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[House Report 116-452]
[From the U.S. Government Publishing Office]


116th Congress    }                                     {       Report
                        HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES
 2d Session       }                                     {      116-452

======================================================================



 
 DEPARTMENTS OF TRANSPORTATION, AND HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT, AND 
               RELATED AGENCIES APPROPRIATIONS BILL, 2021

                                _______
                                

 July 16, 2020.--Committed to the Committee of the Whole House on the 
              State of the Union and ordered to be printed

                                _______
                                

  Mr. Price of North Carolina, from the Committee on Appropriations, 
                        submitted the following

                              R E P O R T

                             together with

                             MINORITY VIEWS

                        [To accompany H.R. 7616]

    The Committee on Appropriations submits the following 
report in explanation of the accompanying bill making 
appropriations for the Departments of Transportation, Housing 
and Urban Development, and related agencies for the fiscal year 
ending September 30, 2021.

                        INDEX TO BILL AND REPORT

                                                            Page number

                                                            Bill Report
Title I--Department of Transportation......................     2
                                                                      8
Title II--Department of Housing and Urban Development......   108
                                                                     99
Title III--Related Agencies................................   210
                                                                    145
Title IV--General Provisions...............................   215
                                                                    151
Title V--Additional Infrastructure Investments.............   233
                                                                    153
Minority Views.............................................
                                                                    219

                     PROGRAM, PROJECT, AND ACTIVITY

    During fiscal year 2021, for the purposes of the Balanced 
Budget and Emergency Deficit Control Act of 1985 (Public Law 
99-177), as amended, with respect to appropriations contained 
in the accompanying bill, the terms ``program, project, and 
activity'' (PPA) shall mean any item for which a dollar amount 
is contained in appropriations acts (including joint 
resolutions providing continuing appropriations) and 
accompanying reports of the House and Senate Committees on 
Appropriations, or accompanying conference reports and joint 
explanatory statements of the committee of conference. This 
definition shall apply to all programs for which new budget 
(obligational) authority is provided, as well as to 
discretionary grants and discretionary grant allocations made 
through either bill or report language.
    The Committee directs the Departments and agencies funded 
by this bill to address each number listed in the reports in 
their respective operating plans and warns that efforts to 
operate programs at levels contrary to the levels recommended 
and directed in these reports would not be advised.

              OPERATING PLANS AND REPROGRAMMING GUIDELINES

    The Committee includes a provision (section 405) 
establishing the authority by which funding available to the 
agencies funded by this Act may be reprogrammed for other 
purposes. The provision specifically requires the advance 
approval of the House and Senate Committees on Appropriations 
of any proposal to reprogram funds that:
           creates a new program;
           eliminates a program, project, or activity 
        (PPA);
           increases funds or personnel for any PPA for 
        which funds have been denied or restricted by the 
        Congress;
           redirects funds that were directed in such 
        reports for a specific activity to a different purpose;
           augments an existing PPA in excess of 
        $5,000,000 or 10 percent, whichever is less;
           reduces an existing PPA by $5,000,000 or 10 
        percent, whichever is less; or
           creates, reorganizes, or restructures 
        offices different from the congressional budget 
        justifications or the table at the end of the Committee 
        report, whichever is more detailed.
    The Committee retains the requirement that each agency 
submit an operating plan to the House and Senate Committees on 
Appropriations not later than 60 days after enactment of this 
Act to establish the baseline for application of reprogramming 
and transfer authorities provided in this Act. Specifically, 
each agency must provide a table for each appropriation with 
columns displaying the budget request; adjustments made by 
Congress; adjustments for rescissions, if appropriate; and the 
fiscal year enacted level. The table shall delineate the 
appropriation both by object class and by PPA. The report also 
must identify items of special Congressional interest. Should 
the agency create, alter, discontinue, or otherwise change any 
program as described in the agency's budget justification, 
those changes must be a part of the agency's operating plan. 
Finally, the agency shall submit with the operating plan a 
summary of the reporting requirements contained in this Act, 
the House and Senate reports, and the statement of the 
managers. The summary should include Inspector General and 
Government Accountability Office reports as well. In certain 
instances, the Committee may direct the agency to submit a 
revised operating plan for approval or may direct changes to 
the operating plan if the plan is not consistent with the 
directives of the conference report and statement of the 
managers.
    The Committee expects the agencies and bureaus to submit 
reprogramming requests in a timely manner and to provide a 
thorough explanation of the proposed reallocations, including a 
detailed justification of increases and reductions and the 
specific impact of proposed changes on the budget request for 
the following fiscal year. Any reprogramming request shall 
include any out-year budgetary impacts and a separate 
accounting of program or mission impacts on estimated carryover 
funds. Reprogramming procedures shall apply to funds provided 
in this Act, unobligated balances from previous appropriations 
Acts that are available for obligation or expenditure in fiscal 
year 2021, and non-appropriated resources such as fee 
collections that are used to meet program requirements in 
fiscal year 2021.
    The Committee expects each agency to manage its programs 
and activities within the amounts appropriated by the Congress. 
The Committee reminds agencies that reprogramming requests 
should be submitted only in the case of an unforeseeable 
emergency or a situation that could not have been anticipated 
when formulating the budget request for the current fiscal 
year. Except in emergency situations, reprogramming requests 
should be submitted no later than June 30, 2021. Further, the 
Committee notes that when an agency submits a reprogramming or 
transfer request to the Committees on Appropriations and does 
not receive identical responses from the House and Senate, it 
is the responsibility of the agency to reconcile the House and 
Senate differences before proceeding and, if reconciliation is 
not possible, to consider the request to reprogram funds 
unapproved.
    The Committee would also like to clarify that this section 
applies to working capital funds of both the Department of 
Transportation (DOT) and Department of Housing and Urban 
Development (HUD) and that no funds may be obligated from 
working capital fund accounts to augment programs, projects, or 
activities for which appropriations have been specifically 
rejected by the Congress, or to increase funds or personnel for 
any PPA above the amounts appropriated by this Act.

                  CONGRESSIONAL BUDGET JUSTIFICATIONS

    Budget justifications are the primary tool used by the 
House and Senate Committees on Appropriations to evaluate the 
resource requirements and fiscal needs of agencies. The 
Committee is aware that the format and presentation of budget 
materials is largely left to the agency within presentation 
objectives set forth by the Office of Management and Budget 
(OMB). In fact, OMB Circular A-11, part 1 specifically 
instructs agencies to consult with congressional committees 
beforehand. The Committee expects that all agencies funded 
under this Act will heed this directive.
    The Committee expects all of the budget justifications to 
provide the data needed to make appropriate and meaningful 
funding decisions. The Committee continues the direction that 
justifications submitted with the fiscal year 2022 budget 
request by agencies funded under this Act contain the customary 
level of detailed data and explanatory statements to support 
the appropriations requests at the level of detail contained in 
the funding table included at the end of this report. Among 
other items, agencies shall provide a detailed discussion of 
proposed new initiatives, proposed changes in the agency's 
financial plan from prior year enactment, detailed data on all 
programs, and comprehensive information on any office or agency 
restructurings. At a minimum, each agency must also provide 
adequate justification for funding and staffing changes for 
each individual office and materials that compare programs, 
projects, and activities that are proposed for fiscal year 2022 
to the fiscal year 2021 enacted levels.
    The Committee is aware that the analytical materials 
required for review by the Committee are unique to each agency 
in this Act. Therefore, the Committee expects that each agency 
will coordinate with the House and Senate Committees on 
Appropriations in advance on its planned presentation for its 
budget justification materials in support of the fiscal year 
2022 budget request.

                             OTHER MATTERS

    The Committee directs each of the Departments and agencies 
funded by this Act to identify opportunities to prioritize 
resilience, equity, regional efforts, and robust stakeholder 
engagement.
    Resiliency.--The Committee believes that every new 
construction or major rehabilitation project funded by this Act 
should be constructed to the most current relevant standards 
and that these projects should address the risk of structure 
failure or loss of use from natural hazards throughout the 
lifetime of the project. As a measure of responsible fiscal 
prudence, resilient construction and land management practices 
should be integrated into every program funded by this Act.
    Performance measures.--The Committee directs each of the 
Departments and agencies funded by this Act to comply with 
title 31 of the United States Code, including the development 
of their organizational priority goals and outcomes such as 
performance outcome measures, output measures, efficiency 
measures, and customer service measures.
    Customer service.--The Committee continues to support 
efforts to improve customer service in accordance with 
Executive Order 13571. The Committee directs all Departments 
and agencies funded by this Act to develop standards to improve 
customer service and incorporate the standards into the 
performance plans required under title 31 of the United States 
Code. Further, the Committee recognizes not all Departments and 
agencies are subject to Executive Order 13571. For such 
Departments and agencies funded by this Act, the Committee 
directs the Departments and agencies to make continuous 
improvements and adopt best practices for improving customer 
service.
    Regional councils of government.--The Committee recommends 
that all Departments and agencies funded by this Act list 
regional councils and councils of governments as eligible 
entities in competitions for Federal funding whenever local 
governments or non-profit agencies are eligible entities. 
Furthermore, the Committee encourages all Departments and 
agencies funded by this Act to actively seek opportunities for 
regional councils and councils of governments to serve as lead 
applicants and grantees in order to encourage and expand 
greater regional collaboration. In the competitive grants 
process, all Departments and agencies funded by this Act should 
work with entities having previous experience with 
administering Federal funding that resulted in successful, 
comprehensive, well-coordinated outcomes.
    Native plant preference.--In undertaking a land management 
activity on lands under the jurisdiction of any of the 
Departments or agencies funded by this Act, including 
maintenance and restoration in response to degradation caused 
by human activity or natural events (such as fire, flood, or 
infestation), the Committee continues to direct that it be the 
policy of the aforementioned agencies that preference shall be 
made, to the extent practicable, for the use of locally adapted 
native plant materials.
    Contracting.--As the largest advertiser in the United 
States, the Federal government should work to ensure fair 
access to its advertising contracts for small, disadvantaged 
businesses and businesses owned by minorities and women. The 
Committee directs each Department and agency funded by this Act 
to submit the following information in a report to the House 
and Senate Committees on Appropriations no later than 30 days 
after the submission of the fiscal year 2022 budget 
justification: expenditures for fiscal year 2020 and expected 
expenditures for fiscal year 2021, respectively, for (1) all 
contracts for advertising services and (2) contracts for the 
advertising services of all Small Business Administration-
recognized socioeconomic subcategory-certified small 
businesses, as defined in the Small Business Act, and women- 
and minority-owned businesses.
    In addition, the Committee encourages Federal Departments 
and agencies to consider using, to the greatest extent 
possible, local media in their advertising, including local 
television, radio broadcast stations, and newspapers. The 
Committee further directs each Department and agency funded by 
this Act with annual advertising budgets in excess of $500,000 
to include details on expenditures on local media advertising 
for fiscal years 2020 and 2021 in the report specified in the 
previous paragraph.
    Targeted investments in impoverished areas.--The Committee 
supports targeted investments in impoverished areas, 
particularly in persistent poverty counties and in other high-
poverty census tracts. To understand how programs funded 
through the Departments and agencies funded by this Act are 
serving these particular areas, House Report 116-106 directed 
those Departments and agencies to submit a report on the 
percentage of funds allocated by each program in fiscal years 
2017, 2018, and 2019 and estimates for fiscal year 2020 that 
serve populations living in persistent poverty counties or 
census tracts. The Committee looks forward to receiving the 
reports on this information from the Departments and agencies 
funded by this Act, and reiterates that if current data 
collected for a program are unable to be readily aggregated by 
county or census tract, then a statement on the limitations of 
the data for that program shall satisfy such reporting 
requirement. Upon completing the initial report required by 
House Report 116-106, the Committee directs the Departments and 
agencies funded by this Act to update the information with the 
data for the next fiscal year. Therefore, in fiscal year 2021, 
the Departments and agencies funded by this Act shall report 
information for fiscal year 2020 to the House and Senate 
Committees on Appropriations within 90 days of such data being 
available. Further, for Departments and agencies funded by this 
Act that identify a program for which current data collected 
are unable to be readily aggregated by county or census tract, 
the Committee directs such Departments and agencies to consult 
with the House and Senate Committees on Appropriations prior to 
initiating the report for the next fiscal year in order to 
determine if available data which is similar in nature to 
county or census tract can satisfy such reporting requirement.
    Fair access to science and technology research.--The 
Committee applauds the considerable progress made by the White 
House Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP) on the 
Department and agency public access plans required by the 
February 22, 2013 Memorandum on Increasing Access to the 
Results of Federally Funded Scientific Research. The Committee 
understands that 22 Departments and agencies with annual 
expenditures on research and development of $100,000,000 or 
more have completed their public access plans for increasing 
access to peer reviewed scholarly publications and digital data 
resulting from Federally funded research. The Committee 
encourages OSTP to continue its efforts to coordinate the 
implementation of public access policies across all Departments 
and agencies funded by this Act and to identify additional 
opportunities to enhance access to the results of Federally 
funded research. The Committee urges OSTP to report on an 
annual basis on the progress of all Departments and agencies 
funded by this Act in implementing their public access plans, 
including relevant measures of progress, and on additional 
steps being taken to improve access to the results of Federally 
funded research. Further, the Committee urges all Departments 
and agencies funded by this Act to continue their efforts 
toward full implementation of their public access plans, and to 
provide an update on their progress in their fiscal year 2022 
budget justification.
    Land use.--The Committee is concerned with urban sprawl, 
overwhelming traffic, and a lack of housing supply in job-rich 
areas. The Committee encourages HUD to consult with DOT and 
issue joint non-binding guidance outlining voluntary best 
practices for land use policies to increase the supply of 
affordable and market-rate housing. This guidance should 
provide recommendations for local, regional, and State land use 
agencies to improve their zoning, such as increasing density, 
reducing minimum lot sizes, creating by-right development for 
multi-family homes, streamlining or shortening the permitting 
processes, eliminating impact fees, or allowing accessory 
dwelling units. This guidance should also focus on providing 
best practices to local land use agencies and transit agencies 
who work together to promote transit-oriented development, and 
should consider best practices among urban, suburban, and rural 
communities.
    Building design.--Since World War II, the United States has 
favored investment in virtual space over physical places, 
individual autonomy over community, and globalization over 
local prosperity. As a result, some cities are sprawling, 
fragmented, carbon-producing, inequitable, unsustainable, and 
disconnected and prefer individual mobility over human 
flourishing. Few buildings are carefully considered and those 
that are tend to be for the wealthiest. The Committee 
encourages design professionals, social scientists, health 
experts, industry, academia, and the Federal government to 
collaborate on mechanisms that promote cost-effective design 
best practices. This partnership could yield walkable, mixed-
use, culturally rich, diverse, resilient, sustainable, healthy, 
and vibrant communities that empower all people to have lives 
of meaning and purpose. The Committee encourages HUD and DOT to 
coordinate with programs focused on community and livability at 
the Department of Agriculture and the Department of Health and 
Human Services to establish a new framework for design and 
building. HUD and DOT should convene a summit with other 
agencies and outside leaders in planning, architecture, and 
health to create a new framework for community livability.
    Foundations of Evidence-Based Policymaking Act and OPEN 
Government Data Act.--The Committee commends DOT and HUD for 
taking steps to implement the Foundations of Evidence-Based 
Policymaking Act of 2018 (P.L. 115-435) and the OPEN Government 
Data Act, which was enacted as part of P.L. 115-435. DOT has 
hired a chief data officer, an evaluation officer, and a senior 
staff member to focus on performing an agency capacity 
assessment and learning agenda, as required by P.L. 115-435. As 
part of its fiscal year 2021 budget request, HUD plans to hire 
a chief data officer in order to implement the requirements of 
P.L. 115-435 and requested funding under the Management and 
Administration accounts.
    The Committee directs DOT and HUD to report to the House 
and Senate Committees on Appropriations no later than 120 days 
after enactment of this Act on the implementation of P.L. 115--
435 and progress being made at the Departments. The Committee 
further urges DOT and HUD to develop guidance to ensure all 
relevant participants and grantees are provided the opportunity 
to comment on their respective Department-wide processes of 
prioritizing evidence needs. In addition, the Committee 
encourages DOT and HUD to work towards consolidating existing 
and leveraging new commercial technologies to implement Federal 
data initiatives and carry out pilot projects related to the 
implementation of the OPEN Government Data Act.
    Federal law enforcement.--The Committee notes that the 
Commerce, Justice, Science, and Related Agencies Appropriations 
Act, 2021 directs the Attorney General to establish a training 
program to cover the use of force and de-escalation, racial 
profiling, implicit bias, and procedural justice, to include 
training on the duty of Federal law enforcement officers to 
intervene in cases where another law enforcement officer is 
using excessive force, and make such training a requirement for 
Federal law enforcement officers. The Committee further notes 
that several Departments and agencies funded by this Act employ 
Federal law enforcement officers and are Federal Law 
Enforcement Training Centers partner organizations. The 
Committee directs such Departments and agencies to adopt and 
follow the training program established by the Attorney 
General, and to make such training a requirement for its 
Federal law enforcement officers. The Committee further directs 
such Departments and agencies to brief the House and Senate 
Committees on Appropriations on their efforts relating to 
training no later than 90 days after the Attorney General has 
established such a training program.
    In addition, the Committee directs such Departments and 
agencies, to the extent that such Departments and agencies have 
not already done so, to submit their use of force data to the 
Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI)'s National Use of Force 
Data Collection database. The Committee further directs such 
Departments and agencies to brief the House and Senate 
Committees on Appropriations no later than 90 days after 
enactment of this Act on their current efforts to tabulate and 
submit its use of force data to the FBI.

                 TITLE I--DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION


                        Office of the Secretary


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

 
 
 
Appropriation, fiscal year 2020.......................      $115,490,000
Budget request, fiscal year 2021......................       127,374,000
Recommended in the bill...............................       126,174,000
Bill compared with:
    Appropriation, fiscal year 2020...................       +10,684,000
    Budget request, fiscal year 2021..................        -1,200,000
 

    Immediate Office of the Secretary.--The immediate Office of 
the Secretary has primary responsibility to provide overall 
planning, direction, and control of departmental affairs.
    Immediate Office of the Deputy Secretary.--The Office of 
the Deputy Secretary has primary responsibility to assist the 
Secretary in the overall planning, direction, and control of 
departmental affairs. The Deputy Secretary serves as the chief 
operating officer of the Department of Transportation (DOT).
    Office of the General Counsel.--The Office of the General 
Counsel provides legal services to the Office of the Secretary 
and coordinates and reviews the legal work of the chief 
counsels' offices of the operating administrations.
    Office of the Under Secretary of Transportation for 
Policy.--The Office of the Under Secretary of Transportation 
for Policy serves as the Department's chief policy officer, and 
is responsible for the coordination and development of 
departmental policy and legislative initiatives, international 
standards development and harmonization, aviation and other 
transportation-related trade negotiations, the performance of 
policy and economic analysis, and the execution of the 
Essential Air Service program.
    Office of the Assistant Secretary for Budget and 
Programs.--The Assistant Secretary for Budget and Programs is 
responsible for developing, reviewing, and presenting budget 
resource requirements for the Department to the Secretary, the 
Congress, and Office of Management and Budget.
    Office of the Assistant Secretary for Governmental 
Affairs.--The Office of the Assistant Secretary for 
Governmental Affairs is responsible for coordinating all 
Congressional, intergovernmental, and consumer activities of 
the Department.
    Office of the Assistant Secretary for Administration.--The 
Office of the Assistant Secretary for Administration serves as 
the principal advisor to the Secretary on department-wide 
administrative matters and the responsibilities include 
leadership in acquisition reform and human capital.
    Office of Public Affairs.--The Office of Public Affairs is 
responsible for the Department's press releases, articles, 
briefing materials, publications, and audio-visual materials.
    Office of the Executive Secretariat.--The Executive 
Secretariat assists the Secretary and Deputy Secretary in 
carrying out their responsibilities by controlling and 
coordinating internal and external documents.
    Office of Intelligence, Security, and Emergency Response.--
The Office of Intelligence, Security, and Emergency Response is 
responsible for intelligence, security policy, preparedness, 
training and exercises, national security, and operations.
    Office of the Chief Information Officer.--The Office of the 
Chief Information Officer serves as the principal advisor to 
the Secretary on information resources and information systems 
management.

                        COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION

    The Committee recommendation provides $126,174,000 for the 
salaries and expenses of the offices comprising the Office of 
the Secretary of Transportation. The Committee recommendation 
includes individual funding levels in this Act for each office 
as in prior fiscal years.
    In addition, the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic 
Security Act (CARES Act) (P.L. 116--136) included $1,753,000 
for the salaries and expenses account to prevent, prepare for, 
and respond to coronavirus.
    Governmental and public affairs reorganization.--The budget 
request proposes a reorganization of the governmental and 
public affairs operations across the Department. Specifically, 
the Office of the Secretary is seeking to transfer 1 full-time 
staff member from the governmental affairs offices of 9 
operating administrations to the Office of Governmental Affairs 
in the Office of the Secretary and to transfer 1 full-time 
staff member from the public affairs offices of 8 operating 
administrations to the Office of Public Affairs in the Office 
of the Secretary. Under this proposal, the operating 
administrations would continue to be responsible for the 
salaries and benefits of these 17 employees, while the 
employees are organizationally and physically located within 
the Office of the Secretary. The Committee believes this 
reorganization would constitute an augmentation of funds as the 
operating administrations would be using fiscal year 2021 
salaries and expenses appropriations to support the work of the 
Office of the Secretary. The Committee opposes this 
reorganization proposal, and section 194 of this Act prevents 
the Department from consolidating governmental and public 
affairs activities from the operating administrations into the 
Office of the Secretary. Further, if the Office of the 
Secretary wishes to move forward with expanding its 
governmental and public affairs capabilities, then the 
Committee directs the Department to request funding for such 
activities as part of its fiscal year 2022 budget 
justification.
    Departmental oversight.--In addition to the routine 
oversight of the appropriations process conducted by the 
Committee, the Committee employs and uses its Surveys and 
Investigations division to conduct in depth reviews and 
analysis of program issues. The Surveys and Investigations 
division plays an important role in supporting the Committee's 
responsibility to appropriate taxpayer dollars wisely and 
provide oversight of those Federal funds. Each study is 
initiated with the full support of the Committee Chair and 
Ranking Member and Subcommittee Chair and Ranking Member.
    The Surveys and Investigations division recently completed 
a report for the Committee on the Federal Railroad 
Administration's consolidated rail infrastructure and safety 
improvements (CRISI) grant program. While the Committee 
appreciates the Department's overall cooperation with the 
Surveys and Investigations division as it conducted this 
important review, there were specific and completely 
appropriate requests for information relating to the CRISI 
grant program which were denied by the Department, including 
information related to the scoring of CRISI applications and 
data that should have been readily available in the 
Department's financial systems. The Department's unwillingness 
to provide this information to the Surveys and Investigations 
division, and therefore the Committee, is unacceptable. The 
Committee directs the Department to be more forthcoming with 
information requested by the Surveys and Investigations 
division in future reviews. Further, the Explanatory Statement 
accompanying the Further Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2020 
(P.L. 116-94) reminds the Department of Housing and Urban 
Development that providing timely and accurate information and 
technical assistance to the House and Senate Committees on 
Appropriations is an essential requirement of our 
Constitutional democracy and is necessary to conduct oversight 
of Federal resources and execution of Congressional direction. 
The Committee notes that this direction also applies to the 
Department of Transportation.
    Open skies.--The Committee continues to urge the Department 
to take steps to ensure that U.S. airline carriers and their 
workers have a fair and equal opportunity to compete in 
accordance with open skies agreements with foreign governments. 
The Committee notes that DOT worked with the State Department 
to reach recent memorandums of agreement with foreign 
governments to ensure transparency, accountability, and 
enforcement remain important tenets of open skies agreements. 
The Committee directs the Department to continue to proactively 
work with the State Department to take appropriate action with 
any foreign governments where government subsidies have 
resulted in market distortion. The Committee directs the 
Department to provide regular updates to the Committee on their 
activities related to the fair enforcement of open skies 
agreements.
    Transportation accessibility and mobility.--The Committee 
recognizes that availability, accessibility, and efficiency of 
transportation is essential for everyone to go about their 
daily lives and provide for themselves and their families. 
Transportation systems provide connections to job and economic 
opportunities, healthcare, childcare, education and workforce 
training, and many other services. However, some groups, 
including pregnant women, older adults, people with 
disabilities, and individuals of low income, may experience 
unique challenges with accessing or riding public transit, 
including making first and last mile connections, adjusting 
work schedules to align with transit schedules and, 
potentially, paying fares. The Committee recognizes the ongoing 
work by the Department to improve accessibility and mobility 
services and supports the goals of the Coordinating Council on 
Access and Mobility (CCAM), which is housed within the Federal 
Transit Administration (FTA). Within 30 days of completion of 
the CCAM report, which is expected in the Fall of 2020, the 
Committee directs the Department to brief the House and Senate 
Committees on Appropriations on the results of that report. To 
continue to increase accessibility in transportation, the 
Committee directs the Department to identify policy gaps in 
planning requirements, challenges or opportunities with Federal 
funding eligibilities in competitive grant and formula 
programs, and conduct research. In addition, the FTA shall 
complete an analysis of the challenges faced by and the 
accessibility of public transit for pregnant women within 1 
year of enactment of this Act and post the analysis on their 
website.
    Infrastructure coordinator.--Mexico is the United States' 
third largest trading partner. The Committee supports 
strengthening coordination between the Department and other 
relevant Federal agencies to improve freight infrastructure 
development at the southwest border, which is critical to 
maintaining this bilateral trade relationship. Therefore, the 
Committee directs the Department to work with the General 
Services Administration (GSA), the Department of Homeland 
Security (DHS), and other relevant agencies to designate a lead 
infrastructure coordinator to facilitate more efficient 
development of infrastructure projects and to coordinate with 
his or her counterpart in the Mexican government. The Committee 
looks forward to receiving the report on the Department's 
efforts on this matter as required by House Report 116-106.
    Ports of entry (POE).--The Committee directs the Department 
to coordinate with the Office of Management and Budget, GSA, 
and DHS, including U.S. Customs and Border Protection, 
regarding its efforts in support of those entities in opening 
and closing POEs that affect commercial motor vehicle traffic, 
including providing sufficient time to plan for operational and 
staffing changes. The Committee strongly encourages the 
Department to share relevant information with these entities, 
when appropriate, and to consider economic impacts, safety, and 
input from stakeholders transporting commercial goods when 
coordinating with respect to making operational changes to 
POEs. The Committee directs the Department to brief the House 
and Senate Committees on Appropriations no later than 60 days 
after enactment of this Act on its efforts in this regard.
    Value capture.--The Committee understands value capture is 
the use of a portion of increased property values created as a 
result of public infrastructure investment and is usually part 
of a mixed funding and financing package. The Committee 
encourages more widespread consideration of value capture as a 
tool for economic development and as a non-Federal source of 
funding for transportation infrastructure, such as transit and 
passenger rail projects. The Committee encourages the 
Department to improve the dissemination of information and 
education on the benefits of value capture and guidance on 
policies and procedures necessary to utilize value capture, and 
to provide technical assistance as appropriate.
    Climate change and transportation.--The transportation 
sector is a principal contributor to greenhouse gas emissions 
in the United States. The Committee recognizes the urgent need 
to reduce greenhouse gas emissions in order to mitigate the 
impacts of climate change, as well as the importance of the 
transportation sector in that effort. The Committee encourages 
the Department to integrate considerations of the impacts of 
climate change into all aspects of the Department's 
transportation planning and into competitive grant and formula 
programs.
    Alternative fuels.--The Committee notes that the 
integration of alternative fuels into the national 
transportation system presents opportunities to address climate 
change and economic growth through electric vehicle recharging 
stations, passenger vehicle biofuel refueling, aviation 
alternative fuel usage, and increased use of hydrogen, 
electric, and other fuels. The Committee directs the Department 
to brief the House and Senate Committees on Appropriations no 
later than 180 days after enactment of this Act on the efforts 
the Department is taking to encourage adoption of alternative 
fuels, including ongoing collaboration with the Department of 
Energy.
    Careers in transportation.--Transportation is the backbone 
of the national economy, moving people, goods, and services 
across the country and beyond. The Committee recognizes the 
importance of ensuring the transportation industry workforce is 
sufficient to meet future demands. Therefore, the Committee 
encourages the Department to consider initiatives that could 
increase the number and diversity of the transportation 
workforce, including pilots, airport executives, engineers, 
truck drivers, inspectors, technicians, and maritime workers, 
and to focus on engaging the next generation on potential 
careers in transportation fields.
    Cost-benefit analysis.--The Committee understands that the 
Department utilizes cost-benefit analysis to assist in the 
competitive grant application evaluation process. The Committee 
recognizes that given the wide array of projects eligible under 
competitive grant programs and the diverse types of benefits 
that might be applicable to these projects, it is difficult for 
the Department to use one standardized cost-benefit analysis 
form across the entire Department. The Committee further 
recognizes that completing multiple different cost-benefit 
analyses can be challenging for applicants. Therefore, the 
Committee urges the Department to continue to assist applicants 
in developing cost-benefit analyses through guidance, technical 
assistance, webinars, debriefs on past applications, and other 
means deemed appropriate by the Department.
    Distressed coal communities.--The Committee encourages the 
Department to prioritize technical assistance to assist coal 
communities emerging from economic downturn and to help them 
utilize competitive grant programs to revitalize their 
communities.
    Nationally significant freight and highway (INFRA) 
projects.--The Committee is concerned that the competitive 
grant process for INFRA includes limited transparency into the 
evaluation process. Consistent with the recommendations issued 
by the Government Accountability Office in GAO-19-541, as part 
of its annual report on the program, the Committee directs the 
Department to include a summary of each project for which an 
application was submitted and a single rating for each 
project's ability to fulfill the goals outlined in section 
117(a)(2) of title 23, United States Code. More transparency 
would allow project sponsors to improve applications in future 
competitions and enhance public confidence that the Department 
has selected the most urgent projects of national and regional 
significance. Further, the Committee encourages the Department 
to give priority consideration to projects which address the 
needs of large metropolitan cities and increase the flow of 
commerce, including at ports, and to applicants which have 
demonstrated a successful track record of managing and 
implementing complex projects on time and on budget.
    North-south four-lane highways.--The Committee encourages 
the Department to work with States on projects to complete 
north-south four-lane highways, especially in States with no 
existing north-south four-lane highways in place and where 
there are significant freight traffic and safety concerns.
    Mode-neutral framework.--The Committee is concerned that 
the Department's current approach to autonomous systems could 
result in different regulatory structures and safety or 
operational standards being imposed on different modes of 
transportation. The Committee encourages the Department to 
develop guidelines so that operating administrations can 
establish safety and operational standards, including for 
automated systems. Such guidelines could facilitate research, 
development, and testing of emerging technologies and processes 
by freight transportation industries.

                        RESEARCH AND TECHNOLOGY

 
 
 
Appropriation, fiscal year 2020.......................       $21,000,000
Budget request, fiscal year 2021......................        11,033,000
Recommended in the bill...............................        19,800,000
Bill compared with:
 Appropriation, fiscal year 2020......................        -1,200,000
 Budget request, fiscal year 2021.....................        +8,767,000
 

    The Office of the Assistant Secretary for Research and 
Technology coordinates, facilitates, and reviews the 
Department's research and development programs and activities; 
coordinates and develops positioning, navigation, and timing 
(PNT) technology; maintains PNT policy, coordination, and 
spectrum management; manages the nationwide differential global 
positioning system (GPS); and oversees and provides direction 
to the Bureau of Transportation Statistics, the Intelligent 
Transportation Systems Joint Program Office, the University 
Transportation Centers (UTCs) program, the John A. Volpe 
National Transportation Systems Center, and the Transportation 
Safety Institute.

                        COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION

    The Committee recommendation provides $19,800,000 for 
research and technology activities.
    Transportation resilience metrics study.--The Committee 
continues to assert that new construction or major 
rehabilitation projects funded by the Department through 
competitive grant and formula programs should be constructed to 
the most current relevant standards and address the risk of 
structural failure or loss of use from natural hazards 
throughout the lifetime of the project. The Committee is 
pleased that the Department entered into an agreement in April 
2020 with the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and 
Medicine to conduct a study through the Transportation Research 
Board on effective ways to measure the resilience of 
transportation systems. The Committee understands the 
Transportation Research Board will identify and examine metrics 
to assess the resilience of existing infrastructure and to 
inform infrastructure investment planning across the surface, 
marine, and aviation modes for a wide array of natural 
disasters and hazards. The Committee looks forward to receiving 
the findings and recommendations of this study as required by 
P.L. 116-94.
    Highly automated systems safety center of excellence (HASS 
COE).--As automated systems and technologies become 
increasingly widespread, the Committee continues to believe 
that the safety of the traveling public jointly depends on 
technology developers, owners and operators, and appropriate 
Federal regulations and effective oversight. The Committee 
appreciates the Department's efforts to date to launch the HASS 
COE as required by P.L. 116-94. As outlined in section 105 of 
P.L. 116-94, the HASS COE is intended to serve as a dedicated 
workforce at the Department capable of reviewing, assessing, 
and validating the safety of highly automated systems across 
all modes of transportation. To ensure the Department has the 
necessary expertise and capabilities within the HASS COE to 
collaborate with and provide support to all operating 
administrations, the Committee directs the Department to staff 
the HASS COE with full-time equivalents who have expertise in 
automation and human factors, computer science, data analytics, 
machine learning, sensors, and other technologies involving 
automated systems. This would fulfill the Committee's intent in 
fiscal year 2020 to allow the Department to hire the best and 
brightest in these fields, including direct hires from outside 
the Federal government like industry or academia as well as 
detailees from operating administrations or other Federal 
agencies. While section 105 of P.L. 116-94 provides the 
Department the flexibility to utilize detailees from operating 
administrations or other Federal agencies, the HASS COE shall 
not be solely comprised of detailees. Nor shall the HASS COE 
consist of part-time, fee-for-service experts or be staffed on 
a project-by-project basis. The needs and requests of the 
operating administrations should drive the work of the HASS 
COE; however, each new project should not require assembling a 
staff. The use of part-time, fee-for-service experts shall be 
limited in scope to emerging issues or incidents requiring 
capabilities not already provided by the full-time experts 
within the HASS COE.
    The Committee maintains the importance of having a 
dedicated workforce at the Department through the HASS COE to 
build internal expertise and capacity in complex 
transportation-based systems to ensure automated technologies 
are safe and work as intended. Therefore, the Committee 
provides $3,000,000 for the HASS COE for the Department to 
retain the expertise outlined in section 105 of P.L. 116-94 
through a dedicated, full-time equivalent workforce. The 
Committee directs the Department to continue to consult with 
the House and Senate Committees on Appropriations on the HASS 
COE and to submit a staffing plan and budget for the HASS COE 
to the House and Senate Committees on Appropriations for 
approval no later than 60 days after enactment of this Act.
    UTCs.--The Committee continues to support UTCs, which are 
authorized under section 5505 of title 49, United States Code, 
and funded through the Federal Highway Administration 
consistent with the amounts authorized in the INVEST in America 
Act. The Committee is aware of the important role UTCs can play 
in conducting research and development activities on 
technologies for safe and efficient transportation that could 
reduce vehicle idling, decrease congestion, and manage urban 
arterials with scalable systems and real-time responsiveness. 
Further, the Committee encourages the Department to work with 
relevant UTCs to launch a clearinghouse for new innovations by 
providing a platform for bridge and structure stakeholders to 
find technically robust and unbiased information and reports 
that evaluate innovations and accelerate acceptance and 
implementation of new bridge and structure materials and 
technologies.
    Emergency planning transportation data initiative.--The 
Committee recognizes that emergency planning decision-makers 
and the public require real-time roadway weather data to make 
important transportation decisions to protect public safety. A 
variety of weather events create hazardous driving conditions 
that lead to transportation accidents that could have been 
prevented with better data integration. P.L. 116-94 provided 
$1,000,000 for the emergency planning transportation data 
initiative to conduct research and develop models of data 
integration of geo-located weather and roadway information for 
emergency and other severe weather conditions to improve public 
safety, emergency evacuation, and response capabilities. The 
Committee encourages the Department to continue to support this 
initiative in fiscal year 2021.
    PNT technologies.--PNT technologies are critical to all 
modes of transportation. The Department is the lead for civil 
PNT requirements and represents the civil departments and 
agencies in the development, acquisition, management, and 
operations of GPS. In 2019, the Department issued a request for 
information and subsequently a request for quotation for 
commercial technologies to support a backup GPS capability and 
complementary PNT services demonstration. The Committee 
understands 11 commercial technologies with a high level of 
technical readiness were selected to conduct field 
demonstrations, which took place in March 2020. The Committee 
further understands the Department is analyzing and assessing 
the data from these field demonstrations and will work with the 
Departments of Defense and Homeland Security, in coordination 
with members of the National Executive Committee for Space-
Based PNT, to develop recommendations for a technology or a 
combination of technologies later this year. The Committee 
directs the Department to brief the House and Senate Committees 
on Appropriations on the results of the field demonstration and 
the Department's recommendations no later than 30 days after 
the recommendations have been finalized. This briefing should 
include estimates on the funding necessary to carry out the 
Department's recommendations. Further, the Committee provides 
$5,000,000 to assist the Department in carrying out its 
recommendations.
    Recycled plastic materials in transportation.--The 
Committee provides $800,000 for the Secretary to enter into an 
agreement with the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, 
and Medicine to conduct a study through the Transportation 
Research Board on the use of recycled plastic materials in 
transportation infrastructure. The study should (1) identify 
domestic and international examples of transportation 
infrastructure projects which have used recycled plastic 
materials and projects in which recycled plastic materials have 
been incorporated into or with other transportation 
infrastructure, (2) assess the effectiveness and utility of 
recycled plastic materials, (3) assess the extent to which 
recycled plastic materials are consistent with recognized 
specifications and standards for transportation infrastructure, 
(4) review relevant impacts of recycled plastic materials 
compared to non-waste plastic materials, (5) assess the health, 
safety, and environmental impacts of recycled plastic materials 
on humans and animals, (6) assess the ability of recycled 
plastic materials to withstand natural disasters and extreme 
weather events, and (7) assess the potential economic benefits 
of recycled plastic materials. The Committee directs the 
Secretary to submit to the House and Senate Committees on 
Appropriations a final study, with recommendations, developed 
by the National Academy of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine 
no later than 2 years after enactment of this Act.

                  NATIONAL INFRASTRUCTURE INVESTMENTS

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

 
 
 
Appropriation, fiscal year 2020.......................    $1,000,000,000
Budget request, fiscal year 2021......................     1,000,000,000
Recommended in the bill...............................     1,000,000,000
Bill compared with:
 Appropriation, fiscal year 2020......................             - - -
 Budget request, fiscal year 2021.....................             - - -
 

    The national infrastructure investments program (also known 
as BUILD and formerly known as TIGER) was created in the 
American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (P.L. 111-5) to provide 
grants and credit assistance to State and local governments, 
tribal governments, U.S. territories, transit agencies, port 
authorities, metropolitan planning organizations, or a 
combination of such entities to improve the Nation's 
transportation infrastructure. Eligible projects include 
highways and bridges, public transportation, freight and 
passenger rail, port infrastructure, and bicycle and pedestrian 
improvements. The national infrastructure investments program 
awards funds on a competitive basis to projects that will have 
a significant local or regional impact.

                        COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION

    The Committee recommendation provides $1,000,000,000 for 
the national infrastructure investments program to support 
multimodal, multijurisdictional transportation projects that 
are more difficult to accomplish through traditional 
transportation programs. Key tenets of this program include its 
flexibility and the ability for any public entity to apply 
directly and not through a State department of transportation 
as is the case with many Federal transportation programs. BUILD 
also fosters collaboration and leverages non-Federal 
investments from private, State, and local sources. The 
Committee has consistently heard from communities large and 
small on the difference BUILD grants have made in improving 
safety, state of good repair, economic competitiveness, 
environmental sustainability, and quality of life.
    The Committee remains concerned that the Department 
continues to move away from the original intent of the program 
and has overemphasized road projects in fiscal years 2017, 
2018, and 2019. In fiscal year 2019, the Department awarded 68 
percent of the total funding available to 38 road projects. The 
remaining 32 percent of the funding was spread among 17 
transit, rail, maritime, and aviation projects. The 
Department's prioritization of road projects comes mostly at 
the expense of transit-related projects, which on average 
received about 32 percent of awards between fiscal years 2009 
and 2016. This also contradicted direction in the Consolidated 
Appropriations Act, 2019 (P.L. 116-6) to invest in a variety of 
transportation modes. The Committee strongly reminds the 
Department that highway and bridge projects have dedicated 
funding sources through Highway Trust Fund formula programs. 
Therefore, the Committee directs the Department to achieve a 
more equitable distribution of fiscal year 2021 funding to the 
transportation modes which have been underfunded in fiscal 
years 2017, 2018, and 2019; including transit projects, 
passenger and freight rail projects, port infrastructure 
improvement projects, bicycle and pedestrian projects, and 
multimodal infrastructure projects.
    The Committee is also disappointed with the Department's 
efforts to prioritize rural communities over urban communities. 
Despite direction in P.L. 116-6 to award 50 percent of the 
funding to rural and urban areas, respectively, the Department 
awarded $449,708,055 to rural projects and $433,763,168 to 
urban projects. Instead of distributing the $16,528,777 in the 
administrative costs evenly across the rural and urban set-
asides, the Department decided to take the vast majority--
$16,236,832--of the administrative costs from the urban set-
aside. P.L. 116-94 requires the Department to assign the 
administrative costs evenly across the rural and urban set-
asides and this Act continues that requirement. Further, to 
ensure a more equitable distribution of fiscal year 2021 
funding, the Committee requires the Department to distribute 
awards based on the population of the United States. 
Specifically, 40 percent of the funding will support projects 
in rural areas with a population of 250,000 or less, and 60 
percent of the funding will support projects in urban areas 
with a population greater than 250,000. These percentages 
directly correlate to the number of people living in these 
areas in the 2010 Census. The Committee also notes that 
investments in projects can have benefits far beyond the 
project location. For example, projects in urban areas can 
provide benefits to rural areas. Therefore, the Committee 
encourages the Department to consider the benefits of a project 
to the fullest extent possible and to include all relevant 
geographic areas. In addition, the Committee urges the 
Department to consider projects in urban areas that use new and 
emerging technologies to improve traffic flow, enhance safety, 
and reduce congestion.
    The Committee reminds the Department and applicants that 
BUILD grants support a broad variety of transportation projects 
including, but not limited to, highway, bridge, or road 
projects; transit projects; passenger and freight rail 
projects, including high speed passenger rail; port 
infrastructure improvement projects; intermodal projects; 
bicycle and pedestrian projects; and multimodal infrastructure 
projects, including infrastructure reuse projects and projects 
that improve transportation safety and efficiency at ports, 
piers, and parks. The Committee also reiterates that applicants 
from all 50 States, the District of Columbia, and all U.S. 
territories are eligible to apply for BUILD grants. The 
Committee notes that despite their eligibility and having 
submitted 114 applications between fiscal years 2009 and 2019, 
the U.S. territories have been awarded only 3 projects over the 
life of the program. The Committee encourages the Department to 
fairly consider applications for projects located in the U.S. 
territories.
    Notice of funding opportunity (NOFO).--The Department's 
fiscal year 2020 NOFO again incorporates new criteria which the 
Department will use to evaluate and award grants. This 
contradicts the direction in P.L. 116-94 to consider and award 
projects based solely on the selection criteria from the fiscal 
year 2017 NOFO. The Committee directs the Department to only 
use the selection criteria from the fiscal year 2017 NOFO for 
fiscal year 2021.
    Planning grants.--The Committee recognizes that planning 
support can be critical for communities seeking to invest in 
infrastructure projects, including transit, transit-oriented 
development, and multimodal projects. The Committee provided 
funding for planning grants in fiscal years 2010, 2014, 2018, 
2019, and 2020. Planning grants awarded in fiscal years 2010 
and 2014 have spurred project development and, in turn, 
construction. The Committee is disappointed that the Department 
again did not award a single planning grant in fiscal year 
2019. P.L. 116-94 requires the Department to use $15,000,000 in 
fiscal year 2020 funding for planning grants, and the Committee 
is pleased that the Department's fiscal year 2020 NOFO complies 
with this directive.
    The Committee recommendation continues to support planning 
grants and requires the Department to award $40,000,000 in 
grants for the planning, preparation, or design of projects. Of 
this amount, $20,000,000 is provided for any eligible project 
and applicant with an emphasis on transit, transit-oriented 
development, and multimodal projects, and $20,000,000 is 
provided for any eligible project located in or directly 
benefiting counties and census tracts experiencing persistent 
poverty or any territory or possession of the United States.

     NATIONAL SURFACE TRANSPORTATION AND INNOVATIVE FINANCE BUREAU

 
 
 
Appropriation, fiscal year 2020.......................        $5,000,000
Budget request, fiscal year 2021......................         4,250,000
Recommended in the bill...............................        15,500,000
Bill compared with:
    Appropriation, fiscal year 2020...................       +10,500,000
    Budget request, fiscal year 2021..................       +11,250,000
 

    The National Surface Transportation and Innovative Finance 
Bureau (Bureau) is authorized under section 9001 of the Fixing 
America's Surface Transportation (FAST) Act (P.L. 114-94). The 
Bureau administers and coordinates the Department's existing 
transportation finance programs and INFRA competitive grant 
program and provides technical assistance and outreach to 
communities on financing and funding opportunities for 
transportation infrastructure.

                        COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION

    The Committee recommendation provides $15,500,000 for the 
Bureau. The Committee opposes the proposal in the budget 
request to eliminate the maritime guaranteed loan (Title XI) 
program and to transfer existing loans from the Maritime 
Administration to the Bureau for administration.
    Transit-oriented development (TOD).--In the FAST Act, 
Congress authorized TOD projects as an eligible use for credit 
assistance under the Transportation Infrastructure Finance and 
Investment Act (TIFIA) and Railroad Rehabilitation and 
Improvement Financing (RRIF) programs. The Committee notes with 
disappointment that the Department has not submitted a report 
required by House Report 116-106 summarizing potential TOD 
projects and applications and identifying statutory, 
regulatory, or administrative requirements that may be 
hindering the financing of TOD projects under TIFIA and RRIF. 
The Committee directs the Department to complete this report no 
later than 30 days after enactment of this Act.
    Rural community outreach.--The FAST Act established the 
Bureau to provide assistance and communicate best practices to 
project sponsors seeking to take advantage of the TIFIA and 
RRIF programs. These credit assistance programs were created to 
leverage Federal dollars in the form of direct loans, loan 
guarantees, and lines of credit to finance surface and rail 
transportation projects. The Committee directs the Department 
to submit a report to the House and Senate Committees on 
Appropriations no later than 180 days after enactment of this 
Act summarizing the Bureau's efforts to conduct outreach to 
communities located outside metropolitan or micropolitan 
statistical areas and recommendations to improve outreach, 
communication, and technical assistance with rural communities. 
Further, the report should identify whether projects receiving, 
or that have received, assistance under the TIFIA program are 
located in a metropolitan statistical area, micropolitan 
statistical area, or neither, and should identify current 
statutory, regulatory, or administrative requirements that may 
be hindering the financing of TIFIA projects in areas outside 
of metropolitan or micropolitan statistical areas. If current 
data collected under the TIFIA program are unable to be readily 
aggregated as a metropolitan statistical area, micropolitan 
statistical area, or neither, then the Bureau is directed to 
report on the limitations of the data and provide available 
data which is similar in nature to metropolitan or micropolitan 
statistical areas.
    Planning grants to assist areas of persistent poverty.--The 
Committee recognizes that planning support can be critical for 
communities seeking to invest in transportation infrastructure. 
Unfortunately, communities that lack the resources or expertise 
to adequately plan for such investments experience greater 
challenges in securing competitive grants to assist with 
project construction. Therefore, the Committee provides 
$10,000,000 for a new competitive grant program for planning 
grants to assist areas of persistent poverty. These planning 
grants would support pre-construction activities including 
planning, engineering, design, environmental analysis, 
feasibility studies, and finance plans for highway, bridge, or 
road projects, bicycle and pedestrian projects, transit 
projects, passenger and freight rail projects, port 
infrastructure improvement projects, airport improvement 
projects, and intermodal projects that are located in or 
directly benefiting counties and census tracts experiencing 
persistent poverty or any territory or possession of the United 
States.

       RAILROAD REHABILITATION AND IMPROVEMENT FINANCING PROGRAM

 
 
 
Appropriation, fiscal year 2020.......................             - - -
Budget request, fiscal year 2021......................             - - -
Recommended in the bill...............................       $70,000,000
Bill compared with:
    Appropriation, fiscal year 2020...................       +70,000,000
    Budget request, fiscal year 2021..................       +70,000,000
 

    The RRIF program was established in the Transportation 
Equity Act for the 21st Century (P.L. 105-178) to provide 
direct loans and loan guarantees to State and local 
governments, government-sponsored entities, and railroads. 
Credit assistance under the program may be used for 
rehabilitating or developing rail equipment and facilities, 
developing or establishing intermodal facilities, and transit-
oriented development.

