
below the threshold of armed conflict. The report shall be 
unclassified without any designation relating to dissemination 
control but may contain a classified annex. At a minimum, the 
report shall include:
    1. The objectives of such strategy;
    2. A summary of any guidance that the Department has 
produced or received concerning whole-of-government efforts to 
implement such strategy in accordance with the National Defense 
Strategy and the National Security Strategy, as applicable;
    3. The Department's primary lines of effort in support of 
such strategy, the methodology used to define such lines of 
effort, and a description of how the Department aligns 
priorities with delegation of tasks;
    4. Skillsets, capabilities, and resources required to 
achieve the objectives of such strategy
    5. Assistance provided to other Departments and Agencies in 
support of a unified, whole-of-government strategy for 
competition below the threshold of armed conflict;
    6. A summary of obstacles identified that hinder the 
Department's ability to achieve the objectives of such 
strategy;
    7. A summary of organizational reforms the Department has 
implemented or considered to achieve the objectives of such 
strategy;
    8. A summary of efforts to integrate the Department's 
activities with partners and allies, international 
organizations, and other non-government entities;
    9. A summary of the Department's efforts to track progress 
on meeting the objectives of such strategy.

   Report on the Use of Unmanned Platforms to Improve Taiwan's Self-
                           Defense Capability

    The committee believes that the unique and close 
relationship between the United States and Taiwan has provided 
significant advantages to both nations' economic and strategic 
well-being for over 50 years. The vital security and strategic 
interests of the United States in the Taiwan Strait and the 
Taiwan Relations Act, which states that it is the policy of the 
United States to provide Taiwan with arms of a defensive 
character, has been a bedrock of this relationship. The 
committee commends the Department of Defense's efforts at 
strengthening this key relationship by working with other U.S. 
departments and agencies, and Taiwan, to enhance Taiwan's self-
defense capability.
    The committee understands that Taiwan is acquiring 
asymmetric capabilities to continue to improve its self-defense 
capabilities. Unmanned systems could create unique dilemmas for 
the People's Liberation Army should the People's Republic of 
China consider resorting to the use of force.
    The committee encourages the Secretary of Defense, in 
coordination with the Secretary of State, to consider options 
to provide affordable, multi-role, medium altitude and 
persistent unmanned air vehicles for its defense. Further, the 
committee directs the Secretary of Defense to provide a 
briefing to the congressional defense committees by February 1, 
2021, to include the following:
    (1) A discussion of how the transfer of defense articles, 
such as unmanned platforms that can provide persistent ISR and 
maritime domain awareness, would enhance Taiwan's Overall 
Defense Concept;
    (2) A summary of the Department's efforts to assist Taiwan 
in effectively integrating ISR capabilities into its military 
forces; and
    (3) An assessment of how unmanned systems could improve 
Taiwan's self-defense capabilities, including to threats 
presented by the People's Republic of China.

                Report on Ties between Russia and China

    The Department of Defense has acknowledged that China and 
Russia are increasingly working in cooperation on a wide range 
of matters, including economically, politically, and 
militarily; and that the Department believes the growing ties 
between Russia and China are challenging the rules-based order 
and present a threat to U.S. national security interests. The 
committee notes that the National Defense Strategy highlights 
the joint force's eroding competitive edge against China and 
Russia. The committee endeavors to fully understand the extent 
of the ties between Russia and China. Therefore, the committee 
directs the Director of National Intelligence, in consultation 
with the Secretary of Defense, to submit a report to the 
congressional defense committees and the congressional 
intelligence committees by March 1, 2021, on the relationship 
between China and Russia. The report shall include:
    (1) an assessment of the military relationship between 
Russia and China, including military exercises, arms sales, 
security agreements, and joint military educational exchanges;
    (2) an assessment of the strength and impacts of increased 
defense cooperation, coordination, interoperability, and 
increased proficiencies between Russia and China, including 
defense industrial cooperation on dual-use technologies; 
bilateral training and exercises; cyberspace and electronic 
warfare capabilities; gray zone activities; coordination and 
capability-sharing; and strategic goals of conventional and 
non-conventional arms and arms control agreements;
    (3) an assessment of the locations where Russia and China 
are enhancing their respective military and strategic presence 
and access around the world and the tools and mechanisms Russia 
and China are using to increase such presence and access;
    (4) an assessment of the potential implications to United 
States military and security operations of increased defense 
cooperation, coordination, and interoperability between Russia 
and China as described in paragraphs (2) and (3);
    (5) an assessment of the economic ties between Russia and 
China, including collaboration or cooperation on China's One 
Belt One Road initiative;
    (6) an assessment of cultural exchanges between Russia and 
China;
    (7) an assessment of the educational and professional 
exchanges between Russia and China, to include scientists, 
engineers, academics, and other technical professionals;
    (8) an assessment of competing interests between Russia and 
China that limit collaboration and cooperation between the two 
countries; and
    (9) an assessment of whether, and if so, to what degree 
cooperation between Russia and China is eroding the United 
States competitive edge or its influence around the world.
    The report required shall be submitted in unclassified 
form, but may include a classified annex.

        Security Sector Assistance Training for Foreign Students

    The committee is aware that the United States has trained 
foreign partner forces for decades and the Department of 
Defense conducts security sector assistance related training 
for international military students from around the world. The 
committee supports the goal that training international 
military students advances U.S. national security interests by 
building defense partnerships and facilitating interoperability 
with our foreign partners. The committee is aware that the 
Secretary of Defense directed a review of vetting procedures 
for all international military students who train in the United 
States. The committee supports such a review. The committee is 
aware that the Department already implemented certain 
modifications to vetting procedures, and that additional 
modifications may be forthcoming, which may impact the 
population of international military students training in the 
United States.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of Defense 
to provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services 
not later than December 30, 2020, on foreign partner force 
training in the United States. Such briefing shall, at a 
minimum, include results of the Secretary's review of vetting 
procedures for international military students, any changes to 
policies and procedures as a result of such review, the current 
locations for international military student training 
(including flight training), the number of international 
military students being trained at each location, the type of 
training, the potential impact of modified vetting procedures 
to the international military student population at all 
locations, and measures being taken to ensure that the goals of 
training international military students in the United States 
are achieved.

                        Taiwan Defense Relations

    The committee affirms the Taiwan Relations Act and the 
``Six Assurances'' as the foundation of United States-Taiwan 
relations and acknowledges the need to maintain a strong and 
vibrant defense relationship with the government of Taiwan. The 
committee notes with concern the increasingly aggressive 
actions by the People's Republic of China towards Taiwan and 
believes this behavior is inconsistent with China's past 
commitments to ensure peace and stability in the Indo-Pacific 
region. The committee continues to support Taiwan's development 
of a capable and modern defense force to resist external 
coercion and preserve its security and economic prosperity.
    The committee strongly supports the efforts of the 
Department of Defense in facilitating the provision of defense 
articles, and other forms of exchange and cooperation, that 
enhance the capabilities and readiness necessary for Taiwan's 
self-defense. The committee further encourages the Department 
to deepen and expand its defense cooperation with Taiwan 
through practical military training and exercises, air and 
naval engagements, professional military education, and 
exchanges between senior defense officials and general officers 
for the purposes of enhancing cooperation, defense planning, 
and interoperability for the military forces of the United 
States and Taiwan.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of Defense 
to provide the House Committee on Armed Services a briefing, no 
later than December 1, 2020, on the Department's policies with 
respect to commencing bilateral military exercises with Taiwan, 
including naval and air exercises that would seek to enhance 
cross-strait deterrence, and utilizing ship visits, as 
appropriate. The briefing should also include an update on 
military engagements planned for the next year, as well as any 
other matters that the Secretary of Defense deems appropriate 
to deepen and expand defense cooperation with Taiwan.

                    United States Strategy on China

    The committee believes that China is, and will remain, a 
strategic competitor for the foreseeable future. The committee 
also believes all elements of United States national power are 
required to address concerns raised by China's comprehensive 
strategy exercising its diplomatic, informational, military, 
and economic power. To that end, the committee is concerned 
that the U.S. Government's current efforts to compete with 
China are often disjointed, and should be congruent and 
sufficiently coordinated.
    The committee believes that the report provided to Congress 
on the United States' strategic approach to the People's 
Republic of China, required by section 1261 of the John S. 
McCain National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2019 
(Public Law 115-232), while late, is a first step in 
articulating a whole of government approach to competition with 
China. However, the committee notes that the report did not 
identify resources necessary to implement the strategy and the 
annual budget submission to Congress did not highlight new 
programs and projects proposed to be funded that relate to the 
strategy. The committee believes there needs to be continued 
attention and focus on implementing a whole-of-government 
strategy, U.S. Government's efforts to compete with China 
should be coordinated and appropriately resourced across 
departments and agencies, and the Administration should 
continue to keep the U.S. Congress informed on the 
implementation of the strategy.

   Utilization of Smaller Vessels in Indo-Pacific Area of Operations

    The committee remains concerned that the Navy has yet to 
provide an updated shipbuilding plan as required by section 231 
of title 10, United States Code, or a briefing on the updated 
Integrated Force Structure Assessment. Without the requisite 
information, the committee is unable to properly assess whether 
vessels smaller than 200 meters in length may have a forward 
deployed mission set, such as supporting Expeditionary Advanced 
Base Operations. Therefore, the committee directs the Chief of 
Naval Operations to provide a briefing to the House Committee 
on Armed Services not later than February 1, 2021, on the 
feasibility of utilizing smaller vessels in the Indo-Pacific to 
patrol coastal areas and enhance presence in a contested 
environment.

                      West African Airlift Support

    The committee notes the importance of maintaining presence 
in West Africa for counterterrorism efforts and partner 
capacity building and further recognizes the need to provide 
U.S. forces on the ground with vital resources for mission 
accomplishment and life support, especially for quick 
evacuation of wounded personnel. The committee encourages the 
Department to evaluate the operational resources needed to 
support these missions while also providing adequate assurance 
for the safety of U.S. servicemembers and partner nation 
forces. Any reduced force levels in Africa could have an impact 
on the ability of troops on the ground to receive needed 
airlift support, especially casualty and medical evacuation 
(CASEVAC and MEDEVAC) support, and would increase risk to 
American lives. Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary 
of Defense to provide a briefing to the House Committee on 
Armed Services, not later than December 15, 2020, on the 
Department's plan to ensure airlift support for deployed 
servicemembers and partner nation forces in West Africa, 
including--(1) the number of remaining aircraft, both fixed-
wing and rotary-wing, to support CASEVAC and MEDEVAC needs in 
theater; (2) a risk analysis to support the reduction of 
CASEVAC services from the levels provided in fiscal year 2019; 
(3) courses of action to maintain the safety and airlift 
support needs of remaining U.S. servicemembers; and (4) any 
other matters the Secretary considers relevant.

                         LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS


                  Subtitle A--Assistance and Training


    Section 1201--Modification and Extension of Support of Special 
                    Operations for Irregular Warfare

    This section modifies section 1202 of the National Defense 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2018 (Public Law 115-91), as 
most recently amended by section 1207 of the National Defense 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2020 (Public Law 116-92), by 
striking ``$10,000,000'' and inserting ``$15,000,000''; and by 
striking ``2023'' and inserting ``2025''. This section also 
expands notification elements to require reporting on steps 
taken to ensure that the recipients of the support have not and 
will not engage in human rights violations or violations of the 
Geneva Conventions of 1949.

 Section 1202--Department of Defense Participation in European Program 
      on Multilateral Exchange of Surface Transportation Services

    This section would authorize the Secretary of Defense to 
participate in the Surface Exchange of Services Program of the 
Movement Coordination Centre Europe.

 Section 1203--Extension of Authority to Transfer Excess High Mobility 
           Multipurpose Wheeled Vehicles to Foreign Countries

    This section would extend and modify section 1276 of the 
National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2018 (Public 
Law 115-91).

  Section 1204--Modification and Extension of Update of Department of 
                  Defense Freedom of Navigation Report

    This section would amend section 1275 of the National 
Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2017 (Public Law 114-
328) to require such report on a biannual basis, require 
additional elements to such report, and extend the reporting 
requirement to December 31, 2025.

       Section 1205--Extension of Report on Workforce Development

    This section would extend a report on Department of Defense 
security cooperation workforce development, as required by 
section 1250 of the National Defense Authorization Act for 
Fiscal Year 2017 (Public Law 114-328), by 5 years.

        Subtitle B--Matters Relating to Afghanistan and Pakistan


Section 1211--Extension and Modification of Authority for Reimbursement 
  of Certain Coalition Nations for Support Provided to United States 
                          Military Operations

    This section would extend through December 31, 2021, the 
authority to make Coalition Support Fund payments under section 
1233 of the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 
2008 (Public Law 110-181) as most recently amended by section 
1217 of the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 
2020 (Public Law 116-92).

  Section 1212--Extension of the Afghan Special Immigrant Visa Program

    This section would extend the Afghan Allies Protection Act 
of 2009 (Public Law 111-8) as well as extend an expiring 
report.
    The committee notes the critical importance of the Special 
Immigrant Visa Program for U.S. Government operations in 
Afghanistan. Last year's modification and extension reinforce 
the importance of this program by authorizing 4,000 additional 
visas and returning applicant eligibility requirements to the 
original criteria set forth in the Afghan Allies Protection Act 
of 2009. This year, the committee extended Department of 
Defense and Department of State reporting requirements to 
ensure the program is executed efficiently. The committee 
remains committed to Afghan citizens who, at great personal 
risk, support United States operations in Afghanistan.

   Section 1213--Limitation on Use of Funds to Reduce Deployment to 
                              Afghanistan

    This section would require the Administration to submit a 
comprehensive, interagency report and certification prior to a 
drawdown of U.S. military personnel in Afghanistan below troop 
levels of 8,000 and 4,000. The Secretary of Defense may waive 
the reporting requirement in this provision if it is vital to 
the national security interests of the United States or 
necessary due to an imminent and extraordinary threat to 
members of the United States Armed Forces.

           Section 1214--Report on Operation Freedom Sentinel

    This section would direct the Secretary of Defense to 
provide a report on Operation Freedom Sentinel activities to 
the House Committee on Armed Services and the Senate Committee 
on Armed Services not later than 90 days after the date of the 
enactment of this Act and with each Presidential budget request 
for the following 2 fiscal years. The report would include 
specific direct war requests, costs that occur inside and 
outside the geographical boundaries of Afghanistan, activities 
that fund the services, as well as transportation and 
logistical support.

         Subtitle C--Matters Relating to Syria, Iraq, and Iran


   Section 1221--Extension and Modification of Authority to Provide 
       Assistance to Counter the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria

    This section would modify section 1236 of the Carl Levin 
and Howard P. Buck'' McKeon National Defense Authorization Act 
for Fiscal Year 2015 (Public Law 113-291) to provide assistance 
to the security forces of the Government of Iraq to counter the 
Islamic State of Iraq and Syria and extend the authority 
through December 31, 2021. This section would also require the 
Secretary of Defense to submit an annual report detailing the 
weapons and equipment purchased using the Counter-ISIS Train 
and Equip Fund, as well as the incremental costs for operations 
and maintenance for Operation Inherent Resolve (OIR) in the 
previous fiscal year. This section would also require the 
Department to submit annual budget justifications for OIR for 
fiscal years 2022 and 2023.

   Section 1222--Extension of Authority to Provide Assistance to the 
                        Vetted Syrian Opposition

    This section would extend and modify section 1209 of the 
Carl Levin and Howard P. Buck'' McKeon National Defense 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2015 (Public Law 113-291), by 
extending the authority to support vetted Syrian groups and 
individuals through December 30, 2021, and the required notice 
before the provision of assistance. This section would also 
direct the Secretary of Defense to certify to the House 
Committee on Armed Services, the Senate Committee on Armed 
Services, the House Committee on Foreign Affairs, and the 
Senate Committee on Foreign Relations within 30 days of the 
date of the enactment of this Act that no U.S. military forces 
are being used or have been used for the extraction, transport, 
transfer, or sale of oil from Syria.

    Section 1223--Extension of Authority to Support Operations and 
        Activities of the Office of Security Cooperation in Iraq

    This section would extend section 1215 of the National 
Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2012 (10 U.S.C. 113), 
the Office of Security Cooperation-Iraq authority, as most 
recently amended by section 1223 of the National Defense 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2020 (Public Law 116-92), 
through fiscal year 2021. It would limit the expenditure of 
funds pending the submission of the certification required by 
section 1223 of Public Law 116-92.