                        COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION

    The Committee recommendation provides $70,000,000 for the 
modification cost for credit risk premium repayment for RRIF 
loans in cohort 3. Further, the Committee recommendation allows 
the credit risk premium for RRIF loans to be eligible for 
grants under the national infrastructure investments program.

                      FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT CAPITAL

 
 
 
Appropriation, fiscal year 2020.......................        $2,000,000
Budget request, fiscal year 2021......................         2,000,000
Recommended in the bill...............................         2,000,000
Bill compared with:
    Appropriation, fiscal year 2020...................             - - -
    Budget request, fiscal year 2021..................             - - -
 

    The financial management capital program supports a multi-
year project to upgrade the Department's financial systems, 
processes, and reporting capabilities and implement 
requirements of the Digital Accountability and Transparency 
(DATA) Act (P.L. 113-101).

                        COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION

    The Committee recommendation provides $2,000,000 for the 
financial management capital program.

                       CYBER SECURITY INITIATIVES

 
 
 
Appropriation, fiscal year 2020.......................       $15,000,000
Budget request, fiscal year 2021......................        22,000,000
Recommended in the bill...............................        19,300,000
Bill compared with:
    Appropriation, fiscal year 2020...................        +4,300,000
    Budget request, fiscal year 2021..................        -2,700,000
 

    The cyber security initiatives account is an effort to 
close performance gaps in the Department's cyber security. The 
account includes support for essential program enhancements, 
infrastructure improvements, and contractual resources to 
enhance the security of the Department's computer network and 
reduce the risk of security breaches.

                        COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION

    The Committee recommendation provides $19,300,000 to 
support the Secretary's cyber security initiatives.

                         OFFICE OF CIVIL RIGHTS

 
 
 
Appropriation, fiscal year 2020.......................        $9,470,000
Budget request, fiscal year 2021......................         9,600,000
Recommended in the bill...............................         9,600,000
Bill compared with:
    Appropriation, fiscal year 2020...................          +130,000
    Budget request, fiscal year 2021..................             - - -
 

    The Office of Civil Rights is responsible for advising the 
Secretary on civil rights and equal opportunity issues and 
ensuring the full implementation of the civil rights laws and 
departmental civil rights policies in all official actions and 
programs. This office is responsible for enforcing laws and 
regulations that prohibit discrimination in Federally operated 
and Federally assisted transportation programs and enabling 
access to transportation providers. The Office of Civil Rights 
also handles all civil rights cases affecting Department 
employees.

                        COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION

    The Committee recommendation provides $9,600,000 for the 
Office of Civil Rights.

           TRANSPORTATION PLANNING, RESEARCH, AND DEVELOPMENT

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

 
 
 
Appropriation, fiscal year 2020.......................       $10,879,000
Budget request, fiscal year 2021......................         9,350,000
Recommended in the bill...............................        10,879,000
Bill compared with:
    Appropriation, fiscal year 2020...................             - - -
    Budget request, fiscal year 2021..................        +1,529,000
 

    This appropriation finances research activities and studies 
related to the planning, analysis, and information development 
used in the formulation of national transportation policies and 
plans. It also finances the staff necessary to conduct these 
efforts. The overall program is carried out primarily through 
contracts with other Federal agencies, educational 
institutions, non-profit research organizations, and private 
firms.

                        COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION

    The Committee recommendation provides $10,879,000 for 
transportation planning, research, and development activities, 
of which $1,000,000 is for the Interagency Infrastructure 
Permitting Improvement Center.
    Non-traditional and emerging transportation technology 
(NETT) council.--The Committee recognizes the growth and 
innovation in new transportation technologies that seek to 
improve safety, alleviate congestion and shorten commute times, 
expand access and mobility for rural and urban communities, and 
enable a more efficient flow of commercial goods. The Committee 
understands hyperloop technology is an emerging transportation 
concept that has the potential to fulfill some of these 
objectives. P.L. 116-94 directed the Department, through the 
NETT Council, to conduct a study on new and emerging cross-
modal transportation technologies, including hyperloop 
technology. The Committee looks forward to the NETT Council 
completing this study and directs the Department to brief the 
House and Senate Committees on Appropriations on the findings 
and recommendations no later than 30 days after the completion 
date set in P.L. 116-94. Further, the Committee provides 
$2,000,000 for activities supporting such technologies that 
were initiated with funding provided in fiscal year 2020. 
Specifically, the Committee directs the Department to utilize 
fiscal year 2021 funding to conduct research to better 
understand the safety and regulatory needs of such technologies 
and to provide technical assistance to local and State 
governments for non-traditional and emerging technologies. The 
fiscal year 2021 funding may also be used to implement 
recommendations from the study conducted by the NETT Council. 
If the Department seeks to utilize the fiscal year 2021 funding 
to support these recommendations, then the Committee directs 
the Department to request and receive approval from the House 
and Senate Committees on Appropriations for the use of such 
funds.
    Automated vehicle proving grounds.--The auto industry is in 
the midst of a seismic technological shift that could 
significantly change the transportation of people and goods. 
Automated vehicle proving grounds are designated pilot sites to 
encourage testing and information sharing on automated vehicle 
technologies. The Committee is concerned with the lack of 
transparency as it relates to the automated vehicle proving 
grounds. The Committee directs the Department to report to the 
House and Senate Committees on Appropriations no later than 90 
days after enactment of this Act on significant findings 
discovered from the automated vehicle testing at designated 
pilot sites, such as technological advancements and safety 
concerns.

                          WORKING CAPITAL FUND

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

 
 
 
Limitation, fiscal year 2020..........................      $319,793,000
Budget request, fiscal year 2021......................               n/a
Recommended in the bill...............................       372,016,000
Bill compared with:
    Limitation, fiscal year 2020......................       +52,223,000
    Budget request, fiscal year 2021..................               n/a
 

    The Working Capital Fund (WCF) was created to provide 
common administrative services to the Department's operating 
administrations and outside entities that contract for the 
Fund's services. The WCF operates on a fee-for-service basis 
and receives no direct appropriations. It is fully self-
sustaining and must achieve full cost recovery.

                        COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION

    The Committee recommends a limitation of $372,016,000 on 
the Working Capital Fund, which fully supports the WCF's 
administration and information technology (IT) activities for 
the Department and the WCF's commodity IT shared services 
initiative. The limitation allows the Department to complete 
the commodity IT shared services initiative and, if needed, the 
migration of personnel associated with commodity IT. The 
limitation does not support non-commodity, programmatic IT 
consolidation in the WCF. The Committee continues to stipulate 
that the limitation is only for services provided to the 
Department of Transportation, not other entities. Further, the 
Committee directs that, as much as possible, services shall be 
provided on a competitive basis.
    Equipment inventory.--The Committee notes that the 
Department committed to making changes to its asset management 
policies and procedures in response to the Office of Inspector 
General's November 4, 2019 audit of the Department's management 
of WCF laptop computers. The Department is directed to brief 
the House and Senate Committees on Appropriations no later than 
90 days after enactment of this Act on the steps the Department 
has taken to improve the policies and procedures for laptop 
computer asset management.

       SMALL AND DISADVANTAGED BUSINESS UTILIZATION AND OUTREACH

 
 
 
Appropriation, fiscal year 2020.......................        $4,646,000
Budget request, fiscal year 2021......................         4,714,000
Recommended in the bill...............................         4,714,000
Bill compared with:
    Appropriation, fiscal year 2020...................           +68,000
    Budget request, fiscal year 2021..................             - - -
 

    The Office of Small and Disadvantaged Business Utilization 
and Outreach assists small, disadvantaged businesses and 
businesses owned by minorities and women in competing for 
contracting opportunities with the Department and Department-
funded contracts or grants for transportation-related projects. 
The office also provides technical and financial assistance, 
bonding education, training, counseling, and procurement 
assistance, and administers the Department's Small Business 
Transportation Resource Center program.

                        COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION

    The Committee recommendation provides $4,714,000 for the 
small and disadvantaged business utilization and outreach 
account.

                        PAYMENTS TO AIR CARRIERS

                    (AIRPORT AND AIRWAY TRUST FUND)

 
 
 
Appropriation, fiscal year 2020.......................      $162,000,000
Budget request, fiscal year 2021......................       141,724,000
Recommended in the bill...............................       162,000,000
Bill compared with:
    Appropriation, fiscal year 2020...................             - - -
    Budget request, fiscal year 2021..................       +20,276,000
 

    The Essential Air Service (EAS) program provides subsidies 
to air carriers to maintain a minimal level of scheduled air 
service to small communities that had received air service 
prior to the Airline Deregulation Act of 1978. Since 1998, the 
source of funding for the EAS program has been ``overflight 
fees,'' which are charged to carriers for Federal Aviation 
Administration navigational and surveillance services for 
flights that traverse, but neither take off from nor land in, 
the United States.

                        COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION

    The following table shows the appropriation, overflight 
fees, and total program levels for the EAS program.

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                    Overflight
                                                                  Appropriations       fees            Total
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
FY 2020 Enacted.................................................    $162,000,000    $150,500,000    $312,500,000
Request.........................................................     141,724,000     153,000,000     294,724,000
Recommendation..................................................     162,000,000     153,000,000     315,000,000
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    In addition, the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic 
Security Act (CARES Act) (P.L. 116-136) included $56,000,000 
for the Essential Air Service program to prevent, prepare for, 
and respond to coronavirus.
    The Committee directs the Department to utilize all 
collected overflight fees and provides an additional 
$162,000,000 for this vital link between small communities and 
the nation.

  ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISIONS--OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF TRANSPORTATION

                        (INCLUDING RESCISSIONS)

    Section 101 prohibits the Office of the Secretary of 
Transportation from approving assessments or reimbursable 
agreements pertaining to funds appropriated to the operating 
administrations in this Act, unless such assessments or 
agreements have completed the normal reprogramming process for 
Congressional notification.
    Section 102 requires the Secretary to post on the internet 
a schedule of all Council on Credit and Finance meetings, 
agendas, and meeting minutes.
    Section 103 allows the Department's WCF to provide payments 
in advance to vendors for the Federal transit pass fringe 
benefit program and to provide full or partial payments to, and 
to accept reimbursements from, Federal agencies for transit 
benefit distribution services.
    Section 104 allows the Department's WCF to provide payments 
in advance to commercial vendors for the Federal transit pass 
fringe benefit program and requires the Department to include 
safeguards in the contract with vendors.
    Section 105 allows the Department's WCF to utilize not more 
than $1,000,000 in fiscal year 2021 unused van pool benefits to 
provide contractual services in support of section 190 of this 
Act.
    Section 106 extends the obligation date for the amounts 
made available for the national infrastructure investments 
program for fiscal years 2017, 2018, 2019, and 2020.

                    Federal Aviation Administration

    The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) is responsible 
for the safety of civil aviation, navigation and surveillance, 
and airports. The Federal government's regulatory role in civil 
aviation dates back 1926. When the Department of Transportation 
began its operations in 1967, the FAA became one of several 
modal administrations within the Department. FAA's mission 
expanded in 1995 with the transfer of the Office of Commercial 
Space Transportation from the Office of the Secretary and 
contracted in December 2001 with the transfer of civil aviation 
security activities to the Transportation Security 
Administration.
    Next Generation of Air Traffic Control (NextGen).--The 
Committee places a high priority on NextGen programs and 
provides resources in the operations, facilities and equipment, 
and research, engineering, and development accounts to 
modernize air traffic control along with private sector 
stakeholders.
    NextGen Advisory Committee (NAC).--The NAC includes an 
appropriate mix of the aviation community, including 
representatives from general aviation, commercial aviation, 
labor organizations, airports, local community representatives, 
and the Federal government. The Committee supports the current 
diverse NAC membership and believes that the NAC performs an 
important role in setting priorities for the FAA's air traffic 
control modernization efforts. The Committee encourages the FAA 
to implement NAC recommendations and directs the FAA to provide 
an annual update on the status of NAC recommendations to the 
House and Senate Committees on Appropriations.
    Trust fund share of the FAA budget.--In a break with 
convention, the Committee derives the FAA's funding for the 
``Operations'', ``Facilities and Equipment'', and ``Research, 
Engineering and Development'' accounts from the general fund of 
the Treasury rather than the Airport and Airway Trust Fund 
(AATF). As air passenger traffic plummeted as a result of the 
coronavirus pandemic, so did the revenue from aviation taxes 
that are remitted to the AATF. Then, the Coronavirus Aid, 
Relief, and Economic Security Act (CARES Act) (P.L. 116-136) 
suspended certain aviation taxes through January 2021. 
Consequently, the AATF may have insufficient aviation tax 
revenue to meet all of its obligations in fiscal year 2021. The 
Committee expects AATF revenue and obligations to regain 
balance in fiscal year 2022.

                               OPERATIONS

 
 
 
Appropriation, fiscal year 2020.......................   $10,630,000,000
Budget request, fiscal year 2021......................    11,001,500,000
Recommended in the bill...............................    11,051,500,000
Bill compared with:
    Appropriation, fiscal year 2020...................      +421,500,000
    Budget request, fiscal year 2021..................       +50,000,000
 

    This appropriation provides funds for the operation, 
maintenance, communications, and logistical support of the air 
traffic control and air navigation systems. It also covers 
administrative and managerial costs for the FAA's regulatory, 
international, medical, engineering, and development programs 
as well as policy oversight and overall management functions.
    The operations appropriation includes the following major 
activities: (1) operation of a national air traffic system on a 
24-hour daily basis; (2) establishment and maintenance of a 
national system of aids to navigation; (3) establishment and 
surveillance of civil air regulations to ensure safety in 
aviation; (4) development of standards, rules and regulations 
governing the physical fitness of airmen, as well as the 
administration of an aviation medical research program; (5) 
administration of the acquisition, and research and development 
programs; (6) headquarters, administration, and other staff 
offices; and (7) development, printing, and distribution of 
aeronautical charts used by the flying public.

                        COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION

    The following table shows a comparison of the budget 
request and the Committee recommendation by budget activity.

------------------------------------------------------------------------
       FAA Operations Activities            Request       Recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Aviation Safety.......................   $1,474,039,000   $1,500,000,000
Air Traffic Organization..............    8,210,821,000    8,231,000,000
Commercial Space Transportation.......       27,555,000       27,555,000
Finance and Management................      836,141,000      836,000,000
NextGen and Operations Planning.......       62,862,000       62,862,000
Security and Hazardous Materials            124,928,000      129,000,000
 Safety...............................
Staff offices.........................      265,154,000      265,083,000
                                       ---------------------------------
    Total, Operations.................   11,001,500,000   11,051,500,000
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    In addition, the CARES Act included $25,000,000 in 
budgetary resources for the Operations account to prevent, 
prepare for, and respond to coronavirus.
    Aviation safety.--Every FAA office and program's primary, 
secondary, and tertiary mission is safety. The Committee 
provides funding for the FAA's safety mission in each of the 
FAA's appropriations accounts and will insist that the FAA 
demonstrate how these public resources are being used to 
provide the public good of safety. Eliminating human error is 
unobtainable and simply striving for human perfection will not 
appreciably improve safety. Instead, the Committee supports a 
systems and interdisciplinary approach to aviation safety to 
identify the root causes, circumstances, and conditions that 
increase the likelihood of human error and then develop 
countermeasures to minimize the frequency and impact of human 
error.
    Consistent with the request, the Committee provides an 
increase of $36,679,000 within the Operations account for 
improving aviation safety and oversight. This is the second in 
a series of investments to review and respond to the numerous 
recommendations made by multiple entities that completed or 
have yet to complete their review or investigation of the 737 
MAX accidents or the aircraft certification process in general. 
The funds will also enhance the functionality or integrity of 
investigative or analytical systems such as the Investigation 
Repository/Cyber Analysis Virtual Environment (CAVE), Aviation 
Safety Information Analysis and Sharing (ASIAS), Aviation 
Safety Reporting Program (ASRP), and the FAA Hotline 
Information System (FHIS). The FAA's request includes the 
creation of a new, single office, instead of multiple regional 
offices to oversee 78 Organization Designation Authorization 
(ODA) entities. The Committee believes in the merit to the 
proposal and invites the FAA to submit a reprogramming request 
to create the ODA Office to the House and Senate Committees on 
Appropriations in accordance with section 405 of this Act.
    To further promote aviation safety, within the Aviation 
Safety budget activity, the Committee recommendation includes 
not less than $285,000,000 for the Aircraft Certification 
Service (AIR) and not less than $935,000,000 for the Flight 
Standards Service (AFS), which are $4,773,000 and $4,854,000 
above the request, respectively. These increases above the 
request are for the AIR and AFS to collaborate early and often 
in furtherance of removing artificial barriers between AIR and 
AFS, including deeper engagement with the Aircraft Evaluation 
Groups, who can serve as a bridge between these engineering and 
operational specialists. In addition, to comply with 
recommendations regarding aircraft certification, AIR and AFS 
are to give greater weight to human factors, both physical and 
psychological, in their work from start to finish.
    Aircraft have become increasing automated, measurably 
improving safety, while also introducing new hazards, such as 
pilot complacency. In the fall of 2019, the FAA submitted a 
working paper to the International Civil Aviation Organization 
(ICAO) that outlined the potential for automation to degrade 
pilot skills that are essential in the event that automated 
systems fail. The ICAO will ultimately produce a comprehensive 
study and a set of international standards, but the final 
product could be years away. In the meantime, the Committee 
provides $2,000,000 for the FAA to study one aspect of pilot 
training that merits immediate attention due to its ubiquity--
pilot dependency on automation, which was also identified among 
the recommendations regarding aircraft certification.
    Section 303 of the FAA Reauthorization Act (P.L. 115-254) 
directed the FAA to update its safety critical staffing model 
to determine the number of aviation safety inspectors that FAA 
needs to fulfill its safety oversight mission. In November 
2019, FAA informed the Department's Office of Inspector General 
(OIG) that it updated the model and, as also required by 
section 303, the OIG initiated an audit of the model in March 
2020. The Committee believes that safety is not strictly the 
number of FAA inspectors, but also the range of their training 
and work experience. Accordingly, the Committee provides 
$2,000,000 for a staffing study of current AIR personnel 
training and work experience, such as whether it is equivalent 
to their private sector counterparts, the ratio of senior to 
junior inspectors, and FAA support for continued education and 
training. The Committee directs the FAA to submit quarterly 
reports to the House and Senate Committees on Appropriations 
beginning not later than 60 days after the date of enactment of 
this Act on the status of recommendations made by the National 
Transportation Safety Board, the Department of Transportation 
Special Committee to Review FAA's Aircraft Certification 
Process, the Joint Authorities' Technical Review, and the 
Komite Nasional Keselamatan Transportasi in the Aircraft 
Accident Investigation Report on Lion Air Flight 610.
    In a June 2020 legal opinion (B-331090), the Government 
Accountability Office (GAO) found that the FAA relied on 49 
U.S.C. 106(l)(6) to provide a routine aviation safety-related 
service to an airline carrier in exchange for money, which had 
the effect of circumventing the User Charge Statute (31 U.S.C. 
9701) and improperly augmenting the FAA's Operations 
appropriations. The Committee directs the FAA to submit a 
report to the House and Senate Committees on Appropriations not 
later than 90 days after the date of enactment of this Act on 
its usage of 49 U.S.C. 106(l)(6). The report shall include the 
guidelines, standards, and processes for using 49 U.S.C. 
106(l)(6), including the offices and officials who propose, 
review, approve, and terminate the use of 49 U.S.C. 106(l)(6); 
the annual amount of money the FAA has collected from a person, 
firm, association, or corporation for aviation safety-related 
services since 1998 while relying on 49 U.S.C. 106(l)(6); the 
internal controls for enforcing these guidelines, standards, 
and processes; a complete list of aviation safety-related 
services and their associated costs that are available to any 
person, firm, association, or corporation; a description of how 
the FAA make these services and their costs known to the 
general public; and an explanation of how the FAA ensures that 
aviation safety-related services are neither performed nor 
performed any earlier than they otherwise would be for a 
person, firm, association, or corporation. Not later than 90 
days after the FAA transmits such report to Congress, the GAO 
shall evaluate the report against its legal opinion, best 
practices for user fees, and best practices for procurement and 
brief the House and Senate Committees on Appropriations on such 
evaluation.
    Air tour management.--The Committee shares the U.S. Court 
of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit's opinion of 
the FAA and National Park Service's underwhelming and 
unsuccessful effort to implement the Air Tour Management Act of 
2000. The Committee directs the FAA to submit not later than 15 
days after the date of enactment of this Act to the House and 
Senate Committees on Appropriations a court-approved plan for 
bringing 23 national parks into compliance with the Act and the 
subsequent court-required updates as of the date of enactment 
of this Act. The Committee reminds the FAA that it has a duty 
to provide leadership with regards to all aspects of aviation, 
including noise.
    Commercial space licensing.--The Committee supports the DOT 
and the FAA in their efforts to move forward in reforming, 
streamlining, and reducing reporting requirements and timelines 
for the licensing of U.S. commercial launch services providers. 
The Committee directs the FAA to inform the Committee 
immediately if the licensing workload outpaces the Office of 
Commercial Space's workforce capabilities and potential 
productivity gains from technology solutions.
    Commercial tour flights.--The Committee directs the FAA to 
report to the House and Senate Committees on Appropriations not 
later than 180 days after the date of enactment of this Act on 
FAA responses to the National Transportation Safety Board 
recommendations regarding commercial air tour flights flying 
under 14 C.F.R. Pt. 91 and Pt. 135, including what action FAA 
has taken on each recommendation and why or why none was taken.
    Community engagement and noise.--Community concerns need to 
be considered as the national airspace system evolves. Both the 
FAA and the aviation industry need to provide meaningful 
opportunities for the public to learn about aviation 
technology, research, and operations and to communicate how the 
sum of these factors affects their quality of life. The 
Committee provides an increase of $5,000,000 for the FAA to 
hire additional staff to increase the FAA's community 
engagement capacity, including participating in community 
roundtables and meetings with local officials; for contractor 
support to make more data about aircraft positions and altitude 
publicly available; to prepare air traffic histories and 
analyses; and to conduct environmental reviews.
    Not later than 180 days after the date of enactment of this 
Act, the FAA shall submit a report to the House and Senate 
Committees on Appropriations, on the activities undertaken by 
the Regional Ombudsmen, who serve as the regional liaisons on 
issues regarding aircraft noise, pollution, and safety. Not 
later than 180 days after the date of enactment of this Act, 
the FAA shall provide a report to the House and Senate 
Committees on Appropriations cataloguing all FAA programs 
related to airport, aircraft, and environmental noise. Not 
later than 180 days after the date of enactment of this Act, 
the FAA shall provide a report to the House and Senate 
Committees on Appropriations describing the current FAA in-take 
and response process for noise complaints and the process 
expected after the Noise Complaint and Inquiry Database and 
Tracking System (Noise Portal) is implemented nationally.
    The Committee awaits the conclusion of the Administrator's 
ongoing review of the relationship between aircraft noise 
exposure and its effects on communities around airports, as 
required by section 187 of the FAA Reauthorization Act (P.L. 
115-254), which is estimated to be in autumn 2020.
    Contract tower program.--The Committee recommendation 
includes $172,800,000 for the contract tower program, including 
the contract tower cost share program. The Committee continues 
to strongly support the FAA contract tower program as a cost-
effective and efficient way to provide air traffic control 
services to smaller airports across the country. The Committee 
expects FAA to continue to operate the 256 contract towers 
currently in the program, annualize funding for towers that 
will be added in 2020, and provide full-year funding for new 
airports expected to be added to the program in fiscal year 
2021.
    Disease transmission.--The FAA began as a safety agency and 
has diligently and dutifully remained so as the national 
airspace systems has grown in complexity, size, and 
sophistication. The Committee, however, believes that safety is 
more than people, products, and processes that promote an equal 
number of takeoffs and landings. The FAA is the Federal focal 
point for all aspects of aviation, including the risk of 
disease transmission. While the FAA may not be able to provide 
a definitive medical solution, it does have the power to 
convene the agencies and organizations that can. The 
coronavirus pandemic exposed a void in leadership with regards 
to contact tracing to identify aviation passengers possibly 
exposed to pathogens, the use of masks for aviation passengers 
and crewmembers, policies for social distancing and seating 
arrangements on aircraft, and recirculation of pathogens in 
airliner cabins. The Committee directs the FAA to inform the 
House and Senate Appropriations Committees if resources, new 
legislative authority, or clarifying existing legislative 
authority is needed to fill this void.
    FAA reauthorization.--The Committee directs the FAA to 
submit a report to the House and Senate Committees on 
Appropriations on March 2, 2021, and September 8, 2021, on the 
status of implementation of the provisions in the FAA 
Reauthorization Act (P.L. 115-254), including a list of all 
mandates and associated deadlines, the primary office 
responsible for executing each mandate, and actions taken to 
date on implementing each mandate.
    Fuel dumping.--The Committee is troubled by a January 14, 
2020, fuel dump over Los Angeles and its surrounding 
communities. Not later than 180 days after the date of 
enactment of this Act, the FAA shall submit a report to the 
House and Senate Committees on Appropriations on the annual 
occurrences of fuel dumps in the United States over the fiscal 
year 2015-2020 period. This report shall include the location 
of the fuel dumps, the amount of fuel dumped, the population 
density of the community over which the fuel dump location 
occurred, if the fuel dump occurred over land, and the FAA's 
process for reviewing fuel dumps.
    Human Intervention Motivation Study (HIMS) and the Flight 
Attendant Drug and Alcohol Program (FADAP).--The Committee 
recognizes the effectiveness of the HIMS and the FADAP in 
mitigating drug and alcohol misuse through a peer 
identification and intervention program. The Committee 
recommends that the FAA continue to prioritize these programs 
and urges the FAA to continue this program from within 
available resources.
    Lunar exploration.--The Committee notes the possible value 
of using the payload and lifting capabilities of the Space 
Launch System and encourages the FAA to continue to facilitate 
lunar exploration and development.
    Special issuance for pilot medical certification.--
Consistent with a 2018 opinion from the U.S. Court of Appeals 
for the District of Columbia Circuit, the FAA should develop an 
evidence-based framework to allow for the special issuance of 
first- or second-class medical certification for pilots with 
insulin-treated diabetes. The Committee reminds the FAA that a 
2020 report to the House and Senate Committees on 
Appropriations on actions, taken or planned, for completing 
such a framework is overdue.
    Travel reports.--The Committee directs the FAA to submit 
its travel reporting information profile, and senior federal 
travel and premium class travel reports to the House and Senate 
Committees on Appropriations in an electronic, searchable 
format without any personally identifiable information not less 
than 14 days after its submission to the GSA Travel Reporting 
Tool.
    Workforce diversity.--To further the goal of workforce 
diversity, the Committee provides $7,500,000 for the Minority 
Serving Institutions (MSI) internship program, which provides 
students from Historically Black Colleges and Universities, 
Hispanic Serving Institutions, students attending a college or 
university with a high percentage of Asian American and Pacific 
Islanders, Tribal Colleges and Universities, and Students with 
Disabilities the opportunity to participate in internship 
opportunities. The Committee also recognizes the contributions 
of the Educational Partnership Initiative within the FAA's 
Office of Civil Rights' National Outreach Program for Diversity 
and Inclusion. Establishing educational collaborations and 
partnerships between the FAA and colleges and universities with 
a high concentration of underserved groups forms a pipeline to 
fill mission-critical occupations at the FAA.
    The Committee appreciates the FAA's many efforts to 
increase its own workforce diversity and that of the aviation 
industry at large. The success of these efforts, however, 
depends on widespread and sustained executive support both at 
headquarters and in the field. The Committees provides 
$1,500,000 to increase support for the Science, Technology, 
Engineering, and Math Aviation and Space Education program 
(STEM AVSED). With dedicated staff, STEM AVSED can be formally 
incorporated with the MSI program, the pathways programs, the 
targeted disability hiring program, and the FAA-U.S. Air Force 
aviation workforce initiative announced on May 31, 2019. Not 
later than 90 days after the date of enactment of this Act, the 
FAA shall provide a briefing to the House and Senate Committees 
on Appropriations on how these multiple efforts are coordinated 
and evaluated, which offices and executives are involved, and 
the contributions made by the eight officially recognized 
employee associations:
           FAA Gay, Lesbian, or Bisexual Employees,
           National Asian and Pacific American 
        Association,
           National Black Coalition of Federal Aviation 
        Employees,
           Native American/Alaska Native Coalition for 
        Federal Aviation Employees,
           National Coalition of Federal Aviation 
        Employees with Disabilities,
           National Hispanic Coalition of Federal 
        Aviation Employees,
           Professional Women Controllers, and
           Technical Women's Organization.
    The Committee continues to support the Women in Aviation 
Advisory Board established by section 612 of the FAA 
Reauthorization Act (P.L. 115-254) and is pleased that the 
Secretary appointed 30 members to the Board so it can begin its 
work to assess the education, training, mentorship, outreach, 
and recruitment of women in the aviation industry.
    Unfinished rulemakings.--The Committee notes that the FAA 
has not met the statutory deadlines to comply with section 336 
of the FAA Reauthorization Act (P.L. 115-254), which requires 
the FAA to issue an order for ``secondary cockpit barrier on 
each new aircraft''; section 308 of the FAA Modernization and 
Reform Act of 2012 (P.L. 112-95), which requires the FAA to 
issue a rule related to alcohol and controlled substances 
testing of persons that perform safety-sensitive maintenance 
functions on commercial air carrier aircraft; and section 
335(a) of the FAA Reauthorization Act (P.L. 115-254), which 
requires the FAA to update a rule related to flight attendant 
duty period limitations and rest requirements. The Committee 
directs the FAA to report every 30 days after the date of 
enactment of this Act to the House and Senate Committees on 
Appropriations, the House Committee on Transportation and 
Infrastructure, and the Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, 
and Transportation on actions taken and planned to promulgate 
final rules on these matters.
    Airport operating certificate.--The Committee reminds the 
FAA to adhere to the ``Notice of Policy on Evaluating Disputed 
Changes of Sponsorship at Federally Obligated Airports'' 
published in the Federal Register on June 6, 2016, when 
presented with a request to change the sponsorship of, and/or 
operational responsibility for, an airport from one public 
agency to another public agency.
    Land Transfer.--The Committee acknowledges the ongoing 
dialogue between the FAA and United States Southern Command 
regarding the potential transfer of Miami-Dade County Folio 35 
3028-000-0030, Doral, Florida. The Committee encourages both 
parties to continue working toward a mutually beneficial 
agreement, which will allow the FAA to continue to safely 
monitor U.S. airspace and allow the Department of Defense to 
provide military housing to our servicemen and women.

                        FACILITIES AND EQUIPMENT

 
 
 
Appropriation, fiscal year 2020.......................    $3,045,000,000
Budget request, fiscal year 2021......................     3,000,000,000
Recommended in the bill...............................     3,045,000,000
Bill compared with:
    Appropriation, fiscal year 2020...................             - - -
    Budget request, fiscal year 2021..................       +45,000,000
 

    The Facilities and Equipment (F&E) account is the principal 
means for modernizing and improving air traffic control and 
airway facilities. The appropriation also finances major 
capital investments required by other agency programs, 
experimental research and development facilities, and other 
improvements to enhance the safety and capacity of the airspace 
system.

                        COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION

    Navigational aids monitoring equipment.--The FAA is 
conducting an investment analysis of navigational aids 
monitoring equipment. Until such an analysis is completed and 
an investment decision is made, the Committee directs the FAA 
to make funding available to maintain the operational viability 
of the two existing navigational aids monitoring equipment 
systems--Integrated Control and Monitoring System (IMCS) and 
Universal Interlock Controller (UIC), which are currently 
deployed at 32 airports. The Committee appreciates that the FAA 
investment process is lengthy and involved, requiring careful 
analysis of the competing interests of different FAA programs 
and offices for limited resources. This studious approach, 
however, cannot be allowed to jeopardize the operational status 
of critical systems such as ICMS and UIC. Ensuring the 
viability of the ICMS and UIC systems includes, but is not 
limited to, replacing any obsolete parts or software and 
maintaining an inventory of replacement parts.
    Radio modernization.--The Committee directs that funding 
for NEXCOM above the budget request be used to accelerate the 
radio modernization program to address critical safety and 
obsolescence issues.
    Remote towers.--Consistent with section 161 of the FAA 
Reauthorization Act (P.L. 115-254), the Committee encourages 
the FAA to use remote tower technology as a means to enhance 
safety, reduce costs, and expand air traffic control services 
at rural and small community airports.
    Central Appalachia.--The Committee requests FAA to review 
the air navigation needs in Central Appalachia and brief the 
Committee on potential solutions to improve safety no later 
than 90 days after enactment of this Act.

------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                            Request       Recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Activity 1--Engineering, Development,
 Test and Evaluation
    Advanced Technology Development              26,600           26,600
     and Prototyping..................
    William J. Hughes Technical Center           16,900           16,900
     Laboratory Sustainment...........
    William J. Hughes Technical Center           10,000           10,000
     Infrastructure Sustainment.......
    Separation Management Portfolio...           21,200           21,200
    Traffic Flow Management Portfolio.            8,000            8,000
    On Demand NAS Portfolio...........           10,500           10,500
    NAS Infrastructure Portfolio......           15,000           15,000
    NextGen Support Portfolio.........            8,400            8,400
    Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS)...           22,000           22,000
    Enterprise, Concept Development,             15,000           15,000
     Human Factors, & Demonstrations
     Portfolio........................
                                       =================================
        TOTAL ACTIVITY 1..............          153,600          153,600
Activity 2--Air Traffic Control
 Facilities and Equipment
a. En Route Programs
    En Route Automation Modernization            66,900           66,900
     (ERAM)--System Enhancements and
     Tech Refresh.....................
    En Route Communications Gateway               2,350            2,350
     (ECG)............................
    Next Generation Weather Radar                 3,600            3,600
     (NEXRAD)--Provide................
    Air Route Traffic Control Center            101,200          101,200
     (ARTCC) & Combined Control
     Facility (CCF) Building
     Improvements.....................
    Air/Ground Communications                     7,850            7,850
     Infrastructure...................
    Air Traffic Control En Route Radar            7,500            7,500
     Facilities Improvements..........
    Oceanic Automation System.........            9,150            9,150
    Next Generation Very High                    40,000           60,000
     Frequency Air/Ground
     Communications (NEXCOM)..........
    System-Wide Information Management           31,050           31,050
    ADS -B NAS Wide Implementation....          170,000          180,000
    Windshear Detection Service.......            2,500            2,500
    Air Traffic Management                       56,000           17,200
     Implementation Portfolio.........
    Time Based Flow Management                   16,250           20,000
     Portfolio........................
    NextGen Weather Processor.........           24,300           24,300
    Airborne Collision Avoidance                  5,100            5,100
     System X (ACASX).................
    Data Communications in Support of            99,800          119,000
     NG Air Transportation System.....
    Reduced Oceanic Separation........           10,450           20,000
    En Route Service Improvements.....            2,000            2,000
    Commercial Space Integration......           11,000           11,000
                                       ---------------------------------
        Subtotal En Route Programs....          667,000          690,700
b. Terminal Programs
    Standard Terminal Automation                 74,900           80,000
     Replacement System (STARS) (TAMR
     Phase 1).........................
    Terminal Automation Program.......            3,900            3,900
    Terminal Air Traffic Control                 55,000           55,000
     Facilities--Replace..............
    ATCT/Terminal Radar Approach                 84,600           90,000
     Control (TRACON) Facilities--
     Improve..........................
    NAS Facilities OSHA and                      28,900           28,900
     Environmental Standards
     Compliance.......................
    Integrated Display System (IDS)...           30,000           30,000
    Terminal Flight Data Manager                 79,050          100,000
     (TFDM)...........................
    Performance Based Navigation &                8,000            8,000
     Metroplex Portfolio..............
    Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS)              26,600           26,600
     Implementation...................
    Airport Ground Surveillance                  30,350           19,000
     Portfolio........................
    Terminal and EnRoute Surveillance            78,600           62,500
     Portfolio........................
    Terminal and EnRoute Voice Switch            43,400           40,750
     and Recorder Portfolio...........
    Implementation of Flight Object              10,500           10,000
     Exchange and Enterprise
     Information Management...........
                                       ---------------------------------
        Subtotal Terminal Programs....          553,800          554,650
c. Flight Service Programs
    Aviation Surface Observation                  5,000            5,000
     System (ASOS)....................
    Future Flight Services Program....           17,800           17,800
    Alaska Flight Service Facility                2,650            2,650
     Modernization (AFSFM)............
    Weather Camera Program............  ...............            2,000
    Juneau Airport Wind System (JAWS)--           1,000            1,000
     Technology Refresh...............
                                       ---------------------------------
        Subtotal Flight Service                  26,450           28,450
         Programs.....................
d. Landing and Navigational Aids
 Program
    VHF Omnidirectional Radio Range              19,000           19,000
     (VOR) Minimum Operating Network
     (MON)............................
    Wide Area Augmentation System                83,900           83,900
     (WAAS) for GPS...................
    Runway Safety Areas--Navigational             1,800            1,800
     Mitigation.......................
    Landing and Lighting Portfolio....           68,950           68,950
    DME, VORTAC, TACAN (DVT)                     10,000           20,000
     Sustainment Portfolio............
                                       ---------------------------------
        Subtotal Landing and                    183,650          193,650
         Navigational Aids Programs...
e. Other ATC Facilities Programs
    Fuel Storage Tank Replacement and            32,400           32,400
     Management.......................
    Unstaffed Infrastructure                     60,200           60,200
     Sustainment......................
    Aircraft Replacement and Related             36,100           36,100
     Equipment Program................
    Airport Cable Loop Systems--                  9,000            9,000
     Sustained Support................
    Alaskan Satellite                             1,000            1,000
     Telecommunications Infrastructure
     (ASTI)...........................
    Facilities Decommissioning........            4,800            4,800
    Electrical Power Systems--Sustain/          149,400          149,400
     Support..........................
    Energy Management and Compliance              7,400            7,400
     (EMC)............................
    Child Care Center Sustainment.....            1,000            2,000
    FAA Telecommunications                       34,700           34,700
     Infrastructure...................
    Operational Analysis and Reporting           15,900           11,000
     Systems..........................
    TDM-to-IP Migration...............           11,300           38,000
                                       ---------------------------------
        Subtotal Other ATC Facilities           363,200          386,000
         Programs.....................
                                       =================================
            TOTAL ACTIVITY 2..........        1,794,100        1,853,450
Activity 3--Non-Air Traffic Control
 Facilities and Equipment
a. Support Equipment
    Hazardous Materials Management....           27,500           26,000
    Aviation Safety Analysis System              23,500           23,500
     (ASAS)...........................
    National Air Space (NAS) Recovery            12,000           12,000
     Communications (RCOM)............
    Facility Security Risk Management.           24,400           22,000
    Information Security..............           18,500           18,500
    System Approach for Safety                   29,200           29,200
     Oversight (SASO).................
    Aviation Safety Knowledge                     9,700            9,700
     Management Environment (ASKME)...
    Aerospace Medical Equipment Needs            28,300           26,800
     (AMEN)...........................
    System Safety Management Portfolio           21,500           21,500
    National Test Equipment Program...            3,000            3,000
    Mobile Assets Management Program..            2,500            2,500
    Aerospace Medicine Safety                    20,200           20,200
     Information Systems (AMSIS)......
    Configuration, Logistics, and                29,300           20,350
     Maintenance Resource Solutions
     (CLMRS)..........................
                                       ---------------------------------
        Subtotal Support Equipment....          249,600          235,250
b. Training, Equipment and Facilities
    Aeronautical Center Infrastructure           14,000           14,000
     Modernization....................
    Distance Learning.................            1,000            1,000
                                       ---------------------------------
        Subtotal Training, Equipment             15,000           15,000
         and Facilities...............
                                       =================================
            TOTAL ACTIVITY 3..........          264,600          250,250
Activity 4--Facilities and Equipment
 Mission Support
a. System Support and Services
    System Engineering and Development           39,100           39,100
     Support..........................
    Program Support Leases............           48,000           48,000
    Logistics and Acquisition Support            12,000           12,000
     Services.........................
    Mike Monroney Aeronautical Center            21,100           21,100
     Leases...........................
    Transition Engineering Support....           17,000           17,000
    Technical Support Services                   28,000           28,000
     Contract (TSSC)..................
    Resource Tracking Program (RTP)...            8,000            8,000
    Center for Advanced Aviation                 57,000           57,000
     System Development (CAASD).......
    Aeronautical Information                      7,500            7,500
     Management Program...............
                                       =================================
            TOTAL ACTIVITY 4..........          237,700          237,700
Activity 5--Personnel and Related
 Expenses
    Personnel and Related Expenses....          550,000          550,000
                                       =================================
            TOTAL ALL ACTIVITIES......        3,000,000        3,045,000
------------------------------------------------------------------------

                 RESEARCH, ENGINEERING AND DEVELOPMENT

 
 
 
Appropriation, fiscal year 2020.......................      $192,665,000
Budget request, fiscal year 2021......................       170,000,000
Recommended in the bill...............................       192,665,000
Bill compared with:
    Appropriation, fiscal year 2020...................             - - -
    Budget request, fiscal year 2021..................       +22,665,000
 

    This appropriation provides funding for long-term research, 
engineering, and development programs to improve the air 
traffic control system and to raise the level of aviation 
safety, as authorized by the Airport and Airway Improvement Act 
and the Federal Aviation Act. The appropriation also finances 
the research, engineering, and development needed to establish 
or modify federal air regulations.

                        COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION

    Aviation professionals.--The Committee supports increasing 
the strength and number of aviation professionals who are well-
trained and can be relied upon to make air travel safe and 
efficient. To that end, the Committee provides $5,000,000 for 
the aviation maintenance technician development program and 
$5,000,000 for aviation workforce development program in 
accordance with section 625 of the FAA Reauthorization Act 
(P.L. 115-254). Additionally, the Committee directs the FAA to 
include the section 625 grant program as part of the workforce 
diversity briefing required under the ``Operations'' heading.
    Crew complements.--The presence of two well-trained, 
qualified pilots in commercial aircraft is another example of 
safety through redundancy. Funding made available in this Act 
to study alternative crew complements for flight decks in 
commercial operations should prioritize the safety effects 
relative to two-person flights. This direction is not intended 
to limit FAA's research and development activities related to 
unmanned aerial vehicles.
    Counter-Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS).--The Committee 
concurs with the need for a plan, as required by section 383 of 
the FAA Reauthorization Act (P.L. 115-254), for certifying 
permitting, authorizing, or allowing the deployment of 
technologies or systems to detect and mitigate the potential 
risks posed by errant or hostile unmanned aircraft systems. The 
Committee provides $14,000,000 for the Center of Excellence 
(COE) for UAS Research and believes it is very well-suited and 
capable of supporting the FAA's section 383 work. When the FAA 
begins conducting the airspace hazard mitigation program, the 
Committee reminds the FAA that robust results are derived from 
heterogenous airport environments and operations.
    Environment and Energy.--The recommendation provides 
$21,000,000 for Environment and Energy, of which $3,000,000 is 
additional funding for the FAA to analyze noise at a national 
level using existing public health surveillance datasets and to 
conduct field studies in the U.S.
    NextGen-Environmental Research-Aircraft Technologies and 
Fuels.--The recommendation provides $35,174,000 for NextGen-
Environmental Research-Aircraft Technologies and Fuels to 
reduce aviation noise and exhaust emissions, of which 
$3,000,000 is additional funding to support the Continuous 
Lower Energy, Emissions and Noise (CLEEN) program to reduce 
noise at its source--the aircraft engine.

------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                            Request       Recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Safety
    Fire Research and Safety..........            7,136            7,136
    Propulsion and Fuel Systems.......            4,215            4,215
    Advanced Materials/Structural                 1,003            1,191
     Safety...........................
    Aircraft Icing/Digital System                 6,426            7,500
     Safety/Aircraft Cyber............
    Continued Air Worthiness..........            9,642           11,269
    Aircraft Catastrophic Failure                 - - -            3,000
     Prevention Research..............
    Flightdeck/Maintenance/System                 7,469            7,469
     Integration Human Factors........
    Safety System Management/Terminal             5,485            5,485
     Area Safety......................
    Air Traffic Control/Technical                 5,685            5,685
     Operations Human Factors.........
    Aeromedical Research..............           10,235           11,500
    Weather Research..................            6,236            7,750
    Unmanned Aircraft Systems Research           24,035           24,035
    Alternative Fuels for General                 2,524            2,524
     Aviation.........................
    Commercial Space..................            5,840            5,840
    NextGen--Wake Turbulence..........            3,698            3,698
    NextGen--Air Ground Integration...            6,757            6,000
    NextGen--Weather Technology in the            1,982            1,982
     Cockpit..........................
    Information Security..............            4,769            4,769
    NextGen--Flight Data Exchange.....            1,000            1,000
                                       ---------------------------------
        Total Safety..................          114,137          122,048
Environmental Sustainability
    Environment and Energy............           17,911           21,000
    NextGen Environmental Research--             27,009           35,174
     Aircraft Technologies and Fuels..
                                       ---------------------------------
        Total Environmental                      44,920           56,174
         Sustainability...............
Mission Support
    System Planning and Resource                  8,022           11,522
     Management.......................
    William J. Hughes Technical Center            2,921            2,921
     Laboratory Facilities............
                                       ---------------------------------
        Total Mission Support.........           10,943           14,443
                                       =================================
            Total Research Engineering          170,000          192,665
             & Development............
------------------------------------------------------------------------

                       GRANTS-IN-AID FOR AIRPORTS

                (LIQUIDATION OF CONTRACT AUTHORIZATION)

                      (LIMITATION ON OBLIGATIONS)

                    (AIRPORT AND AIRWAY TRUST FUND)

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                        Limitation of
                                          contract        Limitation of
                                        authorization      obligations
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Appropriation, fiscal year 2020.....    $3,000,000,000    $3,350,000,000
Budget request, fiscal year 2021....     3,350,000,000     3,350,000,000
Recommended in the bill.............     3,350,000,000     3,350,000,000
Bill compared to:
    Appropriation, fiscal year 2020.      +350,000,000             - - -
    Budget request, fiscal year 2021             - - -             - - -
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    This funding provides grants for airport planning and 
development, noise compatibility and planning, the military 
airport programs, reliever airports, airport program 
administration, and other authorized activities.
    The Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act 
(CARES Act) (P.L. 116-136) included $10,000,000,000 for the 
Grants-in-Aid for Airports program to prevent, prepare for, and 
respond to coronavirus.

                        COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION

    Airport technology research.--The Committee recommendation 
includes not less than $40,666,000 for the FAA's airport 
technology research program to conduct research on topics such 
as concrete and asphalt airport pavement in accordance with 
section 744 of the FAA Reauthorization Act (P.L. 115-254); 
airport marking and lighting; airport rescue and firefighting; 
airport planning and design; wildlife hazard mitigation; and 
visual guidance.
    Emergency preparedness.--The Committee directs the FAA to 
work with airport sponsors and other Federal, State and local 
agencies to help plan for emergency preparedness and response, 
including planning for what spaces on the airport might be 
needed in the future in accordance with section 149 of the FAA 
Reauthorization Act (P.L. 115-254) in order to effectively 
support these activities. The Committee recognizes the 
important role that regional airports play in serving the 
emergency preparedness needs of rural communities and supports 
critical infrastructure projects that increase the resilience 
of airports that are designated to serve rural communities in 
the event of a natural disaster or emergency.
    Noise and environment.--The Committee shares the 
frustration of communities experiencing airport and aircraft 
noise. Many factors influence how a community experiences 
airport and aircraft noise, including proximity to an airport, 
frequency of flights, time of day of those flights, aircraft 
fleet mix, weather, altitude, zoning and permitting of land 
use, and the location and concentration of arrival and 
departure procedures. Many of these factors are beyond the 
control of the FAA, but the FAA can use its convening power and 
aviation expertise to collaborate with air carriers, airports, 
aircraft manufacturers, pilots, research universities, State 
and local governments, and local communities to mitigate noise 
where possible. The Committee directs the Administrator to 
utilize available funds to implement the Environmental 
Mitigation Pilot Program and to conduct a series of studies and 
reports on aircraft noise in accordance with the Airport Noise 
and Environmental Streamlining subtitle of the FAA 
Reauthorization Act (P.L. 115-254). The Committee directs the 
FAA to promote both the Airport Zero Emissions Vehicle and 
Infrastructure Pilot Program and the Voluntary Airport Low 
Emissions Program as opportunities for airports to meet their 
obligations under the Clean Air Act.
    The Committee notes that the FAA completed its evaluation 
of alternative airplane noise metrics and has awarded a grant 
to the FAA's Air Transportation Center of Excellence for 
Alternative Jet Fuels and Environment in April 2019 in order to 
study the health impacts of noise from overflights in 
accordance with sections 173 and 189 of the FAA Reauthorization 
Act (P.L. 115-254). Research on the health effects of aircraft 
noise in the United States is lagging. Studies on sleep 
disturbances due to a range of noise exposure could inform 
decisions about airport and flight operations.
    Sound insulation.--The Committee directs the FAA to 
consider residences that were mitigated prior to 1993 with 
sound insulation as ``unmitigated'' if an airport can verify 
that the residences continue to fall within the latest day-
night average sound level (DNL) 65 decibel (dB) contour, and 
have an interior noise level of DNL 45 dB or higher. The FAA 
should consider these residences as ``unmitigated'' because of 
uncertainty about whether the doors, windows, and other 
insulation installed would have achieved sufficient interior 
noise reductions as those manufactured and installed consistent 
with FAA standards. Any such retreatment should be limited to 
purchasing and installing windows and doors that conform to 
currently published FAA standards that would achieve a 
measurable reduction in interior noise levels.
    Airport curb traffic management.--The Committee is aware of 
ongoing data collection efforts by multiple and diverse 
airports to ensure equitable and data-based treatment for the 
commercial ground transportation industry. The Committee 
commends these airports for taking this initiative and believes 
collecting relevant data points is a reasonable and important 
first step to understanding the changing dynamics at the curb. 
The Committee supports more transparency in this regard and 
encourages continued and enhanced collaboration between our 
nation's airports and commercial ground transportation 
operators.