 Section 1224--Prohibition on Provision of Weapons and Other Forms of 
                    Support to Certain Organizations

    This section would prohibit the use of funds authorized to 
be appropriated by this Act to the Department of Defense for 
fiscal year 2021 to provide weapons or any form of support to 
al-Qaeda, the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria, Jabhat Fateh al 
Sham, Hamas, Hizballah, Palestinian Islamic Jihad, al-Shabaab, 
Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps, or any individual or group 
associated with these organization.

   Section 1225--Consolidated Budget Display and Report on Operation 
                             Spartan Shield

    This section would require the Secretary of Defense to 
provide a report to the House Committee on Armed Services not 
later than 180 days after the date of the enactment of this 
Act, and annually thereafter in fiscal years 2022 and 2023, on 
Operation Spartan Shield. This section would also require the 
Department to submit annual budget justifications for Operation 
Spartan Shield for fiscal years 2022 and 2023.

  Section 1226--Sense of Congress on Peshmerga Forces as a Partner in 
                       Operation Inherent Resolve

    This section would express the sense of Congress regarding 
Peshmerga forces of the Kurdistan Region of Iraq.

                 Subtitle D--Matters Relating to Russia


    Section 1231--Prohibition on Availability of Funds Relating to 
           Sovereignty of the Russian Federation over Crimea

    This section would extend by 1 year the prohibition imposed 
by section 1245 of the National Defense Authorization Act for 
Fiscal Year 2016 (Public Law 114-92), as amended by section 
1232 of the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 
2020 (Public Law 116-92). This section would prohibit the use 
of fiscal year 2021 funds to implement any activity that 
recognizes the sovereignty of Russia over Crimea. This section 
would also allow the Secretary of Defense, with the concurrence 
of the Secretary of State, to waive the prohibition if the 
Secretary of Defense determines that doing so would be in the 
national security interest of the United States and submits a 
notification to the House Committee on Armed Services, the 
Senate Committee on Armed Services, the Senate Committee on 
Foreign Relations, and the House Committee on Foreign Affairs.

 Section 1232--Extension of Limitation on Military Cooperation between 
              the United States and the Russian Federation

    This section would extend for 1 year section 1232(a) of the 
National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2017 (Public 
Law 114-328), as most recently amended by section 1231 of the 
National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2020 (Public 
Law 116-92). This section would limit the use of fiscal year 
2021 funds for bilateral military-to-military cooperation 
between the Government of the United States and Russia until 
the Secretary of Defense, in coordination with the Secretary of 
State, provides a certification to appropriate congressional 
committees relating to certain actions by Russia. This 
extension includes a rule of construction that nothing in the 
provision shall be construed to limit bilateral military-to-
military dialogue for the purpose of reducing the risk of 
conflict.

Section 1233--Modification and Extension of Ukraine Security Assistance 
                               Initiative

    This section would extend by one year section 1250 of the 
National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2016 (Public 
Law 114-92), most recently amended by section 1244 of the 
National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2020 (Public 
Law 116-92), to authorize the Secretary of Defense to provide 
security assistance and intelligence support to the Government 
of Ukraine, with the concurrence of the Secretary of State. 
This section would also authorize $250.0 million to carry out 
this authority in fiscal year 2021.
    This section would extend for 2 years the reports on 
military assistance to Ukraine required in section 1275(e) of 
the Carl Levin and Howard P. ``Buck'' McKeon National Defense 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2015 (Public Law 113-291).

   Section 1234--United States Participation in the Open Skies Treaty

    This section would require that in the event of withdrawal 
by the United States from the Open Skies Treaty, the Secretary 
of Defense and Secretary of State jointly shall submit to the 
appropriate defense committees either:
    (1) a notification that agreements are in place with other 
state parties that host U.S. military forces and assets to 
ensure that after such withdrawal the U.S. will be provided 
sufficient notice of observation flights over the territory of 
those state parties under the Treaty; or,
    (2) if agreements are not in place, a description of how 
the U.S. will consistently and reliably be provided sufficient 
warning of observation flights described above, including a 
description of assets, personnel, and policy implications of 
using such other means.
    This section would also require the Secretary of Defense 
and Secretary of State, in coordination with the Director of 
National Intelligence, to jointly submit a report of the 
impacts of potential future U.S. withdrawal on:
    (1) collaboration with allies, U.S. leadership in the North 
Atlantic Treaty Organization, and continued dialogue with 
Russia that the Treaty offers,
    (2) how imagery captured under the Treaty will be replaced,
    (3) how intelligence gained under the Treaty will be 
replaced, and
    (4) the ability of the U.S. to influence future decisions 
on certification of new sensors within the Treaty that could 
pose a threat to deployed U.S. military personnel and assets.
    The report would also include unedited correspondence 
between the U.S. and Treaty state parties with respect to 
potential U.S. withdrawal.

            Subtitle E--Matters Relating to Europe and NATO


Section 1241--Limitations on Use of Funds to Reduce the Total Number of 
Members of the Armed Forces Serving on Active Duty Who Are Stationed in 
  Germany, to Reduce the Total Number of Members of the Armed Forces 
  Stationed in Europe, and to Divest Military Infrastructure in Europe

    This section would prohibit the use of funds authorized to 
be appropriated or otherwise made available to the Department 
of Defense to reduce the total number of members of the Armed 
Forces serving on active duty stationed in Germany, or to 
reduce the total number of members of the Armed Forces serving 
on active duty stationed in Europe, below the levels present on 
June 10, 2020, until 180 days after the date on which the 
Secretary of Defense and the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of 
Staff have separately certified and submitted to the 
congressional defense committees certain requirements and 
assessments.
    This section would also prohibit the Secretary of Defense 
from taking action to divest infrastructure or real property in 
Europe under the operational control of the Department of 
Defense unless the Secretary certifies that no military 
requirement for the future use of the infrastructure or real 
property is foreseeable. The limitation on divestment would 
sunset 5 years after the date of enactment.

 Section 1242--Sense of Congress on Support for Coordinated Action to 
                  Ensure the Security of Baltic Allies

    This section would express the sense of Congress regarding 
defense and security activities in Estonia, Latvia, and 
Lithuania.

  Section 1243--Sense of Congress on Support for Estonia, Latvia, and 
                               Lithuania

    This section would express the sense of Congress regarding 
the United States support for Estonia, Latvia, and Lithuania.

         Section 1244--Sense of Congress on Support for Georgia

    This section would express the sense of Congress regarding 
the United States support for Georgia.

   Section 1245--Sense of Congress on Burden Sharing by Partners and 
                                 Allies

    This section would express the sense of Congress regarding 
burden sharing by United States partners and allies.

  Section 1246--Sense of Congress on NATO's Response to the COVID-19 
                                Pandemic

    This section would express the sense of Congress regarding 
NATO's response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

        Subtitle F--Matters Relating to the Indo-Pacific Region


           Section 1251--Indo-Pacific Reassurance Initiative

    This section would direct the Secretary of Defense to carry 
out a program of prioritized activities to reassure United 
States allies and partners, appropriately prioritize activities 
and resources to implement the National Defense Strategy, and 
enhance the ability of Congress to provide oversight of and 
support to Department of Defense efforts. It would define five 
objectives for an Indo-Pacific Reassurance Initiative: (1) 
optimizing the presence of U.S. Armed Forces in the Indo-
Pacific; (2) strengthening and maintaining bilateral and 
multilateral military exercises and training with partners and 
allies in the Indo-Pacific; (3) improving infrastructure in the 
Indo-Pacific to enhance the responsiveness of U.S. Armed 
Forces; (4) enhancing the prepositioning of equipment and 
materiel in the Indo-Pacific; and (5) building the defense and 
security capabilities, capacity, and cooperation of partners 
and allies in the Indo-Pacific. This section would also require 
a future years plan on activities and resources of the 
Initiative, a budget justification for the Initiative, an end 
of fiscal year report, and a briefing on funds obligated for 
the Initiative.

Section 1252--Limitation on Use of Funds to Reduce the Total Number of 
Members of the Armed Forces Serving on Active Duty Who Are Deployed to 
                              South Korea

    This section would prohibit the use of funds authorized to 
be appropriated by this Act to reduce the number of members of 
the Armed Forces serving on Active Duty in the Republic of 
Korea below 28,500 until 180 days after the date that the 
Secretary of Defense certifies to the congressional defense 
committees that such a reduction is in the national security 
interest of the United States, will not significantly undermine 
the security of the United States' allies in the region, is 
commensurate with a reduction in the threat posed by North 
Korea, that South Korea is capable of deterring a conflict, and 
the Secretary has appropriately consulted with allies of the 
United States regarding such a reduction.