                       GRANTS-IN-AID FOR AIRPORTS

 
 
 
Appropriation, fiscal year 2020.......................      $400,000,000
Budget request, fiscal year 2021......................             - - -
Recommended in the bill...............................       500,000,000
Bill compared with:
    Appropriation, fiscal year 2020...................      +100,000,000
    Budget request, fiscal year 2021..................      +500,000,000
 

    This funding provides grants for airport planning and 
development, noise compatibility and planning, the military 
airport programs, reliever airports, airport program 
administration, and other authorized activities.

                        COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION

    Prioritization.--Section 47115(j)(3)(B) of title 49, United 
States Code, requires that not less than 50 percent of the 
funds made available under this heading shall be for grants at 
nonhub, small hub, reliever, and nonprimary airports. The 
Committee directs the FAA to restrict this set-aside to 50 
percent and to use the remaining funds for grants at medium hub 
and large hub airports. In addition, the Committee directs the 
FAA to provide priority consideration for grant applications 
that complete previously awarded discretionary grant projects, 
and to provide priority consideration based on project 
justification and completeness of pre-grant actions.
    Temporary flight restrictions (TFR).--The Transportation, 
Housing and Urban Development, and Related Agencies 
Appropriations Act, 2019 made $3,500,000 in Grants-in-Aid for 
Airports funding available to provide reimbursement to airports 
that closed during a TFR for any residence of the President 
that is designated or identified to be secured by the U.S. 
Secret Service. The Committee is pleased that the FAA has 
awarded $600,000 of these funds. The Committee is aware that 
the FAA is in the process to make additional awards and directs 
the FAA to make the selection process as non-adversarial and 
streamlined as possible. While documentation is necessary for 
the FAA to conduct its due diligence, the FAA is required to 
minimize the burden on the public in accordance with the 
Paperwork Reduction Act. Furthermore, working directly with the 
eligible airport sponsors is the most immediate way to identify 
financial losses due to the actions of the Federal government.

       ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISIONS--FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION

    Section 110 allows no more than 600 technical staff-years 
at the center for advanced aviation systems development.
    Section 111 prohibits funds from being used to adopt 
guidelines or regulations requiring airport sponsors to provide 
FAA ``without cost'' building construction or space.
    Section 112 allows reimbursement for fees collected and 
credited under 49 U.S.C. 45303.
    Section 113 allows reimbursement of funds for providing 
technical assistance to foreign aviation authorities to be 
credited to the operations account.
    Section 114 prohibits funds from being used for Sunday 
premium pay unless work was actually performed on a Sunday.
    Section 115 prohibits funds from being used to buy store 
gift cards with Government issued credit cards.
    Section 116 prohibits funds from being obligated or 
expended for retention bonuses for FAA employees without prior 
written approval of the DOT Assistant Secretary for 
Administration.
    Section 117 requires, upon the request of an owner or 
operator, the Secretary to block the display of an owner or 
operator's aircraft registration number in the aircraft 
situational display to industry program.
    Section 118 prohibits funds from being used for salaries 
and expenses of more than nine political and Presidential 
appointees in the FAA.
    Section 119 prohibits funds from being used to increase 
fees under 49 U.S.C. 44721 until the FAA provides a report to 
the House and Senate Committees on Appropriations that 
justifies all fees related to aeronautical navigation products 
and explains how such fees are consistent with Executive Order 
13642.
    Section 119A requires the FAA to notify the House and 
Senate Committees on Appropriations at least 90 days before 
closing a regional operations center or reducing the services 
provided.
    Section 119B prohibits funds from being used to change 
weight restrictions or prior permission rules at Teterboro 
Airport in New Jersey.
    Section 119C prohibits funds from being used to withhold 
from consideration and approval certain applications for 
participation in the contract tower program or for certain 
reevaluations of cost-share program participation.
    Section 119D prohibits funds from being used to open, 
close, redesignate, or reorganize a regional office, the 
aeronautical center, or the technical center subject to the 
normal reprogramming requirements outlined under section 405 of 
this Act.

                     Federal Highway Administration

    The Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) provides 
financial assistance to the states to construct and improve 
roads and highways. It also provides technical assistance to 
other agencies and organizations involved in road building 
activities. Title 23 of the United States Code and other 
supporting statutes provide authority for the activities of the 
FHWA. Funding is provided by contract authority, while program 
levels are established by annual limitations on obligations, as 
set forth in appropriations Acts.

                 LIMITATION ON ADMINISTRATIVE EXPENSES

                          (HIGHWAY TRUST FUND)

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

 
 
 
Appropriation, fiscal year 2020.......................      $456,798,689
Budget request, fiscal year 2021......................       478,897,049
Recommended in the bill...............................       478,897,049
Bill compared with:
    Appropriation, fiscal year 2020...................       +22,098,360
    Budget request, fiscal year 2021..................             - - -
 

    The limitation on administrative expenses caps the amount 
from within the limitation on obligations that FHWA may spend 
on salaries and expenses necessary to conduct and administer 
the federal-aid highway program, highway-related research, and 
most other federal highway programs.

                        COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION

    The Committee recommends a limitation on FHWA 
administrative expenses of $478,897,049. In addition, up to 
$3,248,000 may be transferred to the Appalachian Regional 
Commission.

                          FEDERAL AID HIGHWAYS

                      (LIMITATION ON OBLIGATIONS)

                          (HIGHWAY TRUST FUND)

 
                                             Limitation on obligations*
 
Appropriation, fiscal year 2020...........               $46,365,092,000
Budget request, fiscal year 2021..........                49,982,000,000
Recommended in the bill...................                61,130,000,000
Bill compared with:
    Appropriation, fiscal year 2020.......               +14,764,908,000
    Budget request, fiscal year 2021......               +11,148,000,000
 
*These amounts do not include $739,000,000 of contract authority exempt
  from the limitation on obligations. As a result, the total program
  level for fiscal year 2020 was $47,104,092,000. The total recommended
  program level for fiscal year 2021 is $61,869,000,000.

    The Federal-aid highways program is funded by contract 
authority, and liquidating cash appropriations are subsequently 
provided to fund resulting outlays. The Committee sets, through 
the annual appropriations process, an overall limitation on the 
total contract authority that can be obligated under the 
program in a given year. Programs included within the Federal-
aid highways program are financed from the Highway Trust Fund.
    Federal-aid highways and bridges are managed through a 
Federal-state partnership. States and localities maintain 
ownership of and responsibility for the maintenance, repair and 
new construction of roads. State highway departments have the 
authority to initiate Federal-aid projects, subject to FHWA 
approval of the plans, specifications, and cost estimates. The 
Federal government provides financial support, on a 
reimbursable basis, for construction and repair through 
matching grants.

                        COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION

    Consistent with the amounts authorized in the INVEST in 
America Act, the Committee recommends a total program level of 
$61,869,000,000 for the regular Federal-aid highway program in 
fiscal year 2021. Included within the recommended amount is an 
obligation limitation of $61,130,000,000 and $739,000,000 in 
contract authority that is exempt from the obligation 
limitation.
    Coronavirus pandemic.--The Committee recognizes the 
significant toll that the coronavirus-19 pandemic has taken on 
the budgets and staff of state departments of transportation. 
In conjunction with the authorized flexibilities provided for 
in the INVEST in America Act that will make $14,742,808,640 
available for operations and administrative expenses or to 
match other Federal funds, the Committee eliminates any 
requirements that states match Federal funds for most of the 
programs subject to the obligation limitation.
    Efficient allocation of funding.--The Committee notes that 
in a 2016 report, the Congressional Budget Office indicated 
that, according to FHWA's analysis in the most recent Status of 
the Nation's Highways, Bridges, and Transit Conditions & 
Performance report, capital spending would produce greater 
benefits relative to costs if it was reoriented toward 
expanding urban interstates, making major repairs of urban 
highways and repairing bridges in both urban and rural areas. 
Roughly half of roads in rural areas are rated as having good 
pavement conditions, whereas, in urban areas, roughly one-
quarter of the roads are rated as good. The Committee is 
concerned that the Department is not following the guidance 
suggested by its own analysis when making recommendations for 
funding and grant awards. The Department is also not providing 
up-to-date data on the funding distribution between urban and 
rural areas. The last year-end report for FHWA Highway 
Statistics is for 2016. Without updated data showing how 
Federal highway dollars are being distributed, it is more 
difficult for Congress to assess the effectiveness of how the 
states are distributing dollars to the urban areas with 
substandard pavement conditions. Consistent with section 1402 
of the FAST Act, the Committee directs FHWA to annually publish 
data on the urban-rural obligations of Federal-Aid Highway 
funding by the state departments of transportation.
    Truck size and weight.--In fiscal year 2020, the Committee 
directed the Department to expeditiously develop an 
implementation plan, including projected timelines, for 
conducting the research outlined in the Transportation Research 
Board's Truck Size and Weight Research Plan. The Truck Size and 
Weight Research Plan outlines numerous projects, including 
those related to the impact of different truck configurations 
on driver safety, the service life and deterioration rates of 
bridges, and the condition of pavement. The Committee notes 
that it has not yet received this implementation plan and 
directs FHWA to brief the House and Senate Committees on 
Appropriations on the implementation plan within 90 days of 
enactment of this Act. The results of this research should be 
considered by the Department and Congress before any national 
changes in truck length or weight policy are considered.
    Permeable pavements.--The Committee encourages the 
Secretary to accelerate research, demonstration, and deployment 
of permeable pavements to achieve flood mitigation, pollutant 
reduction, stormwater runoff reduction, environmental 
conservation, and resilience for new road construction and 
retrofit of existing roads. The Committee encourages the 
Secretary to conduct structural evaluations of flood-damaged 
pavements, with emphasis on local roads and highways subject to 
flooding and extended periods of inundation. Such evaluations 
will contribute to understanding the mechanisms of flood damage 
and how permeable pavements might be used to prevent or reduce 
damage from future flooding.
    Materials for highway construction.--Innovative materials 
are key to increasing resilience in construction. The Committee 
encourages the Secretary to disseminate information on how 
States can prioritize the use of resilient and sustainable 
materials including, but not limited to, aggregates, cross 
laminated timber, and recycled composite carbon fiber 
materials. The Committee directs FHWA to work with the U.S. 
Geological Survey to ensure that information about efficient 
and environmentally friendly access to aggregates is available 
to stakeholders. The Committee also directs FHWA to work with 
stakeholders to enable optimal use of reclaimed asphalt and 
concrete materials as well as virgin aggregate resources. While 
innovative materials are an important source of highway 
materials, the Committee encourages the Department to support 
materials neutral decisions that do not promote or provide 
preference for specific building materials.
    Guardrails.--The Committee supports continued efforts by 
the Secretary to help state and local departments of 
transportation capitalize on federal investment in Geosynthetic 
Reinforced Soil Integrated Bridge Systems. The Committee 
encourages the Secretary to consider testing of geo-
synthetically reinforced soil guardrails for performance under 
vehicle impact and use this data to develop specifications for 
use in future roadway construction.
    Transportation demand management.--Transportation demand 
management measures can improve multi-modal system 
efficiencies, offer a variety of options to commuters, and move 
people more effectively. In addition, such measures can reduce 
congestion, improve air quality, and increase resiliency. The 
Committee encourages the Department to work with state and 
local governments and other transportation stakeholders to 
implement such measures.
    Safe systems.--The Committee is aware of the critical work 
that FHWA is doing to define, support, and encourage adoption 
of a safe systems approach to reduce and eventually eliminate 
fatalities and serious injuries on our nation's roadways. The 
Committee directs FHWA to continue to work with the Road to 
Zero Coalition and other safety stakeholders to accelerate 
adoption of a safe systems approach by state and local 
transportation agencies. As part of establishing safe systems, 
cities nationwide are developing interagency Vision Zero plans 
to connect engineering, education, and enforcement with the 
goal of ending transportation deaths and serious injuries. The 
Committee directs FHWA to work with state and local 
stakeholders to facilitate the implementation of their Vision 
Zero plans and strategies.
    Complete streets.--The Committee is concerned about recent 
increases in cyclist and pedestrian fatalities and encourages 
the adoption of a complete streets design model in which roads 
and streets are designed and operated to enable safe access for 
all users, including but not limited to pedestrians, 
bicyclists, motorists, and transit riders across a broad 
spectrum of ages and abilities. To lay the groundwork for the 
adoption of a complete streets design model, the Committee 
directs FHWA to review its current policies, rules, and 
procedures to determine their impact on safety for road users, 
particularly those outside automobiles, and to report their 
findings to the House and Senate Committees on Appropriations 
within one year after enactment of this Act. Subsequently, the 
Committee directs the Department to disseminate best practices 
for complete streets to state and local highway partners.
    Safe routes to schools.--The Committee recognizes the 
important role infrastructure investments, education, and 
enforcement efforts can have in ensuring safe access to 
schools. Investments in sidewalks, bike paths, and alternative 
transportation have proven to increase safety and decrease the 
number of deaths and injuries associated with commutes to 
school. The Committee encourages FHWA to work with NHTSA, the 
Safe Routes to School Partnership, and state and local 
stakeholders to facilitate safe student access to schools.
    Center for Accelerating Innovation.--The Committee 
anticipates that technologies addressing the first and last 
mile of any trip will allow consumers to become more 
comfortable with autonomous vehicle technology. The low speeds 
of parking solutions and low-speed deployments provide an 
opportunity to test systems and technologies. The Committee 
directs FHWA to prioritize first-mile/last-mile solutions when 
developing any notice of funding opportunity issued under the 
auspices of the Center for Accelerating Innovation.
    Advanced Transportation and Congestion Management 
Technologies Deployment (ATCMTD).--Under the FAST Act, the 
ATCMTD has been able to fund 5 to 10 projects, annually, to 
make competitive grants for the development of model deployment 
sites for large scale installation and operation of advanced 
transportation technologies with the goal of improving safety, 
efficiency, system performance, and return on investment. The 
levels of funding provided under this heading will allow the 
Department to increase research funding for additional 
advancements in such transportation technologies.
    Freight.--Our nation's major freight corridors improve our 
economic efficiency, advance exports and imports, increase the 
efficiency of national and international freight movement, 
promote economic growth on a regional and national basis, and 
increase employment.
    The proposed Interstate 69 extension over the Ohio River is 
a crucial corridor for the movement of freight. The Interstate 
69 extension between Indiana and Kentucky would address 
capacity constraints and create a continuous transportation 
network from Canada to Mexico that will facilitate 
international trade and spur economic development. The 
Committee encourages FHWA to work with the relevant state 
departments of transportation to address capacity constraints 
at these chokepoints and develop robust funding plans to 
complete these critical projects.
    In addition, the Committee believes critical commerce 
corridors (CCC), an authorized use of funds in the INFRA 
program, can improve our economic efficiency, reduce travel 
times, and promote safe travel on our nation's roads and 
highways. CCCs create a barrier on existing highways, 
physically separating lanes dedicated for heavy commercial 
trucks from lanes dedicated for passenger vehicles. The 
committee encourages the Secretary to consider applications for 
the creation of CCCs when awarding competitive grants funded by 
the Department.
    Border state infrastructure.--The Committee again directs 
the Department to encourage States using Federal funds 
designated for border-state infrastructure to ensure 
participation of city and county governments along the U.S.-
Mexico border in project selection processes. The Committee 
looks forward to the Department's report, as directed in House 
Report 116-106, on its efforts in this regard within 60 days of 
enactment of this Act.
    Pennsylvania.--The Committee recognizes challenges faced on 
Interstate 380 and Route 2001 in the Commonwealth of 
Pennsylvania. Interstate 380 is a crucial artery for both 
regional tourism and access to Tobyhanna Army Depot. 
Pennsylvania Route 2001 is a key north-south route option in 
southeastern Pike County, Pennsylvania and is often the only 
option for north-south travel during the winter. In both cases, 
when snow and ice are present, these roads can be subject to 
significant traffic-safety hazards. The Committee directs FHWA 
to work with state and local stakeholders to address surface 
conditions and other improvements, including but not limited 
to, reconfiguration of an interchange to alleviate the 
recurring delays and chokepoints on both highways in order to 
reduce potentially dangerous backups.
    Cap park development.--The Committee notes the growing 
interest in communities across the country in developing cap 
parks (also called a city deck park) in which a park is placed 
over a highway. These parks connect neighborhoods that have 
long been divided by highways and from other opportunities, 
reduce traffic congestion, improve air quality, and bring green 
space to communities. The Committee directs FHWA to analyze the 
benefits of such parks and to report to the House and Senate 
Committees on Appropriations within one year of enactment of 
this Act.
    Sonoran corridor.--The Committee recognizes the importance 
of the Sonoran corridor to southern Arizona and the Tucson 
Valley. Upon completion, the Sonoran corridor will provide 
increased access to economic opportunity throughout southern 
and central Arizona. The Committee encourages FHWA to work with 
the State of Arizona to identify funds to facilitate the 
completion of tier II Environmental Impact Statements on High 
Priority Corridors of less than 25 miles in distance and within 
100 miles of the U.S.-Mexico border.
    Coastal erosion.--The Committee recognizes the unique 
situation of Hawaii, Puerto Rico, the U.S. Virgin Islands, 
Guam, American Samoa, and the Northern Mariana Islands as it 
relates to shoreline erosion resulting from global sea level 
increases. The Committee directs FHWA to provide a report to 
the House and Senate Committees on Appropriation that details 
shoreline erosion impacting roadways in Hawaii and the U.S. 
Territories. The report shall include a list of coastal roads 
most vulnerable to sea level rise and recommendations for 
addressing shoreline erosion impacting these roadways. The 
Committee directs FHWA to provide technical assistance to 
departments of transportation in the affected states and 
territories as they develop their transportation budgets and 
priorities.
    New interstate designations.--The Committee recognizes the 
benefits that communities achieve when existing roads are 
designated as interstates or future interstates. In particular, 
the Committee recognizes that the Louie B. Nunn Cumberland 
Parkway in Kentucky and the future Interstate 76 and Interstate 
27 corridors through Texas, Oklahoma, Colorado, and New Mexico 
will be key economic drivers for their communities. In 
addition, the extension and completion of Interstate 73 through 
South Carolina will facilitate the safe evacuation of coastal 
areas. The Committee encourages FHWA to work with the 
appropriate state departments of transportation to facilitate 
the development of these highways.
    Congestion Mitigation and Air Quality (CMAQ).--CMAQ 
programs are essential to reducing congestion and improving air 
quality nationwide. One popular use of CMAQ funds is to create 
high-occupancy vehicle (HOV) lanes to help reduce congestion. 
The Committee directs the Department to study how HOV lanes 
help to reduce traffic congestion and facilitate states meeting 
their air quality goals. The Department should evaluate 
different options for the future of HOV lanes and report to the 
House and Senate Committees on Appropriation within one year 
after enactment of this Act.
    The Committee urges the FHWA to consider the feasibility of 
utilizing or deploying innovative technologies that provide 
traffic congestion relief, offer quick alternatives to costly 
road construction, result in safer roadways, provide positive 
protection, help eliminate crossover fatalities, offer 
flexibility, improve air quality, and decrease fuel consumption 
as part of any project the federal government provides 
financial support, on a reimbursable basis, for construction 
and repair through matching grants.
    Surface Transportation Block Grant (STBG) program.--The 
STBG program provides the most flexible funding available to 
states and Metropolitan Planning Organizations (MPOs). MPOs 
that represent transportation management areas of at least five 
million people are in particular need of assistance in order to 
expedite project delivery for surface transportation block 
grants. The Committee encourages the Secretary to provide 
technical assistance to expedite project delivery in such 
transportation management areas.
    Manual on Uniform Traffic Control Devices (MUTCD).--The 
Committee recognizes the importance that the MUTCD plays in 
creating a uniform and safe experience for drivers nationwide. 
However, uniformity and safety are sometimes at odds with 
innovations, whether those innovations be in the form of 
patented products or new technologies for driving like electric 
vehicles. Each of these examples would require FHWA to conduct 
a rulemaking to amend the MUTCD, and the Committee encourages 
FHWA to analyze the need for rulemakings to amend the MUTCD.
    Design speeds.--The Committee is concerned about the 
relationship between design speed, posted speed, and operating 
speed. The Committee is looking forward to the results of two 
upcoming projects underway by the National Cooperative Highway 
Research Program (NCHRP), NCHRP Project 17-76, ``Guidance for 
the Setting of Speed Limits'' and NCHRP Project 15-76, 
``Designing for Target Speed''. Following the completion of 
each study, the Department should summarize the findings and 
report to the House and Senate Committees on Appropriations 
detailing findings on how speed limits are set, how they impact 
roadway design, and the implications for enforcement and 
crashes where posted speeds and design speeds deviate.
    Tribal Technical Assistance Program (TTAP).--The Committee 
is concerned about the lack of tribal input in regards to the 
restructuring of the TTAP. As the current two-year pilot 
program ends, the Committee directs FHWA to ensure proper 
tribal consultation as the agency decides how to proceed so 
that tribal nations receive appropriate technical assistance 
and capacity building opportunities.
    Emergency relief.--FHWA's Emergency Relief program provides 
funds for the repair and reconstruction of roads that have 
suffered serious damage from natural disasters. Over the past 
several years, many states have experienced significant needs 
for Emergency Relief funding, and since 2011, the Congress has 
appropriated more than $6,400,000,000. In addition to needs in 
other states, California's FHWA Emergency Relief program-
eligible need is approximately $879,000,000 from damage caused 
primarily by storm and wildfire events. The Committee 
encourages FHWA to continue to allocate funds to areas in need 
of assistance.
    Scenic byways.--The scenic byways program includes a 
collection of 150 distinct and diverse roads nationwide that 
provide key economic benefits to the communities they traverse. 
The Committee directs FHWA to study the economic benefits of 
scenic byways and to make the report publicly available on the 
FHWA website.
    Nondestructive inspections.--The Committee recognizes that 
aging drainage infrastructure can present significant safety 
concerns to roadways and transportation infrastructure. The 
Committee urges the Department to test and review new 
nondestructive technologies that can identify pipes or soil 
voids behind the pipe wall that could result in catastrophic 
failure to roadways. Such new nondestructive technologies 
include technologies that can provide imaging and photographic 
documentation of defects and which would allow for subsequent 
targeted repair or replacement, as appropriate.

                (LIQUIDATION OF CONTRACT AUTHORIZATION)

                          (HIGHWAY TRUST FUND)

                   LIQUIDATION OF CONTRACT AUTHORITY

 
 
 
Appropriation, fiscal year 2020...........               $47,104,092,000
Budget request, fiscal year 2021..........                50,721,000,000
Recommended in the bill...................                61,869,000,000
Bill compared with:
    Appropriation, fiscal year 2020.......               +14,764,908,000
    Budget request, fiscal year 2021......               +11,148,000,000
 

                        COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION

    The Committee recommends a liquidating cash appropriation 
of $61,869,000,000. This is the amount required to pay the 
outstanding obligations of the highway program at levels 
provided in the Act and prior appropriations Acts.

                    HIGHWAYS INFRASTRUCTURE PROGRAMS

 
 
 
Appropriation, fiscal year 2020.......................    $2,166,140,392
Budget request, fiscal year 2021......................             - - -
Recommended in the bill...............................     1,000,000,000
Bill compared with:
    Appropriation, fiscal year 2020...................    -1,166,140,392
    Budget request, fiscal year 2021..................    +1,000,000,000
 

    The FAST Act provides contract authority for Highway 
programs funded from the Highway Trust Fund. This account 
provides additional funds from the General Fund of the Treasury 
for the programs funded by formula under the FAST Act and 
important safety and management priorities administered by the 
Federal Aid Highways Administration (FHWA).

                        COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION

    The Committee recommends $1,000,000,000 for Highway 
Infrastructure Programs. The following table provides funding 
levels for activities within this account:

------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                           Request       Recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Surface Transportation Block Grants.            $- - -      $632,220,000
Appalachian Development Highway                  - - -       100,000,000
 System.............................
Puerto Rico Highway Program.........             - - -         3,150,000
Territorial Highway Program.........             - - -           630,000
Nationally Significant Federal Lands             - - -       150,000,000
Grade-Crossing Competitive Grants...             - - -        50,000,000
Tribal Transportation Program.......             - - -        30,000,000
Advanced Digital Construction                    - - -        15,000,000
 Management.........................
Regional Infrastructure Accelerator.             - - -        12,000,000
National Road Network Pilot.........             - - -         5,000,000
Tribal Fatalities Study.............             - - -         2,000,000
                                     -----------------------------------
    Total...........................             - - -     1,000,000,000
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Nationally Significant Federal Lands.--The Committee 
directs that when making grant awards under this heading, FHWA 
shall prioritize roadways that in the prior fiscal year have 
been closed or had speed reductions due to unsafe travel 
conditions as a result of the roadway's infrastructure 
condition and maintenance.
    Tribal transportation programs (TTP).--The Committee 
recognizes that providing safe and adequate transportation over 
the more than 160,000 miles of roads and trails within Indian 
reservations, Indian lands, and Alaska Native Village 
communities is crucial for the safety and welfare of tribal and 
surrounding non-tribal communities. A prime objective of the 
TTP is to contribute to the economic development, self-
determination, and employment of Indians and Native Americans. 
In recognition of the consolidation of multiple tribal 
transportation programs, the Committee has included $30,000,000 
of additional funding for the Tribal Transportation Program, to 
encourage the Department to ensure potentially overlooked high 
priority projects, particularly needed by smaller tribes, be 
addressed by this program.
    Highway-rail grade crossings.--The Committee notes that 
highway-rail grade crossing collisions are the second leading 
cause of all rail-related fatalities in the United States. In 
addition to the amounts provided from the Highway Trust Fund 
for Section 130 of title 23, United States Code, the Committee 
provides an additional $50,000,000 in competitive grants to 
improve the safety of highway-rail grade crossings.
    Advanced Digital Construction Management Systems.--Advanced 
Digital Construction Management Systems are defined as 
commercially proven digital technologies and processes for 
management of construction and engineering activities, 
including systems for infrastructure planning and coordination, 
construction, maintenance, modernization and management, asset 
management systems for machines, site equipment, and personnel. 
Project delivery systems for project management are also 
included. The Committee intends for software, hardware, 
services, and employee training on the use and management of 
Advanced Digital Construction Management Systems to be eligible 
expenses under this heading.
    National Road Network Pilot Program.--The Committee 
provides $5,000,000 for continued work on developing and 
expanding a National Road Network Pilot program. Under the 
pilot program, the Committee directs FHWA to continue work on 
creating a standardized geospatial dataset which should support 
interagency interoperability among state departments of 
transportation. A unified data standard for all transportation 
agencies would provide myriad data sharing and reuse 
opportunities. As part of that dataset, FHWA should complete 
outreach to states to assist with improved and standardized 
data reporting of data that are attached to their linear road 
networks. The Committee encourages FHWA to develop a central 
source of geospatial data that supports interoperability of 
data. As part of the pilot program, FHWA may connect to 
databases produced by states or other federal agencies to 
provide real-time information. The Committee intends for 
purchases of software and hardware to be eligible expenses 
under the pilot program.
    Study on tribal transportation.--The Committee provides 
$2,000,000 for research that leads to decreases in highway and 
pedestrian fatalities among tribal populations. This research 
should build on reports mandated in the FAST Act and should be 
competitively awarded to state governments, academic 
institutions, or non-profits which have existing partnerships 
among tribal governments as well as traffic safety and 
transportation research expertise. Research should focus on 
priority areas identified in FHWA's 2018 report ``Options for 
Improving Transportation Safety in Tribal Areas''.

       ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISIONS--FEDERAL HIGHWAY ADMINISTRATION

    Section 120 distributes obligation authority among federal-
aid highway programs.
    Section 121 credits funds received by the Bureau of 
Transportation Statistics to the federal-aid highways account.
    Section 122 provides requirements for any waiver of the Buy 
America Act.
    Section 123 requires Congressional notification before the 
Department provides credit assistance under the TIFIA program.
    Section 124 requires 60-day notification to the House and 
Senate Committees on Appropriations of any grants as authorized 
under 23 U.S.C. 117.
    Section 125 allows state DOTs to repurpose certain highway 
project funding to be used within 5 miles of its original 
designation.
    Section 126 requires the Federal Highway Administration to 
adjudicate Buy America waivers based on the rules and 
regulations in effect before April 17, 2017, and to process 
those requests within 90 days of their receipt.
    Section 127 specifies that obligation limitation provided 
in fiscal year 2020 shall not be subject to certain 
redistribution processes specified by section 120.

              Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration

    The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) was 
established within the Department of Transportation (DOT) by 
Congress through the Motor Carrier Safety Improvement Act of 
1999. FMCSA's mission is to promote safe commercial motor 
vehicle operations and to reduce truck and bus crashes. FMCSA 
works with federal, state, and local entities, the motor 
carrier industry, highway safety organizations, and the public 
to further its mission.
    FMCSA resources are used to prevent and mitigate commercial 
vehicle accidents through regulation, enforcement, stakeholder 
training, technological innovation, and improved information 
systems. FMCSA also is responsible for enforcing federal motor 
carrier safety and hazardous materials regulations for all 
commercial vehicles entering the United States along its 
southern and northern borders.

              MOTOR CARRIER SAFETY OPERATIONS AND PROGRAMS

                (LIQUIDATION OF CONTRACT AUTHORIZATION)

                      (LIMITATION ON OBLIGATIONS)

                          (HIGHWAY TRUST FUND)

 
 
 
Appropriation, fiscal year 2020.......................      $288,000,000
Budget request, fiscal year 2021......................       299,000,000
Recommended in the bill...............................       379,500,000
Bill compared with:
    Appropriation, fiscal year 2020...................       +91,500,000
    Budget request, fiscal year 2021..................       +80,500,000
 

    This limitation controls FMCSA spending on salaries, 
operating expenses, and research. It provides resources to 
support motor carrier safety program activities and to maintain 
the agency's administrative infrastructure. This funding 
supports nationwide motor carrier safety and consumer 
enforcement efforts, including the Compliance, Safety, and 
Accountability Program, regulation and enforcement of freight 
transport, and federal safety enforcement at the U.S. borders. 
These resources also fund regulatory development and 
implementation, information management, research and 
technology, safety education and outreach, and the safety and 
consumer telephone hotline.

                        COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION

    Consistent with the amounts authorized in the INVEST in 
America Act, the Committee recommends $379,500,000 for the 
Operations and Programs account. Obligation limitation is for 
one year except $98,073,000 is available until September 30, 
2023, and $20,000,000 is available until September 30, 2025. Of 
the amounts available until September 30, 2023, not less than 
$85,000,000 is for information management and not less than 
$13,073,000 is for the research and technology program.
    Hours of Service (HOS).--The Committee has profound 
concerns about the safety and labor ramifications of the final 
rule that FMCSA issued on May 14, 2020 revising HOS. The final 
rule will extend driving time and distance while also reducing 
the amount of time a driver takes for rest. The changes will 
increase driver fatigue, a significant risk factor in large 
truck crashes. In particular, the Committee is concerned about 
the effects of extending the short-haul exemption from 12 hours 
to 14 hours and extending the distance limit for short-haul 
drivers. In fact, 2016 research by the Insurance Institute for 
Highway Safety and the North Carolina Highway Safety Research 
Center found that truckers who reported driving after at least 
12 hours since an extended sleep period were 86 percent more 
likely to crash than drivers who had been awake for less than 
eight hours. Truckers who reported driving more than five hours 
without stopping were more than twice as likely to crash as 
those who drove 1-5 hours. In that study, drivers using a 
short-haul exemption had a crash risk nearly five times as high 
as those drivers that were not using the exemption. In 
addition, proposed changes to the 30-minute rest break could 
significantly increase worker fatigue by eliminating off-duty 
time. The Committee directs FMCSA to complete the study 
required by Section 4306 of the INVEST in America Act before 
implementing such changes to HOS requirements.
    Truck parking.--The Committee notes the importance of safe 
and appropriate places for truck drivers to park their vehicles 
so that drivers can comply with HOS rules and get appropriate 
rest. The Committee directs the Secretary to assist state and 
local entities in working with the private sector to develop 
strategies to increase the availability of safe truck parking 
so that truck drivers may safely comply with HOS and other 
regulations.
    Compliance, safety, accountability data.--The Committee 
reiterates direction to FMCSA to address, in an expedited 
manner, the recommendations submitted by the National Academies 
of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine in the manner specified 
by the Office of the Inspector General on September 25, 2019. 
The Committee believes that Compliance, Safety, Accountability 
data collected by the agency should be made available to the 
general public, consistent with the provisions of the FAST Act.
    Large truck crash causation study.--In 2018, there were 
more than 4,400 fatal crashes involving large trucks, a more 
than 5 percent increase from the prior year and a more than 50 
percent increase since 2009. More than 80 percent of those 
fatalities were occupants of other vehicles or non-occupants 
such as pedestrians or cyclists. Large trucks account for 4 
percent of vehicles and 8 percent of all vehicles involved in 
fatal crashes, and they are 20 percent more likely to be 
involved in multi-vehicle crashes compared to passenger 
vehicles. The Committee applauds FMCSA and NHTSA for their 
proposal to update the large truck crash causation study. The 
Committee provides not less than $3,300,000 to begin the study 
and directs the agencies to report to the House and Senate 
Committees on Appropriation regarding the methodology and 
timeline for the study within 90 days of enactment of this Act.
    Outfitters and guides.--The Committee recognizes the 
important role that youth camps and outfitting guides play in 
the economy of certain states, including Idaho, Wyoming, and 
Montana. The Committee acknowledges that outfitters, guides, 
and youth camps engaged in interstate commerce must comply with 
requirements under FMCSA regulations and that complying with 
such regulations can be costly. The Committee encourages FMCSA 
to study the safety implications of exempting drivers of 9 to 
15 passenger motor vehicles operated by an outdoor adventure 
and recreational outfitter from work and location requirements 
under section 395.1(e) of title 49, Code of Federal 
Regulations, and to report to the House and Senate Committees 
on Appropriations with their findings.

                      MOTOR CARRIER SAFETY GRANTS

                (LIQUIDATION OF CONTRACT AUTHORIZATION)

                      (LIMITATION ON OBLIGATIONS)

                          (HIGHWAY TRUST FUND)

 
 
 
Appropriation, fiscal year 2020.......................      $391,136,000
Budget request, fiscal year 2021......................       403,000,000
Recommended in the bill...............................       506,200,000
Bill compared with:
    Appropriation, fiscal year 2020...................      +115,064,000
    Budget request, fiscal year 2021..................      +103,200,000
 

    This limitation controls FMCSA's spending on motor carrier 
safety grants. Those grants are used to support compliance 
reviews in the states, identify and apprehend traffic 
violators, conduct roadside inspections, and conduct safety 
audits of new entrant carriers. Additionally, grants are 
provided to states for improvement of state commercial driver's 
license oversight activities.

                        COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION

    Consistent with the amounts authorized in the INVEST in 
America Act, the Committee recommends $506,200,000 in 
obligation limitation and liquidating cash for the Federal 
Motor Carrier Safety Grant program. The following table 
provides funding levels for activities within this account:

------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                           Request       Recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Motor Carrier Safety Assistance                  - - -      $389,212,000
 Program............................
Commercial Driver's License.........             - - -        56,880,000
High Priority Activities Program....             - - -        59,108,000
Commercial Motor Vehicle Operators               - - -         1,000,000
 Grants.............................
    Total...........................      $403,000,000       506,200,000
------------------------------------------------------------------------

 ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISIONS--FEDERAL MOTOR CARRIER SAFETY ADMINISTRATION

    Section 130 requires FMCSA to send notice of 49 CFR section 
385.308 violations by certified mail, registered mail, or 
another manner of delivery, which records the receipt of the 
notice by the persons responsible for the violations.
    Section 131 requires FMCSA to update annual inspection 
regulations to require that rear underride guards be inspected 
annually.

             National Highway Traffic Safety Administration

    The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) 
was established in March 1970 to administer motor vehicle and 
highway safety programs. It was the successor agency to the 
National Highway Safety Bureau, which was housed in the Federal 
Highway Administration.
    NHTSA's mission is to save lives, prevent injuries, and 
reduce economic costs due to road traffic crashes through 
education, research, safety standards, and enforcement 
activity. To accomplish these goals, NHTSA establishes and 
enforces safety performance standards for motor vehicles and 
motor vehicle equipment, investigates safety defects in motor 
vehicles, and conducts research on driver behavior and traffic 
safety.
    NHTSA provides grants and technical assistance to state and 
local governments to enable them to conduct effective local 
highway safety programs. Together with state and local 
partners, NHTSA works to reduce the threat of drunk, impaired, 
and distracted drivers, and to promote policies and devices 
with demonstrated safety benefits including helmets, child 
safety seats, airbags, and graduated driver's licenses.
    NHTSA establishes and ensures compliance with fuel economy 
standards, investigates odometer fraud, establishes and 
enforces vehicle anti-theft regulations, and provides consumer 
information on a variety of motor vehicle safety topics.

                        OPERATIONS AND RESEARCH

 
 
 
Appropriation, fiscal year 2020.......................      $194,000,000
Budget request, fiscal year 2021......................       156,100,000
Recommended in the bill...............................       214,073,440
Bill compared with:
    Appropriation, fiscal year 2020...................       +20,073,440
    Budget request, fiscal year 2021..................       +57,973,440
 

    The operations and research appropriation supports vehicle 
safety programs and the administrative expenses of the agency. 
These programs include research and analysis to establish best 
practices, guidance for vehicle safety, and rulemakings on 
safety standards and fuel economy standards. The account also 
includes enforcement of safety regulations including ensuring 
industry compliance with motor vehicle safety standards, 
investigations of safety-related defects and oversight of 
manufacturer recalls. Many of these programs are conducted in 
partnership with state and local governments, the private 
sector, universities, research units, and various safety 
associations and organizations.

                        COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION

    For vehicle safety programs, funded by the general fund, 
the Committee recommends $214,073,440. Amounts are available 
for one year, except $40,000,000 of the funds are available 
until September 30, 2022. The following table provides funding 
levels for activities within this account:

------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                           Request       Recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Rulemaking..........................       $22,586,000       $42,000,000
Enforcement.........................        19,542,000        42,000,000
Research and Analysis...............        32,805,000        48,000,000
Administrative Expenses.............        81,167,000        82,073,440
    Total...........................       156,100,000       214,073,440
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Office of Defects Investigation (ODI).--Of the amounts 
provided for enforcement, no less than $30,000,000 shall be for 
the ODI. The Committee continues to direct ODI to strengthen 
its collection and analysis of early warning data and vehicle 
defects, enhance defect investigations using a risk-based 
process, and increased enforcement to mitigate the impact of 
serious safety defects on drivers. In 2020, the Committee 
required NHTSA to report, by June 17, 2020, on how the agency 
will accomplish these goals. The report is overdue, and the 
Committee directs NHTSA to brief the House and Senate 
Committees on Appropriations regarding the status of the report 
within 30 days of enactment of this Act.
    Fuel-economy regulations.--The Committee is deeply 
concerned about the negative environmental and economic effects 
of loosening fuel economy standards and is disappointed that 
NHTSA finalized the Safer Affordable Fuel-Efficient (SAFE) 
Vehicles Rule. In particular, the Committee finds a number of 
economic assumptions that were included in the modeling 
implausible and is deeply alarmed that the rule did not pass a 
reasonable cost-benefit analysis. Because the Committee 
believes that flaws in the modeling have contributed to the 
rule, the Committee directs NHTSA to develop a comprehensive, 
internally consistent model of the market for vehicle sales 
that incorporates how consumers make choices about when to 
purchase a vehicle, whether that vehicle is purchased new from 
the manufacturer or used, and how consumers make choices about 
how often or how far to drive. To develop the model, NHSTA 
shall consult with industry and academic stakeholders and make 
the model public upon its completion. The Committee further 
directs NHTSA to ensure that they have the appropriate 
personnel to complete such modeling including economists and 
statisticians.
    Truck underrides.--The Committee highlights that DOT has 
been researching underrides for more than 50 years and that 
NHTSA's proposed rulemaking in December 2015 to update truck 
rear impact guard requirements cited 362 annual fatalities 
associated with light vehicle crashes into the rear of trucks. 
The Committee directs NHTSA to prioritize working with relevant 
experts and stakeholders, including researchers, engineers, 
safety advocates, and the trucking industry, to facilitate the 
deployment and adoption of rear and side underride protection 
devices. Last year, the Committee directed NHTSA to implement 
GAO recommendations on underrides and to complete a rulemaking 
to improve rear guards to meet the Insurance Institute for 
Highway Safety standards for Toughguard awards. The Committee 
repeats such direction, and requires NHTSA to brief the 
Committee within 30 days of enactment of this Act on the 
agency's progress on such requirements.
    Automatic emergency braking.--The Committee notes that the 
safety benefits of automatic emergency braking on large trucks 
are well documented. The Insurance Institute for Highway Safety 
has found that the technology can reduce front-to-rear crashes 
with injuries by 56 percent. The costs to generating these 
benefits are not large. A September 2018 study by NHTSA found 
that the incremental cost to a truck driver of automatic 
emergency brakes would be less than $350. The Committee directs 
NHTSA to complete a rulemaking, which was initiated in 2015, on 
automatic emergency braking within one year of enactment of 
this Act. The Committee further directs NHTSA to promulgate 
minimum performance standards as part of this rulemaking.
    Automated vehicle testing.--The Committee notes that in 
November 2019 and February 2020, the National Transportation 
Safety Board (NTSB) issued recommendations to NHTSA regarding 
the testing of autonomous vehicles on public roads including 
around automation tools that allow a vehicle to steer, 
accelerate, and brake automatically within a lane. The 
Committee directs NHTSA to comply with those recommendations 
with all deliberate speed and encourages NHTSA to require 
entities that are testing or intend to test a developmental 
automated driving system on public roads to submit a safety 
self-assessment to NHTSA. The Committee directs NHTSA to comply 
with the NTSB's recommendations and to brief the House and 
Senate Committees on Appropriations within 180 days of 
enactment of this Act on the agency's plan to comply with the 
recommendations.
    Advanced Driver Assistance Systems (ADAS).--The Committee 
applauds the announcement by the Department to endorse 
``Clearing the Confusion'', the list of recommended ADAS 
terminology developed by a collaboration among the National 
Safety Council, AAA, Consumer Reports and data analytics 
company J.D. Power and is based on ADAS system functionality. 
To further these efforts, the Committee encourages NHTSA to 
develop minimum performance standards for these technologies.
    Autonomous vehicles.--Changes in driving technology will 
bring significant changes to the roadways and will likely 
change how occupants position themselves in vehicles. To 
address the changing nature of safety, the Committee directs 
NHTSA to work with the Highly Automated Systems Safety Center 
of Excellence to ensure that the agency has access to staff 
with expertise relevant to the development of automated and 
partially automated vehicles. The Committee directs NHTSA to 
develop a research program in order to better understand the 
kinetics and injury outcomes associated with alternatively 
positioned vehicle occupants. NHTSA shall update the House and 
Senate Committees on Appropriations on their activities and 
plans related to autonomous vehicles within 180 days after 
enactment of this Act.
    The Committee finds that the machine learning and other 
advanced computing methods could be more efficiently used in 
the implementation of Automated Driving Systems (ADS). The 
Committee encourages NHTSA to work with ADS stakeholders to 
identify and define their data needs with an eye towards the 
future goal of developing platforms to address those needs. 
Such a program of research would also support state governments 
as they assess the readiness of their infrastructure to 
accommodate autonomous vehicles. In addition, the Committee 
supports safe autonomous vehicle testing on public roads, 
including by manufacturers of highly automated vehicles, 
automated driving systems, and components of automated driving 
systems.
    New Car Assessment Program (NCAP).--The Committee directs 
NHTSA to conduct a review that outlines whether the crash test 
equipment used in NCAP adequately tests for the risks of injury 
for female, young adult, and elderly drivers and to report to 
the House and Senate Committees on Appropriations upon 
completion of the review, no later than December 31, 2023.
    Crashworthiness research.--The Committee recognizes the 
importance that lightweight plastics and polymer composites 
play to improve automotive safety, meet consumer demand for 
innovative and autonomous vehicles, increase fuel efficiency, 
and support new U.S. highly skilled manufacturing jobs. The 
Committee encourages NHTSA to focus on updating the 
countermeasures in its frontal, side, rollover, front 
seatbacks, and lower interior impacts for children and small 
adults, including women, as well as pedestrian crashworthiness 
projects, with an emphasis on decreasing the weight of vehicles 
in both traditional and autonomous vehicle structural designs. 
The Committee directs NHTSA to leverage lessons learned from 
lightweight materials research at the Department of 
Transportation, the Department of Energy, and by industry 
stakeholders in its development of safety-centered approaches 
for future lightweight automotive design.
    Research on older drivers.--The Committee remains concerned 
about the safety of older drivers and sees promise in the 
development of tools that can prolong safe and independent 
mobility. The Committee would like to see more widespread 
testing of tools such as app-based software that provides in-
vehicle assistance to elderly drivers. The Committee applauds 
NHTSA's current work on smart phone interventions for older 
drivers and directs NHTSA to carry out a pilot program in 
coordination with a university or multi-university consortia 
for such software in order to develop a framework that 
facilitates mobility for elderly drivers. Of the amounts 
provided under this heading, $8,000,000 shall be available for 
a wide-scale field operational test of these technologies.
    Passengerless delivery vehicles.--The Committee notes with 
interest the development of new technologies that may be able 
to provide deliveries of food and other essential items to 
members of the public. However, the Committee is concerned that 
these technologies have not been fully tested in a real-world 
setting, and will watch with significant interest the results 
of a new pilot program for such vehicles in the State of 
California. The Committee is hopeful that the safety and 
performance record of the vehicles will be superb, and that the 
results will provide NHTSA with additional information and data 
as they proceed with rulemakings around such vehicles.
    Motorcoach safety.--Section 32703 of Public Law 112-141, 
the Moving Ahead for Progress in the 21st Century Act (MAP-21), 
required DOT to issue rules requiring seatbelts on 
motorcoaches, regulations for roof strength, anti-ejection 
safety countermeasures, and rollover crash avoidance. Within 60 
days of enactment of this Act, the Committee directs NHTSA to 
update the House and Senate Committees on Appropriations 
regarding the Department's progress in implementing the 
motorcoach safety standards outlined in MAP-21.
    Overdue rulemakings.--The Committee remains concerned about 
the slow progress by NHTSA on completing rulemakings mandated 
by Congress in MAP-21 and the FAST Act. The Committee directs 
the Inspector General of the Department of Transportation to 
conduct a study of NHTSA's rulemaking activities to determine a 
list of all congressionally mandated rulemakings related to 49 
U.S.C. Chapter 301 which the DOT and NHTSA have failed to 
address consistent with required deadlines, the reasons for 
such delays, and potential actions to reduce delay in mandated 
rulemaking activities, including the prioritization of 
congressionally mandated rules in relation to general 
rulemaking activities.

                        OPERATIONS AND RESEARCH

                (LIQUIDATION OF CONTRACT AUTHORIZATION)

                      (LIMITATION ON OBLIGATIONS)

                          (HIGHWAY TRUST FUND)

 
 
 
Appropriation, fiscal year 2020.......................      $155,300,000
Budget request, fiscal year 2021......................       161,200,000
Recommended in the bill...............................       170,612,000
Bill compared with:
    Appropriation, fiscal year 2020...................       +15,312,000
    Budget request, fiscal year 2021..................        +9,412,000
 

    This limitation controls NHTSA's spending from the Highway 
Trust Fund for Highway Safety Research and Development 
programs. Many of these programs are conducted in partnership 
with state and local governments, the private sector, 
universities, research units, and various safety associations 
and organizations. Programs funded by this account include 
research, demonstrations, and technical assistance to state and 
local governments around behavioral aspects of driver, occupant 
and pedestrian behavior. This account also funds NHTSA's 
National Center for Statistics and Analysis which collects and 
analyzes crash data and provides technical assistance to 
support State Highway Safety Activities.

                        COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION

    Consistent with the amounts authorized in the INVEST in 
America Act, for behavioral safety research funded by the 
operations and research account, the Committee recommends 
$170,612,000 in liquidating cash and obligation limitation. 
Obligation limitation is available for one year, except for 
$20,000,000 which is available until September 30, 2022 and 
$3,000,000, for impaired driving detection, which is available 
until expended.
    Highway fatalities.--Despite consistent progress, estimated 
highway fatalities still totaled more than 36,000 in 2019, with 
alcohol-impaired and speeding-related fatalities each totaling 
about one-third of that total. In addition, the national seat 
belt use rate has leveled off at about 90 percent, child safety 
restraint use needs to improve, distracted driving persists, 
motorcycle and pedestrian safety are an ongoing concern, and 
drugged driving and drivers impaired by multiple substances are 
emerging issues. Immediate steps must be taken to focus 
resources on a national campaign to save lives on the roadways. 
The Committee directs NHTSA to assert its leadership by 
developing and implementing such a national campaign, working 
with other federal agencies, the states, law enforcement, the 
public health community, industry, and others who can 
contribute to the goal of saving lives in an expedited manner. 
An initial report on the agency's plans and progress on this 
campaign should be provided to the House and Senate 
Appropriations Committees no later than one year after 
enactment of this Act. The report should include specific goals 
and any impediments to achieving those goals.
    Pedestrian fatalities.--The Committee remains alarmed at 
the increased number of pedestrian fatalities, which over the 
last 10 years, have soared to more than 6,000, or roughly one-
sixth of all traffic deaths in the United States. Reducing 
these fatalities and injuries will take a concerted effort that 
includes enforcement of existing laws, changes in street design 
and engineering, and education of drivers and pedestrians. The 
Committee directs NHTSA to continue to work with FHWA and state 
and local stakeholders to conduct education and enforcement 
efforts in cities nationwide and to convene stakeholders to 
develop and publicize innovative solutions to reduce pedestrian 
fatalities. In addition, the Committee directs NHTSA to update 
data collection methodologies to evaluate pedestrian injuries 
and fatalities. In order to facilitate more robust risk 
analysis, NHTSA should partner with one or more academic 
institutions to develop modern pedestrian crash data collection 
protocols.
    Road to Zero coalition.--The Committee believes that 
conquering persistent problems with speed, seat belt use, 
distraction, and substance-impaired driving requires a 
collaborative effort. In order to reduce motor vehicle 
fatalities, the Road to Zero coalition has awarded 25 safe 
system innovation grants totaling $3,500,000 over three years 
to qualifying organizations and has shared these results with 
other stakeholders so that learning can be applied throughout 
the country. The Committee encourages the Department to remain 
engaged and involved with the Road to Zero coalition as it 
develops data-driven actions to meet the goal of reducing motor 
vehicle fatalities to zero. The Committee directs that NHTSA 
continue to fund grants for such activities at a level 
commensurate with that provided in fiscal years 2017 through 
2020.
    Impaired driving detection.--The Committee is concerned 
that available technology to detect impaired driving has 
changed since funding began for the DADDS program in 2011 and 
is encouraged by the development of a variety of sensor- and 
camera-based technologies in vehicles to detect impaired, 
drowsy and distracted driving. While the DADDS program has made 
significant progress, it has been almost 15 years since NHTSA 
last reviewed the available technology for detecting drivers 
impaired by alcohol. Within 60 days of enactment of this Act, 
the Committee directs NHTSA to contract with the Volpe National 
Transportation Systems Center to update the 2007 Review of 
Technology to Prevent Alcohol-Impaired Crashes. The Committee 
directs NHTSA to brief the House and Senate Committees on 
Appropriations within 30 days of receipt of the Volpe study.
    Because additional technologies to detect drivers impaired 
by alcohol or other substances are emerging, the Committee is 
concerned about their ability to work in a repeatable manner 
and sees a need to eventually develop minimum performance 
standards for such technologies. As a result, the Committee 
directs that $3,000,000, to remain available until expended, be 
available for NHTSA to acquire such technology, to develop a 
research plan and to collect data with the goal of eventually 
developing a test standard. In addition, NHTSA is directed to 
convene a public forum of national and international technology 
developers who have expertise in technologies that detect 
impaired driving in order to increase awareness of such 
technologies and to facilitate technology transfer from 
previously federally funded efforts.
    Drug-impaired driving.--The Committee remains concerned 
with the growing problem of people driving under the influence 
of one or multiple substances, including marijuana and opioids. 
The Committee supports the goal of developing a reliable 
standard for all types of impaired driving and urges NHTSA to 
coordinate research efforts with states and other partners. At 
the same time, the Committee recognizes that developing a 
standard measurement of marijuana impairment, similar to blood 
alcohol concentration (BAC), remains unlikely in the near term. 
The Committee directs NHTSA to continue to robustly support 
Drug Recognition Expert (DRE) and Advanced Roadside Impaired 
Driving Enforcement (ARIDE) training and to prioritize the 
study and development of a standardized field sobriety test 
(SFST) to detect marijuana impairment.
    The Committee directs NHTSA to work with the Department of 
Justice, the Department of Health and Human Services, and the 
Department of Commerce to ensure that state highway safety 
offices and state law enforcement have the most up-to-date 
information from the Federal government on detecting impaired 
driving including an inventory of available technologies to 
detect recent drug use such as oral fluid technologies. In 
order to increase the safety of the transportation network by 
reducing drug-impaired driving, the Committee directs NHTSA to 
work with states to determine their toxicology testing and 
funding needs and to provide states with flexibility in how 
they use impaired driving countermeasures grants, including, 
but not limited to, assistance with state toxicology labs.
    Child-car seat testing.--In 2014, NHTSA issued a proposed 
rulemaking that would have required all car seats designed for 
children up to 40 pounds to be tested for side-impact 
collisions. By December 31, 2021, the Committee directs NHTSA 
to issue the long overdue rule to test car seats for 
effectiveness in side-impact car crashes and to update rules 
for frontal impacts. The Committee directs NHTSA to brief the 
House and Senate Committees on Appropriation within 60 days of 
enactment of this Act on the agency's plan to meet this 
deadline.
    Child hyperthermia.--The Committee is deeply concerned 
about the ongoing crisis involving children dying of 
hyperthermia after being left alone in motor vehicles. In 2018 
and 2019, a total of more than 100 children died in this tragic 
manner. NHTSA must pursue a two-pronged strategy of public 
education and technology solutions. Continued public education 
activities should include aggressive media and community 
outreach. Technological solutions should include requiring the 
automotive industry to swiftly install systems that detect the 
presence of a child and alert individuals inside and outside 
the vehicle. The Committee directs NHTSA to continue policies 
and programs implemented in 2019 to reduce the number of child 
deaths from hyperthermia. Of the amounts provided under this 
heading, the Committee directs that not less than $3,000,000 
shall be available for such activities.
    High visibility enforcement campaigns.--High visibility 
traffic safety enforcement campaigns are effective, life-saving 
countermeasures for addressing increased safety belt and child 
safety seat use, drunk driving prevention, and control of 
distracted driving. The Committee continues to strongly support 
these campaigns and provides substantial resources to conduct 
them throughout the year. In order to enhance the effectiveness 
of these efforts, the Committee directs NHTSA to work with the 
Federal Highway Administration and state departments of 
transportation to use highway dynamic message signs, in 
compliance with the Manual on Uniform Traffic Control Devices, 
to support the national safety emphasis periods.
    Stroke victim transportation protocol.--Stroke is a leading 
cause of death and long-term disability among adults in the 
United States but faster diagnosis and treatment greatly 
increases chances of survival. The Committee encourages NHTSA 
and its Office of Emergency Medical Services to work with 
states to develop and implement assessment, treatment, and 
transport-destination protocols to ensure that stroke patients 
are transported to the most appropriate hospital for treatment. 
Such protocols shall consider the capability of an emergency 
receiving facility to improve outcomes for patients suspected 
of having an emergent large vessel occlusion.

                     HIGHWAY TRAFFIC SAFETY GRANTS

                (LIQUIDATION OF CONTRACT AUTHORIZATION)

                      (LIMITATION ON OBLIGATIONS)

                          (HIGHWAY TRUST FUND)

 
 
 
Appropriation, fiscal year 2020.......................      $623,017,000
Budget request, fiscal year 2021......................       647,200,000
Recommended in the bill...............................       855,488,000
Bill compared with:
    Appropriation, fiscal year 2020...................      +232,471,000
    Budget request, fiscal year 2021..................      +208,288,000
 

    This limitation controls NHTSA's spending on grants to 
states authorized under the FAST Act. The grant programs 
include: Highway Safety Programs, the National Priority Safety 
Program, and the High Visibility Enforcement Program. These 
grants provide flexible funding to States that develop a 
Highway Safety plan to address State highway safety issues. 
This account also includes incentive grants to states that meet 
specific statutory criteria in areas such as impaired and 
distracted driving, occupant protection, motorcyclist safety, 
and nonmotorized safety.

                        COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION

    Consistent with the amounts authorized in the INVEST in 
America Act, the Committee recommends $855,488,000 in 
liquidating cash from the Highway Trust Fund to pay outstanding 
obligations of the Highway Traffic Safety Grant programs at the 
levels provided in this Act and prior Appropriations Acts. The 
Committee also recommends limiting obligations from the Highway 
Trust Fund in fiscal year 2021 for the Highway Traffic Safety 
Grant programs to $855,488,000. The following table provides 
funding levels for activities within this account:

------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                           Request       Recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
State and Community Highway Safety               - - -      $384,800,000
 Grants.............................
National Priority Safety Programs...             - - -       390,900,000
High Visibility Enforcement Program.             - - -        49,702,000
Administrative Expenses.............       $30,086,000        30,086,000
    Total...........................       647,200,000       855,488,000
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Coronavirus pandemic.--The Committee recognizes the 
significant toll that the coronavirus-19 pandemic has taken on 
the budgets and staffing of state departments of 
transportation. In conjunction with the authorized 
flexibilities provided for in the INVEST in America Act and to 
ensure that state highway safety activities remain robust, the 
Committee eliminates any requirements that states match federal 
funds for grants made pursuant to chapter 4 of title 23, United 
States Code, for fiscal year 2021.
    Safety promotional materials.--For the purpose of Federal 
grants administered by NHTSA, safety equipment purchased for 
traffic safety education trainings, such as child car seats, 
bicycle helmets and lights, and reflective vests, shall not be 
considered promotional materials or memorabilia.
    Distracted driving.--The Committee notes that more than 
2,800 people were killed in crashes involving a distracted 
driver in 2018. The Committee continues to fund NHTSA programs 
that support State efforts to educate the public and to enforce 
laws promoting safe driving habits and prevent unnecessary 
deaths.
    State traffic safety information system improvements.--The 
Committee recognizes the potential dangers to drivers and 
pedestrians caused by the delays associated with mailed paper 
notices of out-of-state driving infractions. In coordination 
with the National Driver Registry funded under ``Operations and 
Research,'' and to help meet the outlined purpose of grants 
under sections 402 and 405 of title 23, United States Code, the 
Committee directs NHTSA to continue to provide technical 
assistance to States on improving the interoperability of state 
and national traffic safety information systems, and, where 
possible, to build capacity for a transition to digital 
notifications.

      ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISIONS--NATIONAL HIGHWAY TRAFFIC SAFETY 
                             ADMINISTRATION

    Section 140 provides limited funding for travel and related 
expenses associated with state management reviews and highway 
safety core competency development training.
    Section 141 exempts from the current fiscal year's 
obligation limitation any obligation authority that was made 
available in previous public laws.
    Section 142 provides additional funding for highway safety 
programs.
    Section 143 prohibits funds from being used to enforce 
certain State maintenance of effort requirements under 23 
U.S.C. 405.

                    Federal Railroad Administration

    The Federal Railroad Administration (FRA) was established 
by the Department of Transportation Act (P.L. 89--670) on 
October 15, 1966. FRA plans, develops, and administers programs 
and regulations to promote the safe operation of freight and 
passenger rail transportation in the United States. The U.S. 
freight railroad system consists of over 600 railroads and 
140,000 miles of track, which deliver approximately 5,000,000 
tons of goods each day. In addition, FRA oversees grants to the 
National Railroad Passenger Corporation (Amtrak) with the goal 
of assisting Amtrak with improving its passenger rail service 
and physical infrastructure.

                         SAFETY AND OPERATIONS

 
 
 
Appropriation, fiscal year 2020.......................      $224,198,000
Budget request, fiscal year 2021......................       225,634,000
Recommended in the bill...............................       236,134,000
Bill compared with:
    Appropriation, fiscal year 2020...................       +11,936,000
    Budget request, fiscal year 2021..................       +10,500,000
 

    The safety and operations account provides funding for 
FRA's safety program activities related to passenger and 
freight railroads. Funding also supports salaries and expenses 
and other operating activities related to FRA staff and 
programs.

                        COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION

    The Committee recommendation provides $236,134,000 for the 
safety and operations account. The following table provides 
funding levels for activities within this account.

------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                           Request       Recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Safe transportation of energy                    - - -        $2,000,000
 products...........................
Automated track inspection program          $8,000,000        16,500,000
 and data analysis..................
Railroad safety information system           4,400,000         4,400,000
 and front end interface............
Positive train control support               3,001,000         3,001,000
 program............................
Confidential close call reporting            3,000,000         3,000,000
 system.............................
Trespasser prevention...............         2,300,000         2,300,000
Highway-rail grade crossing safety..         1,325,000         1,325,000
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    In addition, the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic 
Security Act (CARES Act) (P.L. 116-136) included $250,000 for 
the safety and operations account to prevent, prepare for, and 
respond to coronavirus.
    Competitive grants.--The Committee remains concerned with 
the Department's ability to execute FRA's competitive grant 
programs in a timely manner. The Department has established a 
troubling pattern of delays. For example, the fiscal year 2018 
restoration and enhancement grant program awards were selected 
on May 5, 2020, over 2 years after this funding was provided by 
the Congress; the fiscal year 2019 Federal-State partnership 
for state of good repair grant program awards were selected on 
May 27, 2020, over 1 year and 3 months after this funding was 
provided by the Congress; and the fiscal year 2019 consolidated 
rail infrastructure and safety improvements (CRISI) grant 
program awards were selected on March 12, 2020, over 1 year 
after this funding was provided by the Congress. These delays 
in selecting projects to receive awards have a compounding 
effect on each subsequent fiscal year, with the Department not 
issuing the Notice of Funding Opportunity (NOFO) for the next 
fiscal year until several months after the Congress provided 
funding for the grant program.
    The Committee recognizes that competitive grant programs 
require dedicated staff and contract support to issue NOFOs, 
review applications, select projects for awards, execute grant 
agreements, and conduct project management oversight. In fiscal 
year 2021, the Committee again provides significant resources 
to help communities address transportation challenges through 
FRA competitive grant programs. This significant investment by 
the Congress in the Nation's rail infrastructure requires a 
robust program of grant management and oversight. Therefore, 
the Committee increases the administrative set-asides for the 
Federal-State partnership for state of good repair and CRISI 
grant programs to up to 2 percent and directs FRA to administer 
and manage all competitive grant programs funded by this Act in 
a responsible manner.
    Coronavirus pandemic.--The Committee recognizes the 
significant toll that the coronavirus pandemic has taken on the 
budgets and staff of State and local governments, Amtrak, and 
others. Therefore, the Committee eliminates the selection 
preference for projects which have a 50 percent or higher non-
Federal match for the Federal-State partnership for state of 
good repair and CRISI grant programs for fiscal year 2021.
    Safe transportation of energy products.--The Committee 
recommendation supports FRA's safe transportation of energy 
products programs, which includes safety inspectors, safety 
route managers, tank car quality assurance specialists, tank 
car research, and increased mileage of the automated track 
inspection program (ATIP) on routes that carry energy products.
    ATIP.--ATIP uses track geometry measurement vehicles to 
automatically measure track conditions which supplement the 
work of FRA inspectors to ensure railroads are compliant with 
FRA track safety standards. The Committee recommendation 
supports the inspection of passenger rail routes, commuter rail 
routes, routes that carry energy products and other hazardous 
materials, and further enhancements to ATIP's inspection 
capabilities. The Committee notes that funds provided for ATIP 
in fiscal year 2021 are available to inspect tracks and analyze 
data from ATIP operations and inspections.
    Positive train control (PTC).--The Committee recognizes 
that significant progress has been made by freight, passenger, 
and commuter railroads to implement PTC, with PTC systems in 
operation on 56,541 of the nearly 58,000 route miles required 
by the Rail Safety Improvement Act of 2008 (P.L. 110-432) as of 
March 31, 2020. In addition, as of March 31, 2020, 48.5 percent 
of approximately 229 host-tenant railroad relationships had 
achieved PTC interoperability. With the December 31, 2020 
deadline to fully implement PTC quickly approaching, FRA and 
railroads must redouble their efforts to complete revenue 
service demonstration, resolve software and vendor challenges, 
achieve PTC interoperability, and submit and review PTC safety 
plans. The Committee is concerned that as of March 31, 2020, 
FRA has identified 4 railroads at risk of not fully 
implementing PTC by the December 31, 2020 deadline. The 
Committee directs FRA to continue to work with railroads on PTC 
testing and interoperability, provide technical assistance, 
actively monitor industry-wide progress, and take enforcement 
actions, including civil penalties, as necessary. In addition, 
the Committee directs FRA to continue to brief the House and 
Senate Committees on Appropriations on progress by railroads to 
implement PTC on a monthly basis until December 31, 2020, and 
as needed thereafter.
    Confidential close call reporting system (C3RS).--The 
Committee commends FRA for its efforts to increase 
participation in C3RS, a voluntary program that enables 
participating railroads and their employees to identify, 
analyze, and mitigate safety risks and improve safety culture. 
Approximately 20 passenger, commuter, and freight railroads are 
participating in C3RS. To better understand how C3RS helps 
promote and improve safety culture, the Committee directs the 
Government Accountability Office (GAO) to examine FRA's C3RS 
program and similar programs passenger, commuter, and freight 
railroads may have in place to encourage their employees to 
identify and report safety risks. The Committee directs GAO to 
report its findings and recommendations to the House and Senate 
Committees on Appropriations no later than 2 years after 
enactment of this Act.
    Trespasser prevention.--Pedestrians trespassing on railroad 
property remains the leading cause of all rail-related 
fatalities, accounting for 62 percent of U.S. rail-related 
deaths in fiscal year 2018. The Committee commends FRA for its 
efforts to implement the National Strategy to Prevent 
Trespassing on Railroad Property (National Strategy), including 
developing a risk model, initiating grant opportunities to 
support local enforcement efforts, and increasing outreach 
through community summits and symposiums. The Committee 
recommendation provides funding for FRA to continue these 
activities in fiscal year 2021. The Committee looks forward to 
receiving an update of the National Strategy as required by 
House Report 116-106 and directs FRA to provide an update 
annually with the most current data available, FRA's progress 
on the milestones outlined in the National Strategy, and any 
potential new initiatives to reduce trespasser fatalities. FRA 
is directed to submit the updated National Strategy to the 
House and Senate Committees on Appropriations no later than 
June 30 each year.
    Highway-rail grade crossing safety.--Highway-rail grade 
crossing collisions are the second leading cause of all rail-
related fatalities in the United States. Between 2009 and 2018, 
the total number of accidents at public and private highway-
rail grade crossings have remained constant, averaging about 
2,100 per year. Despite more than half of all public crossings 
being equipped with active warning devices, 68 percent of 
collisions occur at crossings with active, functional warning 
devices. The Committee understands FRA is engaging in a data 
driven process to identify the most dangerous highway-rail 
grade crossings in the United States, which would allow FRA to 
engage with communities, State and local agencies, law 
enforcement, railroads, and advocacy organizations to identify 
potential local solutions. In addition, FRA has initiated a 3-
year strategy to implement and demonstrate promising high- and 
low-technology solutions, assist communities in identifying 
Federal funding opportunities, improve outreach and 
partnerships, and conduct research and development. The 
Committee directs FRA to continue these activities and provides 
funding to support FRA's work in fiscal year 2021.
    Blocked railroad crossings.--The Committee remains 
concerned with the increase in the prevalence of railroad 
crossings blocked by trains, and the potential impacts to 
communities and safety. The Committee commends FRA for 
launching a new, dedicated website for the public and law 
enforcement to report blocked highway-rail grade crossings. The 
information collected through this website could provide FRA a 
more complete picture of where, when, for how long, and how 
frequently blocked railroad crossings occur. The Committee 
directs FRA to utilize this information to work with 
communities, State and local agencies, law enforcement, 
railroads, and others to develop local solutions to blocked 
railroad crossings.
    After the website has been operational for 1 year, the 
Committee directs FRA to compile and analyze the information 
submitted through the website. The Committee directs FRA to 
brief the House and Senate Committees on Appropriations on this 
analysis, including any identified trends and proposed actions 
to reduce the number, frequency, and long duration of blocked 
railroad crossings. This briefing shall occur no later than 90 
days after the website has been operational for 1 year.
    On-time performance.--A significant obstacle to 
establishing new passenger rail service or adding frequencies 
is the ability to obtain reliable access to host railroad 
tracks. The Committee recognizes the challenges host railroads 
face in balancing the demands of passenger and freight trains, 
which can impact on-time performance. These challenges are 
regularly reflected in Amtrak's existing service. In fiscal 
year 2019, Amtrak's long-distance trains were on time at 
stations only 42 percent of the time, while Amtrak's State-
supported trains were on time about 78 percent of the time. 
Congress sought to address on-time performance through the 
Passenger Rail Investment and Improvement Act (PRIIA) of 2008 
(P.L. 110-432). The Committee is pleased that following several 
years in Federal court, FRA and Amtrak are again working to 
develop new or improve existing metrics and minimum standards 
for measuring the performance and service quality of intercity 
passenger train operations as required by section 207 of PRIIA. 
FRA and Amtrak jointly developed proposed metrics and minimum 
standards, consulted with impacted stakeholders during the 
development process, and a notice of proposed rulemaking (NPRM) 
was issued by FRA on March 31, 2020. The Committee directs FRA 
and Amtrak to thoroughly review and consider all comments 
received in response to the NPRM and to issue a final rule as 
soon as practicable.
    New transportation projects utilizing existing corridors.--
The Committee is aware that metropolitan planners may seek to 
utilize existing transportation corridors in proposing new 
transportation projects, including high speed rail. The 
Committee notes that documentation of historic disruption of 
affected communities and potential negative impacts to 
communities are to be considered in the documentation required 
under the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). The 
Committee directs the Department to ensure NEPA documentation 
for projects which propose to utilize existing transportation 
corridors includes documentation of the effects of the historic 
disruption of affected communities. Further, the Committee 
encourages the Department to evaluate the impact of new 
transportation projects and their utilization of existing 
corridors and to provide recommendations on ways to mitigate 
community disruption from construction and operation of new 
transportation projects in existing transportation corridors, 
including high speed rail projects.
    Amfleet replacement.--The Committee notes that the Further 
Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2020 (P.L. 116-94) directed 
FRA to utilize the flexibilities provided in 2 CFR 
200.308(d)(1) in order to allow State acquisition costs and on-
going capital charges related to Amtrak's new fleet to be an 
eligible activity in any future NOFOs for the CRISI and 
Federal-State partnership for state of good repair grant 
programs. The Committee continues this direction for these 
competitive grant programs for fiscal year 2021.
    Washington Union Station expansion project.--The Committee 
recognizes the importance of Washington Union Station as a 
multimodal transportation hub for the National Capital Region 
and understands plans are underway to expand capacity and 
improve multimodal facilities at the station. The Committee 
directs FRA to continue working with the District of Columbia 
government on the expansion plan and to consider the feedback 
of all stakeholders, including residents of affected 
neighborhoods, in its planning process.

                   RAILROAD RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT

 
 
 
Appropriation, fiscal year 2020.......................       $40,600,000
Budget request, fiscal year 2021......................        41,000,000
Recommended in the bill...............................        41,000,000
Bill compared with:
    Appropriation, fiscal year 2020...................          +400,000
    Budget request, fiscal year 2021..................             - - -
 

    The railroad research and development program provides 
science and technology support for FRA's policy and regulatory 
efforts. The program's objectives are to reduce the frequency 
and severity of railroad accidents through scientific 
advancement, and to support technological innovations in 
conventional and high speed railroads.

                        COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION

    The Committee recommendation provides $41,000,000 for the 
railroad research and development program.
    The Committee directs FRA to conduct research and 
development activities in all disciplines, including track, 
rolling stock, train control and communications, human factors, 
and railroad systems, in order to maximize gains in rail safety 
and encourages FRA to prioritize new technology and data 
analysis methods to improve safety in all areas of railroad 
operations.
    Safe transportation of energy products.--The Committee 
provides $2,500,000 for FRA to research and mitigate risks 
associated with the transportation of crude oil, ethanol, 
liquefied natural gas (LNG), and other hazardous materials, 
including tank car research in partnership with other Federal 
agencies.
    The Committee is aware of several research and development 
projects FRA and the Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety 
Administration (PHMSA) are actively pursuing relating to the 
transportation of LNG in rail tank cars or the use of LNG as a 
fuel for locomotives. The Committee directs FRA, in 
collaboration with PHMSA, to continue to support cooperative 
research on the safe use of LNG in these applications which 
should inform rulemaking.
    Trespasser prevention and highway-rail grade crossing 
safety.--As previously noted, the Committee is concerned that 
the two leading causes of all rail-related fatalities are 
trespassing on railroad rights-of-way and collisions at 
highway-rail grade crossings. Combined, these two causes 
account for 97 percent of all rail-related fatalities. The 
Committee urges FRA to continue research and development 
activities which could improve trespass detection and 
prevention, including at or near highway-rail grade crossings, 
and to assist with the National Strategy to Prevent Trespassing 
on Railroad Property. In addition, the Committee urges FRA to 
continue research and development activities on grade crossing 
technology and engineering solutions, including human 
interactions with such technology.
    Short-line safety.--The Committee provides $3,000,000 to 
improve safety practices and training and develop safety 
management systems for Class II and Class III freight 
railroads. This funding supports FRA's initiative to partner 
with short-line and regional railroads to build a stronger, 
more sustainable safety culture through safety culture 
assessments, training and education, including on the safe 
transportation of energy products and other hazardous 
materials, outreach activities, and research.
    System safety and risk reduction programs.--The Committee 
recognizes that continued investments in critical rail 
infrastructure programs will make rail infrastructure, 
equipment, and the operating environment safer. Therefore, the 
Committee urges FRA to continue prioritizing investments in the 
development of technologies designed to verify the functional 
performance of complex electronic systems such as: PTC, 
passenger door control, railroad crossing equipment, 
communication systems, train and locomotive systems, train 
environmental control, railcar signs, infrastructure 
maintenance, and monitoring systems. The Committee recognizes 
the importance of deploying these technologies in new and 
existing systems and acknowledges investments made in such 
technologies by cities, transportation agencies, and railroads 
across the country. The Committee urges FRA to continue working 
with industry to develop standardized performance 
specifications, test and verification processes, and 
maintenance and diagnostics tools for such systems.

           FEDERAL-STATE PARTNERSHIP FOR STATE OF GOOD REPAIR

 
 
 
Appropriation, fiscal year 2020.......................      $200,000,000
Budget request, fiscal year 2021......................             - - -
Recommended in the bill...............................       200,000,000
Bill compared with:
    Appropriation, fiscal year 2020...................             - - -
    Budget request, fiscal year 2021..................      +200,000,000
 

    The Fixing America's Surface Transportation (FAST) Act 
(P.L. 114-94) authorized the Federal-State partnership for 
state of good repair grant program under section 11302. The 
purpose of these grants is to reduce the state of good repair 
backlog on publicly- or Amtrak-owned infrastructure, equipment, 
and facilities. Eligible activities include capital projects 
to: (1) replace existing assets in-kind or with assets that 
increase capacity or service levels; (2) ensure that service 
can be maintained while existing assets are brought into a 
state of good repair; and (3) bring existing assets into a 
state of good repair.

                        COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION

    The Committee recommendation provides $200,000,000 for the 
Federal-State partnership for state of good repair grant 
program.
    Competitive grants.--The Committee remains concerned with 
the Department's ability to execute this competitive grant 
program in a timely manner. The Consolidated Appropriations 
Act, 2019 (P.L. 116-6) provided $400,000,000 for the Federal-
State partnership for state of good repair grant program and 
required the Department to select projects to receive awards no 
later than 180 days after enactment of P.L. 116-6. The 
Department did not issue the NOFO for fiscal year 2019 until 
October 8, 2019, more than 230 days after P.L. 116-6 was 
enacted. As a result of the Department's slow pace in 
initiating the NOFO and selecting projects to receive the 
fiscal year 2019 funding, P.L. 116-94 directed the Department 
to make these awards by May 1, 2020. The Committee is extremely 
disappointed that the Department failed to meet this subsequent 
award date despite having more than 140 days between receiving 
applications on December 9, 2019 and May 1, 2020 to review 
applications and select projects to receive awards. While the 
Committee appreciates that the Department finally selected 
projects for the fiscal year 2019 funding on May 27, 2020, this 
came over 1 year and 3 months after this funding was provided 
by the Congress. As previously noted, these delays in issuing 
NOFOs and selecting projects to receive awards have a 
compounding effect on each subsequent fiscal year. In order to 
prevent future delays with the funding the Committee provides 
in fiscal year 2021, the Committee directs the Department to 
complete its work on the funding appropriated in fiscal year 
2020 by December 20, 2020 as required by P.L. 116-94. Further, 
the Committee directs the Secretary to publish a NOFO for 
fiscal year 2021 no later than 60 days after enactment of this 
Act and to make awards no later than 240 days after enactment 
of this Act.
    In addition, the Committee is concerned with the 
Department's decision in NOFOs for fiscal years 2017, 2018, 
2019, and 2020 to limit project eligibility to final design and 
construction activities and to ``not fund any preliminary 
engineering, environmental work, or related clearances.'' The 
FAST Act does not include such limitations for this grant 
program. The Department's subjective decision to restrict 
project eligibility may have resulted in a reduced pool of 
applications in response to NOFOs in fiscal years 2017, 2018, 
and 2019, despite the significant state of good repair needs of 
the Nation's railroad assets. Therefore, the Committee directs 
the Secretary to expand project eligibility in the fiscal year 
2021 NOFO to include design, engineering, location surveys, 
mapping, environmental studies, and acquiring rights-of-way 
activities independently of or in conjunction with 
construction.

        CONSOLIDATED RAIL INFRASTRUCTURE AND SAFETY IMPROVEMENTS

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

 
 
 
Appropriation, fiscal year 2020.......................      $325,000,000
Budget request, fiscal year 2021......................       330,000,000
Recommended in the bill...............................       500,000,000
Bill compared with:
    Appropriation, fiscal year 2020...................      +175,000,000
    Budget request, fiscal year 2021..................      +170,000,000
 

    Authorized under section 11301 of the FAST Act, the purpose 
of the CRISI grant program is to improve the safety, 
efficiency, and reliability of passenger and freight rail 
transportation systems. Eligible activities include a wide 
range of capital, regional and corridor planning, environmental 
analyses, research, workforce development, and training 
projects.

                        COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION

    The Committee recommendation provides $500,000,000 for the 
CRISI grant program. Of the total funds provided, not less than 
$60,000,000 is for projects eligible under section 22907(c)(5) 
of title 49, United States Code; not less than $90,000,000 is 
for projects eligible under section 22907(c)(2) of title 49, 
United States Code, that support the development of new 
intercity passenger rail service routes including alignments 
for existing routes; and not less than $25,000,000 is for 
capital projects and engineering solutions targeting 
trespassing.
    Competitive grants.--While the Committee is pleased that 
the Department awarded the funding appropriated in fiscal year 
2019 on March 12, 2020, the Committee notes with disappointment 
that the Department did not issue the NOFO for fiscal year 2019 
until August 19, 2019, more than 6 months after P.L. 116-6 was 
enacted, and awarded grants more than 270 days after the award 
date established in P.L. 116-6. Considering the Department's 
disregard for the timelines established by the Congress in P.L. 
116-6 for issuing the fiscal year 2019 NOFO and awarding 
grants, the Committee is deeply troubled with the Department's 
unwillingness to provide flexibility to applicants with respect 
to the fiscal year 2020 NOFO application deadline. As with all 
FRA competitive grant programs, the Committee remains concerned 
with the Department's ability to execute the CRISI grant 
program in a timely manner. In order to prevent future delays 
with the funding the Committee provides in fiscal year 2021, 
the Committee directs the Department to complete its work on 
the funding appropriated in fiscal year 2020 by October 15, 
2020 as required by P.L. 116-94. Further, the Committee directs 
the Secretary to publish a NOFO for fiscal year 2021 no later 
than 30 days after enactment of this Act, provide applicants 90 
days to respond to the NOFO, and make awards no later than 210 
days after enactment of this Act.
    In addition, the Committee is concerned with the 
Department's pace in executing grant agreements for projects 
which have been selected for awards. As of April 2020, the 
CRISI grant program had a total unobligated balance of 
$1,017,091,670.58. According to FRA, it takes between 6 to 12 
months to finalize a grant agreement after a project is 
selected for an award, at which point the funding is obligated. 
Based on this timeline, FRA should complete grant agreements 
for all awards for fiscal years 2017 and 2018 in June 2020 and 
the Committee should see a significant decrease in unobligated 
balances. The Committee directs FRA to work expeditiously with 
project sponsors to execute grant agreements for fiscal years 
2017 and 2018. Further, the Committee directs FRA to provide 
quarterly reports to the House and Senate Committees on 
Appropriations on the status of CRISI grant agreements and 
obligations for all awards for fiscal years 2017, 2018, and 
2019.
    PTC.--The Committee is pleased with the efforts made by 
commuter railroads to implement PTC and directs FRA to continue 
to provide technical assistance to commuter railroads as they 
move toward full implementation. The Committee reminds FRA that 
the deployment of PTC is an eligible project under section 
22907(c)(1) of title 49, United States Code, and the Committee 
again expands PTC eligibility to include commuter railroads.
    Trespasser prevention.--The Committee is committed to 
reducing the number of deaths from pedestrians trespassing on 
railroad rights-of-way. FRA identified funding as 1 of 4 
strategic areas in its National Strategy to Prevent Trespassing 
on Railroad Property. The National Strategy notes that programs 
like CRISI could help communities implement targeted trespasser 
mitigation strategies. Therefore, the Committee provides not 
less than $25,000,000 for capital projects and engineering 
solutions targeting trespassing and directs FRA to give 
preference to projects located in counties identified in the 
National Strategy as having the most pedestrian trespasser 
casualties. The Committee further directs FRA to provide 
technical assistance to applicants to ensure proposed 
trespasser mitigation projects meet CRISI grant program 
requirements.

           MAGNETIC LEVITATION TECHNOLOGY DEPLOYMENT PROGRAM

 
 
 
Appropriation, fiscal year 2020.......................        $2,000,000
Budget request, fiscal year 2021......................             - - -
Recommended in the bill...............................         5,000,000
Bill compared with:
    Appropriation, fiscal year 2020...................        +3,000,000
    Budget request, fiscal year 2021..................        +5,000,000
 

    The magnetic levitation technology deployment (MAGLEV) 
program is authorized under section 322 of title 23, United 
States Code. The MAGLEV program funds transportation systems 
that employ magnetic levitation and are capable of safe use by 
the public at speeds in excess of 240 miles per hour.

                        COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION

    The Committee recommendation provides $5,000,000 for the 
MAGLEV program. This funding is available for preconstruction 
planning activities and capital costs.

     GRANTS TO THE NATIONAL RAILROAD PASSENGER CORPORATION (AMTRAK)

    Amtrak was created by the Congress in the Rail Passenger 
Service Act of 1970 (P.L. 91-518) to operate intercity 
passenger rail service, which was previously operated by 
private railroads. Amtrak assumed the common carrier 
obligations of the private railroads in exchange for the right 
to priority access to the private railroad tracks for an 
incremental cost.
    Amtrak operates more than 300 trains each day to more than 
500 destinations in 46 States, the District of Columbia, and 
Canada. About 72 percent of the miles traveled by Amtrak trains 
are on tracks owned by other railroads, and Amtrak owns 624 
route-miles of its own track, most of which is on the Northeast 
Corridor (NEC) from Washington, D.C. to Boston, Massachusetts. 
In fiscal year 2019, Amtrak carried 32.5 million people on the 
NEC, State-supported routes, and long-distance routes.
    The FAST Act authorizes funding for Northeast Corridor 
grants to Amtrak and National Network grants to Amtrak, which 
encompasses Amtrak's State-supported and long-distance routes, 
as well as other non-NEC activities.

                        COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION

    The Committee recommendation provides a total of 
$2,050,000,000 for Amtrak through the Northeast Corridor grants 
and National Network grants accounts, which is consistent with 
the FAST Act authorized structure.
    In addition, the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic 
Security Act (CARES Act) (P.L. 116-136) included $1,018,000,000 
for the Northeast Corridor grants and National Network grants 
accounts for Amtrak to prevent, prepare for, and respond to 
coronavirus.
    Congressional budget justification.--The Committee 
appreciates the level of detail in the fiscal year 2021 budget 
justification and directs Amtrak to submit a budget 
justification with a similar level of detail for fiscal year 
2022.
    Amtrak route network changes.--The Committee strongly 
opposes the proposal in the budget request to fund a new 
National Network transformation grants program to restructure 
Amtrak's long-distance service and require States to take over 
the costs and responsibilities of this service. Despite the 
proposal's phased approach, in the long-term, the budget 
request would amount to shifting shared and system-related 
costs onto State-supported routes which would require States to 
contribute significantly more funding for service on Amtrak's 
National Network. The Committee rejects this proposal and 
provides funding for Amtrak to continue to provide service 
through long-distance and State-supported routes.
    The Committee also does not provide funding requested in 
Amtrak's General and Legislative Report & Fiscal Year 2021 
Grant Request to establish a corridor development program to 
modernize and expand Amtrak's existing route network. The 
Committee understands Amtrak is conducting a review of its 
network and potential changes which could provide new or 
additional intercity service in fast-growing regions and 
corridors throughout the country that are currently underserved 
or not served at all by Amtrak. While the Committee understands 
Amtrak's efforts are intended to address changing demographics 
and travel trends, such changes could have unintended 
consequences for long-distance customers, especially in rural 
and small communities where passenger rail serves as an 
important mobility option and economic driver.
    The Committee directs Amtrak to seek any potential changes 
to its existing route network through the ongoing efforts to 
reauthorize the FAST Act. Further, the Committee directs Amtrak 
to conduct comprehensive outreach and consultation with State 
and local governments, the State-Supported Route Committee, its 
employees, communities, passenger rail organizations, 
railroads, and the public on any potential changes. Amtrak must 
engage in an open and transparent process which encompasses 
anyone who could be impacted, positively or negatively, by such 
changes. The Committee strongly reminds Amtrak that section 
24701 of title 49, United States Code, requires Amtrak to 
operate a national passenger rail system, and urges Amtrak to 
ensure any potential changes also increase ridership in rural 
areas and improve service for long-distance customers.
    ADA policy reviews.--In January 2020, Amtrak proposed a 
charge of $25,000 to remove seats on a train from Chicago to 
Bloomington, Illinois to accommodate several passengers using 
wheelchairs that were seeking to travel together. This proposed 
charge was based on a new policy on railcar reconfiguration 
that went into effect in 2019. Amtrak ultimately did not charge 
this amount, worked to ensure the group could travel together, 
and suspended the policy on railcar reconfiguration. However, 
this incident raises new questions about Amtrak's policies and 
compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) of 
1990 (P.L. 101-336).
    The Committee directs Amtrak to complete a review of the 
railcar reconfiguration policy and seat removal practices for 
passengers traveling with wheelchairs to ensure ADA compliance 
and accessibility. Further, the Committee directs Amtrak to 
conduct a holistic assessment and review of all Amtrak 
policies, procedures, protocols, and guidelines for compliance 
with the ADA. The Committee directs Amtrak to submit a report 
to the House and Senate Committees on Appropriations no later 
than 180 days after enactment of this Act summarizing the 
policies, procedures, protocols, and guidelines that were 
reviewed, including the railcar reconfiguration policy and seat 
removal practices for passengers traveling with wheelchairs, 
any necessary changes to ensure ADA compliance and 
accessibility, and an implementation plan and timeline for 
making changes or improvements identified in the review. The 
Committee strongly encourages Amtrak to engage with disability 
stakeholders during these reviews and when considering changes 
to its policies, procedures, protocols, and guidelines.
    ADA accessibility at Amtrak stations.--July 26, 2020 will 
mark 30 years since the ADA was signed into law. Section 
12162(e) of the ADA requires that all new and existing stations 
used in intercity rail transportation are made accessible to 
and usable by individuals with a disability. The ADA provided 
Amtrak 20 years to complete the necessary upgrades at existing 
stations. Beginning in fiscal year 2012, the Congress began 
providing $50,000,000, annually, to Amtrak through the Federal 
grant to bring Amtrak-served facilities and stations into 
compliance with the ADA. The Committee expresses profound 
disappointment that as of February 2020, only 39 of the 387 
stations at which Amtrak has either sole or shared ADA 
responsibilities were fully compliant with the ADA, and Amtrak 
remains more than 10 years away from full compliance with the 
ADA. Therefore, the Committee recommendation provides 
$75,000,000 through the Northeast Corridor grants and National 
Network grants accounts to bring Amtrak-served facilities and 
stations into compliance with the ADA. Further, the Committee 
urges Amtrak to also use its non-Federal revenue to advance 
this work. In addition, the Committee directs Amtrak to submit 
a report to the House and Senate Committees on Appropriations 
no later than 120 days after enactment of this Act detailing 
the ADA stations program plan and timeline to make the 
remaining 348 stations ADA compliant and accessible.
    Station agents.--The Committee directs Amtrak to provide a 
full-time station agent in each Amtrak station that had a 
ticket agent position eliminated in fiscal year 2018. Station 
agents assist passengers with their intercity passenger rail 
travel, conduct the sale of tickets, provide customer service 
during all hours that a station is open, and perform building 
maintenance duties. Amtrak is directed to continue to improve 
communication and collaboration with local partners and take 
into consideration the unique needs of each community, 
including impacts to local jobs, when making decisions related 
to the staffing of Amtrak stations.
    Amtrak Police Department (APD).--The APD has the 
responsibility of protecting Amtrak's passengers, employees, 
property, and infrastructure. In 2019, Amtrak developed and 
deployed a new data driven system to help determine uniformed 
officer staffing levels throughout Amtrak's network and to 
strategically deploy uniformed officers to areas with 
increasing rates of criminal activity. This resulted in 
reducing the number of uniformed officers in some divisions, 
increasing the number of uniformed officers in other divisions, 
and increasing uniformed officer visibility on trains and 
rights-of-way owned by Amtrak. While the Committee appreciates 
Amtrak's efforts to increase safety by deploying resources to 
areas where incidents are occurring, it is important that these 
changes do not unintentionally result in a reduction in the 
overall police force in the long-term. Maintaining a high level 
of safety at Amtrak stations, on trains, and on rights-of-way 
is critical to the traveling public and to local, regional, and 
national security.
    The Committee is pleased with Amtrak's commitment to comply 
with section 151 of P.L. 116-94 to maintain a uniformed officer 
workforce in fiscal year 2020 that is not less than the 
staffing level on May 1, 2019. The Committee understands Amtrak 
is hiring uniformed officers to meet this directive and support 
its data driven workforce alignment. The Committee directs 
Amtrak to work expeditiously to fill these positions and to 
report quarterly to the House and Senate Committees on 
Appropriations on the total number of uniformed officers by 
division and on Amtrak's hiring efforts. Further, section 151 
of this Act continues to direct Amtrak to maintain a uniformed 
officer workforce in fiscal year 2021 that is not less than the 
staffing level on May 1, 2019.
    Contact centers.--Amtrak employs a dedicated workforce at 
the contact center in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. The contact 
center assists Amtrak's customers with booking travel, managing 
their Amtrak Guest Rewards, arranging group or special travel, 
navigating reimbursements, addressing complaints, and more. 
While the Committee recognizes that Amtrak's total call volumes 
have steadily declined as more of Amtrak's customers choose 
self-service platforms like Amtrak's website or mobile site, 
the Committee believes the employees at the contact center 
continue to provide an important service to Amtrak's customers. 
Further, the Committee contends that Amtrak should continue to 
employ a dedicated Amtrak workforce to support the customer 
service functions currently provided at the Philadelphia 
contact center. The Committee understands that Amtrak does not 
have plans to actively reduce staff at the Philadelphia contact 
center, plans to continue making investments in the building 
where the contact center is housed, and is working to introduce 
new features for customers such as a chat communication channel 
which employees at the contact center would support. The 
Committee directs Amtrak to continue operations at the 
Philadelphia contact center with a dedicated workforce 
consisting of Amtrak employees, maintain such operations with 
Amtrak employees, and minimize the use of outside vendors to 
perform telephonic or internet-based customer service support. 
Further, the Committee directs Amtrak to report quarterly to 
the House and Senate Committees on Appropriations on the total 
number of Amtrak employees at the Philadelphia contact center, 
including specifics on separations, hiring, and vacancies.
    Private cars and charter trains.--In fiscal year 2018, 
Amtrak issued new guidelines for private cars on Amtrak trains 
and charter trains operated by Amtrak. While the Committee 
understands these changes reflect Amtrak's mandate to provide 
efficient, effective, and safe regularly scheduled passenger 
rail service, the Committee remains concerned with Amtrak's 
implementation and communication of these guidelines. Amtrak is 
directed to continually review and evaluate the locations and 
trains that may be eligible for private car moves. If 
additional locations or trains meet Amtrak's criteria, the 
Committee directs Amtrak to update the list of eligible 
locations and trains for private car moves in the Guidelines 
for Private Cars on Amtrak and to notify private car owners 
accordingly. In addition, the Committee directs Amtrak to 
continue to brief the House and Senate Committees on 
Appropriations on the effects of these guidelines on private 
cars and charter trains, including whether improvements and 
operational changes could be made to achieve Amtrak's goals 
without negatively impacting private car and charter train 
operations, particularly in small, rural communities.
    Amtrak is directed to include an updated report on private 
car and charter train policies in its fiscal year 2022 budget 
justification. The report should include the amounts and 
percentages by which revenues and usage declined for private 
cars and charter trains. For charter trains, such information 
should be provided as separate figures for Amtrak-owned and 
privately-owned charter trains. The Committee acknowledges that 
certain information may be commercially sensitive and cannot be 
made public. Therefore, the Committee directs Amtrak to provide 
such information through briefings to the House and Senate 
Committees on Appropriations.
    Communication with stakeholders.--The Committee remains 
concerned that Amtrak continues to make and implement changes 
to operations and services without providing the public or its 
employees adequate time to understand proposed changes and 
provide feedback. Amtrak has made changes to policies and 
procedures relating to station agents, contact centers, private 
cars, charter trains, food and beverage service, law 
enforcement, and railcar configuration, all of which have 
impacts on its customers, employees, and communities. 
Therefore, the Committee directs Amtrak to continue efforts to 
increase engagement with customers, employees, stakeholders, 
and the public on proposals to change operations and services, 
including providing an opportunity to comment on policies prior 
to finalizing decisions.
    On-time performance.--As previously stated, the Committee 
is concerned with Amtrak's on-time performance for long-
distance and State-supported routes. Under Federal law, host 
railroads are required to grant Amtrak trains priority over 
freight trains and Amtrak in turn is required to pay fees for 
its use. In fiscal year 2019, Amtrak paid host railroads 
approximately $150,000,000 for use of the tracks, performance, 
and other resources needed to operate Amtrak trains. According 
to Amtrak's Host Railroad Report Card, the grades host 
railroads received, based on delays caused to Amtrak trains in 
2019, ranged from an ``A'' to an ``F,'' with the average grade 
for all host railroads being a ``C.'' The Committee urges 
Amtrak to continue engaging with host railroads to improve on-
time performance for long-distance and State-supported routes.
    Cyber security.--In 2019, the Amtrak Office of Inspector 
General (OIG) conducted an audit to assess Amtrak's efforts to 
identify and address train control systems' cyber security and 
resiliency and compared Amtrak's efforts with the standards 
developed by the National Institute of Standards and 
Technology. Train control systems are critical to Amtrak's 
ability to safely operate trains each day. Therefore, the 
Committee directs Amtrak to comply with the OIG recommendations 
to improve the cyber security and resiliency of Amtrak's train 
control systems and the OIG is directed to brief the House and 
Senate Committees on Appropriations no later than 180 days 
after enactment of this Act on Amtrak's actions to address 
these recommendations.