Section 1253--Implementation of GAO Recommendations on Preparedness of 
 United States Forces to Counter North Korean Chemical and Biological 
                                Weapons

    This section would direct the Secretary of Defense to 
submit a plan not later than 1 year after the date of the 
enactment of this Act to the congressional defense committees 
to address the recommendations in the U.S. Government 
Accountability Office's (GAO) report on Preparedness of U.S. 
Forces to Counter North Korean Chemical and Biological Weapons 
(GAO-20-79C). This section would also require the Secretary to 
begin implementation of the plan not later than 18 months after 
the date of the enactment of this Act. The Secretary may decide 
not to implement one of the recommendations in the report, but 
must submit justification for why not, and what else the 
Department of Defense will do to address the conditions 
underlying the recommendation.
    The committee is concerned by many issues highlighted by 
GAO, and believes the Department's preparedness for a 
significant state-level weapons of mass destruction event is 
wholly inadequate. The Department's men and women in uniform 
must be trained and equipped to successfully operate and 
perform in a contaminated environment.

Section 1254--Public Reporting of Chinese Military Companies Operating 
                          in the United States

    This section would require a list of each entity determined 
to be directly or indirectly owned, controlled, or beneficially 
owned by the People's Liberation Army, or identified as a 
military-civil fusion contributor to the Chinese defense 
industrial base, engaged in providing commercial services, 
manufacturing, producing, or exporting, and operating directly 
or indirectly in the United States. It would also require the 
Secretary to publish such list in the Federal Register.

 Section 1255--Independent Study on the Defense Industrial Base of the 
                       People's Republic of China

    This section would require the Secretary of Defense to 
enter into a contract with a federally funded research and 
development center to conduct a study on the defense industrial 
base of the People's Republic of China.

Section 1256--Report on China's One Belt, One Road Initiative in Africa

    This section would direct the Secretary of Defense to 
provide a report not later than 1 year after the date of the 
enactment of this Act on China's One Belt, One Road Initiative 
in Africa. Such report shall include a strategy to address 
impacts on United States military and defense interests in 
Africa.

  Section 1257--Sense of Congress on Enhancement of the United States-
                      Taiwan Defense Relationship

    This section would express the sense of the Congress that 
Taiwan is a vital partner of the United States and, consistent 
with the Taiwan Relations Act (22 U.S.C. 3301), the United 
States should continue to strengthen defense and security 
cooperation in support of Taiwan maintaining a sufficient self-
defense capability.

 Section 1258--Report on Supply Chain Security Cooperation with Taiwan

    This section would require a report on the feasibility of 
establishing a United States-Taiwan working group for supply 
chain security, the Department's current and future plans to 
engage with Taiwan on activities ensuring supply chain 
security, and obstacles for conducting such activities.

     Section 1259--Report on United States-Taiwan Medical Security 
                              Partnership

    This section would direct the Secretary of Defense to 
conduct an assessment of the feasibility of developing a U.S.-
Taiwan medical security partnership on issues related to 
pandemic preparedness.

                       Subtitle G--Other Matters


    Section 1261--Provision of Goods and Services to Kwajalein Atoll

    This section would authorize the Secretary of the Army, 
subject to the concurrence of the Secretary of State, to 
provide goods and services to the Government of the Republic of 
the Marshall Islands and to other eligible patrons at Kwajalein 
Atoll. It would also authorize the Secretary of the Army to 
collect reimbursement from the Government of the Republic of 
the Marshall Island or eligible patrons for such goods and 
services in an amount that does not exceed the costs to the 
United States for providing such goods or services and does not 
exceed $7,000,000 annually.

  Section 1262--Annual Briefings on Certain Foreign Military Bases of 
                              Adversaries

    This section directs the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of 
Staff and the Secretary of Defense to provide an annual 
assessment of covered foreign military bases, including such 
bases of China, Russia, and Iran, identifying the activities 
and capabilities at such base and the impact on U.S. national 
security interests.

  Section 1263--Report on Progress of the Department of Defense with 
Respect to Denying a Fait Accompli by a Strategic Competitor Against a 
                        Covered Defense Partner

    This section would require a report not later than April 
30, 2021, and annually thereafter until 2026, on improving the 
ability of the United States Armed Forces to conduct combined 
joint operations to deny the ability of a strategic competitor 
to execute a fait accompli against a covered defense partner.

Section 1264--Modification to Requirements of the Initiative to Support 
    Protection of National Security Academic Researchers from Undue 
                  Influence and Other Security Threats

    This section would modify section 1286(d)(1) of the John S. 
McCain National Defense Authorization Act (Public Law 115-292) 
to include basic research in the defense research and 
development activities for which the Secretary of Defense must 
establish streamlined procedures to collect appropriate 
information relating to individuals, including United States 
citizens and foreign nationals, for the purpose of maintaining 
appropriate security controls over research activities, 
technical information, and intellectual property. This section 
would also require the Secretary to submit to the congressional 
defense committees by January 1, 2021, the required list of 
Chinese and Russian academic institutions with a history of 
improper technology transfer and other malign behavior, and to 
make the unclassified portion publicly available and 
searchable.

         Section 1265--Report on Directed Use of Fishing Fleets

    This section would direct the Office of Naval Intelligence 
to conduct an assessment of fishing fleets as the so-called 
``third arm'' of foreign navies, the geopolitical challenge 
posed by China's hybrid warfare activities, and the national 
security threat to U.S. interests and those of our partners in 
the region posed by IUU fishing and other illegal activity at 
sea.

    Section 1266--Expanding the State Partnership Program in Africa

    This section would require the Secretary of Defense, in 
coordination with the Chief of the National Guard Bureau, to 
seek to build partner capacity and interoperability in the 
United States Africa Command area of responsibility through 
increased partnerships with countries on the African continent, 
military-to-military engagements, and traditional activities of 
the combatant commands.

   Section 1267--Report Relating to Reduction in the Total Number of 
  United States Armed Forces Deployed to United States Africa Command 
                         Area of Responsibility

    This section would require a report to Congress 60 days 
after enactment of this Act on the average total number of 
United States Armed Forces under the direct authority of the 
Commander of United States Africa Command and deployed to the 
United States Africa Command area of responsibility and a 
follow up report not later than 90 days after enactment of this 
Act should the Department reduce the total number of United 
States Armed Forces under the direct authority of the Commander 
of United States Africa Command and deployed to the United 
States Africa Command area of responsibility.

   Section 1268--Report on Enhancing Partnerships between the United 
                      States and African Countries

    This section would require a report on the activities and 
resources required to enhance security and economic 
partnerships between the United States and African countries.

         Section 1269--Sense of Congress with Respect to Qatar

    This section would express the sense of Congress regarding 
Qatar.

 Section 1270--Sense of Congress on United States Military Support for 
       and Participation in the Multinational Force and Observers

    This section would express the sense of Congress regarding 
United States military support for and participation in the 
Multinational Force and Observers.

Section 1271--Prohibition on Support for Military Participation against 
                              the Houthis

    This section would prohibit funds to provide logistical 
support for Saudi-led coalition strikes against the Houthis in 
Yemen. This section would also prohibit funds for any 
Department of Defense civilian, military, or contractor 
personnel to command, coordinate, participate in the movement 
of, or accompany the regular or irregular military forces of 
the Saudi and Emirati-led coalition forces engaged in 
hostilities or in situations where there exists an imminent 
threat of engagement in hostilities with the Houthis in Yemen, 
unless the President has obtained the authority to do so in 
accordance with Section 8(a) of the War Powers Resolution (50 
U.S.C 1547(a)). This prohibitions does not apply to United 
States Armed Forces engaged in operations against al-Qaeda and 
associated forces.

  Section 1272--Rule of Construction Relating to Use of Military Force

    This section would establish that nothing in this Act or 
any amendment made by this Act may be construed to authorize 
the use of military force.