     NORTHEAST CORRIDOR GRANTS TO THE NATIONAL RAILROAD PASSENGER 
                              CORPORATION

 
 
 
Appropriation, fiscal year 2020.......................      $700,000,000
Budget request, fiscal year 2021......................       325,466,000
Recommended in the bill...............................       750,000,000
Bill compared with:
    Appropriation, fiscal year 2020...................       +50,000,000
    Budget request, fiscal year 2021..................      +424,534,000
 

                        COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION

    The Committee recommendation provides $750,000,000 for 
Northeast Corridor grants to Amtrak to support operating and 
capital activities for Amtrak's NEC. This funding level 
provides $5,000,000 for the Northeast Corridor Commission 
established under section 24905 of title 49, United States 
Code.
    In addition, the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic 
Security Act (CARES Act) (P.L. 116-136) included $492,000,000 
for the Northeast Corridor grants account for Amtrak to 
prevent, prepare for, and respond to coronavirus.

 NATIONAL NETWORK GRANTS TO THE NATIONAL RAILROAD PASSENGER CORPORATION

 
 
 
Appropriation, fiscal year 2020.......................    $1,300,000,000
Budget request, fiscal year 2021......................       611,000,000
Recommended in the bill...............................     1,300,000,000
Bill compared with:
    Appropriation, fiscal year 2020...................             - - -
    Budget request, fiscal year 2021..................      +689,000,000
 

                        COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION

    The Committee recommendation provides $1,300,000,000 for 
National Network grants to Amtrak to support operating and 
capital activities for Amtrak's long-distance and State-
supported routes, and other non-NEC activities. This funding 
level provides $2,000,000 for the State-Supported Route 
Committee established under section 24712 of title 49, United 
States Code.
    In addition, the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic 
Security Act (CARES Act) (P.L. 116-136) included $526,000,000 
for the National Network grants account for Amtrak to prevent, 
prepare for, and respond to coronavirus.

       ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISIONS--FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION

                        (INCLUDING RESCISSIONS)

    Section 150 limits overtime to $35,000 per Amtrak employee 
and allows Amtrak's president to waive this restriction for 
specific employees for safety or operational efficiency 
reasons. It also requires Amtrak to submit a report to the 
House and Senate Committees on Appropriations no later than 60 
days after enactment of this Act summarizing overtime payments 
incurred by Amtrak for calendar year 2020 and the 3 prior 
calendar years. The summary shall include the total number of 
employees that received waivers and the total overtime payments 
paid to employees receiving waivers for each month for 2020 and 
the 3 prior calendar years.
    Section 151 prohibits the use of funds made available to 
Amtrak to reduce the total number of Amtrak Police Department 
uniformed officers patrolling on board passenger trains or at 
stations, facilities, or rights-of-way below the staffing level 
on May 1, 2019.
    Section 152 prohibits the use of funds made available by 
this Act by Amtrak in contravention of the Worker Adjustment 
and Retraining Notification Act.
    Section 153 provides that unobligated balances remaining 
for the CRISI grant program after 6 years from the date of 
enactment of P.L. 116-6 and after 6 years from the date of 
enactment of P.L. 116-94 may be used for any eligible project 
under section 22907(c) of title 49, United States Code.
    Section 154 rescinds certain unobligated balances.

                     Federal Transit Administration

    The Federal Transit Administration (FTA) was established as 
a component of the Department of Transportation on July 1, 
1968, when most of the functions and programs under the Federal 
Transit Act (78 Stat. 302; 49 U.S.C. 1601 et seq.) were 
transferred from the Department of Housing and Urban 
Development. The Federal Transit Administration administers 
Federal financial assistance programs for planning, developing, 
and improving comprehensive mass transportation systems in both 
urban and non-urban areas.
    The most recent authorization for the programs under FTA is 
contained in the Fixing America's Surface Transportation (FAST) 
Act (P.L. 114-94). Annual appropriations Acts include annual 
limitations on obligations for the transit formula grants 
programs, and direct appropriations of budget authority from 
the General Fund of the Treasury for FTA's administrative 
expenses, some research programs, and capital investment 
grants.

                        ADMINISTRATIVE EXPENSES

 
 
 
Appropriation, fiscal year 2020.......................      $117,000,000
Budget request, fiscal year 2021......................       121,052,000
Recommended in the bill...............................       121,052,000
Bill compared with:
    Appropriation, fiscal year 2020...................        +4,052,000
    Budget request, fiscal year 2021..................             - - -
 

    The FTA administers Federal financial assistance programs 
for planning, developing, and improving comprehensive mass 
transportation systems in both urban and non-urban areas. This 
appropriation provides, from the General Fund of the Treasury, 
amounts for the administrative expenses of the agency.

                        COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION

    The Committee recommends a total of $121,052,000 for FTA's 
administrative expenses, of which $15,000,000 shall remain 
available until September 30, 2022. The Committee's 
recommendation provides these funds from the General Fund.
    Operating plans.--The Committee directs FTA to comply with 
Act-wide directives for operating plans and reprogramming 
guidelines. Consistent with these guidelines, the Committee 
directs FTA to provide an operating plan to the House and 
Senate Committees on Appropriations within 60 days of enactment 
of this Act and to follow the reprogramming requirements 
contained in section 405 of this Act.
    Budget justifications.--The Committee strongly encourages 
FTA to maintain the format and content of the fiscal year 2020 
budget justification in the fiscal year 2022 documents. The 
Committee is disappointed by the lack of policy detail provided 
in the fiscal year 2021 budget justification.
    Annual new starts report.--The Committee has again included 
language in the Act requiring FTA to submit the annual new 
starts report with the initial submission of the fiscal year 
2022 budget request.
    Full funding grant agreements (FFGA).--Title 49 of the 
United States Code requires that FTA notify the House and 
Senate Committees on Appropriations as well as the House 
Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure and the Senate 
Committee on Banking, Housing, and Urban Affairs 30 days before 
executing a FFGA. In its notification to the House and Senate 
Committees on Appropriations, the Committee directs FTA to 
include the following: (1) a copy of the proposed FFGA; (2) the 
total and annual Federal appropriations required for the 
project; (3) yearly and total Federal appropriations that can 
be reasonably planned or anticipated for future FFGAs for each 
fiscal year through 2024; (4) a detailed analysis of annual 
commitments for current and anticipated FFGAs against the 
program authorization, by individual project; (5) a financial 
analysis of the project's cost and the sponsor's ability to 
finance the project, which shall be conducted by an independent 
examiner, and which shall include an assessment of the capital 
cost estimate and the finance plan; (6) the source and security 
of all public- and private-sector financial instruments; (7) 
the project's operating plan, which enumerates the project's 
future revenue and ridership forecasts; and (8) a listing of 
all planned contingencies and possible risks associated with 
the project.
    The Committee continues to direct FTA to inform the House 
and Senate Committees on Appropriations in writing 30 days 
before approving schedule, scope, or budget changes to any 
FFGA. Correspondence relating to such changes shall include any 
budget revisions or program changes that materially alter the 
project as originally stipulated in the FFGA, including any 
proposed change in rail car procurements.
    In addition, the Committee directs FTA to continue 
reporting monthly to the House and Senate Committees on 
Appropriations on the status of each project with a FFGA or 
that is within two years of a FFGA. The Committee directs that 
monthly reporting include any requests for letters of no 
prejudice and the levels of funds allocated and obligated, by 
fiscal year.

                         TRANSIT FORMULA GRANTS

                (LIQUIDATION OF CONTRACT AUTHORIZATION)

                      (LIMITATION ON OBLIGATIONS)

                          (HIGHWAY TRUST FUND)

------------------------------------------------------------------------
                              Liquidation of contract    Limitation on
                                      authority           obligations
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Appropriation, fiscal year            $10,800,000,000    $10,150,348,462
 2020.......................
Budget request, fiscal year            11,696,000,000     11,046,000,000
 2021.......................
Recommended in the bill.....           16,595,000,000     15,945,200,000
Bill compared with:
    Appropriation, fiscal              +5,795,000,000     +5,794,851,538
 year 2020..................
    Budget request, fiscal             +4,899,000,000     +4,899,200,000
 year 2021..................
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    The FAST Act provides contract authority for the transit 
formula grant programs funded from the mass transit account of 
the Highway Trust Fund. These programs include: urbanized area 
formula grants, state of good repair grants, formula grants for 
rural areas, growing states and high-density states, mobility 
for seniors and persons with disabilities, bus and bus 
facilities grants, bus testing facilities, planning programs, 
transit-oriented development, a pilot program for enhanced 
mobility, public transportation innovation, technical 
assistance and workforce development, and the National Transit 
Database. This Act sets an annual obligation limitation for 
such authority and provides liquidating cash. This account is 
the only FTA account funded from the Highway Trust Fund.

                        COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION

    Consistent with the levels authorized in the INVEST in 
America Act, the Committee recommends an obligation limitation 
of $15,945,200,000 for formula programs and activities. The 
Committee's recommendation also includes $16,595,000,000 in 
liquidating cash.
    Coronavirus pandemic.--The Committee recognizes the 
significant toll that the coronavirus pandemic has taken on the 
budgets and staff of transit grantees. In conjunction with the 
authorized flexibilities provided for in the INVEST in America 
Act that will make $5,794,851,538 available for operations and 
maintenance expenses or to match other Federal funds, the 
Committee eliminates requirements that states match Federal 
funds for certain amounts subject to the obligation limitation. 
The Committee directs that the flexibilities provided under 
this heading in this Act apply solely to funds newly obligated 
in fiscal year 2021. The Committee directs FTA to treat any 
funds previously obligated on grants as if those amounts were 
obligated with their original characteristics and Federal 
share. To facilitate administration of this provision, the 
Committee directs that these flexibilities be available to 
unobligated funds previously provided in prior Acts under the 
heading ``Transit Infrastructure Grants'' that were distributed 
by formula to urbanized areas or States.
    Transit-oriented development (TOD).--The utilization and 
expansion of TOD is critical to revitalizing cities, reducing 
pollution and congestion, and enhancing economic opportunity. 
However, such projects require significant planning work before 
sponsors may apply for a Capital Investment Grant. The 
Committee directs that not less than $15,000,000 should be made 
available for the FTA's Pilot Program for TOD as authorized 
under Section 20005(b) of MAP-21 (Public Law 112-141).
    Extending commuter rail service across state lines.--The 
Committee supports instances where commuter rail service can be 
extended to communities that lie over a state boundary through 
an existing commuter rail system because the addition of 
commuter and transit rail services can facilitate local 
economic growth. The Committee directs the FTA to coordinate 
with FRA to identify opportunities for transit agencies and 
providers of commuter rail to extend their service over state 
lines. The Committee encourages FTA and FRA to provide such 
agencies with technical assistance to promote the development 
of additional cross-state-line commuting by rail. In addition, 
the Committee directs FTA and FRA to report to the House and 
Senate Committees on Appropriations within 180 days of 
enactment of this Act on innovative strategies to increase 
capacity for commuter and transit rail, especially across state 
boundaries.
    Transit worker assaults.--The Committee is concerned about 
the safety of frontline transit workers, especially bus 
drivers. As a result, the Committee directs the Administrator 
to require grant recipients to report information on each 
assault on a transit worker to the National Transit Database as 
part of the risk evaluation process under FR 2019-10281. An 
assault on a transit worker shall include all events in which 
the safety or health of a transit worker is placed at risk 
while the transit worker is performing his or her duties 
including circumstances that do not require immediate medical 
attention or that do not result in a fatality.
    Innovation.--Using funds under section 5312 of title 49, 
United States Code, the Accelerating Innovative Mobility (AIM) 
initiative is establishing a national network of transit 
agencies that will test and share project results and use FTA's 
technical assistance centers to promote promising innovations. 
The Committee encourages FTA to continue to develop innovative 
approaches to technical problems and to disseminate information 
and expand on the lessons learned from the Smart Cities 
challenge.
    Urban transit challenges.--The Committee is concerned about 
urban transportation challenges relating to equity, access, and 
sustainability, including improving mobility options for 
transportation-challenged communities and ensuring robust 
public transportation, particularly in cities with dense urban 
populations. The Committee encourages FTA to address these 
challenges by prioritizing research collaborations with large 
research universities, particularly those with Minority Serving 
Institution status.

                     TRANSIT INFRASTRUCTURE GRANTS

 
 
 
Appropriation, fiscal year 2020.......................      $510,000,000
Budget request, fiscal year 2021......................             - - -
Recommended in the bill...............................       510,000,000
Bill compared with:
    Appropriation, fiscal year 2020...................             - - -
    Budget request, fiscal year 2021..................      +510,000,000
 

    The FAST Act provides contract authority for the transit 
formula grants program from the mass transit account of the 
Highway Trust Fund. This account provides additional funds from 
the General Fund of the Treasury for important transit 
priorities authorized under Chapter 53 of title 49, United 
States Code.

                        COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION

    The Committee recommends an additional $510,000,000 in 
transit infrastructure grants to remain available until 
expended. The following table provides funding levels for 
activities within this account:

------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                         Request         Recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Bus and Bus Facilities............              - - -       $374,000,000
Low and No Emission Bus Grants....              - - -        125,000,000
Passenger Ferry Program...........              - - -         10,000,000
Innovative Mobility...............              - - -          1,000,000
                                   -------------------------------------
    Total.........................              - - -        510,000,000
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    In addition, the Coronavirus Aid, Relief and Economic 
Security Act (CARES Act) (P.L. 116-136) included 
$25,000,000,000 through the Transit Infrastructure grants 
account for transit agencies to prevent, prepare for, and 
respond to coronavirus.
    Low and no emission bus grants.--The Committee is pleased 
by the interest in low and no emission buses nationwide and 
provides $125,000,000 under this heading, in addition to the 
amounts provided under ``Transit Formula Grants'', for FTA to 
continue this competitive grant program authorized in the FAST 
Act. As part of the criteria for the fiscal year 2021 Notice of 
Funding Opportunity, the Committee encourages the FTA to 
include evaluation criteria that considers the number of 
electric buses the applicant currently has in revenue service.
    Transit vehicle innovation deployment centers project 
(TVIDC).--The Committee remains keenly interested in the TVIDC 
project which provides critical research and technical 
assistance to advance innovation in transit. The Committee 
directs FTA to provide ongoing support to TVIDC and the 
recommendation includes $5,000,000 from the low and no emission 
bus grants appropriation to support the work of TVIDC. The 
Committee directs FTA to work with TVIDC to focus on transit's 
transition to low and no emission bus fleets. In that role, 
TVIDC should establish workforce development plans to support 
the new technologies, develop plans to expand transit bus 
testing to include automated vehicle technologies, 
cybersecurity testing, and component testing, establish 
procedures to efficiently and fairly divide testing 
responsibilities amongst the three FTA bus testing centers, 
establish testing protocols and priorities while also making 
recommendations about how to best disseminate results, 
establish FTA's research priorities to support the transition 
to zero emission fleets, including automation and fueling 
technologies, and continue to work with transit and power 
utilities to establish standards for bus fleet fueling.
    Bus and bus facilities.--The Committee supports the FAST 
Act's inclusion of competitive grants in the buses and bus 
facilities grant program and encourages FTA to follow the 
guidance set forth in the FAST Act when developing selection 
criteria for the program. Consistent with section 3017 of the 
FAST Act, the age and condition of buses, bus fleets, related 
equipment, and bus-related facilities should be the primary 
components of selection criteria. The amounts provided under 
this heading are in addition to the amounts provided under 
``Transit Formula Grants''.
    Green space surrounding bus terminals.--The Committee finds 
that urban trees, vegetation, and other natural elements 
provide opportunities to mitigate transportation pollution, 
improve air quality, control storm water runoff, and reduce 
energy use while also serving as a welcoming component for 
passengers entering or exiting a bus transportation hub. As a 
result, the Committee includes language that clarifies that 
such projects are eligible for a grant under the bus and bus 
facilities program.

                   TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE AND TRAINING

 
 
 
Appropriation, fiscal year 2020.......................        $5,000,000
Budget request, fiscal year 2021......................             - - -
Recommended in the bill...............................         7,000,000
Bill compared with:
    Appropriation, fiscal year 2020...................        +2,000,000
    Budget request, fiscal year 2021..................        +7,000,000
 

    The FAST Act authorizes FTA to provide technical assistance 
under section 5314 of title 49, United States Code, for human 
resource and training activities, and workforce development 
programs.

                        COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION

    The Committee recommends $7,000,000 for technical 
assistance and training authorized under section 5314(a)(2) of 
title 49, United States Code. In addition to the amounts 
provided under this heading for activities under section 5314 
of title 49, United States Code, an additional $9,000,000 is 
provided through the obligation limitation under the heading 
``Transit Formula Grants''.
    Workforce development and standards based training.--The 
Committee directs that not less than $2,500,000 shall be for a 
cooperative agreement through which the Federal Transit 
Administration assists transit recipients with frontline 
workforce development and standards based training in 
maintenance and operations. The cooperative agreement should be 
with a national nonprofit organization with a demonstrated 
capacity to develop and provide such programs though labor 
management partnerships and apprenticeships.
    Mobility for people with disabilities and older adults.--Of 
the total amounts made available for activities under section 
5314 of title 49, United States Code, the Committee directs the 
Department to continue to fund agreements that support mobility 
for people with disabilities and older adults at an level 
commensurate with the amounts dedicated to such agreements in 
each year since 2018.
    Bus Exportable Power Systems (BEPS).--The Committee notes 
that communities and states are in need of more resilient and 
flexible options for generating power immediately after natural 
disasters. The BEPS technologies developed under previous FTA 
grants for research may have the ability to address this type 
of challenge by transforming hybrid buses into mobile power 
generators. The Committee directs FTA, with industry 
stakeholders and technical partners, to develop national 
standards for interoperability so that systems can use the same 
technology base and applications. The Committee recommendation 
includes not less than $1,000,000 for the development of such 
standards.
    National Center for Applied Transit Technology (N-CATT).--
The Committee directs that funds made available under this 
heading continue to support the N-CATT. The N-CATT delivers 
expert, focused technical assistance to transit agencies and 
organizations in rural areas and small cities to use or develop 
transit technologies and innovations that make services more 
cost-effective and efficient.

                       CAPITAL INVESTMENT GRANTS

 
 
 
Appropriation, fiscal year 2020.......................    $1,978,000,000
Budget request, fiscal year 2021......................     1,888,690,000
Recommended in the bill...............................     2,175,000,000
Bill compared with:
    Appropriation, fiscal year 2020...................      +197,000,000
    Budget request, fiscal year 2021..................      +286,310,000
 

    Grants for capital investment to rail or other fixed 
guideway transit systems are awarded to public bodies and 
agencies including states, municipalities, other political 
subdivisions of states; public agencies and instrumentalities 
of one or more states; and certain public corporations, boards 
and commissions under state law.

                        COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION

    The Committee recommends $2,175,000,000 for Capital 
Investment Grants. The following table provides funding levels 
for activities within this account:

------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                         Request         Recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
New Starts........................              - - -     $1,250,000,000
Core Capacity.....................              - - -        525,000,000
Small Starts......................              - - -        300,000,000
Expedited Project Delivery........              - - -        100,000,000
                                   -------------------------------------
    Total.........................     $1,888,690,000      2,175,000,000
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    While the Committee believes that FTA is making progress on 
carrying out the program in accordance with the will of 
Congress, the Committee remains concerned about the execution 
of the Capital Investment Grant program. The Committee notes 
with dismay that important projects nationwide continue to 
experience difficulties in progressing through the FFGA 
process. The Committee directs FTA to continue to update the 
House and Senate Committees on Appropriations on the status of 
projects that are in the current Capital Investment Grant 
funding pipeline.
    The Committee directs FTA to continue to administer the 
program under current guidance and to proactively work with 
applicants and grantees to facilitate projects moving through 
the Capital Investment Grant pipeline and towards a FFGA. FTA 
is directed to evaluate, rate, and recommend projects for 
funding, and subsequently award grants to projects that meet 
the statutory requirements of 49 U.S.C. 5309. The Committee 
encourages FTA to fully consider Small Starts projects that 
would include stations that serve one or more Opportunity 
Zones, as defined in Public-Law 115-97. The Committee further 
directs that FTA may provide funding for projects without a 
FFGA. Funding is provided for projects that currently have 
executed grant agreements, and for projects that have met the 
statutory requirements of 49 U.S.C. 5309 and that are 
anticipating grant agreements in 2021.
    The Committee directs FTA to enter into FFGAs in which the 
Capital Investment Grant contribution is not less than 40 
percent of the net project cost, except at the direct request 
of the project sponsor. The Committee also directs the 
Secretary to provide notice to the House and Senate Committees 
on Appropriations not less than 90 days prior to altering or 
rescinding any rule, circular or guidance relating to the 
evaluation, rating, and approval process pursuant to 49 U.S.C. 
5309.
    The Committee directs the Secretary to submit the fiscal 
year 2022 annual report on funding recommendations as required 
by 49 U.S.C. 5309, to maintain the Federal funding commitments 
for all existing grant agreements, and to identify all projects 
with a medium or higher rating that anticipate requesting a 
grant agreement in fiscal year 2022. As part of the fiscal year 
2022 budget request, the Committee directs the Secretary to 
submit a list of projects to which it expects to award an FFGA 
during the budget year.
    Coronavirus pandemic.--The Committee recognizes that 
projects in the Capital Investment Grant pipeline may be 
experiencing significant uncertainty both with financing plans 
and project timelines due to the effects of the coronavirus 
pandemic. The Committee notes that projects currently under 
construction and in the Engineering phase are facing 
significantly different economic circumstances than when the 
project sponsor, along with FTA, determined the maximum Federal 
share of project costs. The Committee directs FTA to work with 
sponsors who have projects in the Engineering phase that may 
need additional Federal contributions to revise upward the 
Federal share of the project costs and to provide technical 
assistance, as necessary, to all projects as project sponsors 
look to revise financial plans or project timelines as a result 
of the coronavirus pandemic. The Committee further directs FTA 
to consider all possible flexibilities for projects that 
currently have an FFGA including deferred local share or 
increasing the Federal share for such projects.
    Expedited Project Delivery (EPD) grant program.--The 
Committee is concerned about the pace of the FTA's efforts 
relating to the EPD pilot program and encourages FTA to issue 
further guidance on the implementation and continued management 
of the program. The Committee encourages the Department to 
finalize this guidance document within 120 days of enactment of 
this Act.

      GRANTS TO THE WASHINGTON METROPOLITAN AREA TRANSIT AUTHORITY

 
 
 
Appropriation, fiscal year 2020.......................      $150,000,000
Budget request, fiscal year 2021......................       150,000,000
Recommended in the bill...............................       150,000,000
Bill compared with:
    Appropriation, fiscal year 2020...................             - - -
    Budget request, fiscal year 2021..................             - - -
 

    This program provides grants to the Washington Metropolitan 
Area Transit Authority (WMATA) for capital investment and asset 
rehabilitation activities as authorized by the Passenger Rail 
Investment and Improvement Act (PRIIA) of 2008 (P.L. 110-432). 
These funds, along with funds provided under FTA's core formula 
programs, will help return the existing system to a state of 
good repair and improve the safety and reliability of service. 
Federal funds provided under this account are matched dollar-
for-dollar by Virginia, Maryland, and the District of Columbia 
in equal proportions.

                        COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION

    The Committee provides $150,000,000 for WMATA for critical 
capital and safety improvements. PRIIA created a successful 
Federal-State partnership under which the three WMATA 
jurisdictions collectively match this funding with another 
$150,000,000 each year. This funding will maintain the Federal 
government's commitment to a safe and reliable public 
transportation system for the National Capital Region.
    Cybersecurity.--The Committee remains concerned that as 
systems for controlling various modes of transportation become 
more complex, the security of transportation could be 
compromised. As a result, the Committee again includes 
direction that WMATA work with the Secretary of Transportation 
and the Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency within 
the Department of Homeland Security to ensure that the agency 
is complying with best practices for the procurement of 
Industrial Control Systems. The Committee directs WMATA to 
include analysis of Internet of Things (IoT) and unknown and 
unauthorized devices in its cybersecurity plan.
    Safety improvements.--The Committee notes that the Federal 
Transit Administration served as the safety oversight body for 
WMATA before the agency certified that the Washington Metrorail 
Safety Commission as the State Safety Oversight (SSO) body 
responsible for ensuring the safety of the Metrorail system. As 
a result, the FTA has direct experience with safety oversight. 
The Committee encourages the FTA to analyze the safety 
improvements achieved during and after their oversight and 
issue a report that includes best practices for transit 
agencies and SSOs.

       ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISIONS--FEDERAL TRANSIT ADMINISTRATION

                         (INCLUDING RECISSIONS)

    Section 160 exempts previously made transit obligations 
from limitations on obligations.
    Section 161 allows funds appropriated for Capital 
Investment Grants and bus and bus facilities not obligated by 
September 30, 2024, plus other recoveries, to be available for 
other projects under 49 U.S.C. 5309.
    Section 162 allows for the transfer of prior year 
appropriations from older accounts to be merged into new 
accounts with similar, current activities.
    Section 163 prohibits the enforcement of the Rostenkowski 
Test.
    Section 164 allows certain recipients of Low and No 
Emission Bus Grants to continue to partner with non-profits and 
companies as part of their grant applications.
    Section 165 prohibits the use of funds to impede or hinder 
project advancement or approval for any project seeking a 
Federal contribution from the Capital Investment Grants program 
of greater than 40 percent of project costs.
    Section 166 prohibits the use of funds to implement the 
June 29, 2018 ``Dear Colleague'' letter distributed by the 
Federal Transit Administration to Capital Investment Grant 
program project sponsors.
    Section 167 prohibits the use of funds by the Department of 
Transportation to implement policies that require a project to 
receive a medium or higher project rating within the Capital 
Investment Grants program before taking actions to finalize an 
environmental impact statement.
    Section 168 rescinds unobligated amounts made available in 
prior fiscal years from the formula grants account.
    Section 169 rescinds unobligated amounts made available in 
prior fiscal years from the job access and reverse commute 
account.
    Section 169A rescinds unobligated amounts made available in 
prior fiscal years from the research, training, and human 
resources account.

             Saint Lawrence Seaway Development Corporation


                       OPERATIONS AND MAINTENANCE

                    (HARBOR MAINTENANCE TRUST FUND)

 
 
 
Appropriation, fiscal year 2020.......................       $38,000,000
Budget request, fiscal year 2021......................        30,700,000
Recommended in the bill...............................        40,000,000
Bill compared with:
    Appropriation, fiscal year 2020...................        +2,000,000
    Budget request, fiscal year 2021..................        +9,300,000
 

    The Great Lakes Saint Lawrence Seaway System, located 
between Montreal and Lake Erie, is a binational, 15-lock system 
jointly operated by the U.S. Saint Lawrence Seaway Development 
Corporation (SLSDC) and its Canadian counterpart, the Canadian 
St. Lawrence Seaway Management Corporation. The SLSDC was 
established by the St. Lawrence Seaway Act of 1954, is a wholly 
owned government corporation, and an operating administration 
of the Department of Transportation. The SLSDC is charged with 
operating and maintaining the U.S. portion of the St. Lawrence 
Seaway, which includes the 2 U.S. locks in Massena, New York, 
vessel traffic control in portions of the St. Lawrence River 
and Lake Ontario, and trade development functions to enhance 
the utilization of the St. Lawrence Seaway. The Water Resources 
Development Act of 1986 (P.L. 99-662) authorized the Harbor 
Maintenance Trust Fund as a source of appropriations for the 
SLSDC operations and maintenance. Additionally, the SLSDC 
generates non-Federal revenues which can be used for operations 
and maintenance.

                        COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION

    The Committee recommendation provides $40,000,000 to fund 
the operations, maintenance, and capital infrastructure 
activities of the SLSDC. Of the total funds provided, not less 
than $15,800,000 is for the seaway infrastructure program.
    Market development and promotion.--The Committee provides 
$4,000,000 for market development and promotion of the Great 
Lakes St. Lawrence Seaway navigation system, to be carried out 
in cooperation with system stakeholders. These resources may be 
used to enhance and expand existing marketing efforts, conduct 
market research, support marketing initiatives and trade 
promotion with the goal of growing the volume of waterborne 
commerce and passenger cruise activity on the system, or update 
signage for the SLSDC. The Committee directs the SLSDC to 
provide a strategic plan for the use of this funding to the 
House and Senate Committees on Appropriations no later than 120 
days after enactment of this Act. The strategic plan should 
include details on market development and trade promotion, 
engagement and coordination with system stakeholders, how the 
SLSDC utilized or plans to use the $2,000,000 provided for 
trade and economic development activities in the Further 
Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2020 (P.L. 116-94), activities 
initiated with fiscal year 2020 funding which could be 
continued with fiscal year 2021 funding, and potential 
proposals for additional market development and trade promotion 
activities in future fiscal years.

                        Maritime Administration

    The Maritime Administration (MARAD) is responsible for 
strengthening the U.S. maritime industry in support of the 
Nation's security and economic needs, as authorized by the 
Merchant Marine Act of 1936 (P.L. 74-835). MARAD's mission is 
to promote the development and maintenance of a U.S. merchant 
marine sufficient to carry the Nation's waterborne domestic 
commerce and a substantial portion of its waterborne foreign 
commerce, and to serve as a naval and military auxiliary in 
time of war or national emergency.
    MARAD, working with the Department of Defense (DOD), 
provides a seamless, time-phased transition from peacetime to 
war-time operations, while balancing the defense and commercial 
elements of the maritime transportation system. MARAD also 
manages the maritime security program, the voluntary intermodal 
sealift agreement program, and the Ready Reserve Force, which 
assures DOD access to commercial and strategic sealift and 
associated intermodal capability. Further, MARAD's education 
and training programs through the U.S. Merchant Marine Academy 
(USMMA) and 6 state maritime academies help develop skilled 
U.S. merchant marine officers.

                       MARITIME SECURITY PROGRAM

 
 
 
Appropriation, fiscal year 2020.......................      $300,000,000
Budget request, fiscal year 2021......................       314,007,780
Recommended in the bill...............................       314,007,780
Bill compared with:
    Appropriation, fiscal year 2020...................       +14,007,780
    Budget request, fiscal year 2021..................             - - -
 

    The maritime security program (MSP) is authorized by 
chapter 531 of title 46, United States Code, to maintain and 
preserve a U.S. flag merchant fleet to serve the national 
security needs of the United States. MSP provides direct 
payments to U.S. flagship operators engaged in U.S.-foreign 
trade. Participating operators are required to keep the vessels 
in active commercial service and are required to provide 
intermodal sealift support to the DOD in times of war or 
national emergency.

                        COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION

    The Committee recommendation provides $314,007,780 for the 
maritime security program, consistent with the authorized 
funding level.
    The Committee rejects the proposal in the budget request to 
rescind $20,553,780 in unobligated balances from MSP. Instead 
section 171 of this Act requires MARAD to use unobligated 
balances from MSP to provide an additional $500,000 in fiscal 
year 2021 for each vessel covered by an operating agreement as 
of the date of enactment of this Act.

                      CABLE SECURITY FLEET PROGRAM

 
 
 
Appropriation, fiscal year 2020.......................             - - -
Budget request, fiscal year 2021......................             - - -
Recommended in the bill...............................       $10,000,000
Bill compared with:
    Appropriation, fiscal year 2020...................       +10,000,000
    Budget request, fiscal year 2021..................       +10,000,000
 

    Section 3521 of the National Defense Authorization Act for 
Fiscal Year 2020 (P.L. 116-92) authorized the establishment of 
the cable security fleet program. The purpose of the cable 
security fleet program is to establish and maintain a fleet of 
United States-documented cable vessels to meet the national 
security requirements of the United States. The cable security 
fleet program will provide direct payments to U.S. flagship 
operators and participating operators are in turn required to 
operate in commercial service providing cable services and to 
make the vessel available upon the request of the DOD.

                        COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION

    The Committee recommendation provides $10,000,000 for the 
cable security fleet program, consistent with the authorized 
funding level.
    The Committee directs MARAD to brief the House and Senate 
Committees on Appropriations no later than 90 days after 
enactment of this Act on its efforts to establish the cable 
security fleet program.

                        OPERATIONS AND TRAINING

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

 
 
 
Appropriation, fiscal year 2020.......................      $152,589,000
Budget request, fiscal year 2021......................       137,797,000
Recommended in the bill...............................       161,417,000
Bill compared with:
    Appropriation, fiscal year 2020...................        +8,828,000
    Budget request, fiscal year 2021..................       +23,620,000
 

    The operations and training account provides funding for 
headquarters and field offices to administer and direct MARAD 
operations and programs and for the operation of the USMMA.

                        COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION

    The Committee recommendation provides $161,417,000 for 
MARAD operations and training expenses. The following table 
provides funding levels for activities within this account.

------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                         Request         Recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
USMMA operations..................        $76,444,000        $82,289,000
USMMA facilities maintenance and            5,500,000          5,500,000
 repair, equipment................
Maritime environmental and                      - - -          3,000,000
 technical assistance program.....
Short sea transportation program                - - -         14,775,000
 (America's marine highways)......
MARAD headquarters operations.....         55,853,000         55,853,000
                                   -------------------------------------
    Total.........................        137,797,000        161,417,000
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    In addition, the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic 
Security Act (CARES Act) (P.L. 116-136) included $3,134,000 for 
the operations and training account, of which $1,000,000 was 
for USMMA operations, to prevent, prepare for, and respond to 
coronavirus.
    MARAD reorganization.--The budget request proposes a 
reorganization within the MARAD headquarters operations program 
activity. Specifically, MARAD is seeking to establish 2 new 
offices--the Office of Policy and Strategic Engagement and the 
Office of Maritime Industry--and in turn to eliminate 2 
existing offices--the Office of Environment and Compliance and 
the Office of Business and Finance Development. While this 
reorganization would not result in a reduction in full-time 
positions or full-time equivalents, the budget request does not 
provide sufficient information for the Committee to approve 
this reorganization. The Committee directs MARAD to request 
approval from the House and Senate Committees on Appropriations 
through the process outlined in section 405 of this Act if it 
wishes to move forward with this reorganization.
    MARAD staffing.--The Committee continues to require MARAD 
to submit to the House and Senate Committees on Appropriations 
information on the number of vacancies at MARAD headquarters 
and regional offices, and the duties associated with each 
vacancy concurrent with the fiscal year 2022 budget 
justification.
    Sexual assault and sexual harassment at USMMA.--While the 
Committee appreciates the USMMA's efforts to establish and 
staff the Sexual Assault/Sexual Harassment Prevention and 
Response Office, the USMMA has struggled to retain staff within 
this 4-person office. The Committee is concerned that staff 
turn-over and prolonged vacancies can result in challenges with 
developing relationships and trust with midshipmen and USMMA 
staff, implementing policies and training, and achieving the 
goal of reducing sexual assault and sexual harassment at the 
USMMA. The Committee directs the USMMA to fully staff the 
Sexual Assault/Sexual Harassment Prevention and Response Office 
and to increase its efforts to retain staff to ensure the 
office is a reliable and sustainable resource for midshipmen.
    The Further Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2020 (P.L. 
116-94) directs the Secretary to seek concurrent criminal 
jurisdiction over the USMMA campus, as authorized in section 
3506 of the John S. McCain National Defense Authorization Act 
for Fiscal Year 2019 (P.L. 115-232). This would allow local law 
enforcement to prosecute sexual assault incidents that occur on 
campus. The Committee understands that MARAD is taking steps to 
comply with this direction, including engaging with local 
authorities and coordinating with other Federal agencies, and 
plans to engage the USMMA community. The Committee directs 
MARAD to expeditiously work toward achieving campus-wide 
concurrent criminal jurisdiction and to brief the House and 
Senate Committees on Appropriations on its progress on a 
quarterly basis until the Department files a notice of 
jurisdictional relinquishment with the State of New York.
    The USMMA is required to conduct a survey on sexual 
harassment and sexual assault every other year. The most recent 
Service Academy Gender Relations Survey was conducted with 
midshipmen in 2018 for the 2017-2018 Academic Year. While the 
Preliminary 2017-2018 Academic Year Biennial Survey and Report 
on Sexual Harassment and Sexual Assault at the United States 
Merchant Marine Academy was transmitted to the Congress on 
March 22, 2019, it did not include the results from the survey 
sessions held in November 2018. Further, the Committee notes 
with disappointment that MARAD failed to transmit the report to 
the House and Senate Committees on Appropriations by April 18, 
2020 as required by P.L. 116-94. The next survey is scheduled 
to be conducted in 2020 for the 2019-2020 Academic Year. The 
Committee directs MARAD to work with the USMMA to ensure the 
preliminary and final report for the 2019-2020 Academic Year 
are completed in a timely manner as these surveys and 
accompanying analysis are important tools in determining the 
effectiveness of the policies, training, and procedures the 
USMMA has put into place to address sexual harassment and 
sexual assault and improving the culture at the USMMA.
    Shipyards.--Due to the lack of available private shipyard 
facilities and the extended time to relocate vessels and 
assets, there is a backlog of maintenance, repair, and 
modernization projects which may impair maritime commerce and 
national security. To avoid displacement, costs, and impacts on 
East Coast and West Coast based vessels and personnel, the 
Committee encourages MARAD to continue utilizing privately 
owned shipyards for National Defense Reserve Fleet and Ready 
Reserve Force maintenance, repair, and modernization. The 
Committee also encourages MARAD to compile a list of available 
shipyards and to share such a list with other government 
partners.
    Economic development at public ports.--In addition to 
supporting the movement of freight by water, rail, and road, 
public ports are increasingly involved in economic development 
activities. Public port property supports mixed-use commercial 
development, public marketplaces, docking for river or sea 
cruise ships and water taxis, cultural and environmental 
development, and more. The Committee notes that there are 
limited Federal grant programs that support these types of 
activities. The Committee directs the Government Accountability 
Office to report to the House and Senate Committees on 
Appropriations no later than 18 months after enactment of this 
Act on public ports ability to contribute to economic 
development beyond freight and industrial manufacturing, and 
identify gaps in Federal grant programs to assist public ports 
in America's marine highway program. The report should assess 
the availability of Federal assistance to public ports, 
including through grants awarded by the Department through the 
port infrastructure development program and the national 
infrastructure investments program, and the process by which 
the Department reviews grant applications and awards funding. 
It should also assess the extent to which grants have been 
awarded for maritime dock rehabilitation, replacement, or 
retrofitting projects that support economic development 
projects at public ports.
    Domestic maritime centers of excellence (DMCOEs).--Section 
3507 of the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 
2018 (P.L. 115-91) authorized the Department to designate 
community and technical colleges or maritime training centers 
as DMCOEs and to enter into cooperative agreements with DMCOEs 
to support maritime workforce training and education. To help 
address the shortage in qualified U.S. maritime workers, MARAD 
may use up to $2,000,000 of the funding provided to MARAD 
headquarters operations to assist DMCOEs in expanding their 
capacity to provide maritime and marine technology workforce 
training.

                   STATE MARITIME ACADEMY OPERATIONS

 
 
 
Appropriation, fiscal year 2020.......................      $342,280,000
Budget request, fiscal year 2021......................       337,700,000
Recommended in the bill...............................       431,700,000
Bill compared with:
    Appropriation, fiscal year 2020...................        +89,420,00
    Budget request, fiscal year 2021..................       +94,000,000
 

    The state maritime academy (SMA) operations account 
provides financial assistance to 6 state maritime academies.

                        COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION

    The Committee recommendation provides $431,700,000 for 
state maritime academy operations. The following table provides 
funding levels for activities within this account.

------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                         Request         Recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Schoolship maintenance and repair.        $30,500,000        $30,500,000
    [Training vessel sharing......              - - -         8,000,000]
National security multi-mission           300,000,000        389,000,000
 vessel program...................
Student incentive program.........          2,400,000          2,400,000
Fuel assistance payments..........          1,800,000          3,800,000
Direct payments for SMAs..........          3,000,000          6,000,000
                                   -------------------------------------
    Total.........................        337,700,000        431,700,000
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    In addition, the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic 
Security Act (CARES Act) (P.L. 116-136) included $1,000,000 for 
the state maritime academy operations account for direct 
payments for SMAs to prevent, prepare for, and respond to 
coronavirus.
    National security multi-mission vessel (NSMV).--The NSMV 
will serve as a critical educational and training platform for 
the next generation of mariners, replacing 5 aging SMA training 
vessels while supporting Federal response capabilities for 
humanitarian assistance and disaster relief. In May 2019, MARAD 
selected a vessel construction manager to use commercial 
practices to contract with a single shipyard to construct up to 
5 NSMVs according to MARAD specified designs, conduct oversight 
and management of vessel construction, and deliver the vessels 
to MARAD. In April 2020, the vessel construction manager 
selected a shipyard to construct up to 5 vessels, with the 
first vessel scheduled to be delivered in March 2023. Based on 
MARAD's acquisition strategy, the expected cost per vessel was 
to be $300,000,000. Despite MARAD's efforts to develop a cost-
effective program utilizing a single vessel design, series 
construction, commercial practices, and a commercial shipyard, 
the Committee understands the average per vessel construction 
cost is 4.5 percent higher than MARAD's cost estimate. With 
$900,000,000 appropriated in fiscal years 2018, 2019, and 2020 
for the first 3 vessels, the Committee understands 
approximately $704,400,000 must now be appropriated over fiscal 
years 2021 and 2022 to fully fund the third, fourth, and fifth 
vessels. Therefore, the Committee recommendation provides 
$389,000,000 for the NSMV program to fully fund the third and 
fourth vessels and the Committee remains committed to fully 
funding the fifth vessel. The Committee directs MARAD to 
conduct vigorous oversight over the vessel construction manager 
to prevent any further cost escalations and delays in vessel 
delivery. Further, the Committee directs MARAD to provide 
briefings to the House and Senate Committees on Appropriations 
on the construction of the NSMVs on a quarterly basis.

                     ASSISTANCE TO SMALL SHIPYARDS

 
 
 
Appropriation, fiscal year 2020.......................       $20,000,000
Budget request, fiscal year 2021......................             - - -
Recommended in the bill...............................        20,000,000
Bill compared with:
    Appropriation, fiscal year 2020...................             - - -
    Budget request, fiscal year 2021..................       +20,000,000
 

    As authorized under section 54101 of title 46, United 
States Code, the assistance to small shipyards program provides 
grants, loans, and loan guarantees to small shipyards for 
capital improvements and training programs.

                        COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION

    The Committee recommendation provides $20,000,000 for the 
assistance to small shipyards program.

                             SHIP DISPOSAL

 
 
 
Appropriation, fiscal year 2020.......................        $5,000,000
Budget request, fiscal year 2021......................         4,200,000
Recommended in the bill...............................         5,000,000
Bill compared with:
    Appropriation, fiscal year 2020...................             - - -
    Budget request, fiscal year 2021..................          +800,000
 

    MARAD serves as the Federal government's disposal agent for 
government-owned merchant vessels weighing 1,500 gross tons or 
more. The ship disposal program provides resources to dispose 
of obsolete merchant-type vessels in the National Defense 
Reserve Fleet. These vessels pose a significant environmental 
threat due to the presence of hazardous substances such as 
asbestos and solid and liquid polychlorinated biphenyls.

                        COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION

    The Committee recommendation provides $5,000,000 for ship 
disposal activities. This funding level provides $3,000,000 to 
maintain the NS Savannah in protective storage in accordance 
with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's license requirements 
while it is being disposed.
    The Committee rejects the proposal in the budget request to 
rescind $6,803,172 in unobligated balances from the ship 
disposal program.

          MARITIME GUARANTEED LOAN (TITLE XI) PROGRAM ACCOUNT

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

 
 
 
Appropriation, fiscal year 2020.......................        $3,000,000
Budget request, fiscal year 2021......................             - - -
Recommended in the bill...............................         3,000,000
Bill compared with:
    Appropriation, fiscal year 2020...................             - - -
    Budget request, fiscal year 2021..................        +3,000,000
 

    The maritime guaranteed loan program, as established by 
Title XI of the Merchant Marine Act of 1936 (P.L. 74-835), 
provides for guaranteed loans for the construction, 
reconstruction, or reconditioning of vessels by the U.S. 
shipbuilding industry and for modernization of U.S. shipyards.

                        COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION

    The Committee recommendation provides $3,000,000 for the 
administrative expenses of the maritime guaranteed loan 
program.
    The Committee opposes the proposal in the budget request to 
eliminate the maritime guaranteed loan program and transfer 
existing loans for administration to the National Surface 
Transportation and Innovative Finance Bureau within the Office 
of the Secretary. Further, the Committee rejects the proposal 
in the budget request to rescind $27,900,000 in unobligated 
balances from the maritime guaranteed loan program.

                PORT INFRASTRUCTURE DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM

 
 
 
Appropriation, fiscal year 2020.......................      $225,000,000
Budget request, fiscal year 2021......................             - - -
Recommended in the bill...............................       300,000,000
Bill compared with:
    Appropriation, fiscal year 2020...................       +75,000,000
    Budget request, fiscal year 2021..................      +300,000,000
 

    The port infrastructure development program is authorized 
by section 50302(c) of title 46, United States Code, to improve 
port facilities and the transportation networks and flows of 
cargo in, around, and through ports. Port authorities, States 
and local governments, tribal governments, publicly chartered 
entities, and special purpose districts with a transportation 
function are eligible to apply for this competitive grant 
program.

                        COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION

    The Committee recommendation provides $300,000,000 for the 
port infrastructure development program.
    The Committee directs MARAD to follow the eligibility 
requirements enumerated in this Act.

           ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISIONS--MARITIME ADMINISTRATION

    Section 170 authorizes MARAD to furnish utilities and 
services and to make necessary repairs in connection with any 
lease, contract, or occupancy involving government property 
under control of MARAD and allows payments received to be 
credited to the Treasury and to remain available until 
expended.
    Section 171 requires MARAD to use prior year unobligated 
balances from the maritime security program to provide an 
additional $500,000 in fiscal year 2021 for each vessel covered 
by an operating agreement as of the date of enactment of this 
Act and to make such payments no later than 60 days after 
enactment of this Act.

         Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration

    The Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration 
(PHMSA) administers nationwide safety programs designed to 
protect the public and the environment from risks inherent in 
the commercial transportation of hazardous materials by 
pipeline, air, rail, vessel, and highway. Many of these 
materials are essential to the national economy. PHMSA's 
highest priority is safety, and it uses safety management 
principles and security assessments to promote the safe 
transport of hazardous materials and the security of the 
Nation's pipelines, underground natural gas storage facilities, 
and liquefied natural gas (LNG) facilities.

                          OPERATIONAL EXPENSES

 
 
 
Appropriation, fiscal year 2020.......................       $24,215,000
Budget request, fiscal year 2021......................        24,215,000
Recommended in the bill...............................        25,715,000
Bill compared with:
    Appropriation, fiscal year 2020...................        +1,500,000
    Budget request, fiscal year 2021..................        +1,500,000
 

    This appropriation finances the operational support costs 
for PHMSA, including the agency-wide functions of 
administration, management, policy development, legal counsel, 
budget, financial management, civil rights, human resources, 
acquisition services, information technology, and governmental 
and public affairs.

                        COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION

    The Committee recommendation provides $25,715,000 for PHMSA 
operational expenses, of which $1,500,000 shall be for the 
pipeline safety information grants to communities program.
    Pipeline safety rulemaking.--Congress required PHMSA to 
establish regulations on the use of automatic and remote-
controlled shut-off valves on transmission pipeline facilities 
and hazardous liquid pipeline facilities leak detection systems 
in the Pipeline Safety, Regulatory Certainty, and Job Creation 
Act of 2011 (P.L. 112-90). The Committee commends PHMSA for 
issuing a notice of proposed rulemaking (NPRM) on Pipeline 
Safety: Valve Installation and Minimum Rupture Detection 
Standards on February 6, 2020 to address these overdue 
Congressional mandates. While the proposed rule is intended to 
address P.L. 112-90 and recommendations from the National 
Transportation Safety Board (NTSB), the Committee notes that 
the NTSB submitted comments on the NPRM indicating that the 
proposed actions will not satisfy safety recommendations P-11-
9, P-11-10, and P-11-11. The Committee directs PHMSA to 
thoroughly review and consider all comments received in 
response to the NPRM and to issue a final rule no later than 
December 20, 2020 as required by the Further Consolidated 
Appropriations Act, 2020 (P.L. 116-94).

                       HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY

 
 
 
Appropriation, fiscal year 2020.......................       $61,000,000
Budget request, fiscal year 2021......................        60,700,000
Recommended in the bill...............................        62,000,000
Bill compared with:
    Appropriation, fiscal year 2020...................        +1,000,000
    Budget request, fiscal year 2021..................        +1,300,000
 

    The hazardous materials safety program advances the safe 
and secure transport of hazardous materials (hazmat) in 
commerce by air, truck, rail, and vessel. PHMSA evaluates 
hazmat safety risks, develops and enforces regulations for 
transporting hazmat, educates shippers and carriers, 
investigates hazmat incidents and failures, conducts research, 
and provides grants to improve emergency response to 
transportation incidents involving hazmat.

                        COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION

    The Committee recommendation provides $62,000,000 for the 
hazardous materials safety program. This funding level supports 
PHMSA's existing hazardous materials safety program, including 
the safe transportation of energy products, and provides 
$1,000,000 for the community safety grant program.
    LNG by rail.--The Committee remains concerned that the 
transportation of LNG by rail poses new and different risks to 
the public, environment, and property. The Committee is aware 
of several research and development projects PHMSA and the 
Federal Railroad Administration (FRA) are actively pursuing 
relating to the transportation of LNG in rail tank cars or the 
use of LNG as a fuel for locomotives. These activities are 
expected to continue through December 2021 and additional 
research projects are planned for fiscal years 2020 and 2021.
    In addition, PHMSA entered into an agreement in April 2020 
with the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and 
Medicine to conduct an independent study through the 
Transportation Research Board (TRB) on the transportation of 
LNG in rail tank cars as required by P.L. 116-94. The Committee 
understands the TRB will conduct this study in two phases. In 
Phase 1 the TRB will review ongoing and planned research, 
testing, and data analysis by PHMSA and FRA relating to the 
transportation of LNG in rail tank cars. In Phase 2 the TRB 
will gather and analyze information relating to the 
transportation of LNG in rail tank cars, including information 
on methods used to transport LNG by other modes, train 
operational controls, and emergency response planning.
    The Committee is profoundly disappointed that the 
Department chose to initiate and complete a rulemaking to 
authorize the bulk transportation of LNG by rail in DOT-113 
rail tank cars without having all the information in hand, in 
particular the results of ongoing research projects by PHMSA 
and FRA and the independent study by the TRB. The Committee is 
further concerned that this rulemaking was completed in record 
speed, with only 245 days between issuing the notice of 
proposed rulemaking and final rule. This fast-tracked process 
leads the Committee to believe the Department was more 
concerned with fulfilling the directives of Executive Order 
13868, than with the safety of the communities living along 
potential LNG transportation routes. The Committee continues to 
assert that the ongoing research projects and the TRB study 
should have informed the Department's decision-making and this 
rulemaking. Therefore, no later than 30 days after the TRB has 
completed Phase 1 of the TRB study, the Committee directs PHMSA 
to brief the House and Senate Committees on Appropriations on 
actions the agency plans to take in response to the results of 
Phase 1, including any potential changes to the final rule 
authorizing the bulk transportation of LNG by rail in DOT-113 
rail tank cars. In addition, no later than 30 days after the 
TRB has completed Phase 2 of the TRB study, which P.L. 116-94 
required to be completed no later than December 20, 2020, the 
Committee directs PHMSA to brief the House and Senate 
Committees on Appropriations on actions the agency plans to 
take in response to the results of Phase 2, including any 
potential changes to the final rule authorizing the bulk 
transportation of LNG by rail in DOT-113 rail tank cars. 
Further, the Committee notes that the INVEST in America Act 
requires the Department to rescind any special permit or 
approval for the transportation of LNG by rail tank cars and 
places a stay on any regulation authorizing the transportation 
of LNG by rail tank cars until the Department completes a 
thorough evaluation of the safety, security, and environmental 
risks of transporting LNG by rail.
    Safe transportation of energy products.--The Committee 
continues to closely monitor PHMSA's efforts to improve the 
safety of transporting Class 3 flammable liquids, including 
crude oil and ethanol, by rail. The Fixing America's Surface 
Transportation (FAST) Act (P.L. 114-94) established a schedule 
to phase-out certain rail tank cars used to transport Class 3 
flammable liquids. In October 2019, the Bureau of 
Transportation Statistics reported that 34 percent of all tank 
cars transporting Class 3 flammable liquids in 2018 met the new 
safety requirements, which is a 14 percent increase over 2017. 
The Committee encourages the Department to work with industry 
to ensure continued progress on the tank car phaseout, and if 
possible, accelerate the phaseout timeline.
    The Committee understands that the Department, in 
partnership with the Department of Energy, has completed the 
collaborative research study on the volatility and properties 
of crude oil from various locations, including the Bakken Shale 
in North Dakota, and to accurately assess and characterize 
volatility before transportation. The Committee directs the 
Department to brief the House and Senate Committees on 
Appropriations no later than 90 days after enactment of this 
Act on the findings and recommendations of the Crude Oil 
Characterization Research Study.
    Inland ports of entry.--The Committee directs PHMSA to 
continue to work with local governments and their Mexican 
counterparts at international inland ports of entry with a high 
volume of hazardous materials crossing the border to reduce the 
risk associated with transporting and storing hazardous 
materials and to enhance the capacity of local officials in 
dealing with the threat of hazardous materials incidents.

                            PIPELINE SAFETY

                         (PIPELINE SAFETY FUND)

                    (OIL SPILL LIABILITY TRUST FUND)

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                  Underground
                                                 Oil Spill                        Natural Gas
                                              Liability Trust  Pipeline Safety      Storage           Total
                                                    Fund             Fund           Facility
                                                                                 Safety Account
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Appropriation, fiscal year 2020.............      $23,000,000     $137,000,000       $8,000,000     $168,000,000
Budget request, fiscal year 2021............       22,000,000      131,000,000       10,000,000      163,000,000
Recommended in the bill.....................       23,000,000      140,000,000       10,000,000      173,000,000
Bill compared with:
    Appropriation, fiscal year 2020.........            - - -       +3,000,000       +2,000,000       +5,000,000
    Budget request, fiscal year 2021........       +1,000,000       +9,000,000            - - -      +10,000,000
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    PHMSA oversees the safety, security, and environmental 
protection of more than 2,750,000 miles of pipelines and 152 
LNG facilities through analysis of data, damage prevention, 
education and training, development and enforcement of 
regulations and policies, research and development, grants for 
State pipeline safety programs, and emergency planning and 
response to accidents. The pipeline safety program is 
responsible for a national regulatory program to protect the 
public against the risks to life and property in the 
transportation of natural gas, petroleum, and other hazardous 
materials by pipeline and the storage of natural gas 
underground.

                        COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION

    The Committee recommendation provides $173,000,000 to 
continue pipeline safety operations, research and development, 
and State grants. Of the total, $23,000,000 is from the Oil 
Spill Liability Trust Fund, $140,000,000 is from the Pipeline 
Safety Fund, and $10,000,000 is from the Underground Natural 
Gas Storage Facility Safety Account within the Pipeline Safety 
Fund. The following table provides funding levels for 
activities within this account.

------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                         Request         Recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Research and development..........        $15,000,000        $15,000,000
State pipeline safety grants......         53,000,000         58,000,000
Underground natural gas storage             8,000,000          8,000,000
 facilities safety grants.........
One-Call State grants.............              - - -          1,058,000
State damage prevention grants....              - - -          1,500,000
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Staffing and hiring plans.--The Committee directs PHMSA to 
provide a report to the House and Senate Committees on 
Appropriations no later than 120 days after enactment of this 
Act detailing staffing and hiring plans for fiscal year 2021 
and information on the actual turnover and hiring in fiscal 
year 2020. Based on the reports provided to the Committee for 
fiscal years 2018 and 2019, the Committee remains concerned 
with PHMSA's ability to fill existing vacancies and retain 
staff due in part to competition from the private sector. The 
Committee supports PHMSA's proposal in the budget request to 
utilize $1,000,000 to recruit and retain qualified pipeline and 
LNG engineers through incentives such as tuition assistance and 
student loan reimbursement.
    LNG facilities.--PHMSA is responsible for overseeing the 
safe operations of LNG facilities, evaluating the safety of 
siting LNG facilities, and conducting safety inspections during 
LNG facilities construction. The Committee recognizes that the 
increased work associated with LNG facilities requires 
additional staff. The Committee supports PHMSA's efforts to 
hire 5 inspectors and engineers to help address the potential 
risks associated with LNG facilities.
    The PIPES Act of 2016 (P.L. 114-183) directed the 
Department to review and update minimum safety standards for 
LNG facilities, and PHMSA announced its intent to update Part 
193 regulations in 2018. The Committee continues to support 
PHMSA's efforts to update regulations for LNG facilities, and 
urges PHMSA to conduct a thorough and methodical rulemaking 
process on Part 193 to ensure the safety of the public and 
environment. The Committee reiterates its direction from fiscal 
year 2020 and directs PHMSA to move forward with a notice of 
proposed rulemaking to update Part 193, provide a minimum of 45 
days for public comment, and issue a final rule upon review and 
analysis of all comments. Further, the Committee directs PHMSA 
not to delay any efforts to complete the overdue Congressional 
mandates from P.L. 112-90 as the agency pursues updating Part 
193 regulations.

                     EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS GRANTS

                      (LIMITATION ON OBLIGATIONS)

                     (EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS FUND)

 
 
 
Appropriation, fiscal year 2020.......................       $28,318,000
Budget request, fiscal year 2021......................        28,318,000
Recommended in the bill...............................        28,318,000
Bill compared with:
    Appropriation, fiscal year 2020...................             - - -
    Budget request, fiscal year 2021..................             - - -
 

    The Hazardous Materials Transportation Uniform Safety Act 
of 1990 (P.L. 101-615) requires PHMSA to: (1) develop and 
implement a reimbursable emergency preparedness grants program; 
(2) monitor public sector emergency response training and 
planning and provide technical assistance to States, political 
subdivisions, and tribal governments; and (3) develop and 
periodically update a mandatory training curriculum for 
emergency responders.

                        COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION

    The Committee recommendation provides $28,318,000 for the 
emergency preparedness grants program.
    Energy products training.--The Committee recognizes the 
important role the emergency preparedness grants program plays 
in training local emergency responders, including response 
activities related to the transportation of crude oil, ethanol, 
and other flammable liquids by rail. As PHMSA's 
responsibilities for the safe movement of LNG expands, the 
Committee directs PHMSA to enhance its training curriculum for 
local emergency responders to account for LNG facilities and 
the transportation of LNG in rail tank cars.

                      Office of Inspector General


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

 
 
 
Appropriation, fiscal year 2020.......................       $94,600,000
Budget request, fiscal year 2021......................        98,150,000
Recommended in the bill...............................        98,150,000
Bill compared with:
    Appropriation, fiscal year 2020...................        +3,550,000
    Budget request, fiscal year 2021..................             - - -
 

    The Office of Inspector General (OIG) was established in 
1978 to provide an objective and independent organization that 
would be more effective in: (1) preventing and detecting fraud, 
waste, and abuse in departmental programs and operations; and 
(2) providing a means of keeping the Secretary of 
Transportation and the Congress fully and currently informed of 
problems and deficiencies in the administration of such 
programs and operations. According to the authorizing 
legislation, the Inspector General is to report dually to the 
Secretary of Transportation and to the Congress.

                        COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION

    The Committee recommends $98,150,000 for the Office of 
Inspector General.
    In addition, the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic 
Security Act (CARES Act) (P.L. 116-136) included $5,000,000 for 
the Office of Inspector General to conduct audits and 
investigations of projects and activities carried out by the 
Department of Transportation to prevent, prepare for, and 
respond to coronavirus.
    The Committee is aware of the OIG's increased scrutiny on 
the FAA certification process audit and the resources necessary 
to conduct a complete and thorough investigation.
    OIG leadership.--On May 15, 2020, the President designated 
the Administrator of the Pipeline and Hazardous Materials 
Safety Administration (PHMSA) as the Acting Inspector General 
of the Department of Transportation while also maintaining the 
role of PHMSA Administrator. While the Committee appreciates 
the steps taken by the OIG and PHMSA to address potential 
conflicts of interests relating to audits and investigations 
involving PHMSA, the Committee remains concerned with requiring 
one individual to perform two important duties for the 
Department and the potential for other conflicts of interests 
with the Secretary and administrators of other DOT agencies 
that could arise while performing both roles. The Committee 
notes that the Government Accountability Office (GAO) published 
a report on June 8, 2020 entitled ``Inspectors General: 
Independence Principles and Considerations for Reform'' (GAO-
20-639R) which underscores these concerns. Specifically, the 
GAO finds that ``unique independence challenges exist when an 
acting IG holds a position as a senior employee or PAS 
[appointed by the President with the advice and consent of the 
Senate] official of the agency (outside of the OIG)'' and 
``their existing portfolios of work and relationships may be 
more likely to appear to constitute threats of bias, 
familiarity, undue influence, or management participation than 
those of differently situated acting IGs.''
    Despite this unique circumstance, the Committee expects the 
OIG to continue to provide the Department and the Congress a 
high level of independence and objectivity in carrying out 
audits and investigations. The Committee directs the Acting 
Inspector General to maintain this independence and, if 
necessary, to institute additional recusals and apply 
safeguards to protect the important work and integrity of the 
OIG. Further, the Committee directs the Secretary to ensure 
this dual role will not jeopardize the work of either the OIG 
or PHMSA. The Committee reminds the OIG, PHMSA, and entire DOT 
workforce that all DOT employees have the right to disclose 
wrongdoing within the executive branch of the Federal 
government and subsequent protection from retaliation for such 
disclosure under section 2302(b)(8) of title 5, United States 
Code.
    Audit reports.--The Committee directs the OIG to continue 
forwarding copies of all audit reports to the Committee 
immediately after they are issued, and to continue to make the 
Committee aware immediately of any review that recommends 
cancellation or modifications to any major acquisition project 
or grant, or which recommends significant budgetary savings. 
The OIG is also directed to withhold from public distribution 
for a period of 15 days any final audit or investigative report 
that was requested by the House or Senate Committees on 
Appropriations.

            GENERAL PROVISIONS--DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION

    Section 180 provides authorization for DOT to maintain and 
operate aircraft, hire passenger motor vehicles and aircraft, 
purchase liability insurance, buy uniforms, or allowances 
therefor.
    Section 181 limits appropriations for services authorized 
by section 3109 of title 5, United States Code, to the rate 
permitted for an Executive Level IV.
    Section 182 prohibits recipients of funds in this Act from 
disseminating personal information obtained by State DMVs in 
connection to motor vehicle records with an exception.
    Section 183 prohibits funds in this Act for salaries and 
expenses of more than 125 political and Presidential appointees 
in DOT.
    Section 184 stipulates that revenue collected by FHWA and 
FRA from States, counties, municipalities, other public 
authorities, and private sources for training may be credited 
to specific accounts within the agencies with an exception for 
State rail safety inspectors participating in training.
    Section 185 prohibits DOT from using funds to make a loan, 
loan guarantee, line of credit, cooperative agreement, or 
discretionary grant, unless DOT provides a 3-day advance notice 
to the House and Senate Committees on Appropriations. The 
provision requires concurrent notice of any ``quick release'' 
of funds from FHWA's emergency relief program, and prohibits 
notifications from involving funds not available for 
obligation. The provision also requires DOT to provide a 
comprehensive list of all loans, loan guarantees, lines of 
credit, cooperative agreements, or discretionary grants that 
will be announced with a 3-day advance notice to the House and 
Senate Committees on Appropriations.
    Section 186 allows funds received from rebates, refunds, 
and similar sources to be credited to appropriations of DOT.
    Section 187 allows amounts from improper payments to a 
third-party contractor that are lawfully recovered by DOT to be 
made available until expended to cover expenses incurred in 
recovery of such payments.
    Section 188 requires that reprogramming actions have to be 
approved or denied by the House and Senate Committees on 
Appropriations, and reprogramming notifications shall be 
transmitted solely to the Appropriations Committees.
    Section 189 allows funds appropriated to operating 
administrations to be obligated for the Office of the Secretary 
for costs related to assessments only when such funds provide a 
direct benefit to that operating administration.
    Section 190 authorizes the Secretary to carry out a program 
that establishes uniform standards for developing and 
supporting agency transit pass and transit benefits, including 
distribution of transit benefits.
    Section 191 allows the use of funds to assist a contract 
utilizing geographic, economic, or other hiring preference not 
otherwise authorized by law, only if certain requirements are 
met related to availability of local labor, displacement of 
existing employees, and delays in transportation plans.
    Section 192 directs the Secretary of Transportation to work 
with the Secretary of Homeland Security to ensure that best 
practices for Industrial Control Systems procurement are up to 
date and that systems procured with funds provided under this 
title were procured using such practices.
    Section 193 prohibits de-obligated funds associated with 
Cooperative Agreement No. FR-HSR-0118-12-01-01 from being made 
available for any purpose until the final determination of any 
litigation concerning such funds.
    Section 194 prohibits DOT from using funds in this Act to 
consolidate governmental affairs activities across the 
Department in the Office of Governmental Affairs in the Office 
of the Secretary or public affairs activities across the 
Department in the Office of Public Affairs in the Office of the 
Secretary. The provision also prohibits operating 
administrations from transferring personnel to the Office of 
Governmental Affairs in the Office of the Secretary or the 
Office of Public Affairs in the Office of the Secretary.

         TITLE II--DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT


                     Management and Administration


                           EXECUTIVE OFFICES

 
 
 
Appropriation, fiscal year 2020.......................       $14,217,000
Budget request, fiscal year 2021......................        17,659,000
Recommended in the bill...............................        15,000,000
Bill compared with:
    Appropriation, fiscal year 2020...................          +783,000
    Budget request, fiscal year 2021..................        -2,659,000
 

    The Executive Offices (EO) account funds the salaries and 
expenses for the leadership and executive management offices of 
the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD). 
Specifically, these offices are the Office of the Secretary, 
including the Executive Secretariat Division, the Office of the 
Deputy Secretary, the Office of Congressional and 
Intergovernmental Relations, the Office of Public Affairs, the 
Office of Adjudicatory Services, the Office of Small and 
Disadvantaged Business Utilization, and the Center for Faith 
Based and Neighborhood Partnerships.

                        COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION

    Affordable housing organization accreditation.--The 
Committee directs the Department to consider a cooperative 
agreement with a highly qualified nonprofit entity that has 
developed affordable housing standards and is experienced with 
affordable housing organizations, including public housing 
agencies, to develop standards and protocols for implementing a 
national accreditation process for affordable housing 
organizations. Such entity shall offer voluntary, fee-based 
accreditation to affordable housing organizations. Those 
accreditation standards should include assessing the 
organization's operations, policies, procedures, practices, 
communications, and relationships with residents and 
stakeholders. The Committee directs the Department to report 
back to the Committees on Appropriations of the House and 
Senate not later than 120 days after the date of enactment of 
this Act on the feasibility of such an agreement.
    Collaboration with the Department of Health and Human 
Services (HHS).--The Committee recognizes that a number of 
Department programs have an impact in improving health 
outcomes. The Committee is aware that the Department of Defense 
and Labor, Health and Human Services, and Education 
Appropriations Act, 2019 and Continuing Appropriations Act, 
2019 (P.L. 115-245) encouraged HHS to devise a strategy on how 
to construct a decision-support tool that can contribute to 
community-participatory health prevention efforts. The 
Committee is interested in whether HUD can collaborate with HHS 
in such a decision support tool to assess the value of the 
Department's investments. The Committee encourages the 
Department, not later than 90 days after the date of enactment 
of this Act, to outline plans for collaboration with HHS and to 
make a recommendation for how HUD can help support the 
development of a local decision support tool.
    Director of domestic violence prevention activities.--The 
Committee directs the Secretary to establish a Director of 
Domestic Violence Prevention Activities position within the 
Office of the Secretary, and to hire or appoint a person to 
fill that position, not later than 60 days after the date of 
enactment of this Act. The Director shall coordinate domestic 
violence prevention activities throughout the Department, 
including Department responsibilities under the Violence 
Against Women Act and serve as a liaison and central point of 
contact for HUD's work with external stakeholders involved in 
domestic violence prevention and advocacy.
    Energy codes.--The Committee is concerned the Department 
has yet to update minimum energy efficiency standards, as 
required under 42 U.S.C. 12709, since the 2009 International 
Energy Conservation Code and American Society of Heating, 
Refrigerating, and Air-Conditioning Engineers Standard 90.1-
2007. Further, the Committee notes the Department of Energy 
found that more recent model codes reduce energy use by more 
than 25 percent and are cost effective. The Committee urges the 
Department to obtain information from the housing, energy, 
energy conservation, and homeowner sectors, and then assess the 
feasibility of updating the standards with respect to the 
energy efficiency, technological feasibility, economic 
justification, availability, and affordability factors for HUD-
owned and -subsidized properties.
    Equal access to housing.-- The Committee is deeply 
disappointed that a report regarding lesbian, gay, bisexual, 
and transgender (LGBT) access to HUD programs, which was 
required by H. Rept. 114-129, is more than four years overdue. 
The Department has been unresponsive to repeated requests for 
this report. Thus, the recommendation requires the Department 
to issue the report required by H. Rept. 114-129 detailing (1) 
the Department's strategy for continuing to ensure that LGBT 
individuals have access to HUD programs for which they are 
eligible, to be provided by HUD's Office of Fair Housing and 
Equal Opportunity; and (2) the plan for disseminating this 
information to public housing authorities. The Department is 
directed to provide this report not later than 30 days after 
enactment of this Act, and the amount appropriated for the 
Office of the Secretary shall be reduced by $10,000 for each 
day after that deadline that the report has not been submitted 
to the Congress.
    Federal Housing Administration (FHA) loans and Deferred 
Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) recipients.--FHA loans 
have long been made to non-U.S. citizens who are lawful 
permanent or non-permanent residents of the U.S. under the same 
terms and conditions that they are available to U.S. citizens. 
The Secretary and other Department officials repeatedly told 
the Committee that this policy is unchanged, but omitted that 
the Department's interpretation of the policy changed. The 
Committee is deeply disturbed that the Secretary and other 
Department officials may have knowingly misrepresented 
information about the implementation and enforcement of this 
policy on multiple occasions, in testimony and other 
communications with the Committee. The Committee directs the 
Office of Inspector General to conduct a thorough investigation 
on the change of the policy and whether officials made 
misrepresentations to Congress. The Committee strongly endorses 
resuming the previous interpretation of making FHA loans to 
DACA recipients. The Committee adamantly opposes the current 
interpretation that denies a path to homeownership for many 
DACA recipients.
    Housing protections for domestic violence survivors.--The 
Department shall, not later than 90 days after the date of 
enactment of this Act, provide the Committee with information 
regarding the implementation status of housing protections for 
survivors of domestic violence, dating violence, sexual 
assault, and stalking as outlined in 34 U.S.C. 12491, including 
notification requirements, confidentiality requirements, and 
emergency transfers. The Department shall also provide 
information about the extent to which public housing agencies 
and owners have adopted emergency transfer policies since the 
publication of the Department's model emergency transfer plan, 
and about the effectiveness of those emergency transfer 
policies in allowing survivors to access safe housing.
    Office of Congressional and Intergovernmental Relations 
(CIR).--The Committee does not provide any funding to increase 
the staffing level of the CIR, thereby prohibiting the proposal 
to realign the Appropriations Liaison Division from the Office 
of the Chief Financial Officer (OCFO) to CIR. The Committee is 
adamantly opposed to such a realignment because it would upend 
the current working relationship and natural affinity between 
the Committee and the OCFO. The Committee insists on direct and 
unobstructed communications with the OCFO and bureau budget 
offices.
    Top management challenges.--In 2019, the HUD Office of 
Inspector General (OIG) identified eight top management 
challenges: (1) HUD's Human Capital--Fewer Employees, 
Significant Reliance on Contracted Services, (2) Ensuring the 
Availability of Affordable Housing That Is Decent, Safe, 
Sanitary, and in Good Repair, (3) Protecting the Mortgage 
Insurance Programs, (4) Providing Adequate Monitoring and 
Oversight of Its Operations and Program Participants, (5) 
Administering Disaster Recovery Assistance, (6) Modernizing 
Technology and the Management and Oversight of Information 
Technology, (7) Instituting Sound Financial Management, and (8) 
Ensuring Ethical Conduct. The Committee is troubled to learn 
that the Department is stymied by basic business fundamentals. 
The OIG went out of its way to identify where progress is being 
made, such as information technology, but even that progress is 
hampered by challenges elsewhere, such as procurement. Given 
the related nature of these eight challenges and the need for 
sustained executive attention, not later than 30 days after the 
date of enactment of this Act, the Committee directs the 
Secretary to form an executive task force to address these 
challenges. The task force shall submit a report to the House 
and Senate Committees on Appropriations not later than 120 days 
after the date of enactment of this Act on a strategy and 
action items to address these eight challenges in the short- 
and long-term.

                     ADMINISTRATIVE SUPPORT OFFICES

 
 
 
Appropriation, fiscal year 2020.......................      $563,378,000
Budget request, fiscal year 2021......................       578,913,000
Recommended in the bill...............................       600,000,000
Bill compared with:
    Appropriation, fiscal year 2020...................       +36,622,000
    Budget request, fiscal year 2021..................       +21,087,000
 

    The Administrative Support Offices (ASO) appropriation pays 
for the staff and activity cost that cannot be attributable to 
a specific Department programs. ASO offices provide Department-
wide services for both the programs and the program staff. 
Specifically, these offices are the: Office of the Chief 
Financial Officer, the Office of the General Counsel, Office of 
the Assistant Secretary for Administration, the Office of Field 
Policy and Management, the Office of Departmental Equal 
Employment Opportunity, and the Office of the Chief Information 
Officer.

                        COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION

    The Committee recommends the following amounts for each ASO 
office.

------------------------------------------------------------------------
  Administrative Support Offices         Request         Recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Office of Chief Financial Officer.        $70,776,000        $71,576,000
Office of General Counsel.........        109,044,000        109,044,000
Office of the Assistant Secretary         266,258,000        286,258,000
 for Administration...............
Office of Field Policy and                 65,200,000         65,200,000
 Management.......................
Office of the Departmental Equal            4,435,000          4,535,000
 Employment Opportunity...........
Office of the Chief Information            63,200,000         63,387,000
 Officer..........................
                                   -------------------------------------
    Total, ASO....................        578,913,000        600,000,000
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    In addition, the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic 
Security Act (CARES Act) (P.L. 116-136) included $35,000,000 
for the Administrative Support Offices account to prevent, 
prepare for, and respond to coronavirus.
    Hiring and separation report.--The Committee directs HUD's 
Office of the Chief Financial Officer and Office of the Human 
Capital Officer to submit quarterly reports to the House and 
Senate Committees on Appropriations on hiring and separations 
by program office. This report shall include position, titles, 
location, associated full-time equivalent, and include the 
Office of Inspector General and the Government National 
Mortgage Association.
    Office of the Chief Financial Officer (OCFO).--The 
Committee does not approve the realignment of staff from the 
OCFO to the Office of Congressional and Intergovernmental 
Relations. Therefore, these staff and a corresponding amount of 
funding remain in OCFO. The Committee is adamantly opposed to 
such a realignment because it would upend the current working 
relationship and natural affinity between the Committee and the 
OCFO. The Committee insists on direct and unobstructed 
communications with the OCFO and bureau budget offices.
    Office space.--The recommendation includes $20,000,000 to 
support the efficient utilization of the Robert C. Weaver 
Federal Building and to support ``reduce the footprint'' 
efforts consistent with OMB Memorandum M-20-03. The Weaver 
Building has served continuously as the Department's 
headquarters office space since it opened in 1968. In 2000, the 
building was named in honor of the first HUD Secretary and 
first African American member of a President's Cabinet. The 
building was added to the National Register of Historic Places 
in 2008 as an exceptional and significant example of Brutalist 
architecture. Unlike most other Federal office buildings, the 
Department and the General Services Administration (GSA) have 
entered into a negotiated delegation agreement and share the 
cost of operating, maintaining, and improving the Weaver 
building, while GSA maintains responsibility for capital 
improvements. The current agreement was completed in 2019 and 
Department is now poised to begin long-term planning and 
immediate repairs to the Weaver building. The recommendation 
also supports the Department's efforts to restack or 
consolidate leased space nationally and strongly encourages the 
Department to work with GSA to do so in Federally owned 
buildings where cost-efficient, inclusive of move and 
relocation costs. Not later than 90 days after the enactment 
date of this Act, the Secretary shall submit to the House and 
Senate Committees on Appropriations an expenditure plan for 
these funds. Any changes to this plan are subject to the 
reprogramming process described in section 405 of this Act.
    Top management challenges.--Based on the eight top 
management challenges identified in 2019 by the HUD OIG, the 
Committee is concerned that the Department's growing and 
complex mission rests on a fragile foundation. Since many of 
these challenges fall under the purview of an office within the 
ASO, the Committee directs the executives of the ASO to fully 
participate and support the executive task force that the 
Secretary is directed to form under the heading ``Management 
and Administration, Executive Offices'' to address these eight 
challenges.

                            PROGRAM OFFICES

 
 
 
Appropriation, fiscal year 2020.......................      $847,000,000
Budget request, fiscal year 2021......................       900,149,000
Recommended in the bill...............................       909,595,000
Bill compared with:
    Appropriation, fiscal year 2020...................       +62,595,000
    Budget request, fiscal year 2021..................        +9,446,000
 

    The Program Offices (PO) appropriation pays for the staff 
cost attributable to specific Department programs, whereas the 
cost of the assistance is accounted for in the preceding 
program accounts, such as Tenant-based Rental Assistance. Each 
PO office implements one or more HUD programs.
           The Office of Public and Indian Housing 
        oversees the administration of the Public Housing, 
        Housing Choice Voucher, and all of HUD's Native 
        American and Native Hawaiian programs.
           The Office of Community Planning and 
        Development is responsible for the administration of 
        Community Development Block Grants (CDBG), the Home 
        Investment Partnership (HOME), Homeless Assistance 
        Grants, and other community development programs.
           The Office of Housing implements Federal 
        Housing Administration multi- and single-family 
        homeownership programs and assisted rental housing 
        programs.
           The Office of Policy Development and 
        Research directs the Department's annual research 
        agenda to support the research and evaluation of 
        housing and other departmental initiatives to improve 
        HUD's effectiveness and operational efficiencies.
           The Office of Fair Housing and Equal 
        Opportunity receives, investigates, conciliates and 
        recommends the issuance of charges of discrimination 
        and determinations of non-compliance for complaints 
        filed under Title VIII and other civil rights 
        authorities.
           The Office of Lead Hazard Control and 
        Healthy Homes is responsible for the Lead-Based Paint 
        Hazard Reduction program and addressing multiple 
        housing-related hazards affecting the health of 
        residents, particularly children.

                        COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION

    The Committee recommends the following amounts for each PO 
office.

------------------------------------------------------------------------
          Program Offices                Request         Recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Office of Public and Indian              $236,439,000       $245,000,000
 Housing..........................
Office of Community Planning and          129,503,000        138,290,000
 Development......................
Office of Housing.................        411,878,000        400,000,000
Office of Policy Development and           35,443,000         35,443,000
 Research.........................
Office of Fair Housing and Equal           77,024,000         81,000,000
 Opportunity......................
Office of Lead Hazard Control and           9,862,000          9,862,000
 Healthy Homes....................
                                   -------------------------------------
    Total.........................        900,149,000        909,595,000
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    In addition, the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic 
Security Act (CARES Act) (P.L. 116-136) included $15,000,000 
for the Program Offices account to prevent, prepare for, and 
respond to coronavirus.
    Public and tribal housing inspections.--The Committee 
provides additional resources for public and tribal housing to 
support ongoing public housing financial and physical 
assessment activities, continue work on a new physical 
inspection process, and implement the recommendations made in 
the March 2019 Government Accountability Office (GAO) report 
``Real Estate Inspection Center: HUD Should Improve Physical 
Inspection Process and Oversight of Inspectors'' (GAO-19-254).
    Transfers.--The Committee is wholly dissatisfied with the 
Department's decision to transfer $2,000,000 in fiscal year 
2020 funding from the salaries and expenses of the Office of 
Fair Housing and Equal Opportunity (OFHEO) to the Office of the 
Chief Financial Officer (OCFO) for a customer advisory board. 
While the transfer was technically in accordance with the 
thresholds in section 218 at the time, the Committee is 
troubled that with this action the Department has undermined a 
Congressional priority--ensuring access to fair housing--that 
was the outcome of a conference agreement negotiated between 
the House and Senate and signed into law by the President. P.L. 
116-94 deliberately provided additional funds to OFHEO in 
fiscal year 2020 for the Department to conduct additional Fair 
Housing Act enforcement. Consequently, the Committee has 
modified section 218 to prohibit all transfers out of OFHEO, 
the Office of Lead Hazard Control and Healthy Homes, and the 
Office of the Departmental Equal Employment Opportunity.

                          WORKING CAPITAL FUND

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

    The Department of Housing and Urban Development's Working 
Capital Fund (WCF), in its present form, was established by the 
Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2016 (P.L. 114-113) to perform 
a limited number of commodity-like administrative functions 
where economies of scale can be achieved. These functions are 
limited in statute to the following: financial management, 
procurement, travel, relocation, human resources, printing, 
records management, space renovation, furniture, supply 
services, the operational expenses of the WCF, and information 
technology customer devices and support.
    The Committee does not provide any funding to the WCF. 
Instead, the WCF staff and its activities are funded with 
transfers from the Department's salary and expenses accounts 
(i.e., Executive Offices, Administrative Support Offices, 
Program Offices, and Government National Mortgage Association).
    Prior to exercising discretion to centrally fund an 
activity, the Secretary shall have established transparent and 
reliable unit cost accounting for the offices and agencies of 
the Department that use the activity, and shall have ensured 
adequately trained staff within each affected office and agency 
on resource planning and accounting processes associated with 
the centralization of funds to this account.
    Prior to exercising its authority to transfer funds for 
activities beyond what is required for shared service 
agreements, the Committee directs HUD to establish a clear 
execution plan for centralizing the additional activities, and 
to transmit that plan to the House and Senate Committees on 
Appropriations 15 days prior to transferring such funds into 
the WCF.

                       PUBLIC AND INDIAN HOUSING

                     TENANT-BASED RENTAL ASSISTANCE

 
 
 
Appropriation, fiscal year 2020.......................   $23,874,050,000
Budget request, fiscal year 2021*.....................    23,346,300,000
Recommended in the bill...............................    25,739,312,000
Bill compared with:
    Appropriation, fiscal year 2020...................    +1,865,262,000
    Budget request, fiscal year 2021..................    +2,393,012,000
 
*Includes the separate Administration request for Moving To Work (MTW)
  for renewals and administrative fees of $4,172,900,000 and
  $340,400,000, respectively.

    In fiscal year 2005, the Housing Certificate Fund was 
separated into two new accounts: Tenant-Based Rental Assistance 
and Project-Based Rental Assistance. This account administers 
the tenant-based Section 8 rental assistance program otherwise 
known as the Housing Choice Voucher program.

                        COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION

    The Committee recommends $25,739,312,000 for Tenant-Based 
Rental Assistance. Consistent with the budget request, the 
Committee continues the advance of $4,000,000,000 of the funds 
appropriated under this heading for Section 8 programs to 
October 1, 2021. The following table provides funding levels 
for activities within this account.

------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                         Request         Recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Voucher Renewals..................   $21,130,900,000*    $22,852,000,000
Administrative Fees...............     1,805,400,000*      2,154,812,000
Veterans Affairs Supportive                     - - -         20,000,000
 Housing (VASH)...................
Tribal HUD-VASH...................              - - -          2,500,000
Tenant Protection Vouchers........        100,000,000        125,000,000
Family Unification Vouchers.......              - - -         25,000,000
811 Mainstream Vouchers...........        310,000,000        310,000,000
Incremental Vouchers for                        - - -        250,000,000
 Homelessness.....................
    [Survivors of Domestic                      - - -        40,000,000]
     Violence.....................
    [Veterans.....................              - - -        40,000,000]
                                   -------------------------------------
        Total.....................     23,346,300,000     25,739,312,000
------------------------------------------------------------------------
*Includes the separate Administration request for MTW as noted above.

    In addition, the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic 
Security Act (CARES Act) (P.L. 116-136) included $1,250,000,000 
for the Tenant-Based Rental Assistance account to prevent, 
prepare for, and respond to coronavirus.
    Voucher renewals.--The Committee provides $22,852,000,000 
for the renewal of tenant-based vouchers. The Committee directs 
the Department to monitor and report to the House and Senate 
Committees on Appropriations each quarter on the trends in 
Section 8 subsidies and to report on the required program 
alterations due to changes in rent or changes in tenant income. 
The Committee does not support the Administration's request to 
move funding for MTW public housing agencies into a separate 
account and, therefore, includes the renewal and administrative 
funding within the Tenant-Based Rental Assistance account.
    Incremental Vouchers to Address Homelessness.--The 
Committee provides $250,000,000 to reduce homelessness among 
families with children and the unsheltered, veterans, and, for 
the first time, provides dedicated resources for survivors of 
domestic violence.
    Veterans Affairs Supportive Housing (VASH) and additional 
resources to address veterans' homelessness.--To continue the 
effort to eliminate homelessness among our Nation's veterans, 
the Committee provides $20,000,000 for new, incremental 
vouchers dedicated to vulnerable veteran households through the 
VASH program. The Committee estimates that $753,000,000 in 
voucher renewal funding is included in the overall fiscal year 
2021 voucher renewal appropriation and reserves to support 
approximately 90,000 eligible VASH vouchers funded in prior 
years. Since 2008, the Committee has provided more than 
$795,000,000 in targeted funding to increase the number of VASH 
vouchers available to address veteran homelessness and billions 
of dollars have been made available to renew VASH vouchers over 
the same period.
    The Committee is concerned about the utilization of 
vouchers in the VASH program. HUD's 2019 point in time count 
indicates that there were 14,345 unsheltered homeless veterans. 
At the same time, there were more than 17,000 unutilized VASH 
vouchers. Further, some individuals are identified as a veteran 
in the point in time count, but are ineligible for a VASH 
voucher. While the VASH program has made significant strides in 
reducing veteran homelessness, HUD and the Department of 
Veterans Affairs (VA) must redouble efforts to improve agency 
coordination.
    In addition to VASH funding, for the first time, the 
Committee is providing $40,000,000 of the Incremental Vouchers 
to Address Homelessness for new vouchers to veterans with 
preference given to public housing authorities (PHAs) that 
demonstrate a strategy to coordinate services that these 
veterans need to become stably housed. These new vouchers will 
complement the VASH vouchers. Between VASH and this new 
funding, a total of $60,000,000 is provided to address veteran 
homelessness, an increase of $20,000,000 over fiscal year 2020. 
In providing these new vouchers, the Committee anticipates that 
HUD can more rapidly house homeless veterans, provide more 
access to all veterans, provide more available vouchers in 
diverse areas, and give the VASH program time to increase case 
manager staffing and improve VASH voucher utilization.
    Domestic violence.--The Committee is also dedicating 
$40,000,000 of the Incremental Vouchers to Address Homelessness 
to address homelessness among survivors of domestic violence, 
dating violence, sexual assault, or stalking. This is the first 
time such resources have been dedicated for this population.
    Vouchers for homeless Native American veterans.--The 
Committee provides $2,500,000 for rental assistance and 
associated administrative costs for the Tribal HUD-VASH program 
to serve Native American veterans who are homeless or at risk 
of homelessness living on or near a reservation, or other 
Indian areas. This program was first funded in fiscal year 
2015, and because of the unique nature of the program, a 
separate renewal line is required. These resources are in 
addition to the VASH appropriations.
    The Committee recognizes that the rural and remote nature 
of many Native communities presents unique barriers to hiring 
and retaining qualified professionals who meet the VA standards 
for case managers. The Committee encourages HUD to continue 
working collaboratively with the VA and Tribal HUD-VASH funding 
recipients to implement their program. In addition, the 
Committee urges HUD to ensure that Tribal HUD-VASH funding 
recipients unable to fully implement their program due to 
challenges hiring and retaining case managers are not treated 
inequitably due to delays, particularly in performance 
evaluations and when applying for continued funding.
    Tenant Protection vouchers.--The Committee provides 
$125,000,000 for Tenant Protection vouchers. The Committee 
rejects proposals included in the budget request to reduce 
public housing, but includes this increase to address 
anticipated closures of certain public housing properties 
unrelated to any reductions proposed by the Administration. In 
its annual notice of funding awards for tenant protection 
vouchers, the Department shall also include each specific 
Property ID and name that experienced a triggering event to 
support each funding award.
    Section 811 Mainstream vouchers.--The Committee provides 
$310,000,000 for Section 811 tenant-based subsidies. This is 
$80,950,000 over the fiscal year 2020 enacted level and 
sufficient to renew previously awarded eligible vouchers.
    Family Unification Program vouchers.--The Committee 
provides $25,000,000 for Family Unification vouchers. This is 
equal to the fiscal year 2020 level to provide housing vouchers 
on demand for at-risk youth who have ``aged out'' of foster 
care.
    Homeless veterans on U.S.-Mexico border.--The Committee 
notes that there are many homeless veterans living on the U.S.-
Mexico border, many of whom have not historically been counted 
in the point in time homeless survey. The Committee directs HUD 
to take action to ensure that VASH vouchers are made available 
to this unique population. The Committee further directs HUD to 
build upon previous work and develop strategies and 
recommendations for addressing and reducing veteran 
homelessness on the U.S.-Mexico border, and to provide a report 
to the House and Senate Committees on Appropriations on its 
efforts not later than 90 days after enactment of this Act.
    Small public housing agencies.--The Committee is aware of 
confusion regarding the definition of ``rural'' as applied to 
small public housing agencies by HUD in implementing P.L. 115-
174. The Committee directs HUD to provide a report to the 
relevant congressional committees not later than 120 days after 
enactment of this Act clarifying what small public housing 
agencies qualify as rural under such law.
    Fair market rents.--The Committee is aware of the concerns 
regarding the data used to calculate fair market rents and 
directs the Department to work with its authorizing 
congressional committees to develop statutory flexibilities for 
operating the voucher program in such a way that vouchers will 
be usable in rapidly rising rental markets. The Committee 
further directs the Department to study the correlation of 
rapidly rising rental markets and areas, defined as high-growth 
by the latest census data, and to explore strategies to avoid 
displacement in these communities.
    Facial recognition.--The Committee is concerned about the 
use of technology which facilitates or otherwise enables an 
automated or semi-automated process to identify an individual 
based on physical characteristics, or logs characteristics of 
an individual's face, head, or body in Federally subsidized 
housing buildings and urges the Department to take into 
consideration possible abuse when evaluating the possible use 
of such technology. The Committee notes the National Institute 
of Standards and Technology's 2019 report, ``Face Recognition 
Vendor Test (FRVT), Part 3: Demographics'', which indicated a 
wide range in accuracy among face recognition algorithms and 
general findings of elevated false-positive identification 
errors among people of color, women, children and the elderly.
    Evictions data.--The Committee directs the Department to 
explore what it would take to collect, analyze, and make 
publicly available data on evictions from all of its Federally-
assisted housing properties, including classes protected under 
the Fair Housing Act, and report to the House and Senate 
Committees on Appropriations on its findings not later than 120 
days after enactment of this Act.
    Homeownership assistance.--The Committee directs HUD to 
report to the House and Senate Committees on Appropriations on 
the impediments and/or barriers of using Section 8 Housing 
Choice Voucher program funding for the purposes of home 
purchase assistance such as down payment assistance and closing 
costs not later than 120 days after enactment of this Act.
    Housing for the reentry population.--The Committee is 
encouraged by the actions that HUD has taken to reduce the 
barriers that the reentry population faces in securing housing. 
Recognizing that a firm foundation including safe and reliable 
housing is a critical part of reducing recidivism, the 
Committee urges HUD to further explore other initiatives to 
reducing barriers.
    Mental health care for foster youth.--The Committee 
recognizes that foster youth are significantly more likely to 
suffer from trauma or Post Traumatic Stress Disorder than their 
peers and, on average, move once to twice a year. Although 
children entering foster care are required to undergo physical 
health assessments, many children do not receive a mental 
health screening. The Committee strongly recommends that the 
Department collaborate with the Department of Health and Human 
Services to identify and support programs that could promote 
mental health screenings for foster youth.
    Administration's ``rent reform'' proposals.--The Committee 
again does not include language implementing any of the 
Administration's ``rent reform'' proposals and funds accounts 
accordingly. The Committee believes these proposals would harm 
America's most vulnerable populations and do nothing to address 
the issues of poverty they face.

                        HOUSING CERTIFICATE FUND

                        (INCLUDING RESCISSIONS)

    The Housing Certificate Fund, until fiscal year 2005, 
provided funding for both the project-based and tenant-based 
components of the Section 8 program. Project-Based Rental 
Assistance and Tenant-Based Rental Assistance are now 
separately funded accounts. The Housing Certificate Fund 
retains balances from previous years' appropriations.

                        COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION

    Language is included to allow unobligated balances from 
specific accounts to renew or amend Project-Based Rental 
Assistance contracts.

                      PUBLIC HOUSING CAPITAL FUND

 
 
 
Appropriation, fiscal year 2020.......................    $2,869,894,000
Budget request, fiscal year 2021......................             - - -
Recommended in the bill...............................     3,180,000,000
Bill compared with:
    Appropriation, fiscal year 2020...................      +310,106,000
    Budget request, fiscal year 2021..................    +3,180,000,000
 

    The Public Housing Capital Fund provides funding for public 
housing capital programs, including public housing development 
and modernization. Examples of capital modernization projects 
include replacing roofs and windows, improving common spaces, 
upgrading electrical and plumbing systems, and renovating the 
interior of an apartment.

                        COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION

    The Committee recommends $3,180,000,000 for the Public 
Housing Capital Fund. The recommendation does not include the 
proposals in the budget request to eliminate this account and 
direct unobligated balances to the Public Housing Operating 
Fund, to provide for competitive grants to demolish public 
housing, and to create a new Moving to Work account. The 
Committee continues to support a significant Federal commitment 
to public housing and rejects multiple proposals included in 
the budget request intended to facilitate a reduction of the 
public housing portfolio.
    Within the amounts provided, the Committee directs that:
          --Up to $23,000,000 is to support the ongoing public 
        housing financial and physical assessment activities of 
        the Real Estate Assessment Center, pilot a new physical 
        inspection process, and implement recommendations made 
        in the March 2019 GAO report (GAO-19-254);
          --Up to $1,000,000 is to support the costs of 
        administrative and judicial receiverships;
          --Not to exceed $74,650,000 is for emergency capital 
        needs, excluding Presidentially-declared disasters. The 
        Committee includes language in the Act to ensure that 
        funds are used only for repairs needed due to an 
        unforeseen and unanticipated emergency event or natural 
        disaster that occurs during fiscal year 2021, or for 
        certain security measures. Of that amount, $20,000,000 
        is for safety and security measures, and $34,650,000 is 
        for public housing agencies under administrative and 
        judicial receiverships or under the control of a 
        Federal monitor;
          --$25,000,000 is for competitive grants to evaluate 
        and reduce lead-based paint hazards;
          --$100,000,000 is for competitive grants for 
        activities under the Healthy Homes Initiative, 
        including addressing carbon monoxide poisoning, mold, 
        and other household hazards;
          --$5,000,000 is for a radon testing demonstration;
          --Up to $30,000,000 is for lead service line 
        replacement grants; and
          --$25,000,000 is for competitive grants to public 
        housing agencies to install automatic sprinkler 
        systems. The Secretary shall collect information on the 
        presence or absence of automatic sprinkler systems in 
        the public housing project and units and shall include 
        such information collection on a sample basis.
    The Committee directs that all PHAs, including those that 
are troubled, substandard, or are under the direction of HUD, a 
monitor, or a court-appointed receiver are eligible for funding 
for competitive grants for automatic sprinkler systems, lead 
service replacement lines, and both lead-based paint hazards 
and activities under the Healthy Homes Initiative. The 
Committee intends that the PHAs with the greatest need will 
have access to the funds. Additionally, the Committee directs 
that HUD consider increasing the amount of individual grants so 
that the scale of the problems can be addressed appropriately.
    Health hazards funding.--Overall, the Committee 
recommendation provides $525,000,000 in resources to improve 
the health and safety of residents living in all types of HUD-
assisted housing. In addition to the $185,000,000 in the Public 
Housing Capital Fund outlined above to address carbon monoxide, 
lead, radon, mold, and fire hazards, the Committee provides 
$340,000,000 in the Office of Lead Hazard Control and Healthy 
Homes to address health hazards in HUD-assisted housing.
    Carbon monoxide poisoning.--The Committee is alarmed at the 
continuing reports of deaths resulting from carbon monoxide 
poisoning in public housing subsidized by the Department. The 
Secretary indicated during the Subcommittee's hearing on HUD's 
budget request on March 4, 2020, that the Department was 
working on a rule. Therefore, the Committee directs the 
Secretary to promulgate a notice of proposed rulemaking not 
later than 6 months after enactment of this Act for the Housing 
Choice Voucher, Multifamily and Public Housing programs to add 
a requirement for functioning carbon monoxide detectors in 
units with fuel-fired/burning appliance(s), and/or an attached 
garage.
    Radon testing demonstration.--As part of the $5,000,000 
competitive grant program provided for the radon testing 
demonstration, the Committee strongly recommends the Department 
consider the results it will obtain from the Radon Testing and 
Mitigation Demonstration Program to determine whether and, if 
so, how diagnostic testing for radon in current public housing 
should be conducted, how installation of radon mitigation 
systems should be conducted if radon is found at levels 
exceeding the Environmental Protection Agency's radon in air 
action level, and whether radon monitoring by credentialed 
professionals should be conducted for radon monitoring on a 
biennial basis in housing units in which radon exceedances were 
found and mitigated. Additionally, the Committee inquired with 
the Department in the first quarter of 2020 who in the 
Department is responsible for radon-related activities and has 
not yet received a response. The Department is directed to 
provide this information to the House and Senate Committees on 
Appropriations not later than ten days after the date of 
enactment of this Act.
    Emergency safety and security.--The Committee directs the 
Department to review the process for awarding the emergency 
safety and security set-aside within the Public Housing Capital 
Fund to ensure that the program is merit-based and takes into 
consideration factors such as the potential for measurable 
crime-reduction and improved public safety in neighborhoods 
adjacent to public housing. The Department is directed to 
provide an update on this review not later than ninety days 
after enactment of this Act.