                TITLE XIII--COOPERATIVE THREAT REDUCTION

                       ITEMS OF SPECIAL INTEREST


         Importance of the Cooperative Threat Reduction Program

    The budget request included $238.5 million in Operation and 
Maintenance, Defense-Wide, for the Cooperative Threat Reduction 
Account. The committee is concerned with the Department of 
Defense's reduction to the Cooperative Threat Reduction Program 
by 30 percent from the fiscal year 2020 budget request. Last 
year, the committee supported a 10 percent increase to the 
program due to its critical mission of ensuring our national 
security by preventing the proliferation of weapons of mass 
destruction, including chemical, biological, radiological, and 
nuclear threats. At a time when the United States is struggling 
to respond to the spread of a highly infectious new virus, the 
committee is alarmed by the Department's significant reduction 
in the budget request for a mission of detecting and 
confronting biological threats to the United States. The 
committee urges the Department to re-calibrate its focus on 
this vital mission. The committee therefore recommends $373.7 
million, an increase of $135.2 million, in Operation and 
Maintenance, Defense-Wide for the Cooperative Threat Reduction 
Account, to restore funding back to the fiscal year 2020 
enacted amount.

                         LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS


Section 1301--Funding Allocations; Specification of Cooperative Threat 
                            Reduction Funds

    This section would allocate specific funding amounts for 
each program under the Department of Defense Cooperative Threat 
Reduction (CTR) Program from within the overall $373.7 million 
that the committee would authorize for the Cooperative Threat 
Reduction Program. The allocation under this section reflects 
the amount of the budget request for fiscal year 2021.
    This section would specify that funds authorized to be 
appropriated to the Department of Defense for the Cooperative 
Threat Reduction Program, established under the Department of 
Defense Cooperative Threat Reduction Act (50 U.S.C. 3711), 
would be available for obligation for fiscal years 2021, 2022, 
and 2023.

                    TITLE XIV--OTHER AUTHORIZATIONS

                         LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS


                     Subtitle A--Military Programs


                  Section 1401--Working Capital Funds

    This section would authorize appropriations for Defense 
Working Capital Funds at the levels identified in section 4501 
of division D of this Act.

    Section 1402--Chemical Agents and Munitions Destruction, Defense

    This section would authorize appropriations for Chemical 
Agents and Munitions Destruction, Defense at the levels 
identified in section 4501 of division D of this Act.

 Section 1403--Drug Interdiction and Counter-Drug Activities, Defense-
                                  Wide

    This section would authorize appropriations for Drug 
Interdiction and Counter-Drug Activities, Defense-wide at the 
levels identified in section 4501 of division D of this Act.

                Section 1404--Defense Inspector General

    This section would authorize appropriations for the Office 
of the Inspector General at the levels identified in section 
4501 of division D of this Act.

                  Section 1405--Defense Health Program

    This section would authorize appropriations for the Defense 
Health Program at the levels identified in section 4501 of 
division D of this Act.

              Section 1406--National Defense Sealift Fund

    This section would authorize appropriations for the 
National Defense Sealift Fund at the levels identified in 
section 4501 of division D of this Act.

                       Subtitle B--Other Matters


 Section 1411--Authority for Transfer of Funds to Joint Department of 
 Defense-Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Facility Demonstration 
     Fund for Captain James A. Lovell Health Care Center, Illinois

    This section would authorize the Department of Defense to 
transfer funds from the Defense Health Program into Joint 
Department of Defense-Department of Veterans Affairs Medical 
Facility Demonstration Fund for the Captain James A. Lovell 
Federal Health Care Center.

    Section 1412--Authorization of Appropriations for Armed Forces 
                            Retirement Home

    This section would authorize appropriations for fiscal year 
2021 from the Armed Forces Retirement Home Trust Fund in the 
amount of $70.3 million for the operation of the Armed Forces 
Retirement Home.

   TITLE XV--AUTHORIZATION OF ADDITIONAL APPROPRIATIONS FOR OVERSEAS 
                         CONTINGENCY OPERATIONS

                       ITEMS OF SPECIAL INTEREST


              National Guard and Reserve Equipment Account

    The budget request contained no funding for a National 
Guard and Reserve Component equipment account. The committee 
has long been concerned about the availability of modern 
equipment needed to ensure the relevance and readiness of the 
National Guard and Reserve Components as an operational reserve 
and for their domestic support missions. The committee notes 
that the annual National Guard and Reserve Equipment Reports 
over the last several years identify continuing shortages in 
modernized equipment and challenges associated with efficiently 
fulfilling combat readiness training requirements.
    The committee believes additional funds would help manage 
strategic risk and eliminate identified critical dual-use 
equipment shortfalls. The committee expects these funds to be 
used for the purposes of, but not limited to, the procurement 
and modernization of High Mobility Multipurpose Wheeled 
Vehicles; Family of Medium Tactical Vehicles trucks; fighter 
pilot helmet mounted display modernization; F-16 Active 
Electronically Scanned Array radar; C-130J and C-130 Air 
National Guard recapitalization; C-130 propeller upgrades; C-
130 firefighting system upgrades; radar warning receivers for 
F/A-18 aircraft; UH-60 conversions and UH-60M Black Hawk 
helicopters; UH-72 Lakota helicopters; and other critical dual-
use, unfunded procurement items for the National Guard and 
Reserve Components.
    The committee recommends $150.0 million for National Guard 
and Reserve equipment.

                         LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS


              Subtitle A--Authorization of Appropriations


                         Section 1501--Purpose

    This section would establish the purpose of this title and 
make authorization of appropriations available upon enactment 
of this Act for the Department of Defense, in addition to 
amounts otherwise authorized in this Act, to provide for 
additional authorization of funds due to overseas contingency 
operations and other additional funding requirements.

                       Section 1502--Procurement

    This section would authorize additional appropriations for 
procurement at the levels identified in section 4102 of 
division D of this Act.

       Section 1503--Research, Development, Test, and Evaluation

    This section would authorize additional appropriations for 
research, development, test, and evaluation at the levels 
identified in section 4202 of division D of this Act.

                Section 1504--Operation and Maintenance

    This section would authorize additional appropriations for 
operation and maintenance programs at the levels identified in 
section 4302 of division D of this Act.

                    Section 1505--Military Personnel

    This section would authorize additional appropriations for 
military personnel at the levels identified in section 4402 of 
division D of this Act.

                  Section 1506--Working Capital Funds

    This section would authorize additional appropriations for 
Defense Working Capital Funds at the levels identified in 
section 4502 of division D of this Act.

 Section 1507--Drug Interdiction and Counter-Drug Activities, Defense-
                                  Wide

    This section would authorize additional appropriations for 
Drug Interdiction and Counter-Drug Activities, Defense-Wide, at 
the levels identified in section 4502 of division D of this 
Act.

                Section 1508--Defense Inspector General

    This section would authorize additional appropriations for 
the Office of the Inspector General at the levels identified in 
section 4502 of division D of this Act.

                  Section 1509--Defense Health Program

    This section would authorize additional appropriations for 
the Defense Health Program at the levels identified in section 
4502 of division D of this Act.

                     Subtitle B--Financial Matters


          Section 1511--Treatment as Additional Authorizations

    This section would state that amounts authorized to be 
appropriated by this title are in addition to amounts otherwise 
authorized to be appropriated by this Act.

                Section 1512--Special Transfer Authority

    This section would authorize the transfer of up to $2.50 
billion of additional war-related funding authorizations in 
this title among the accounts in this title.

                       Subtitle C--Other Matters


             Section 1521--Afghanistan Security Forces Fund

    This section would extend the Afghanistan Security Forces 
Fund through fiscal year 2021. This section would also set a 
goal of using $29.1 million to support, to the extent 
practicable, the efforts of the Government of Afghanistan to 
promote the recruitment, training, integration, and retention 
of Afghan women into the Afghan National Defense and Security 
Forces.
    This section would also continue to require the Secretary 
of Defense, in consultation with the Secretary of State, to 
submit an assessment of the Government of Afghanistan's ability 
to meet shared security objectives and manage, employ, and 
sustain equipment divested under the Afghanistan Security 
Forces Fund. If the results of said assessment were 
unfavorable, the Secretary of Defense would be required to 
withhold assistance under the Afghanistan Security Forces Fund.

     TITLE XVI--STRATEGIC PROGRAMS, CYBER, AND INTELLIGENCE MATTERS

                       ITEMS OF SPECIAL INTEREST


                            Space Activities


                              Army GEOINT

    The committee believes the Department of Defense requires 
the strongest possible integration with the intelligence 
community. The United States Army, in particular, will be 
dependent upon the interagency for intelligence capabilities to 
enable long-range precision fires. Therefore, the Committee 
directs the Undersecretary of Defense for Intelligence and 
Security and the Army's Deputy Chief of Staff for Intelligence 
to provide the committee with a briefing not later than 
December 31, 2020, on plans to ensure the Army has direct 
access, including collection tasking, to the intelligence 
capabilities required to enable the Army's long range precision 
fires capabilities under development. The briefing should 
include information on the Army's efforts to build an 
information architecture that will support direct access touch 
intelligence capabilities.

                      Cislunar Space Capabilities

    The committee is aware that the Department of Defense has 
begun to assess capabilities and requirements for the cislunar 
region of space, including space domain awareness, space 
weather, and space control. The committee notes U.S. commercial 
capabilities could be used and expanded with new entrants to 
address emerging defense missions and requirements in the 
cislunar region in a cost-effective manner using novel 
approaches.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of Defense 
to submit a report to the Committees on Armed Services of the 
Senate and the House of Representatives by December 1, 2020, on 
deep space mission requirements for national security. The 
report should include;
    (1) the Department's policy related to conducting missions 
like space domain awareness, tracking, relay, space weather, 
positioning/navigation/timing, space control, and rendezvous 
and proximity operations in the cislunar region of space;
    (2) the Department's plans to establish requirements for 
the cislunar region, as necessary, in any of these mission 
areas;
    (3) costs and funding requirements and plans across the 
Future Years Defense Program for technology or system 
development, commercial services, or operational missions in 
the cislunar region; and
    (4) plans to address national security cislunar mission 
requirements using competitive procurement of commercial 
services and modular satellite material solutions from U.S. 
companies for each of the mission area requirements related to 
space domain awareness, space weather, and space control.

             Commercial Space-Based Radio Frequency Mapping

    In the committee report accompanying the National Defense 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2020 (H. Rept. 116-120), the 
committee directed the Director of the National Reconnaissance 
Office to submit a report on commercial space-based radio 
frequency mapping and associated operations and services for 
space-based electromagnetic collections. The committee 
continues to note the potential use of such services and data 
to meet combatant command requirements, and therefore directs 
the Chief of Operations of the Space Force, in coordination 
with the Commander of the U.S. Space Command, to submit a 
report to the Committees on Armed Services of the Senate and 
the House of Representatives by December 1, 2020, that includes 
an assessment of how U.S. commercial space-based radio 
frequency capabilities could support joint and allied 
warfighting activities, and a plan to test, evaluate, and use 
U.S. commercial space-based radio-frequency geo-intelligence 
capabilities and data, and associated costs.

          Digital Ground Satellite Communications Architecture

    The committee supports the Department of Defense's prior 
demonstrations to leverage innovations in commercially 
available technologies to utilize wideband satellite 
communication (SATCOM) ground capabilities across an 
integrated, responsive, flexible, and secure enterprise. The 
committee understands that key attributes and capabilities of a 
warfighter-focused SATCOM enterprise should include common 
digital ground infrastructure elements to ensure warfighter 
situational awareness, access to a common operating picture, 
and automated resource allocation functionality. While the 
committee commends the current ``Fighting SATCOM Enterprise'' 
initiative, the committee favors an accelerated and fully 
defined acquisition strategy related to the ground digitization 
efforts that will enable full-spectrum, seamless, and resilient 
communications across our national security space enterprise.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of Defense 
to submit a plan to the congressional defense committees by 
March 1, 2021, on integrating a digital ground architecture 
that will utilize commercial innovations and solutions to 
enable wideband SATCOM roaming and multi-domain command and 
control capabilities without unnecessary additional investment 
in terminal hardware.

         Intelligence Community and Space Situational Awareness

    The committee notes that space situational awareness 
requirements are currently being filled by Department of 
Defense, intelligence community, other intergovernmental 
agencies, and, increasingly, commercial providers. While 
mission partners in the intelligence community can contribute 
to the decision calculus about the impact of actions resulting 
from a maneuver necessitated by a conjunction assessment, 
various mission partners make different contributions to this 
decision.
    The committee directs the Directors of National Geospatial-
Intelligence Agency, the Director of the National 
Reconnaissance Office, the Commander of U.S. Space Command, and 
the Chief of Operations of the Space Force to provide a 
briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services by November 
1, 2020, on the current contributions the National Geospatial-
Intelligence Agency and the National Reconnaissance Office make 
to operational decisions regarding the necessity to maneuver 
national technical means given a potential conjunction 
assessment, and the coordination among the agencies, Space 
Command and Space Force, in peacetime, in crisis, and during a 
conflict.

                Military Application of LiDAR Satellites

    The committee recognizes that support to long-range 
precision fires and future Intelligence, Surveillance and 
Reconnaissance operations will be degraded based on the Anti-
Access/Anti-Denial environment of adversaries possessing 
advanced air defense capabilities. The committee understands 
there may be innovative new technologies which could provide 
tactically-relevant, high resolution targeting information from 
low earth orbit satellites, such as 3-D LiDAR. Space-based 
LiDAR with the ability to provide triple-canopy deep foliage in 
support of counter Denial and Deception. The committee further 
understands that such capability has proved effective for 
National Aeronautics and Space Administration objectives and 
the feasibility of converting this to military applications 
should be studied, including as a hosted payload on a National 
Reconnaissance Office or Army satellite.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of the Army 
to provide a report to the congressional defense committees not 
later than February 1, 2021, on the feasibility of 
commercializing a multi-aperture single photon LiDAR satellite 
to support Army long-range precision fires and Army Special 
Operations Command elements.

                      Mission Assurance in Launch

    The committee notes that the high levels of mission 
assurance required by the Department of Defense for the 
National Security Space Launch program has ensured 
unprecedented levels of mission success. The committee supports 
the Department of the Air Force's commitment to safety, 
security, and mission delivery. However, the committee also 
notes that the mission assurance requirements of the Air Force 
drive significant costs for current and potential future 
bidders in National Security Launch program and in small 
launch; have not adequately accounted for reusability within 
the context of mission assurance; have not innovated in the 
areas of artificial intelligence, modelling, and computational 
advancements; and lastly, have not been motivated to be more 
cost-efficient.
    The committee directs the Chief of Space Operations of the 
Space Force to provide a briefing and report to the House 
Committee on Armed Services by December 1, 2020, on innovation 
in mission assurance requirements for the National Security 
Space Launch program and for small launch, to include 
considering cost considerations, considering past launch 
performance and identifying levels of risk-tolerance for each 
payload. The briefing and report should also include proposed 
pathways to reconsider the current construct for design and 
implementation of mission assurance requirements to allow 
competition in the design and implementation of a mission 
assurance regime for the program, including considering having 
the Space Force either bring this expertise in-house, or having 
different outside entities be responsible for design of 
requirements versus mission assurance compliance verification. 
The briefing and report should also address how reusability 
should be included in mission assurance requirements, and how 
cost and risk should be balanced.

 National Reconnaissance Office Future Commercial Sources of Satellite 
                                Imagery

    As the National Reconnaissance Office (NRO) moves forward 
with its strategy for acquiring commercial satellite imagery 
following the EnhancedView contract, which is set to end at the 
end of fiscal year 2020, the committee expects the Director to 
continue a program of open competition likely leading to 
contracts to multiple awardees, and to be responsive to the 
requirements of the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency and 
the broader Department of Defense GEOINT user community, 
including Combatant Commands, Functional Commands, and other 
key elements of the armed forces. The committee expects the NRO 
to fulfill the GEOINT requirements of the user community to the 
greatest extent, and believes Office should be working 
proactively with industry to apply commercial solutions to 
known Intelligence, Surveillance, and Reconnaissance gaps as 
much as possible. The Committee expects the NRO to not only 
support the continuation of commercial data acquisitions 
consistent with the needs met by the EnhancedView contract, but 
to further enable on-ramps for new capabilities responsive to 
additional needs. The committee directs the Director of the NRO 
to submit a report to the congressional defense and 
intelligence committees by December 15, 2020, on its plans to 
lead the GEOINT community in identifying and working with new 
commercial providers or new commercial data sets and solutions, 
transitioning them from pilot programs to operational 
contracts, and doing so even as formal requirements are still 
in development.