                     PUBLIC HOUSING OPERATING FUND

 
 
 
Appropriation, fiscal year 2020.......................    $4,549,000,000
Budget request, fiscal year 2021*.....................     4,244,000,000
Recommended in the bill...............................     4,649,000,000
Bill compared with:
    Appropriation, fiscal year 2020...................      +100,000,000
    Budget request, fiscal year 2021..................      +405,000,000
 
*Includes the Public Housing portion of the Administration's separate
  MTW request of $672,000,000.

    The Public Housing Operating Fund subsidizes the costs 
associated with operating and maintaining public housing. This 
subsidy supplements funding received by public housing 
authorities from tenant rent contributions and other income. In 
accordance with section 9 of the United States Housing Act of 
1937, as amended, funds are allocated by formula to public 
housing authorities for the following purposes: utility costs; 
anti-crime and anti-drug activities, including the costs of 
providing adequate security; routine maintenance cost; 
administrative costs; and general operating expenses.

                        COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION

    The Committee recommends $4,649,000,000 for the Federal 
share of PHA operating expenses.
    In addition, the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic 
Security Act (CARES Act) (P.L. 116-136) included $685,000,000 
for the Public Housing Operating Fund account to prevent, 
prepare for, and respond to coronavirus.
    Recycling and Zero Waste Pilot Program.--The Committee 
recognizes the importance of recycling and zero-waste programs 
and supports expanding the availability of these programs in 
public housing. Therefore, the Committee directs the Department 
to create a pilot program that supports recycling and zero-
waste programs in public housing and provides $10,000,000 for 
such a pilot program.
    Quality assurance of physical inspections.--The Committee 
is troubled by reports of deplorable living conditions found in 
some HUD-subsidized properties across the country. The scope of 
this issue spans geographic regions, highlights systemic 
problems, and calls into question the effectiveness of HUD 
oversight, and the Real Estate Assessment Center's (REAC) 
inspections of HUD-assisted housing. The Committee encourages 
the Department to work with the Congress on enforcement 
actions, including assessing civil monetary penalties, that HUD 
can take to ensure PHAs and landlords maintain the physical 
quality of HUD-assisted units. Similarly, while the Committee 
is supportive of efforts to quickly issue tenant-protection 
vouchers, the issuance of these vouchers is a tacit 
acknowledgement that the Department has failed to ensure units 
are maintained as decent, safe, and sanitary. Additionally, 
failure to maintain the physical condition of HUD-assisted 
properties results in a loss of critical affordable housing and 
tenant protection vouchers are of little value to families that 
encounter a lack of affordable housing in their communities. 
The Committee directs the Department to solicit comments from 
stakeholders, including tenants, to identify ways the 
Department can improve its inspection protocols and oversight. 
The Committee will continue to closely monitor the Department's 
efforts and progress and directs the Department to submit to 
the House and Senate Committees on Appropriations not later 
than 60 days after enactment of this Act a report identifying 
how HUD is improving the inspection process and related 
protocols, including quality assurance of inspections, 
identified actions yet to be implemented, the status of actions 
undertaken, and a timeline for completion of all actions.
    Accessibility in public housing.--The Committee directs the 
Department, not later than 180 days after enactment of this 
Act, to submit to the House and Senate Committees on 
Appropriations, the House Committee on Financial Services, and 
the Senate Committee on Banking, Housing, and Urban Affairs a 
report identifying what would be needed to assess the quantity 
of public housing stock nationwide that is compliant with 
Federal accessibility standards, including public housing stock 
built before 1991 as referenced by the Fair Housing Act of 
1991. The report shall include the challenges HUD faces and the 
costs associated with helping PHAs to come into compliance with 
existing fair housing requirements, the costs to make the 
existing public housing portfolio accessible, and how to 
examine opportunities for improving accessibility in public 
housing, including opportunities for cost-savings, 
incorporating engineering best practices for retrofitting 
existing stock, and spurring non-governmental investment.
    Lead assessments in Federally-assisted housing.--The 
Committee continues to believe that, given the significant 
impact lead exposure can have on children and their 
development, there continues to be a need for lead inspection 
standards within Federally-assisted housing, including public 
housing and the Housing Choice Voucher program. The Committee 
believes that the Department has the statutory authority 
necessary to require stringent inspections when checking homes 
for lead paint. Visual lead inspections have proven 
insufficient and more rigorous standards such as requiring risk 
assessments prior to a family moving into a home should be 
considered, where appropriate, to ensure that children living 
in Federally-assisted homes are protected from lead poisoning.
    Public housing located on cemeteries.--The Committee 
directs the Department to survey governmental public housing 
authorities to determine how many PHAs are known to be built on 
cemeteries or historical burial grounds and to report to the 
House and Senate Committees on Appropriations on the results 
not later than one year after enactment of this Act.
    Operating Fund adjustment factors.--The Committee is 
concerned that the Department's current methodology for 
calculating formula income and utility expenses for PHAs does 
not accurately reflect the reality that many PHAs experience 
locally. This is especially true for those PHAs that serve 
large elderly or disabled populations, or operate on a utility 
that is of higher cost than other parts of the country. The 
Committee appreciates that the Department takes seriously the 
concerns raised by PHAs and that HUD is reviewing its data and 
evaluating alternative approaches. The Committee directs the 
Department to report to the House and Senate Committees on 
Appropriations not later than 60 days after enactment of this 
Act on alternative methodologies for calculating PHA formula 
income for purposes of Operating Fund eligibility.

                    CHOICE NEIGHBORHOODS INITIATIVE

 
 
 
Appropriation, fiscal year 2020.......................      $175,000,000
Budget request, fiscal year 2021......................             - - -
Recommended in the bill...............................       250,000,000
Bill compared with:
    Appropriation, fiscal year 2020...................       +75,000,000
    Budget request, fiscal year 2021..................      +250,000,000
 

    The CHOICE Neighborhoods Initiative leverages significant 
public and private dollars to support locally driven strategies 
that address struggling neighborhoods with distressed public or 
HUD-assisted housing through a comprehensive approach to 
neighborhood transformation. The program uses Federal grants to 
help communities transform neighborhoods by revitalizing 
severely distressed public and/or assisted housing and 
catalyzing critical improvements in the neighborhood, including 
vacant property, housing, businesses, services, and schools.

                        COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION

    The Committee recommends $250,000,000 for the CHOICE 
Neighborhoods Initiative program.
    The Committee encourages the Department to give prior year 
planning grant recipients priority consideration when awarding 
implementation grants.

                       SELF-SUFFICIENCY PROGRAMS

 
 
 
Appropriation, fiscal year 2020.......................      $130,000,000
Budget request, fiscal year 2021......................       190,000,000
Recommended in the bill...............................       155,000,000
Bill compared with:
    Appropriation, fiscal year 2020...................       +25,000,000
    Budget request, fiscal year 2021..................       -35,000,000
 

    The Self-Sufficiency Programs account includes several 
programs which help low-income families living in subsidized 
housing enhance job skills, increase earnings, and improve 
their economic security. The Family Self-Sufficiency (FSS) 
program provide grants for FSS coordinators to Public Housing 
Authorities (PHAs) and, with enactment of the Family Self-
Sufficiency Act, has expanded eligibility to residents of 
Project-Based Rental Assistance housing. The Resident 
Opportunity and Self-Sufficiency (ROSS) program funds Service 
Coordinators to work with residents of Public and Indian 
Housing, and the Jobs Plus Initiative provides grants to PHAs, 
which are required to partner with Department of Labor jobs 
centers.

                        COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION

    The Committee recommendation continues the fiscal year 2020 
consolidation of FSS, ROSS, and Jobs Plus into the Self-
Sufficiency Programs (SSP) account and provides a total of 
$155,000,000 for these programs. Previously, ROSS and Jobs Plus 
were funded through the Public Housing Capital Fund, while FSS 
was under its own account. The following table provides funding 
levels for activities under the SSP account:

------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                         Request         Recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Family Self-Sufficiency...........        $90,000,000       $105,000,000
Resident Opportunity and Self-                  - - -         35,000,000
 Sufficiency......................
Jobs Plus.........................        100,000,000         15,000,000
                                   -------------------------------------
    Total.........................        190,000,000        155,000,000
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Expanding economic opportunity through Family Self-
Sufficiency.--The Committee strongly supports FSS, which helps 
low-income families living in HUD-assisted housing access 
economic opportunities that help increase earnings and build 
financial security. FSS is the Federal government's largest 
asset building program for low-income families, and it is 
particularly critical now as a tool to help families recover 
from the economic impact of the COVID-19 pandemic. According to 
a 2018 evaluation of FSS programs in Lynn and Cambridge, MA, 
program participants increased their income by more than 
$10,000 over a five-year period, accrued savings, improved 
credit scores, and reduced debt. The recommendation provides a 
$25,000,000 increase to make the benefits of FSS available to 
an additional 12,500 to 25,000 HUD-assisted households. This 
will fully fund existing grantees as well as between 500 and 
625 new FSS coordinators.
    Expanded FSS eligibility.--The recommendation reflects 
authorizing changes made by the Family Self-Sufficiency Act and 
enacted in Public Law 115-174 (Section 306), which streamline 
FSS program administration and expand the program to residents 
of Project-Based Rental Assistance (PBRA) properties. The 
Committee notes that the Further Consolidated Appropriations 
Act, 2020 (P.L. 116-94) directed the Department to release 
regulations reflecting changes in P.L. 115-174 no later than 90 
days after enactment of that Act, and as of this writing the 
regulation has not been released. The Committee directs the 
Department to release this regulation not more than 15 days 
after enactment of this Act. The Committee directs the 
Department to expand eligibility for new grants in fiscal year 
2021 to owners of PBRA properties.

                        NATIVE AMERICAN PROGRAMS

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

 
 
 
Appropriation, fiscal year 2020.......................      $825,000,000
Budget request, fiscal year 2021......................       600,000,000
Recommended in the bill...............................       835,000,000
Bill compared with:
    Appropriation, fiscal year 2020...................       +10,000,000
    Budget request, fiscal year 2021..................      +235,000,000
 

    The Native American Programs account funds the Native 
American Housing Block Grants and Indian Community Development 
Block Grants programs. The Native American Housing Block Grants 
program, authorized by the Native American Housing Assistance 
and Self-Determination Act of 1996 (NAHASDA), provides funding 
to American Indian tribes and tribally designated housing 
entities (TDHEs) to help address affordable housing needs in 
tribal communities. The Indian Community Development Block 
Grants program, authorized under title I of the Housing and 
Community Development Act of 1974, provides American Indian 
tribes the opportunity to compete for funding to address tribal 
community development needs.

                        COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION

    The Committee recommendation provides $835,000,000 for the 
Native American Programs account. The following table provides 
funding levels for activities within this account.

------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                         Request         Recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Native American Housing Block            $600,000,000       $646,000,000
 Grants--Formula..................
Title VI Loan Program.............              - - -          2,000,000
Native American Housing Block                   - - -        110,000,000
 Grants--Competitive..............
Indian Community Development Block              - - -         70,000,000
 Grants...........................
Training and Technical Assistance.              - - -          7,000,000
                                   -------------------------------------
    Total.........................        600,000,000        835,000,000
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    In addition, the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic 
Security Act (CARES Act) (P.L. 116-136) included $300,000,000 
for Native American Programs, of which no less than 
$200,000,000 was for Native American Housing Block Grants--
Formula and up to $100,000,000 was for Indian Community 
Development Block Grants, to prevent, prepare for, and respond 
to coronavirus.
    A January 2017 report published by HUD confirmed that 
homelessness in tribal areas translates into overcrowded homes, 
finding that between 42,000 and 85,000 Native Americans were 
living with friends or relatives only because they had no place 
of their own and to prevent homelessness. According to the 
report, 33,000 new units are needed in Indian country to 
eliminate overcrowding and another 35,000 new units are needed 
to replace units that are physically inadequate. Recognizing 
this significant need for affordable housing and improving 
living conditions in tribal communities across the nation, the 
Committee recommendation provides $110,000,000 for competitive 
grants to be awarded based on need and administrative capacity 
to recipients eligible under NAHASDA. The Committee notes that 
$1,727,000 in funding appropriated in fiscal year 2017 remains 
available in the section 184 loan guarantee program for the 
construction of rental housing for law enforcement, healthcare, 
educational, technical, and other skilled workers. The 
Committee encourages tribes and TDHEs to consider utilizing 
this support for workforce housing when developing projects for 
competitive grants under the Native American Housing Block 
Grants--Competitive program.
    Formula grant overfunding.--The Native American Housing 
Block Grants--Formula program allocation is based on need as 
measured in part by current assisted housing stock. However, 
housing data used to calculate allocations in any given year 
often contains inaccuracies that are subsequently corrected. 
These data revisions result in some Indian tribes having 
received grants in excess of their accurate formula allocation 
which in turn causes all other Indian tribes to be technically 
underfunded for that same year. To address this recurring 
problem, the Department has in the past recouped prior year 
awards made in excess of eligibility by offsetting current year 
awards. The Committee believes that this practice is within the 
Department's authority. To ensure that the Native American 
Housing Block Grants--Formula program are allocated accurately 
and in accordance with statutory requirements, the Committee 
directs the Department to continue the practice of offsetting 
formula allocations in fiscal year 2021 should it receive data 
indicating that an overpayment occurred, provided the 
Department takes action within 3 years from the date the 
Formula Response Form is sent out. If the Department recoups 
funds from a tribe and a subsequent appeals process determines 
that the funds should not have been recouped, the Committee 
directs the Department to increase the tribe's next funding 
allocation, following the final appeals determination, equal to 
the amount of the improperly recouped funds.
    Training and technical assistance.--The Committee 
recommendation provides $7,000,000 for training and technical 
assistance needs in Indian country to support the Native 
American Housing Block Grants program, the Indian Community 
Development Block Grants program, and other HUD programs in 
order to meet the needs of Native American families and tribal 
communities. The Committee directs HUD to use this funding to 
aid tribes with capacity challenges. The funding should be used 
for training, contract expertise, inspections, and other 
services necessary to address needs identified by tribes. Of 
the total funding provided, no less than $2,000,000 shall be 
awarded to a national organization as authorized by section 703 
of NAHASDA.
    Reservation housing.--The Committee recognizes the 
importance of housing assistance provided as a result of 
NAHASDA and encourages the Department to support efforts by 
tribes to renovate substandard reservation housing. HUD has an 
obligation to ensure that housing in its inventory is 
transferred to Indian tribes, TDHEs, or eligible Native 
American families as expeditiously as possible.
    Coastal tribes.--The Committee understands that several 
coastal tribal communities are actively working to relocate 
homes and other critical infrastructure to higher ground to 
mitigate the impacts of climate change. The Committee 
encourages HUD to prioritize funding and technical assistance 
resources to support these efforts and to encourage the use of 
resilient building and planning practices throughout Indian 
Country.

           INDIAN HOUSING LOAN GUARANTEE FUND PROGRAM ACCOUNT

 
 
 
Appropriation, fiscal year 2020.......................        $1,600,000
Budget request, fiscal year 2021......................         2,000,000
Recommended in the bill...............................         1,600,000
Bill compared with:
    Appropriation, fiscal year 2020...................             - - -
    Budget request, fiscal year 2021..................          -400,000
 

    Section 184 of the Housing and Community Development Act of 
1992 established a loan guarantee program for Native American 
individuals, tribes, and tribally designated housing entities 
to build new housing or purchase existing housing on trust 
land. This program provides access to private financing that 
otherwise might be unavailable because of the unique legal 
status of Indian trust land.

                        COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION

    The Committee recommendation provides $1,600,000 for the 
Indian Housing Loan Guarantee Fund Program Account, of which 
$1,100,000 is for the cost of section 184 guaranteed loans and 
$500,000 is for administrative contract expenses to carry out 
the section 184 loan guarantee program. The Act allows HUD to 
use prior year unobligated balances to support the cost of 
section 184 guaranteed loans. The fiscal year 2021 funding 
combined with the unobligated balances will support a total 
loan volume of $1,000,000,000.

                  NATIVE HAWAIIAN HOUSING BLOCK GRANT

 
 
 
Appropriation, fiscal year 2020.......................        $2,000,000
Budget request, fiscal year 2021......................             - - -
Recommended in the bill...............................         4,000,000
Bill compared with:
    Appropriation, fiscal year 2020...................        +2,000,000
    Budget request, fiscal year 2021..................        +4,000,000
 

    The Hawaiian Homelands Homeownership Act of 2000 created 
the Native Hawaiian Housing Block Grant program to provide 
grants to the State of Hawaii Department of Hawaiian Home Lands 
(DHHL) for housing activities on Hawaiian home lands, in order 
to develop, maintain, and operate affordable housing for 
eligible low-income Native Hawaiian families. As one of the 
United States' indigenous people, Native Hawaiian people have a 
unique relationship with the Federal government.

                        COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION

    The Committee recommendation provides $4,000,000 for the 
Native Hawaiian Housing Block Grant program. The Committee 
encourages the Department to continue to provide technical 
assistance to DHHL in developing and executing plans to meet 
the housing needs of low-income Native Hawaiians.

      NATIVE HAWAIIAN HOUSING LOAN GUARANTEE FUND PROGRAM ACCOUNT

 
 
 
Appropriation, fiscal year 2020.......................             - - -
Budget request, fiscal year 2021......................        -2,000,000
Recommended in the bill...............................             - - -
Bill compared with:
    Appropriation, fiscal year 2020...................             - - -
    Budget request, fiscal year 2021..................        +2,000,000
 

    Section 184A of the Housing and Community Development Act 
of 1992 established a loan guarantee program for Native 
Hawaiian families who are eligible to reside on Hawaiian home 
lands and would otherwise face barriers to acquiring such 
financing because of the unique legal status of the Hawaiian 
home lands.

                        COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION

    The Committee rejects the proposal in the budget request to 
rescind $2,000,000 in unobligated balances from the section 
184A loan guarantee program. The Committee recommendation 
provides no new funding for the program as it continues to 
operate on a negative subsidy basis and has sufficient balances 
of prior year loan guarantee limitation to continue making 
section 184A loans.

                   Community Planning and Development


              HOUSING OPPORTUNITIES FOR PERSONS WITH AIDS

 
 
 
Appropriation, fiscal year 2020.......................      $410,000,000
Budget request, fiscal year 2021......................       330,000,000
Recommended in the bill...............................       430,000,000
Bill compared with:
    Appropriation, fiscal year 2020...................       +20,000,000
    Budget request, fiscal year 2021..................      +100,000,000
 

    The Housing Opportunities for Persons with AIDS (HOPWA) 
program provides states and localities with resources to 
address the housing needs of low-income persons living with 
HIV/AIDS. Stable housing can reduce risky behavior, improve 
adherence to medication, and reduce HIV transmission. Funding 
is distributed primarily by formula to qualifying states and 
metropolitan areas based on the number of individuals living 
with HIV/AIDS reported to the Centers for Disease Control, 
housing costs, and poverty rates. Government grantees are 
required to have a HUD-approved comprehensive plan.

                        COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION

    The Committee recommends $430,000,000 for HOPWA, which is 
sufficient funding to ensure that grantees are held harmless as 
the agency implements HOPWA formula modernization. The 
Committee recommendation includes formula grants and funding 
for the renewal of certain expiring contracts that were 
previously funded under HOPWA competitive grants.
    In addition, the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic 
Security Act (CARES Act) (P.L. 116-136) included $65,000,000 
for the HOPWA program to prevent, prepare for, and respond to 
coronavirus.

                       COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT FUND

 
 
 
Appropriation, fiscal year 2020.......................    $3,425,000,000
Budget request, fiscal year 2021......................             - - -
Recommended in the bill...............................     3,525,000,000
Bill compared with:
    Appropriation, fiscal year 2020...................      +100,000,000
    Budget request, fiscal year 2021..................    +3,525,000,000
 

    The Community Development Fund, authorized by the Housing 
and Community Development Act of 1974 (42 U.S.C. 5301 et seq.), 
provides funding, primarily through Community Development Block 
Grants (CDBG), to State and local governments and other 
eligible entities to carry out community and economic 
development activities.

                        COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION

    The Committee recommends a total of $3,525,000,000 for the 
CDBG formula program for entitlement communities and States.
    Of the amount provided for the CDBG formula programs, 
$7,000,000 is for insular areas, per 42 U.S.C. 5306(a)(2), 
which is the same as the fiscal year 2020 enacted level.
    In addition, the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic 
Security Act (CARES Act) (P.L. 116-136) included $5,000,000,000 
for the Community Development Fund account to prevent, prepare 
for, and respond to coronavirus.
    The recommendation continues language requiring the 
Department to notify grantees of their formula allocation not 
later than 60 days after enactment of this Act.
    Resilience.--The Secretary is directed to continue to 
encourage grantees of the CDBG program to utilize funds for 
activities designed to increase project resilience to harden 
structures to withstand severe weather and other natural 
hazards including flooding, wind, and other hazards identified 
by the Secretary.
    Reinvestment in low- and moderate-income communities.-- The 
Committee reminds both the Department and grantees that a core 
tenet of the CDBG program is the improvement of the living 
environment of low- and moderate-income families. The Committee 
challenges grantees to refocus the level of CDBG investment in 
low- and moderate-income families and neighborhoods. CDBG 
funding is a tool to create equitable, viable, and cohesive 
neighborhoods throughout a jurisdiction. Further, the Committee 
notes that CDBG funding can be used to rebuild and revitalize 
areas affected by civil unrest and urges grantees to consider 
using CDBG funding in these areas.
    Distressed coal communities.--The Committee encourages the 
Department to prioritize technical assistance to assist coal 
communities emerging from the economic downturn and help 
utilize CDBG funds to revitalize those communities.
    Transitional housing for individuals exiting recovery.--The 
Committee recognizes the importance of stable transitional 
living environments for individuals in recovery from substance 
misuse disorder, including opioid addiction, and includes 
$25,000,000 for activities authorized under section 8071 of the 
SUPPORT for Patients and Communities Act. The Committee directs 
HUD to encourage CDBG recipients to provide funding to 
organizations that offer transitional housing opportunities to 
those in recovery, further directs HUD to give special 
consideration to recipients that offer wrap-around services for 
those exiting recovery, and looks forward to receiving HUD's 
guidance on how relevant programs operated.
    Best practices.--The Committee recognizes that the 
flexibility of CDBG is a great asset to bring development to 
communities with diverse needs and assets. The Committee urges 
the Department to conduct trainings on best development 
practices gleaned from success stories from urban areas to 
provide technical expertise to other struggling urban areas on 
how best to invest and leverage these grants. The Committee 
directs the Department to submit a report on these efforts not 
later than 120 days after enactment of this Act.
    Weatherization report.--The Committee recognizes that many 
individuals who would otherwise be eligible for the Department 
of Energy's (DOE) Weatherization Assistance Program (WAP) have 
homes with structural deficiencies--particularly of the roof 
and building envelope--which preclude them from participating. 
Not later than 180 days after enactment of this Act, the 
Department shall issue a report characterizing the deficiencies 
of these homes and the costs to meet the requirements of the 
WAP and any exemplary models across the nation that include 
cooperation with HUD and DOE in improving properties at a 
neighborhood scale and engages residents in apprenticeship 
skills training. The report shall correlate the needs of the 
homes with the demographics of the residents and their 
geographical location with particular attention paid to cities 
eligible for Hardest Hit Funds. The Department is also directed 
to provide technical assistance and educational training 
opportunities to its regional staff and grantees on utilizing 
CDBG or other HUD housing rehabilitation funds, along-side 
complementary weatherization funds from Low Income Home Energy 
Assistance Program (LIHEAP) and DOE. HUD shall instruct 
grantees about the possibilities of a community approach in 
outreach.
    Home modification for aging in place.--The Committee notes 
that cost is often a barrier for senior citizens who wish to 
safely age in the comfort of their own homes. The Committee 
encourages the Department to educate CDBG applicants about the 
benefit of using grants on accessible home modifications. The 
Committee directs the Department to conduct a briefing for the 
Committees on Appropriations of the House and Senate outlining 
what steps the Department has taken to increase availability 
and affordability of aging-friendly home modifications for low- 
and moderate-income seniors not later than 90 days after 
enactment of this Act.
    Responsible financial management.--The Committee is 
troubled by the difficulty the Department continues to have in 
distributing enacted emergency funding to communities affected 
by natural disasters. This difficulty has been demonstrated in 
the Department's inability to publish allocations and other 
administrative guidance for CDBG-DR funding in a timely fashion 
and have been exacerbated by a paternalistic bureaucracy 
imposed by OMB through its statutorily granted apportionment 
authority, an authority which is merely ministerial in nature, 
but has been abused as a policy-making tool, contrary to the 
Congress's intent.
    To assist in expediting the distribution of previously 
enacted emergency funding, the Committee recommendation 
includes a provision to alleviate the administrative burden of 
apportioning funding provided for CDBG-DR in the Further 
Additional Supplemental Appropriations for Disaster Relief 
Requirements Act, 2018, to allow the Department to focus on 
issuing the necessary administrative and programmatic guidance. 
In addition, HUD's OCFO, along with OMB are directed to provide 
reports and briefings to the Committee, not less frequently 
than monthly, on the status of funds appropriated to the 
Community Development Fund in Public Law 115-123. Such 
briefings shall include reports delineating the status of funds 
(including amounts allocated, obligated, and expended, by 
grantee) and the applicable apportionment schedule (including a 
justification and explanation for any funds not available for 
immediate obligation in the current fiscal quarter or otherwise 
subject to any precondition or limitation).

         COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT LOAN GUARANTEES PROGRAM ACCOUNT

------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                         Limitation on
                                  Budget authority      guaranteed loans
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Appropriation, fiscal year                      - - -       $300,000,000
 2020.......................
Budget request, fiscal year                     - - -              - - -
 2021.......................
Recommended in the bill.....                    - - -        300,000,000
Bill compared with:
    Appropriation, fiscal                       - - -              - - -
 year 2020..................
    Budget request, fiscal                      - - -       +300,000,000
 year 2021..................
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    The Section 108 Loan Guarantee program is a source of 
variable and fixed-rate financing for communities undertaking 
projects eligible under the CDBG program.

                        COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION

    The Committee recommendation continues the Section 108 Loan 
Guarantee program as a borrower-paid subsidy program, and 
therefore recommends providing no budget authority, but 
provides a limit on guaranteed loan volume of $300,000,000.

                  HOME INVESTMENT PARTNERSHIPS PROGRAM

 
 
 
Appropriation, fiscal year 2020.......................    $1,350,000,000
Budget request, fiscal year 2021......................             - - -
Recommended in the bill...............................     1,700,000,000
Bill compared with:
    Appropriation, fiscal year 2020...................      +350,000,000
    Budget request, fiscal year 2021..................    +1,700,000,000
 

    The HOME Investment Partnerships Program provides block 
grants to participating jurisdictions (States and units of 
general local government) to undertake activities that expand 
the supply of affordable housing. HOME block grants are 
distributed based on formula allocations. Upon receipt of these 
Federal funds, State and local governments develop a housing 
affordability strategy to acquire, rehabilitate, or construct 
new affordable housing, or to provide rental assistance to 
eligible families.

                        COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION

    The Committee recommends $1,700,000,000 for activities 
funded under this account, an increase of $350,000,000 over 
fiscal year 2020. HOME is the largest Federal block grant to 
State and local governments designed exclusively to create 
affordable housing for low-income households and is therefore a 
crucial tool in the effort to address homelessness in the 
United States. HOME has invested $36,700,000,000 since 1992 to 
help build and preserve about 1.3 million affordable homes and 
to provide direct rental assistance to more than 373,000 
families. This investment has supported more than 656,260 jobs 
and leveraged over $153,000,000,000 in other public and private 
funds.
    Housing shortages near Federal facilities.--The Committee 
encourages the Department and HOME grantees to look for 
opportunities to increase the supply of housing near Federal 
facilities in rural areas, especially those that were opened in 
the last 10 years, if housing shortages exist in those areas.

        SELF-HELP AND ASSISTED HOMEOWNERSHIP OPPORTUNITY PROGRAM

 
 
 
Appropriation, fiscal year 2020.......................       $55,000,000
Budget request, fiscal year 2021......................             - - -
Recommended in the bill...............................        60,000,000
Bill compared with:
    Appropriation, fiscal year 2020...................        +5,000,000
    Budget request, fiscal year 2021..................       +60,000,000
 

    The Self-Help and Assisted Homeownership Opportunity 
Program (SHOP) helps support low-income homeownership by 
providing funding for non-profits that utilize the sweat-equity 
model to build housing for first-time homeowners. Funds are 
distributed through grants to nonprofit organizations and 
consortia that have experience in providing or facilitating 
self-help homeownership opportunities. Grant funds are used for 
land acquisition and improvements associated with developing 
new, quality dwellings for low-income persons, including those 
living in colonias, using the self-help model.

                        COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION

    The Committee recommends $60,000,000 for SHOP. The 
following table provides funding levels for activities within 
this account.

------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                         Request         Recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Self-Help Homeownership...........              - - -        $10,000,000
Opportunity Program Section 4                   - - -         45,000,000
 Capacity Building................
Set-Aside for Rural Capacity                    - - -        [5,000,000]
 Building Activities [non-add]....
National Organizations Rural                    - - -          5,000,000
 Housing Capacity Building
 Activities.......................
                                   -------------------------------------
    Total.........................              - - -         60,000,000
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Section 4 Capacity Building funds are set-aside within this 
account for activities described under section 4(a) of the HUD 
Demonstration Act of 1993 (42 U.S.C. 9816 note). Section 4 
funds are awarded competitively to a limited number of non-
profits, which use the funds to develop the capacity of 
community development corporations (CDCs) and community housing 
development organizations (CHDOs). The CDCs and CHDOs then 
undertake community development and affordable housing 
activities. Section 4 funds must be matched by recipients with 
at least three times the grant amount in private funding.
    Environmental hazards.--Environmental hazards within the 
home can cause a number of adverse health effects including 
asthma, respiratory problems, and lead poisoning. The Committee 
encourages the Department to work with grantees to ensure that 
when rehabilitating existing dwellings, they provide for or 
facilitate the abatement and removal of environmental hazards, 
and ensure that dwellings for which abatement or removal is 
performed are quality dwellings that comply with local building 
and safety codes and standards.

                       HOMELESS ASSISTANCE GRANTS

 
 
 
Appropriation, fiscal year 2020.......................    $2,777,000,000
Budget request, fiscal year 2021......................     2,773,000,000
Recommended in the bill...............................     3,415,000,000
Bill compared with:
    Appropriation, fiscal year 2020...................      +638,000,000
    Budget request, fiscal year 2021..................      +642,000,000
 

    The Homeless Assistance Grants account provides funding for 
programs under title IV of the McKinney Act, as amended by the 
Homeless Emergency Assistance and Rapid Transition to Housing 
(HEARTH) Act of 2009. HEARTH Act programs include the Continuum 
of Care (CoC) competitive grants, the Emergency Solutions 
Grants (ESG) program, and the Rural Housing Stability Grants 
program.

                        COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION

    The Committee recommends $3,415,000,000 for Homeless 
Assistance Grants, to remain available until September 30, 
2023. The following table provides funding levels for 
activities within this account.

------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                         Request         Recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Continuum of Care.................     $2,486,000,000     $2,586,000,000
Emergency Solutions Grants........        280,000,000        290,000,000
Domestic Violence Survivors.......              - - -         75,000,000
Homeless Data Analysis Project....          7,000,000          7,000,000
Youth Homelessness Demonstration..              - - -        162,000,000
    Youth Homeless Projects.......              - - -         82,000,000
    Youth Homelessness Systems                  - - -         70,000,000
     Planning Grants..............
    Technical Assistance for Youth              - - -         10,000,000
     Homelessness.................
Unsheltered Homelessness                        - - -        250,000,000
 Demonstration....................
Eviction prevention services......              - - -         25,000,000
Technical Assistance..............              - - -         20,000,000
                                   -------------------------------------
    Total.........................      2,773,000,000      3,415,000,000
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    The Committee recommendation provides an increase of 
$638,000,000 for Homeless Assistance Grants, including a 
$100,000,000 increase for new CoC grants; a $25,000,000 
increase to provide services for domestic violence survivors; 
an $82,000,000 increase to comprehensively serve homeless youth 
and strengthen the system so every project has the tools to 
provide services for homeless youth; new funding for legal 
assistance for low-income tenants facing eviction; a new 
demonstration project to address unsheltered homelessness; and 
new funding for technical assistance to increase the capacity 
of service providers. Together with a new investment of 
$250,000,000 for vouchers targeted to people currently 
experiencing homelessness, including homeless veterans and 
domestic violence survivors and a $350,000,000 increase for the 
HOME program to increase the supply of affordable housing, this 
Act represents a major step forward in reducing homelessness 
across the nation.
    Addressing the needs of survivors of domestic violence, 
sexual violence, and stalking.--The recommendation includes 
$75,000,000 for rapid re-housing and supportive services 
projects for survivors of domestic violence, sexual assault, 
dating violence, and stalking. The Committee again recommends 
that the Department and CoCs partner with providers, including 
victim service providers, that have experience in delivering 
trauma-specific and culturally appropriate care to survivors.
    Comprehensive approaches to serving homeless youth.-- The 
Committee strongly believes that every CoC must provide safe, 
inclusive and culturally appropriate services for homeless 
youth. To move toward that goal, the recommendation provides 
$162,000,000 to address youth homelessness, including 
$82,000,000 for projects dedicated to providing services to 
homeless youth; up to $70,000,000 for Youth Homelessness 
Systems Planning Grants to support CoC communities in 
modernizing their youth homelessness responses through systems 
change and capacity building; and $10,000,000 for technical 
assistance to help every CoC better serve homeless youth. This 
recommendation is intended to advance best practices learned in 
this demonstration and ease the transition from a demonstration 
program to services provided by all continua of care.
    Unsheltered homelessness.-- The surge in the unsheltered 
homeless population in certain areas of the United States is 
directly correlated with increased housing costs that put 
housing out of reach for low-income Americans. For example, the 
Committee is aware the State of California experienced a 16.4 
percent increase in its homeless population from 2018 to 2019. 
The recommendation includes $250,000,000 for a demonstration 
program to address unsheltered homelessness, targeted to the 
areas with the greatest need. In addition, the Committee 
directs the Secretary to prioritize interventions that will 
reduce unsheltered homelessness in both the CoC and ESG 
programs.
    Eviction prevention.-- More than 6,300 Americans are 
evicted every day--nearly one eviction every four minutes. Low 
income women, especially women of color, are at particularly 
high risk of eviction. Only 10 percent of tenants in eviction 
cases have legal representation, while 90 percent of landlords 
do. The recommendation provides $25,000,000 for competitive 
grants to nonprofit or governmental entities to provide legal 
assistance, including assistance related to pretrial 
activities, trial activities, post-trial activities and 
alternative dispute resolution, at no cost to eligible low-
income tenants at risk of or subject to eviction. The Committee 
also directs the Department to remind grantees that the ESG 
program can be used as a tool to prevent evictions.
    Protecting housing for mixed-status families.--To avoid an 
increase in the numbers of homeless youth, the Committee again 
includes language prohibiting HUD from implementing the 
proposed rule ``Housing and Community Development Act of 1980: 
Verification of Eligible Status'' (Docket No. FR-6124-P-01), 
which the Department's own analysis indicates would threaten 
the housing tenure of thousands of children who are United 
States citizens. The Department's impact analysis also shows 
that the rule would increase HUD costs by $193,000,000 to 
$227,000,000 due to increased subsidies each year and incur 
eviction costs of between $3,300,000 to $4,400,000 to enforce 
the rule. The Committee rejects this and any other proposal 
that would likely increase the number of homeless youth.
    Equal access to homelessness programs.--On June 12, 2020, 
the Department transmitted a draft of the proposed rule 
``Making Admission or Placement Determinations Based on Sex in 
Facilities Under Community Planning and Development Housing 
Programs'' to Congress for review. The Committee has strong 
concerns with the proposed rule. The Supreme Court's June 15, 
2020 ruling in Bostock v. Clayton County, Georgia affirms the 
dignity and bodily integrity of all Americans and prohibits 
employment discrimination ``simply for being homosexual or 
transgender''. Sex-based discrimination cannot be prohibited in 
one arena of public life and sanctioned in another. The 
proposed rule would allow a provider that accepts Federal 
funding to refuse services to transgender individuals who fail 
to conform to their shelter's sex policy and would turn 
homeless service providers into secondary sex characteristics 
evaluators. The Committee rejects this approach. Section 235 
halts the implementation of the proposed rule, and section 236 
restores the 2015 placement guidance.
    In addition, as previously noted, the recommendation 
requires the Department to issue the long overdue report 
required by H. Rept. 114-129 detailing the Department's 
strategy for continuing to ensure that LGBT individuals have 
access to HUD programs for which they are eligible. The 
Department is directed to provide this report within 30 days of 
enactment of this Act, and the amount appropriated for the 
Office of the Secretary will be reduced by $10,000 for each day 
after that deadline that the report has not been submitted to 
the Congress.
    Serving vulnerable youth populations.--The Committee 
recognizes the challenges faced by vulnerable foster youth who 
face significantly higher risks of experiencing homelessness, 
domestic violence, and sex trafficking. The Committee has 
provided funding for the CoC program to take local, community-
driven, and innovative approaches to ending housing insecurity 
and domestic violence. The Committee encourages HUD to 
diligently ensure that the CoC program continues to address all 
populations including vulnerable youth in foster care and youth 
who have aged out of care.
    Housing First.-- Across the nation, homeless service 
providers are using the Housing First approach to address the 
homeless crisis in their communities. The Committee strongly 
supports Housing First, which promotes better outcomes for 
those experiencing homelessness, including improved medical and 
behavioral health and lower rates of substance misuse, as well 
as reduced costs to taxpayers related to emergency health care, 
police, and incarceration services. Housing First allows people 
who have experienced homelessness to take advantage of 
available supportive services, which means people are less 
likely to drop out of the system and more likely to 
expeditiously address their problems and rebuild their lives, 
thus improving outcomes for clients and reducing costs for 
taxpayers. The Housing First approach has enjoyed strong 
bipartisan support since its adoption by the George W. Bush 
Administration. Housing First principles, which are the 
foundation for the permanent supportive housing and rapid re-
housing programs funded through HUD's Homeless Assistance 
Grants, are also the foundation of the HUD-VASH and Supportive 
Services for Veterans Families programs that have achieved 
significant reductions in veteran homelessness. Thus, the 
recommendation again includes language that requires the 
Department to use the criteria specified in the 2018 notice of 
funding availability (NOFA) when administering homeless 
assistance grants programs. HUD's fiscal year 2018 NOFA 
provides a framework that prioritizes permanent housing first, 
while allowing for the strategic use of transitional housing 
for targeted populations.
    Emergency preparedness.--The Committee is concerned about 
homeless service providers who require immediate resources 
during a public health crisis, such as the coronavirus-19 
pandemic, to serve the homeless population, many of whom have 
serious underlying health conditions. The Committee directs the 
Secretary to share best practices from grantees that can enable 
homeless shelters to better respond to future public health 
crises. Best practices could include how to address staff 
shortages, sanitize equipment, create additional beds, or 
establish locations for self-quarantining. The Committee 
directs the Secretary to submit this report no later than a 
year after enactment of this Act and to make it available to 
grantees and the public.
    Annual Homeless Assessment Report (AHAR) to Congress.--The 
Committee is concerned that the AHAR does not include data on 
homelessness in U.S. territories. The Committee encourages the 
Department to collect and publish homelessness estimates for 
these jurisdictions in forthcoming versions of the AHAR to the 
greatest extent possible. The Committee also urges the 
Department to work with grantees to improve data quality, 
providing technical assistance if necessary.
    Aging homeless population.--The Committee is concerned 
about the aging homeless population, and the vulnerability of 
seniors experiencing housing instability. The Committee directs 
the Department, within 120 days of enactment of this Act, to 
share best practices on how to serve this population, including 
analysis on gaps in services and recommendations for Federal 
support in addressing housing need, personal care services, 
home health, and transportation.
    Prioritizing local needs.--The Committee recognizes that 
local communities are best able to determine the housing and 
service needs of different local homeless populations, 
including youth, families, veterans, persons with disabilities, 
and others, and may wish to prioritize activities targeted to 
populations for which they identify the greatest local gaps. 
The Committee encourages the Department to honor communities' 
local priorities and assessments of need.
    Tiny homes.--The Department has made great efforts to find 
housing for the homeless, including homeless veterans. However, 
HUD has not tested the concept of awarding grants to eligible 
entities to purchase and construct rural, single unit, tiny 
homes for homeless individuals. This approach could provide a 
pathway to stable housing for the homeless, including homeless 
veterans. The Committee directs the Department to outline the 
legislative changes required to establish such a program on a 
pilot basis and the feasibility and estimated cost of the 
concept. The report with the aforementioned items should be 
provided to the House Financial Services Committee, Senate 
Committee on Banking, Housing, and Urban Affairs, the House and 
Senate Veterans Affairs Committees, and House and Senate 
Appropriations Committees no later than 60 days after enactment 
of this Act.
    Mental illness.--The Committee recognizes that there is a 
correlation between homelessness and untreated mental 
illnesses. The recommendation includes language directing the 
Secretary to provide incentives to create projects that 
coordinate with housing providers and healthcare organizations 
to provide permanent supportive housing and rapid rehousing 
services.

                            Housing Programs


                    PROJECT-BASED RENTAL ASSISTANCE

 
 
 
Appropriation, fiscal year 2020.......................   $12,570,000,000
Budget request, fiscal year 2021......................    12,642,000,000
Recommended in the bill...............................    13,451,000,000
Bill compared with:
    Appropriation, fiscal year 2020...................      +881,000,000
    Budget request, fiscal year 2021..................      +809,000,000
 

    The Project-Based Rental Assistance (PBRA) account provides 
a rental subsidy to private landlords tied to a specific 
housing unit so that the properties themselves, rather than the 
individual living in the unit, remain subsidized. PBRA provides 
safe, stable, and affordable housing to approximately 1.2 
million households each year. Amounts provided in this account 
include funding for the renewal of expiring project-based 
contracts, including Section 8, moderate rehabilitation, and 
single room occupancy contracts, amendments to Section 8 
project-based contracts, and administrative costs for contract 
administration.

                        COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION

    The Committee provides a total of $13,451,000,000 for the 
annual renewals and amendments of project-based contracts. This 
includes $400,000,000 provided as advance appropriations and 
$350,000,000 for performance-based contract administrators. The 
Committee rejects the ``rental reforms'' proposed in the 
Administration's budget request.
    In addition, the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic 
Security Act (CARES Act) (P.L. 116-136) included $1,000,000,000 
for PBRA to prevent, prepare for, and respond to coronavirus.
    Performance-Based Contract Administrators (PBCAs).--The 
Department suspended PBCA management and occupancy reviews from 
2011 to 2016 in response to litigation filed against the 
Department over the procurement process. The Committee is 
troubled by the findings in an Office of Inspector General 
(OIG) report indicating that this suspension resulted in owners 
not meeting contract requirements and HUD incurring more than 
$5,600,000 in questionable costs. Furthermore, the Department's 
lack of monitoring resulted in ongoing compliance issues which 
have resulted in the physical deterioration of some properties 
and put the health and safety of residents at risk. The 
Committee directs the Department to report to the House and 
Senate Committees on Appropriations not later than 90 days 
after enactment of this Act on the steps HUD has taken to 
implement the recommendations detailed in the OIG Audit Report 
Number 2020-FW-0001.
    The OIG report demonstrates the important role PBCAs play 
in providing oversight and ensuring the safety of residents. 
The Committee reiterates its concern about the Department's 
PBCA solicitation procedures, which have resulted in 
litigation, and due to the contract structure have increased 
costs and created the potential for excessive profits. The 
Committee is aware that HUD is working to develop a new 
solicitation for PBCA contracts that takes into account 
decisions by the Federal Circuit and Court of Appeals, complies 
with the Competition in Contracting Act, and meets requirements 
under the Federal Acquisition Regulations. The Committee 
reiterates that it is HUD's responsibility to implement a new 
competition and award procedure that includes stakeholder 
comments, full and open competition, and is compliant with all 
Federal laws and regulatory requirements.
    Reimbursement delays.--The Committee is aware of 
reimbursement delays to PHAs which have converted housing units 
under the Rental Assistance Demonstration program to be funded 
through PBRA. While the Committee understands that HUD's 
Multifamily division continues to work with PHAs, delays in 
reimbursements can stymie the work and planning of PHAs. 
Accordingly, the Committee directs that, not later than 120 
days after enactment of this Act, the Department provide a 
report to the House and Senate Committees on Appropriations 
with the following information for each PHA experiencing late 
payments: PHA name; property name; the date the PHA's first 
voucher submission was due; the actual date of the most recent 
voucher submission; the most recent voucher amount; the number 
of submitted and unpaid vouchers, including the number of days 
a reimbursement is overdue; the total amount of submitted and 
unpaid vouchers; and the date when PHAs should expect 
reimbursement to be issued.

                        HOUSING FOR THE ELDERLY

 
 
 
Appropriation, fiscal year 2020.......................      $793,000,000
Budget request, fiscal year 2021......................       853,000,000
Recommended in the bill...............................       893,000,000
Bill compared with:
    Appropriation, fiscal year 2020...................      +100,000,000
    Budget request, fiscal year 2021..................       +40,000,000
 

    The Housing for the Elderly (Section 202) program provides 
eligible private, non-profit organizations with capital grants 
to finance the acquisition, rehabilitation, or construction of 
housing intended for low-income, elderly people. In addition, 
the program provides project-based rental assistance contracts 
(PRAC) to support operational costs for units constructed under 
the program.

                        COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION

    The Committee provides $893,000,000 for Housing for the 
Elderly, which will fully fund contract renewals and 
amendments. Of the total amount, $110,000,000 is provided for 
new construction of affordable senior housing, including up to 
$10,000,000 for intergenerational housing; up to $110,000,000 
shall be directed to service coordinators and the continuation 
of congregate services grants to provide supportive services 
for frail residents; and $14,000,000 is provided to extend the 
Integrated Wellness in Supportive Housing (IWISH) supportive 
services demonstration for two years. The Committee rejects the 
``rental reforms'' proposed in the budget request.
    In addition, the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic 
Security Act (CARES Act) (P.L. 116-136) included $50,000,000 
for Housing for the Elderly to prevent, prepare for, and 
respond to coronavirus.
    Investments in new construction.--In fiscal years 2018, 
2019, and 2020, the Committee provided a total of $246,000,000 
in funding for new capital construction to address the acute 
shortage of affordable housing for seniors. After a significant 
amount of time for planning, the Committee is pleased that in 
February 2020 the Department announced an initial round of 18 
awards for a total of $51,647,750, which will result in an 
estimated 1,100 units for very low-income seniors. However, a 
significant portion of funds have yet to be made available by 
HUD. The Committee directs the Department to make all remaining 
funding provided in fiscal years 2018, 2019, and 2020, and the 
$110,000,000 in funding provided in this Act, available not 
later than 60 days after enactment of this Act, and to award 
this funding not later than 180 days after enactment of this 
Act.
    Continuation of IWISH demonstration.--HUD is currently 
implementing the IWISH demonstration program, a randomized 
controlled trial on the impact of an enhanced service 
coordination model on healthcare utilization and continued 
independent living among seniors in assisted housing. HUD and 
the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) are working 
together to aggregate data for this demonstration, which is due 
to expire on September 30, 2020. The Committee provides 
$14,000,000 to extend the IWISH demonstration for two years, 
allowing for collection of additional data, which will 
significantly strengthen the reliability of the research 
findings on the well-being of older low-income tenants. The 
Committee directs the Department to continue collaborating with 
HHS, and specifically the Administration for Community Living, 
as HUD evaluates the effectiveness of IWISH, including its 
potential for expansion and cost-savings implications for the 
healthcare system. The Committee further directs the Department 
to provide an interim evaluation to the House and Senate 
Committees on Appropriations not later than 90 days after 
enactment of this Act.
    Intergenerational housing.--The recommendation provides up 
to $10,000,000 to expand the supply of intergenerational 
dwelling units for elderly caregivers raising children, as 
described in the Living Equitably: Grandparents Aiding Children 
and Youth (LEGACY) Act (P.L. 108-186).
    Project Rental Assistance properties.--The Committee is 
aware of the challenges in converting Section 202 Project 
Rental Assistance properties through the Rental Assistance 
Demonstration in high cost areas. The Department is directed to 
brief the House and Senate Committees on Appropriations not 
later than 160 days after enactment of this Act on what changes 
(and accompanying costs) to the program would enable 
conversions in these instances.