                    Non-Traditional Space Companies

    The committee notes that one of the motivations for the 
establishment of a Space Force was the challenges in 
traditional space requirements and acquisition processes that 
are being outpaced by innovative commercial space companies. 
The committee supports the idea that innovation, competition, 
and on-ramping, non-traditional space companies will augment 
the capacity and capability derived from traditional space 
architectures. The committee recognizes that non-traditional 
space companies often note their inability to do business and 
compete on an equal playing field with traditional defense 
prime contractors.
    The committee directs the Chief of Space Operations of the 
Space Force, in coordination with the Under Secretary of 
Defense for Acquisition and Sustainment, the Commander of U.S. 
Space Command, and the Chair of the Defense Innovation Board, 
to provide a report and briefing to the House Committee on 
Armed Services by December 1, 2020, on the challenges commonly 
encountered by non-traditional space new entrants and pathways 
to resolving those challenges. The report should address areas 
of future space innovation to include algorithm development, 
artificial intelligence, architecture development, high 
computing power developments, and additive manufacturing. The 
report should also address innovative acquisition approaches 
that should be considered for high technology readiness level 
components that can be competitively tested to meet current and 
planned requirements.

  Nuclear Command, Control and Communications Enterprise Modernization

    The committee acknowledges the importance of the Department 
of Defense's efforts to modernize the nuclear command, control, 
and communications (NC3) enterprise as a critical element of 
the nation's nuclear deterrent capability. The recent 
establishment of the Nuclear Command, Control and 
Communications Enterprise Center (NEC) within U. S. Strategic 
Command (USSTRATCOM) is a significant advancement that will 
help inform and enable the modernization of the Department's 
situational awareness, decision-making, force direction, force 
management and planning for resilient NC3. The committee 
believes strong and sustained attention to NC3 will be required 
as the Department continues to implement a comprehensive 
nuclear deterrent modernization program. The committee also 
observes that robust partnerships with industry will be 
required in order to develop, field and affordably sustain a 
modernized NC3 enterprise and believes the NEC can play an 
important role in developing these relationships.
    The committee also recognizes the importance of maintaining 
a responsive and resilient airborne NC3 capability. The 
committee is aware of the ongoing analysis to determine options 
to replace E-4B and E-6B aircraft that currently perform this 
mission. However, as the deliberate planning process to replace 
these aircraft proceeds forward, the committee is aware of the 
age of the legacy airborne NC3 fleet and its capacity to 
maintain a sustained airborne presence if directed. To better 
understand the capabilities and limitations of the current 
airborne NC3 fleet, the committee directs the Secretary of 
Defense to provide a briefing to the congressional defense 
committees by November 30, 2020, on the ability of USSTRATCOM 
to conduct sustained airborne NC3 operations. This briefing 
will include an overview of the Department's airborne NC3 
operational employment concept, an evaluation of current Air 
Force and Navy airborne NC3 capabilities and limitation related 
to manpower, training, maintenance, logistics support, basing, 
and aerial refueling requirements, and an assessment of how 
long contingency airborne NC3 operations can be sustained.

   Policy and Technology Review on Minimizing Orbital Debris Threats

    National security depends on reliable access to, and safe 
operations in, space. Critical Department of Defense (DoD) 
missions operating in space and providing multi-domain support 
depend on minimizing orbital threats, including the threat 
posed by orbital debris. Both satellites and rocket bodies are 
major sources of space debris, particularly in low-Earth orbit. 
There have also been several notable close calls between active 
satellites and active and defunct craft. Our nation and global 
economy cannot afford actual collisions, much less the 
additional debris that would be created as a result.
    The Committee is aware of the routinely updated U.S. 
government's Orbital Debris Mitigation Standard Practices 
(ODMSP) and the Air Force's Unified Data Library (UDL). 
However, notwithstanding the growing risk from orbital debris 
to our national defense assets, the Department does not appear 
to have changed its standard operating practices--for its own 
warfighting satellites, or for the commercial satellite 
operators on which it relies--in any substantive way since 
first publishing the ODMSP report in 2001.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of Defense 
to review the Department's current policies for orbital debris 
mitigation, including compliance with ODMSP, and provide to the 
congressional defense committees a plan for full compliance 
with the ODMSP in all orbits and particularly low earth orbit 
through the establishment of Department-wide orbital debris 
mitigation practices no later than January 31, 2021. Compliance 
should include both nominal end-of-mission operations and off-
nominal operations. For example, if a Department of or 
contracted commercial space service experiences an anomaly in 
orbit, the operator should continue to be subject to the ODMSP.

 Program to Improve Launch Support and Infrastructure at Federal Ranges

    The committee notes section 1609 of the National Defense 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2020 (Public Law 116-92) 
authorized a program to enhance and improve launch support and 
infrastructure at Federal ranges, to support small and medium 
launches. The committee is aware of the age and importance of 
the infrastructure at the Eastern and Western Ranges to sustain 
a broad array of national security launches, including medium 
and heavy launches for national security. Therefore, the 
committee directs the Chief of Space Operations for the Space 
Force to submit a report to the congressional defense 
committees by October 30, 2020, that includes the requirements 
for sustaining and improving the physical infrastructure for 
the ranges at Vandenberg Air Force Base and Cape Canaveral and 
associated funding requirements over the fiscal year defense 
plan.
    The committee further directs the Secretary of Defense to 
submit a report to the congressional defense committees by 
March 1, 2021, on any additional space testing and training 
range requirements that may be necessary to ensure the 
Department is ready and able to protect and defend vital 
national interests in space.

               Satellite Solar Power Technology Sourcing

    The committee is aware that high efficiency solar cells and 
panels are essential for powering civil and national security 
satellites. US technological leadership and secure and reliable 
sources of solar cells and panels are critical aspects of 
satellite operations. A 2019 report by Air Force Research 
Laboratory and the Defense Innovation Unit on the state of the 
space industrial base recommended that the United States 
``include reforms in government contracting and direct 
government investment as needed to compensate for U.S. 
adversaries' anticompetitive behavior, and establish the long-
term technological and logistical space infrastructure needed 
to ensure long-term, U.S. dominance in space.'' The committee 
understands that a whole-of-government approach is needed to 
enable a stable domestic industrial base for solar cell and 
panel manufacturing. The committee is also aware of the 
challenges stemming from foreign competition within the solar 
cell industry that benefit from government subsidies, which can 
undercut price competitiveness for U.S. domestic suppliers.
    The committee therefore directs the Secretary of Defense to 
submit a report to the defense committees by December 31, 2020 
outlining the benefits, vulnerabilities and risks associated 
with foreign sources of satellite solar power technology. The 
report shall include recommended investments, any necessary 
policy changes, or other steps deemed appropriate to support 
this segment of the national security space industrial base.

 Sensor-to-Shooter Tactical Satellite Targeting Support to Deep Strike 
                                Weapons

    The committee notes that near-peer adversaries are fielding 
systems designed to outrange or overmatch Department of Defense 
weapons systems and simultaneously deny our forces access to 
intelligence in the deep battlefield and thus, an ability to 
see and strike critical targets. The committee is concerned 
that, as the Department of Defense develops next-generation, 
deep-strike weapon systems, it lacks persistent deep sensing 
capabilities to find targets for these weapons to strike. The 
committee strongly encourages the Department of Defense to 
leverage advances in technology that now allow for not only a 
precise view of the deep battlefield, but an ability to quickly 
deliver precision targeting data to support deep-strike weapons 
systems.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of Defense 
to brief the House Committee on Armed Services not later than 
February 15, 2021, on the Department of Defense's plans to 
accelerate needed improvements on existing Synthetic Aperture 
Radar (SAR) sensors; advance and further refine processing of 
SAR data; support the development of a tactical ground 
architecture for the delivery of targeting data; and fund 
integration with ongoing experiments and live exercises to 
develop concepts of operations, as well as tactics, techniques, 
and procedures, that can transition to, and be adopted as joint 
doctrine, leading to a significant reduction in the delivery 
time of precision targeting data.

                           Space Acquisition

    The committee notes that 1601(b) of the John S. McCain 
National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2019 (Public 
Law 115-232) and the report accompanying the National Defense 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2020 (Public Law 116-92) 
directed the Secretary of the Air Force to submit to the 
congressional defense committees a report on whether and, if 
so, how to implement an alternative acquisition system. In 
addition, the committee continues to support the development of 
a space acquisition cadre. The committee is aware that the 
Secretary of the Air Force briefed committee members on 
recommendations included in its report on Alternative 
Acquisition System for the United States Space Force in May 
2020 but to date has not submitted a final copy of the report. 
Further, the committee notes that the draft report raised 
questions about the risk of undermining congressional oversight 
of major space acquisition programs and the lack of 
accountability. In addition, the committee continues to support 
and recommend measures to improve and ensure the retention of a 
robust and experienced space acquisition cadre.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Comptroller General of 
the United States to review the draft report on an Alternative 
Acquisition System for the United States Space Force submitted 
by the Secretary of the Air Force and provide its analysis to 
the House and Senate Armed Services committees by December 15, 
2020.
    The committee also directs the Director of the National 
Reconnaissance Office, the Director of Navy Space Systems 
Program and the Director of Naval Reactors at the National 
Nuclear Security Administration to each brief the House Armed 
Services Committee no later than December 1, 2020 on program 
management and personnel practices they use to ensure a high 
level of expertise and effective management of their 
acquisition programs. The briefings shall include whether and 
how the Directors rely on small and collaborative teams, employ 
strong systems engineering and program management, draw from 
the latest advances in technology and concepts of operation, 
establish a short chain of command and avoid bureaucracy, and 
any other element that each Director recommends related to 
creating and sustaining effective acquisition culture and 
program management.

                        Space Development Agency

    The committee notes that the Space Development Agency (SDA) 
has an important mission but that the establishment of this 
agency has been rocky, with the initial SDA Director replaced 
early in the establishment of the agency, only a few weeks 
after briefing the committee, and with no further notification 
to the committee on how its plans had shifted. The committee 
supported the mission and the initial plans for the SDA. 
However, the committee is concerned that the SDA is not 
positioned to execute its mission in an effective manner and is 
neither equipped to focus on the many priorities it has set, 
nor has it adequately budgeted across the Future Years Defense 
Program, with several programs left unfunded. The committee 
encourages the SDA to focus on top priorities, including the 
planned transport layer and the missile warning layer in low-
Earth orbit using commercial architectures, which would 
increase space resilience. The committee expects the SDA 
Director to more regularly brief the committee on its plans and 
progress.
    Furthermore, the committee is aware that the core mission 
of the SDA initially included plans to procure commercial space 
services, for example broadband communications capabilities, 
and is concerned that these plans were dropped, with its focus 
shifting instead to solely a payload and software development 
and procurement model. The committee therefore directs the SDA 
Director, in consultation with the Chief of Space Operations of 
the Space Force, to submit a report to the congressional 
defense committees by December 1, 2020, containing a detailed 
plan to procure commercial services, including funding 
requirements.

            Space-Based Broadband and Cellular Technologies

    The committee continues to be encouraged by U.S. private 
sector development of low-Earth orbit satellite technologies 
and constellations that enhance civil and national security 
capabilities. Such investments have led to groundbreaking 
advances in supporting the warfighter, including advanced 
tactical communication, commercial remote sensing, and space 
situational awareness technologies. In particular, the 
committee is aware that private industry is developing 
commercial low-Earth orbit based satellite technology to 
provide resilient broadband capabilities, including cellular 
and broadband connectivity to fixed and mobile devices and to 
commercial terminals, sensors, and internet-based platforms 
without the need for traditional terrestrial ground 
infrastructure.
    The committee encourages the Department of Defense to 
continue to identify opportunities to develop defense-specific 
applications that leverage this commercial satellite network 
capability and services. Therefore, the committee directs the 
Secretary of Defense to submit a report to the House Committee 
on Armed Services and the Senate Committee on Armed Services 
not later than January 31, 2021, on how this capability can be 
used to address military requirements, including combatant 
command requirements, and on plans to procure this capability 
and these services.

                    Terrestrial Based Backup for GPS

    The committee is aware that Section 1618 of the Fiscal Year 
2017 National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA) (PL 114-328) 
required the Secretaries of Defense, Transportation, and 
Homeland Security to report to the appropriate congressional 
committees on the respective requirements necessary to backup 
and complement the positioning, navigation and timing (PNT) 
capabilities of the Global Positioning System (GPS) for 
national security and critical infrastructure and examine the 
alternative methods to provide backup. The committee also notes 
that the Fiscal Year 2018 NDAA (Section 1606. P.L. 115-91) 
called for the Secretaries to conduct a demonstration of backup 
technologies.
    The federal government has been tasked for over sixteen 
years with developing a GPS backup capability, beginning with 
President Directive NSPD-39 in 2004. Since then, numerous 
studies, both public and private, have validated the critical 
need for backup and identified the lack of such backup as a 
critical vulnerability for national security and critical 
infrastructure. After several years of hearings and studies by 
the appropriate congressional committees, Congress passed the 
National Timing Resilience and Security Act of 2018 (NTSRA) as 
Section 514 of the Frank LoBiondo Coast Guard Authorization Act 
of 2018 (Sec. 514, P.L. 115-282, Dec. 4, 2018). Congress deemed 
it necessary to provide for a terrestrial based backup for the 
timing component as soon as possible because of the Executive 
Branch's failure to do so. The Act uses a public-private 
partnership to build and operate the backup timing system, one 
of the alternative models that were identified for analysis in 
the FY 2017 NDAA.
    The Committee's view is the NTSRA is entirely complementary 
and not in conflict with the Committee's actions to provide 
backup for GPS, especially the positioning and navigation 
elements critical to the military and aviation. An 
uninterrupted timing signal is essential to the national 
economy in the operation of our financial networks, banking 
system, credit and debit transactions, operation of the 
electric grid and telecom networks. Congress determined that 
the nation could no longer risk not having at least a backup 
timing system and passed NTSRA as a result.
    The committee notes that the backup system called for by 
the NTSRA was to be operational by December 2020, but the 
report from the demonstration has yet to been completed. The 
committee directs the Secretaries of Defense, Transportation, 
and Homeland Security to provide a briefing to the appropriate 
congressional committees by January 31, 2021, on the 
implementation of an operational backup system required under 
NTSRA.

                      Weather Acquisition Strategy

    The committee continues to note that the acquisition 
strategy to meet warfighter and Department of Defense 
requirements on weather should be a priority for the Air Force. 
The committee notes the risk in acquisition strategy for cloud 
characterization and theater weather imagery, as the legacy 
systems are long beyond their design life and the Air Force is 
relying on other aging satellites to fill gaps in weather 
coverage. The committee supports efforts to leverage ongoing 
experimental electro-optical/infrared (EO/IR) prototype 
developments as well as efforts for rapid prototyping, using 
proliferated low-Earth orbit architectures and buying weather 
data as a service. The committee encourages the Air Force to 
avoid continuing to slip the acquisition schedule and to 
continue to pursue modern technologies, instead of pursuing 
other risk reduction pathways that rely on outdated and costly 
systems that will not meet requirements.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of the Air 
Force to provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed 
Services by October 30, 2020, on the progress on weather 
acquisition, particularly for EO/IR weather systems.

                        Missile Defense Programs


Ballistic Missile Defense System Advanced Technology Mission Assessment 
                              Architecture

    The committee notes that given the Missile Defense Agency's 
(MDA) platforms and network security could be significantly 
improved by the development and deployment of a high 
performance computing infrastructure designed to enable secure 
data delivery, high fidelity cyber ranges, big data 
repositories with deep data analytics, machine learning, and 
artificial intelligence. Therefore, the committee directs the 
Director of the Missile Defense Agency to provide a briefing to 
the House Committee on Armed Services not later than January 
31, 2021, on MDA's efforts to develop a cyber-secure 
information technology infrastructure that allows users to 
access data via a virtual desktop infrastructure.

                      Boost Phase Missile Defense

    The committee notes that despite advances in midcourse and 
terminal missile defense systems, there are currently no 
efforts to develop boost phase intercept capabilities within 
the Missile Defense Agency's Future Years Defense Program. The 
committee further notes that there are opportunities to modify 
mature kinetic intercept technologies that could prove to be 
cost-effective and appropriate for regional missile defense. 
The committee recommends that the Missile Defense Agency (MDA) 
develop these technologies to further provide a layered missile 
defense system in the near to medium term.
    In addition to a lack of kinetic boost phase intercept 
efforts, the committee is concerned by removal of funding for 
the diode pumped alkali laser (DPAL) effort, in addition to the 
transfer of all directed energy efforts out of MDA. 
Understanding that directed energy solutions for long-range 
missile defense largely remain in the advanced technology 
development phase and could require significant funding and 
time to fully develop and deploy, these technologies could