                 HOUSING FOR PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES

 
 
 
Appropriation, fiscal year 2020.......................      $202,000,000
Budget request, fiscal year 2021......................       252,000,000
Recommended in the bill...............................       227,000,000
Bill compared with:
    Appropriation, fiscal year 2020...................       +25,000,000
    Budget request, fiscal year 2021..................       -25,000,000
 

    The Housing for Persons with Disabilities (Section 811) 
program provides eligible private, non-profit organizations 
with capital grants to finance the acquisition, rehabilitation 
or construction of supportive housing for disabled persons and 
provides project-based rental assistance (PRAC) to support 
operational costs for such units.

                        COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION

    The Committee provides $227,000,000 for Section 811 
activities, which will fully fund project rental assistance and 
project assistant contract renewals and amendments, to remain 
available until September 30, 2024. The recommendation also 
includes $52,000,000 for new capital advances and project 
rental assistance contracts to increase the availability of 
affordable housing for persons with disabilities. The Committee 
rejects ``rental reforms'' proposed in the budget request.
    In addition, the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic 
Security Act (CARES Act) (P.L. 116-136) included $15,000,000 
for Housing for Persons with Disabilities to prevent, prepare 
for, and respond to coronavirus.
    Investments in new construction.--The Committee 
recommendation includes $52,000,000 for new capital advances 
and project rental assistance contracts to increase the 
availability of affordable housing for persons with 
disabilities. From fiscal years 2018-2020, the Committee 
provided a total of $152,700,000 for capital advances and 
project rental assistance contracts. Thus far, the Department 
has issued Notices of Funding Availability (NOFA) for 
$112,000,000, but final awards have not been made. The 
Committee directs the Department to make all remaining funding 
provided in fiscal years 2018, 2019, 2020, and funding provided 
in this Act, available not later than 60 days after enactment 
of this Act, and to award that funding not later than 180 days 
after enactment of this Act.
    Importance of supportive services.--In House Report 116-
106, the Committee directed the Department to provide a report 
on vacancy rates and waiting lists (by State), how 811-funded 
projects are partnering with service providers including State 
health and human services departments and Medicaid agencies to 
provide access to community-based supportive services, and 
recommendations to ensure that necessary supportive services 
for tenants are provided in all units. The Committee looks 
forward to receiving this report and directs the Department to 
provide it to the House and Senate Committees on Appropriations 
not later than 50 days after enactment of this Act.
    Capital advances demonstration.--The Committee is aware of 
the substantial demand for Section 811 properties and that 
individuals with mental disabilities must have access to wrap-
around services to be successful and avoid more costly 
institutionalized care. The Committee directs the Secretary to 
include in fiscal year 2021 awards for new Capital Advances a 
competitively selected demonstration of up to 100 units that 
will include funding service coordination to supplement the 
necessary community-based and property-provided services and 
the coordination of employment opportunities. The demonstration 
shall measure the outcomes related to general well-being, 
health and healthcare utilization of persons with mental health 
disabilities; analyze the effectiveness of coordination related 
to the increased access to support services and employment 
opportunities; and recommendations regarding future models for 
assistance, including a strategy to work with State 
governments.

                     HOUSING COUNSELING ASSISTANCE

 
 
 
Appropriation, fiscal year 2020.......................       $53,000,000
Budget request, fiscal year 2021......................        45,000,000
Recommended in the bill...............................        75,000,000
Bill compared with:
    Appropriation, fiscal year 2020...................       +22,000,000
    Budget request, fiscal year 2021..................       +30,000,000
 

    The Housing Counseling Assistance program, authorized under 
Section 106 of the Housing and Urban Development Act of 1968, 
works with a nationwide network of housing counseling agencies 
and counselors to provide tools to current and prospective 
homeowners and renters so that they can make responsible 
choices to address their housing needs. Housing counseling 
services range from addressing homelessness and preventing 
foreclosures and evictions to planning for first-time home 
purchases. Housing counselors also provide assistance to 
victims of natural disasters.

                        COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION

    The Committee recommends $75,000,000 for Housing Counseling 
Assistance, to remain available until September 30, 2022. The 
Committee retains language that provides two-year funding 
availability, requires the Department to make grants not later 
than 180 days after enactment, and allows multi-year 
agreements.
    Addressing the economic impact of the coronavirus 
pandemic.--The Committee recognizes that as a result of the 
Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, housing 
counselors have experienced a significant increase in demand 
from consumers in need of services, in particular for rental 
assistance, foreclosure and eviction prevention, and reverse 
mortgage counseling. The bill provides funding to increase 
capacity to meet this demand and allows funds to be used to 
purchase equipment or technology to ensure services can be 
provided to consumers through electronic or virtual means in 
response to the COVID-19 pandemic.
    Housing counselor certification.--The Committee is aware of 
the August 1, 2020 statutory deadline requiring that counseling 
services provided by the Department be provided by a HUD 
certified housing counselor. The Committee strongly supports 
this requirement, which is essential to ensuring consumers 
receive high quality services from a trained professional. The 
Committee is aware that the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic may 
impact the ability of counselors to prepare for and complete 
the required exam and directs the Department to ensure that 
certification trainings and exams can proceed with as little 
delay as possible. The Committee further directs HUD to provide 
technical assistance and flexibility to housing counseling 
organizations, if necessary, and to keep the Committee informed 
of any necessary actions that may be required in light of the 
COVID-19 pandemic.
    Real estate fraud.--The Committee recommends the Department 
encourage housing counseling agencies to include education 
warnings about the risk of real estate wire fraud and steps 
buyers should take to protect themselves. The Committee also 
recommends the Department require the Office of Housing 
Counseling to develop brochures and flyers for Housing 
Counseling agencies to distribute to counseling clients and to 
group education participants.

            PAYMENT TO MANUFACTURED HOUSING FEES TRUST FUND

 
 
 
Appropriation, fiscal year 2020.......................       $13,000,000
Budget request, fiscal year 2021......................        14,000,000
Recommended in the bill...............................        13,000,000
Bill compared with:
    Appropriation, fiscal year 2020...................             - - -
    Budget request, fiscal year 2021..................        -1,000,000
 

    The Office of Manufactured Housing Programs (OMHP) 
establishes and enforces Federal standards for the design and 
construction of manufactured homes to assure quality, 
durability, safety, and affordability. All manufactured homes 
are required to meet the Federal standards and fees are charged 
to producers to cover the costs of administering the program.

                        COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION

    The Committee is deeply disappointed by the OMHP's 
unwillingness or inability to finalize a rule related to State 
Administrative Agencies, who partner with OMHP to regulate and 
enforce the Federal manufactured housing program. The Committee 
provided $1,000,000 above the President's budget request in 
fiscal 2020 in anticipation of a final rule and is disheartened 
that these funds will not be used for their intended purpose 
during the intended time. The Committee directs the OMHP to 
make meaningful progress towards a final rulemaking in an 
expeditious manner and to provide a written update to the House 
and Senate Committees on Appropriations on its progress every 
30 days until the final rule is issued.

                     Federal Housing Administration


               MUTUAL MORTGAGE INSURANCE PROGRAM ACCOUNT

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                           Limitation of      Limitation of      Administrative
                                                            direct loans     guaranteed loans  contract expenses
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Appropriation, fiscal year 2020........................         $1,000,000   $400,000,000,000       $130,000,000
Budget request, fiscal year 2021.......................          1,000,000    400,000,000,000        130,000,000
Recommended in the bill................................          1,000,000    400,000,000,000        130,000,000
Bill compared with:
    Appropriation, fiscal year 2020....................              - - -              - - -              - - -
    Budget request, fiscal year 2021...................              - - -              - - -              - - -
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    The Federal Housing Administration (FHA) provides mortgage 
insurance for the purchase, refinance, and rehabilitation of 
single-family homes. FHA mortgage insurance is designed to 
encourage lenders to make credit available to borrowers whom 
the conventional market perceives as bearing more risk, 
including first-time homebuyers, minorities, lower-income 
families, and residents of underserved areas (central cities 
and rural areas).

                        COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION

    FHA loan limits.--The Committee encourages HUD to use the 
highest possible median house price to calculate FHA loan 
limits for Metropolitan Statistical Areas (MSA) that 
experienced a drop in FHA loan limits of 20 percent or more 
when the Housing Economic Recovery Act went into effect. To 
qualify, MSAs must be at least 1,300 square miles or more in 
land area.
    Reports on distressed assets.--The disposition of defaulted 
FHA-held single family and multifamily mortgages is coordinated 
by the FHA's Office of Asset Sales with the goal of reducing 
the number and impact of distressed houses on communities 
across the country and keeping families in their homes. 
Understanding whether the FHA is achieving this goal depends on 
accurate and timely data on not only the terms of sale of the 
distressed assets, but their effect of these sales on the 
neighborhood. The Committee encourages the FHA to continue to 
publish regularly its report on Post Sale Results, to increase 
the participation of qualified non-profits and local government 
entities, and to undertake a longitudinal study of the post-
sale neighborhood outcomes of the FHA's auction strategies.
    Small dollar loans.--Not later than one year after 
enactment of this Act, the Secretary shall submit to the House 
and Senate Committees on Appropriations a review of its FHA 
single-family mortgage insurance policies, practices, and 
products to identify any barriers or impediments to supporting, 
facilitating, and making available mortgage insurance for 
mortgages having an original principal obligation of $70,000 or 
less. This review shall include a description of findings, 
administrative actions that the Department can take to remove 
barriers and impediments to providing mortgage insurance for 
such sized mortgages, and the individual and cumulative effect 
of such actions on the solvency of the Mutual Mortgage 
Insurance Fund (MMI Fund). Further, in its Annual Report to 
Congress regarding the status of the FHA's MMI Fund, HUD shall 
include the number and percent of small dollar mortgages backed 
by the Federal Housing Administration as compared to the 
overall mortgage market.
    Manufactured home loans.--The Committee encourages the 
Department to recognize that the terms and conditions for 
conventional home financing are not necessarily applicable to 
mortgages for manufactured home loans in its policy and loan 
guidance.

                GENERAL AND SPECIAL RISK PROGRAM ACCOUNT

------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                      Limitation of      Limitation of
                                       direct loans     guaranteed loans
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Appropriation, fiscal year 2020...         $1,000,000    $30,000,000,000
Budget request, fiscal year 2021..          1,000,000     30,000,000,000
Recommended in the bill...........          1,000,000     30,000,000,000
Bill compared with:
    Appropriation, fiscal year                  - - -              - - -
 2020.............................
    Budget request, fiscal year                 - - -              - - -
 2021.............................
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    The FHA general insurance and special risk insurance (GI 
and SRI) program account includes 17 different programs 
administered by FHA. The GI fund includes a wide variety of 
insurance programs for special-purpose single and multifamily 
loans, including loans for property improvements, manufactured 
housing, multifamily rental housing, condominiums, housing for 
the elderly, hospitals, group practice facilities, and nursing 
homes. The SRI fund includes insurance programs for mortgages 
in older, declining urban areas that would not be otherwise 
eligible for insurance, mortgages with interest reduction 
payments, and mortgages for experimental housing and for high-
risk mortgagors who would not normally be eligible for mortgage 
insurance without housing counseling.

                Government National Mortgage Association


GUARANTEES OF MORTGAGE-BACKED SECURITIES LOAN GUARANTEE PROGRAM ACCOUNT

------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                      Limitation of      Administrative
                                     guaranteed loans  contract expenses
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Appropriation, fiscal year 2020...   $550,000,000,000        $30,500,000
Budget request, fiscal year 2021..    550,000,000,000         31,479,000
Recommended in the bill...........  1,500,000,000,000         55,500,000
Bill compared with:
    Appropriation, fiscal year       +950,000,000,000        +25,000,000
 2020.............................
    Budget request, fiscal year      +950,000,000,000        +24,021,000
 2021.............................
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Government National Mortgage Association guarantees the 
timely payment of principal and interest on mortgage-backed 
securities issued by private institutions such as mortgage 
companies and banks. The only loans in these privately issued 
securities are mortgages either issued or guaranteed by the 
Federal Housing Administration, the United States Department of 
Veterans Affairs, and the United States Department of 
Agriculture.

                    Policy Development and Research


                        RESEARCH AND TECHNOLOGY

 
 
 
Appropriation, fiscal year 2020.......................       $98,000,000
Budget request, fiscal year 2021......................        94,650,000
Recommended in the bill...............................       118,000,000
Bill compared with:
    Appropriation, fiscal year 2020...................       +20,000,000
    Budget request, fiscal year 2021..................       +23,350,000
 

    Title V of the Housing and Urban Development Act of 1970, 
as amended, directs the Secretary to undertake programs of 
research, evaluation, and reports relating to the Department's 
mission and programs. These functions are carried out 
internally and through grants and contracts with industry, non-
profit research organizations, educational institutions, and 
through agreements with State and local governments and other 
Federal agencies. The research programs seek ways to improve 
the efficiency, effectiveness, and equity of HUD programs and 
to identify methods to achieve cost reductions. This 
appropriation is used to support HUD evaluation and monitoring 
activities and to conduct housing surveys. Finally, funds under 
this heading are used to support technical assistance 
activities to the various States, communities, and agencies 
that are charged with administering HUD's programs and funds.

                        COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION

    The Committee recommends $118,000,000 for this account.
    Of the activities proposed in the budget request, the 
Committee recommends up to $65,000,000 for the core research 
programs; including market surveys, research support and 
dissemination, data acquisition, housing finance studies, 
research partnerships, housing technology, and $10,000,000 for 
cooperative agreements and research partnerships with 
Historically Black Colleges and Universities.
    The Committee recommends up to $22,000,000 for new and 
continuing studies and demonstration evaluations, including 
the:
           Collaboration with the Department of Health 
        and Human Services to review existing programs and 
        identify programmatic areas that could better 
        prioritize or promote on-site childcare supportive 
        services for HUD-assisted families, and make 
        recommendations,
           Qualitative study of how publicly available 
        data on rental property health and safety violations 
        impact landlord and renter behavior,
           Feasibility study to explore how to collect 
        different local policies related to evictions and a 
        statistical effort relating to the creation of an 
        evictions database, including how information is 
        collected, consistent with civil rights protections, to 
        understand eviction trends by classes protected under 
        the Fair Housing Act,
           Unsheltered homelessness,
           Emergency Solutions Grants--CARES Act 
        expansion and eviction prevention study,
           Effectiveness of disaster recovery funding,
           Opportunity Zones research,
           Integrated Wellness in Supportive Housing 
        (IWISH) evaluation extension,
           MTW expansion,
           First-Time Home Buyer Education and 
        Counseling Demonstration: COVID-19 follow-up, and
           Pay for Success-Permanent Supportive Housing 
        Evaluation.
    The recommendation does not include additional funding for 
the Envision Center technical assistance funded in fiscal year 
2019 and directs the Department to provide a briefing and 
report to the House and Senate Committees on Appropriations on 
the outcomes from fiscal years 2019 and 2020 funding before 
seeking additional resources.
    Further, the Committee's recommendation includes 
$31,000,000 for all technical assistance. Of the funds made 
available under technical assistance, $5,000,000 shall be 
available on a competitive basis to non-profit or private 
sector organizations to provide technical assistance to units 
of general local government or non-profit organizations that 
serve counties or census tracts that have had 20 percent or 
more of the population living in poverty as measured by the 
1990 and 2000 decennial census and the most recent five-year 
data series available from the American Community Survey of the 
Census Bureau, and any territory or possession of the United 
States.
    As in prior years, the Committee includes a provision in 
this Act prohibiting funds from being used for a doctoral 
dissertation research grant program. The Committee also 
includes a general provision in Title II of this Act that 
allows the Department to use prior year deobligated or 
unexpended funds made available to the Office of Policy 
Development and Research for other research and evaluations. 
The Committee provides this authority under the condition that 
any new obligations are subject to the regular reprogramming 
procedures outlined in section 405 of this Act.

                  Fair Housing and Equal Opportunities


                        FAIR HOUSING ACTIVITIES

 
 
 
Appropriation, fiscal year 2020.......................       $70,300,000
Budget request, fiscal year 2021......................        65,300,000
Recommended in the bill...............................        80,300,000
Bill compared with:
    Appropriation, fiscal year 2020...................       +10,000,000
    Budget request, fiscal year 2021..................       +15,000,000
 

    The Office of Fair Housing and Equal Opportunity (OFHEO) is 
responsible for implementation and enforcement of the Fair 
Housing Act, Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, Section 
109 of the Housing and Community Development Act of 1974, 
Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, Titles II and 
III of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, the 
Architectural Barriers Act of 1968, the Age Discrimination Act 
of 1975, Title IX of the Education Amendments Act of 1972, and 
Section 3 of the Housing and Urban Development Act of 1968.
    OFHEO is responsible for the enforcement, administration, 
development, and public understanding of federal fair housing 
policies and laws. OFHEO manages fair housing grants, 
investigates discrimination complaints, conducts civil rights 
compliance reviews, and ensures civil rights protections are 
included in HUD programs, with the overall goal of preventing 
housing discrimination.

                        COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION

    The Committee recommends $80,300,000 for the Office of Fair 
Housing and Equal Opportunity. The following table provides the 
funding for various fair housing activities undertaken by the 
office:

------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                         Request         Recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Fair Housing Assistance Program           $23,900,000        $27,000,000
 (FHAP)...........................
Fair Housing Initiative Program            39,600,000         51,450,000
 (FHIP)...........................
Limited English Proficiency                   300,000            350,000
 Initiative.......................
National Fair Housing Training              1,500,000          1,500,000
 Academy..........................
                                   -------------------------------------
    Total.........................         65,300,000         80,300,000
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Of the funds provided for FHIP, not less than $8,000,000 is 
for education and outreach programs, and not less than $900,000 
is for Fair Housing Organization Initiatives.
    In addition, the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic 
Security Act (CARES Act) (P.L. 116-136) included $2,500,000 for 
the OFHEO to prevent, prepare for, and respond to coronavirus.
    FHIP grant disbursements.--FHIP grants provide critical 
funding for fair housing entities which play a crucial role in 
rooting out instances of discrimination and streamlining the 
complaint process at HUD and in state and federal courts. After 
ongoing delays in executing FHIP grants--fiscal year 2019 
grants were not awarded until March 2020--the Further 
Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2020 (P.L. 116-94) required 
that fiscal year 2020 grants be awarded not later than 180 days 
after enactment of the Act. The Department missed that deadline 
by two days. The Committee is concerned that the failure to 
administer these grants in a timely manner threatens the 
integrity of the program and stymies enforcement of the Fair 
Housing Act. The Committee again requires that fiscal year 2021 
grants be awarded not later than 180 days after enactment of 
this Act. In addition, the Committee directs the Department to, 
not later than 30 days after enactment of this Act, provide the 
House and Senate Committees on Appropriations with a detailed 
plan and timeline to more swiftly implement the program for 
fiscal year 2021.
    Transfers from OFHEO.--To improve the administration of 
this program and the timeliness of grantmaking, P.L. 116-94 
included $2,000,000 in additional salaries and expenses 
resources for OFHEO, yet the Department transferred that 
funding to the Office of the Chief Financial Officer. The 
Committee is troubled that this action undermined a 
Congressional priority--ensuring access to fair housing--and 
the recommendation prohibits all transfers out of OFHEO, as 
well as the Office of Lead Hazard Control and Healthy Homes, 
and the Office of the Departmental Equal Employment 
Opportunity.
    Disparate impact rule.--The Committee is dismayed by policy 
decisions from the Department that indicate a shift away from 
enforcing the Fair Housing Act of 1968, or Title VIII of P.L. 
90-284. The Committee believes that the changes proposed in 
2019 to the disparate impact rule are inconsistent with decades 
of case law and that the current disparate impact regulation is 
consistent with the disparate impact analysis outlined in the 
Supreme Court's decision in Texas Dept. of Housing and 
Community Affairs v. Inclusive Communities Project, Inc. The 
Committee believes the proposed changes will create nearly 
insurmountable barriers to addressing systemic causes of 
discrimination by making it almost impossible for plaintiffs 
who believe they have identified a disparate impact in housing 
policy to make a successful claim. These actions represent a 
fundamental abandonment of our obligations under the Fair 
Housing Act. The Committee directs the Secretary to provide the 
House and Senate Committees on Appropriations not later than 
120 days after enactment of this Act a report on the data 
utilized to justify the proposed disparate impact rule change. 
Further, the Committee directs the Department, not later than 
120 days after enactment of this Act, to collect and analyze 
data that estimates the financial impact of the exemption of 
insurance providers from disparate impact liability on housing 
providers who accept Section 8 vouchers or otherwise 
participate in federally subsidized housing programs, such as 
increased premiums and denial of insurance coverage.
    Fair housing report.--The Committee is concerned that the 
OFHEO is inadequately staffed to resolve complaints of 
discrimination and find justice for families who become 
homeless or destabilized. The Committee directs the Department 
to include a comprehensive report on the disposition of housing 
discrimination complaints in the Secretary's annual fair 
housing report to Congress (42 U.S.C. 3608(e)(2)). This report 
should provide the following data for HUD and FHAP 
jurisdictions: the total number of complaints filed, pending 
and resolved in the last fiscal year and an analysis of whether 
the complaint was based on race, religion, sex, national 
origin, familial status (families with children under the age 
of 18), and/or disability. The report should also include an 
analysis of the average wait times from when a complaint is 
filed to when it is resolved, disaggregated by State, county, 
and protected basis.
    Discrimination against individuals with disabilities.--The 
Committee reminds the Department of the directive included in 
House Report 116-106 to develop educational materials for 
individuals with disabilities and for housing providers 
regarding fair housing rights and obligations, including 
appropriate policies and practices when dealing with 
individuals with mental illnesses and intellectual or 
developmental disabilities. These materials should also assist 
individuals with disabilities who are leaving institutional or 
segregated settings by informing them of their legal rights, 
how to recognize discrimination, and what actions to take when 
faced with discrimination. The Committee directs the Department 
to complete these materials not later than 90 days after 
enactment of this Act.

            Office of Lead Hazard Control and Healthy Homes


                         LEAD HAZARD REDUCTION

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

 
 
 
Appropriation, fiscal year 2020.......................      $290,000,000
Budget request, fiscal year 2021......................       360,000,000
Recommended in the bill...............................       340,000,000
Bill compared with:
    Appropriation, fiscal year 2020...................       +50,000,000
    Budget request, fiscal year 2021..................       -20,000,000
 

    The Office of Lead Hazard Control and Healthy Homes 
(OLHCHH) is responsible for the administration of the Lead-
Based Paint Hazard Reduction program authorized by Title X of 
the Housing and Community Development Act of 1992. Through the 
Healthy Homes Initiative, the office also addresses multiple 
housing-related hazards affecting the health of residents, 
particularly children. The office develops lead-based paint 
regulations, guidelines, and policies applicable to HUD 
programs, and enforces the Lead Disclosure Rule issued under 
Title X. For both lead-related and healthy homes issues, the 
office designs and administers programs for grants, training, 
research, demonstration, and education.

                        COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION

    The Committee recommendation includes $340,000,000 for the 
OLHCHH. Of this amount, the Committee provides $70,000,000 for 
the Healthy Homes Initiative and directs the Department to fund 
activities aimed at reducing incidences of asthma, mold, pests, 
and radon. The recommendation also includes $30,000,000 for a 
Housing Choice Voucher Lead Risk Assessment Demonstration and 
allows $2,000,000 to be transferred from the OLHCHH to Policy 
Development and Research for research and studies.
    Health hazards in public housing.--Overall, this 
recommendation provides $525,000,000 in resources to improve 
the health and safety of residents living in all types of HUD-
assisted housing. This includes the funding provided in OLHCHH 
as well as $170,000,000 provided in the Public Housing Capital 
Fund to address health hazards such as lead, mold, carbon 
monoxide, and radon in public housing. The Committee rejects 
the President's budget request to eliminate the Public Housing 
Capital Fund and transfer responsibility for addressing health 
hazards in public housing into OLHCHH.
    Radon testing.-- Radon is a radioactive gas that is created 
by natural processes underground and is the second-leading 
cause of lung cancer across the country. The Committee reminds 
the Department that Healthy Homes funds may be used to address 
radon. Funding to address radon and other health hazards in 
public housing are included in the Public Housing Capital Fund.
    Coordination with weatherization activities.--The Committee 
directs that of the funds provided for the Healthy Homes 
Initiative, $5,000,000 be used for pilot projects in up to five 
communities that are served by both the Healthy Homes 
Initiative and the Department of Energy Weatherization 
Assistance Program (WAP). The Committee directs that grantees 
under this pilot coordinate Healthy Homes and WAP activities 
and the Department's evaluation should assess whether that 
coordination leads to better outcomes and cost savings in 
improving the safety and quality of homes. The Committee 
directs that the evaluation shall be provided to the House and 
Senate Committees on Appropriations and be made available to 
grantees and the public.
    Lead in drinking water.--The Committee encourages the 
Secretary to work in coordination with the Environmental 
Protection Agency (EPA) on the EPA's programs to mitigate 
sources of lead exposure from water from the public water 
supply, ambient air, and industrial emissions. The Committee 
provides $30,000,000 in the Public Housing Capital Fund for a 
pilot program for water pipe replacement in public housing 
properties where there is a companion program to replace 
municipal lead service lines.
    Housing Choice Voucher (HCV) Lead Risk Assessment 
Demonstration.-- According to the National Housing Law Project, 
more than 90,000 children in the HCV program have lead 
poisoning and an additional 340,000 children living in 
federally subsidized housing are at risk. The Committee notes 
the value of the OLHCHH as a tool to eliminate childhood lead 
poisoning. Lead risk assessments are essential in halting 
exposure to lead-based paint hazards, which has a devastating 
long-term impact on children's health. The Committee recognizes 
the need for increased lead inspection standards within 
federally assisted housing, including public housing and 
project-based assisted units occupied by a child under age 6. 
The Department continues to assert that it does not have the 
statutory authority to require more than a visual lead 
assessment in HCV housing units, and those limited actions are 
only required when a child under age 6 resides or is expected 
to reside in the unit. The Committee provides $30,000,000 for a 
HCV Lead Risk Assessment Demonstration and directs HUD to 
provide the House and Senate Committees on Appropriations with 
a report on the implementation and findings of this 
demonstration, including whether public housing agencies can 
effectively incorporate a lead risk assessment or a lead hazard 
screen into the HCV units' Housing Quality Standards inspection 
process while preserving rental housing availability and 
affordability.

             Cybersecurity and Information Technology Fund


                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

 
 
 
Appropriation, fiscal year 2020.......................      $280,000,000
Budget request, fiscal year 2021......................       257,600,000
Recommended in the bill...............................       293,000,000
Bill compared with
    Appropriation, fiscal year 2020...................       +13,000,000
    Budget request, fiscal year 2021..................       +35,400,000
 

    The Cybersecurity and Information Technology (CIT) Fund 
finances the information technology (IT) systems that support 
departmental programs and operations, including mortgage 
insurance, housing assistance and grant programs, as well as 
core financial and general operations. More importantly, the 
CIT prevents breaches into HUD's information technology 
systems, which contain personal identifiable information, 
sensitive financial data, and data exchanges with financial 
institutions.

                        COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION

    Federal Housing Administration (FHA) single-family IT.--For 
the third consecutive year, the Committee is investing 
$20,000,000 in the FHA single-family IT modernization project. 
However, the GAO has repeatedly reported to Congress that HUD 
has shortcomings in its IT management capability. For the FHA 
single-family IT modernization project, the Committee directs 
the Department to submit an update every two months to the 
House and Senate Committees on Appropriations comparing the 
planned and actual project development performance, including 
an explanation for any variance and corresponding corrective 
actions. The Committee further directs the GAO to evaluate 
these updates and brief the Committees not later than 30 days 
after the update is submitted.
    IT investment.--In its top management challenges report, 
the HUD OIG identified IT as a significant risk to the 
Department's ability to accomplish its mission. The 
Department's IT systems are outdated and incompatible with 
current technology, making them susceptible to failure and 
breach. The depth and breadth of these issues requires a 
multiyear investment and strategy. To address these issues, the 
Committee provides $35,400,000 above the request for migrating 
and retiring the remaining 15 COBOL-based legacy systems; 
streamlining, modernizing, and consolidating grant management 
systems, including the disaster grant system; and developing 
and deploying the Office of Native American Programs Loan 
Origination System. In addition, the Committee urges the 
Department of Housing and Urban Development to maintain an 
accurate inventory of Information Technology assets, especially 
to protect Personally Identifiable Information of Americans.
    Performance plan.--That not more than 10 percent of the 
funds made available under this heading for development, 
modernization and enhancement may be obligated until the 
Secretary submits to the House and Senate Committees on 
Appropriations, for approval, a performance plan that--(A) 
identifies for each modernization project: (i) the functional 
and performance capabilities to be delivered by date, (ii) the 
estimated incremental costs associated and the estimated 
cumulative costs by deliverable date, and (iii) the estimated 
life-cycle cost; and (B) demonstrates that each modernization 
project is: (i) compliant with the Department's enterprise 
architecture, (ii) being managed in accordance with applicable 
life-cycle management policies and guidance, (iii) subject to 
the Department's capital planning and investment control 
requirements, and (iv) supported by an adequately staffed 
project office.
    After the initial performance plan is submitted, the 
Department shall provide written updates at two-month intervals 
comparing the initial plan against actual performance. These 
updates should explain the reasons for any variance between 
what was planned and what is accomplished and should also 
explain the actions that will or have been taken to ensure that 
the Department's performance is in line with its plan.

                      Office of Inspector General


 
 
 
Appropriation, fiscal year 2020.......................      $138,200,000
Budget request, fiscal year 2021......................       133,300,000
Recommended in the bill...............................       145,514,000
Bill compared with:
    Appropriation, fiscal year 2020...................        +7,314,000
    Budget request, fiscal year 2021..................       +12,214,000
 

    The Office of Inspector General (OIG) provides agency-wide 
audit and investigative functions to identify and correct 
management and administrative deficiencies that create 
conditions for waste, fraud, and mismanagement. The audit 
function provides internal audit, contract audit, and 
inspection services. Contract audits provide professional 
advice to agency contracting officials on accounting and 
financial matters relative to negotiation, award, 
administration, re-pricing, and settlement of contracts. 
Internal audits evaluate all facets of agency operations. 
Inspection services provide detailed technical evaluations of 
agency operations. The investigative function provides for the 
detection and investigation of improper and illegal activities 
involving programs, personnel, and operations.

                        COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION

    The Committee recommends $145,514,000 for the Office of 
Inspector General.
    The Committee recognizes the importance of the OIG's role 
in safeguarding against waste and fraud and upholding HUD as a 
principled and financially sound agency and therefore provides 
the OIG with funding for external audits. The congressionally 
mandated and self-initiated reports and investigations 
undertaken by the OIG continue to be extremely helpful to the 
Committee.
    CARES Act oversight.-- The Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and 
Economic Security Act (CARES Act) (P.L. 116-136) included 
$5,000,000 for the Office of Inspector General to conduct 
audits and investigations of projects and activities carried 
out by the Department of Housing and Urban Development to 
prevent, prepare for, and respond to coronavirus. The Committee 
directs the OIG to provide an assessment of HUD's use, 
accounting, and reporting of CARES Act funding to the House and 
Senate Committees on Appropriations no later than 120 days 
after enactment of this Act and at intervals thereafter as the 
OIG deems appropriate.

    General Provisions--Department of Housing and Urban Development


                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

                        (INCLUDING RESCISSIONS)

    Section 201 splits overpayments evenly between Treasury and 
State HFAs.
    Section 202 prohibits funds from being used to investigate 
or prosecute lawful activities under the Fair Housing Act.
    Section 203 requires any grant or cooperative agreement to 
be made on a competitive basis, unless otherwise provided, in 
accordance with Section 102 of the Department of Housing and 
Urban Development Reform Act of 1989.
    Section 204 relates to the availability of funds for 
services and facilities for GSEs and others subject to the 
Government Corporation Control Act and the Housing Act of 1950.
    Section 205 prohibits the use of funds in excess of the 
budget estimates, unless provided otherwise.
    Section 206 relates to the expenditure of funds for 
corporations and agencies subject to the Government Corporation 
Control Act.
    Section 207 requires the Secretary to provide quarterly 
reports on uncommitted, unobligated, recaptured, and excess 
funds in each departmental program and activity.
    Section 208 exempts GNMA from certain requirements of the 
Federal Credit Reform Act of 1990.
    Section 209 authorizes HUD to transfer debt and use 
agreements from an obsolete project to a viable project, 
provided that no additional costs are incurred and other 
conditions are met.
    Section 210 sets forth requirements for Section 8 voucher 
assistance eligibility, and includes consideration for persons 
with disabilities.
    Section 211 distributes Native American Housing Block 
Grants to the same Native Alaskan recipients as in fiscal year 
2005.
    Section 212 instructs HUD on managing and disposing of any 
multifamily property that is owned or held by HUD.
    Section 213 allows PHAs that own and operate 400 or fewer 
units of public housing to be exempt from asset management 
requirements.
    Section 214 restricts the Secretary from imposing any 
requirements or guidelines relating to asset management that 
restrict or limit the use of capital funds for central office 
costs, up to the limits established in law.
    Section 215 requires that no employee of the Department 
shall be designated as an allotment holder unless the CFO 
determines that such employee has received certain training.
    Section 216 requires the Secretary to publish all notices 
of funding availability that are competitively awarded on the 
internet for fiscal year 2021.
    Section 217 requires attorney fees for programmatic 
litigation to be paid from the individual program office and 
Office of General Counsel salaries and expenses appropriations.
    Section 218 allows the Secretary to transfer up to 10 
percent of funds or $5,000,000, whichever is less, appropriated 
under the headings ``Administrative Support Offices'' or 
``Program Offices'' to any other office funded under such 
headings with certain exceptions.
    Section 219 requires HUD to take certain actions against 
owners receiving rental subsidies that do not maintain safe 
properties.
    Section 220 places a salary and bonus limit on public 
housing agency officials and employees.
    Section 221 requires the Secretary to notify the House and 
Senate Committees on Appropriations at least 3 full business 
days before grant awards are announced.
    Section 222 prohibits funds to be used to require or 
enforce the Physical Needs Assessment (PNA).
    Section 223 prohibits funds for HUD financing of mortgages 
for properties that have been subject to eminent domain.
    Section 224 prohibits the use of funds to terminate the 
status of a unit of general local government as a metropolitan 
city with respect to grants under section 106 of the Housing 
and Community Development Act of 1974.
    Section 225 allows funding for research, evaluation, and 
statistical purposes that is unexpended at the time of 
completion of the contract, grant, or cooperative agreement to 
be reobligated for additional research.
    Section 226 authorizes the Secretary on a limited basis to 
use funds available under the ``Homeless Assistance Grants'' 
heading to participate in the multiagency performance 
partnership pilots program for fiscal year 2021.
    Section 227 allows program income as an eligible match for 
continuum of care funds.
    Section 228 permits HUD to provide one year transition 
grants under the continuum of care program.
    Section 229 prohibits the use of funds to direct a grantee 
to undertake specific changes to existing zoning laws as part 
of carrying out the final rule entitled, ``Affirmatively 
Furthering Fair Housing'' or the notice entitled, 
``Affirmatively Further Fair Housing Assessment Tool''.
    Section 230 maintains current promise zone designations and 
agreements.
    Section 231 prohibits funds from being used to establish 
review criteria, including rating factors or preference points, 
for competitive grants programs for envision center 
participation or coordination.
    Section 232 prohibits funds from being used to make changes 
to the Annual Contributions Contract that was in effect on 
December 31, 2017.
    Section 233 addresses the establishment of reserves for 
public housing agencies designated as Moving to Work agencies.
    Section 234 prohibits funds from being used to make certain 
eligibility limitations as part of a notice of funding 
availability for competitive grant awards under the Public 
Housing Capital Fund.
    Section 235 prohibits funds in this or any other Act from 
being used to implement, administer, enforce, or in any way 
make effective the proposed rule entitled the ``Making 
Admission or Placement Determinations Based on Sex in 
Facilities Under Community Planning and Development Housing 
Programs.''
    Section 236 codifies the sub-regulatory guidance issued by 
the Department of Housing and Urban Development on February 20, 
2015, entitled ``Appropriate Placement for Transgender Persons 
in Single-Sex Emergency Shelters and Other Facilities.''
    Section 237 prohibits funds from being used to implement, 
administer, enforce, or in any way make effective the proposed 
rule entitled ``Housing and Community Development Act of 1980: 
Verification of Eligible Status'', issued by the Department on 
May 10, 2019 (Docket No. FR-6124-P-01), or any final rule based 
substantively on such proposed rule.
    Section 238 rescinds all remaining balances from the Rental 
Housing Assistance account.
    Section 239 allows for certain funding provided in Public 
Law 113-2 to be used to liquidate valid obligations through 
September 30, 2025 and specifies conditions for certain 
waivers.

                      TITLE III--RELATED AGENCIES


                              Access Board


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

 
 
 
Appropriation, fiscal year 2020.......................        $9,200,000
Budget request, fiscal year 2021......................         9,200,000
Recommended in the bill...............................         9,200,000
Bill compared with:
    Appropriation, fiscal year 2020...................             - - -
    Budget request, fiscal year 2021..................             - - -
 

    The United States Access Board (Access Board) was 
established by section 502 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 
with the mission of promoting equality for people with 
disabilities through accessible design and the development of 
accessibility guidelines and standards for the built 
environment, transportation, communication, medical diagnostic 
equipment, and information technology.
    The Access Board is responsible for developing guidelines 
under the Americans with Disabilities Act, the Architectural 
Barriers Act, and the Communications Act, as well as for 
developing standards under the Rehabilitation Act for 
accessible electronic and information technology used by 
Federal agencies. The Access Board enforces the Architectural 
Barriers Act and provides training and technical assistance on 
its guidelines and standards. The Access Board serves on the 
Election Assistance Commission's Board of Advisors and 
Technical Guidelines Development Committee to assist in 
developing voluntary guidelines for voting systems, including 
accessibility for people with disabilities. Additionally, the 
Board maintains a small research program that develops 
technical assistance materials and provides information needed 
for rulemaking.

                        COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION

    The Committee recommends $9,200,000 for the operations of 
the Access Board.

                      Federal Maritime Commission


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

 
 
 
Appropriation, fiscal year 2020.......................       $28,000,000
Budget request, fiscal year 2021......................        28,900,000
Recommended in the bill...............................        29,800,000
Bill compared with:
    Appropriation, fiscal year 2020...................        +1,800,000
    Budget request, fiscal year 2021..................          +900,000
 

    Established in 1961, the Federal Maritime Commission (FMC) 
is an independent agency, responsible for the regulation of 
oceanborne transportation in the foreign commerce of the United 
States. The FMC monitors ocean common carriers, marine terminal 
operators, conferences, ports, and ocean transportation 
intermediaries to ensure they maintain just and reasonable 
practices. Among other activities, the FMC also maintains a 
trade monitoring and enforcement program, monitors the laws and 
practices of foreign governments and their impacts on shipping 
conditions in the U.S., and enforces special regulatory 
requirements as they apply to controlled carriers.
    The principal shipping statutes administered by the FMC are 
the Shipping Act of 1984 (46 U.S.C. 40101-41309), the Foreign 
Shipping Practices Act of 1988 (46 U.S.C. 42301-42307), section 
19 of the Merchant Marine Act, 1920 (46 U.S.C. 42101-42109), 
sections 2 and 3 of Public Law 89-777 (46 U.S.C. 44101-44106), 
and section 834 of the Frank LoBiondo Coast Guard Authorization 
Act of 2018 (P.L. 115-282).

                        COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION

    The Committee recommendation provides $29,800,000 for the 
FMC. Of the total funds provided, up to $553,744 is available 
for the Office of Inspector General.
    The Committee provides $900,000 above the budget request to 
support the hiring of at least 5 full-time equivalents. The 
Committee directs the FMC to inform the House and Senate 
Committees on Appropriations no later than 30 days after 
enactment of this Act of its hiring plans for these additional 
resources.

                National Railroad Passenger Corporation


                      Office of Inspector General


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

 
 
 
Appropriation, fiscal year 2020.......................       $24,274,000
Budget request, fiscal year 2021......................        26,248,000
Recommended in the bill...............................        26,248,000
Bill compared with:
    Appropriation, fiscal year 2020...................        +1,974,000
    Budget request, fiscal year 2021..................             - - -
 

    The Office of Inspector General (OIG) is an independent, 
objective unit responsible for detecting and preventing fraud, 
waste, abuse, and violations of law and for promoting 
efficiencies and effectiveness at Amtrak.

                        COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION

    The Committee recommendation provides $26,248,000 for the 
OIG. The recommendation will allow the OIG to undertake audits, 
evaluations, and investigations and will ensure effective 
oversight of Amtrak's programs and operations. The OIG's 
efforts have resulted in valuable reports and recommendations 
for the Committee and for Amtrak that have yielded cost savings 
and management improvements.
    CARES Act oversight.--The Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and 
Economic Security Act (CARES Act) (P.L. 116-136) provided 
$1,018,000,000 for Amtrak to prevent, prepare for, and respond 
to coronavirus. The Committee recognizes the need for 
independent and objective oversight of Amtrak's implementation 
of the CARES Act funding, and appreciates the OIG's engagement 
memorandum of April 16, 2020, announcing its intent to monitor 
and assess Amtrak's administration of the CARES Act funding and 
any other emergency appropriations Amtrak may receive in 
response to the coronavirus pandemic. The Committee directs the 
OIG to provide an assessment of Amtrak's use, accounting, and 
reporting of the CARES Act funding to the House and Senate 
Committees on Appropriations no later than 120 days after 
enactment of this Act and at intervals thereafter as the OIG 
deems appropriate.

                  National Transportation Safety Board


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

 
 
 
Appropriation, fiscal year 2020.......................      $110,400,000
Budget request, fiscal year 2021......................       116,400,000
Recommended in the bill...............................       118,400,000
Bill compared with:
    Appropriation, fiscal year 2020...................        +8,000,000
    Budget request, fiscal year 2021..................        +2,000,000
 

    The National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) is an 
independent Federal agency charged by Congress with 
investigating every civil aviation accident in the United 
States, as well as significant accidents in other modes of 
transportation--including railroad, highway, marine and 
pipeline--and issuing safety recommendations aimed at 
preventing future accidents.
    In addition to its investigatory duties, the NTSB is 
responsible for maintaining the government's database of civil 
aviation accidents and conducting special studies of 
transportation safety issues of national significance. 
Furthermore, in accordance with the provisions of international 
treaties, the NTSB supplies investigators to serve as U.S. 
Accredited Representatives for aviation accidents overseas 
involving U.S.-registered aircraft, or involving aircraft or 
major components of U.S. manufacture. The NTSB also serves as 
the court of appeals for any airman, mechanic or mariner 
whenever certificate action is taken by the Administrator of 
the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) or the U.S. Coast 
Guard Commandant, or when civil penalties are assessed by the 
FAA. In addition, the NTSB operates the NTSB Academy in 
Ashburn, Virginia.

                        COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION

    The Committee recommends $118,400,000 for the salaries and 
expenses of the NTSB.
    Most Wanted List.--The Committee notes that the U.S. 
Government Accountability Office (GAO) recently found in GAO-
20-395 that the NTSB could improve transparency in the 
selection of the annual Most Wanted List. The Committee 
encourages the NTSB to comply with the recommendations 
contained in this GAO report.
    Merrimack Valley.--The Committee commends the NTSB and its 
investigators for their outstanding work in producing the 
accident report on the September 13, 2018 Merrimack Valley, 
Massachusetts gas explosions. Moreover, the Committee commends 
the NTSB Chairman for meeting directly with families affected 
by the gas explosions following the report's release.

                 Neighborhood Reinvestment Corporation


          PAYMENT TO THE NEIGHBORHOOD REINVESTMENT CORPORATION

 
 
 
Appropriation, fiscal year 2020.......................      $158,500,000
Budget request, fiscal year 2021......................        27,400,000
Recommended in the bill...............................       208,500,000
Bill compared with:
    Appropriation, fiscal year 2020...................       +50,000,000
    Budget request, fiscal year 2021..................      +181,100,000
 

    The Neighborhood Reinvestment Corporation (NRC) was created 
by the Neighborhood Reinvestment Corporation Act (title VI of 
the Housing and Community Development Amendments of 1978). The 
NRC now operates under the trade name ``NeighborWorks America'' 
and helps local communities establish working partnerships 
between residents and representatives of the public and private 
sectors. These partnership-based organizations are independent, 
tax-exempt, community-based non-profit entities, often referred 
to as NeighborWorks organizations.

                        COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $208,500,000, 
of which $5,000,000 shall be for a multi-family rental housing 
program and $25,000,000 shall be for a competitive grant 
program to carry out neighborhood revitalization support 
activities in areas with concentrations of abandoned or 
distressed properties. The Committee directs that the NRC brief 
the House and Senate Committees on Appropriations, the House 
Committee on Financial Services, and the Senate Committee on 
Banking, Housing, and Urban Affairs on its proposed competition 
guidelines no later than 180 days after enactment of this Act.
    Aging in place.--Due to the rising costs of long-term care 
and societal changes, the Committee continues to support aging 
in place programs that modify and improve older homes so that 
seniors may safely live in those homes for a longer period as 
they age. The Committee continues to encourage the NRC to 
continue to support training, counseling, and programs that 
assist seniors in sustainable aging in place and to identify 
the conflux of older housing stock, older-population states, 
and, in particular, older-population regions within those 
states and to invest robustly in those regions with aging in 
place housing programs.

                      Surface Transportation Board


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

 
 
 
Appropriation, fiscal year 2020.......................       $37,100,000
Budget request, fiscal year 2021......................        37,500,000
Recommended in the bill...............................        37,500,000
Bill compared with:
    Appropriation, fiscal year 2020...................          +400,000
    Budget request, fiscal year 2021..................             - - -
 

    The Surface Transportation Board (STB) was created by the 
ICC Termination Act of 1995 (P.L. 104-88) and is the successor 
agency to the Interstate Commerce Commission. The STB is an 
economic regulatory and adjudicatory body charged by the 
Congress with resolving railroad rate and service disputes and 
reviewing proposed railroad mergers, and the regulation of 
other surface transportation carriers, including the intercity 
bus industry and surface pipeline carriers, and household-good 
carriers. The Surface Transportation Board Reauthorization Act 
of 2015 (P.L. 114-110) established the STB as a wholly 
independent agency.

                        COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION

    The Committee recommendation provides an appropriation of 
$37,500,000 for the STB. The STB is estimated to collect 
$1,250,000 in fees, which will offset the appropriation for a 
total program cost of $36,250,000.
    Cost-benefit analysis.--In March 2019, a petition was filed 
with the STB to institute a rulemaking to adopt procedural 
rules that would require a cost-benefit analysis in certain 
future STB rulemaking proceedings. In response, the STB 
reviewed the practices at other agencies, including independent 
agencies that, like the STB, are not statutorily required to 
have cost-benefit analysis procedural rules. In November 2019, 
the STB issued a solicitation of information to request 
comments from stakeholders on whether and how particular cost-
benefit analysis approaches might be more formally integrated 
into the STB's rulemaking process. The Committee understands 
that there is significant interest in this matter. The 
Committee encourages the STB to thoroughly review and consider 
all comments received in response to the solicitation of 
information. If the STB decides to adopt a cost-benefit 
analysis procedure for significant rulemakings, then the 
Committee encourages the STB to request additional resources, 
as necessary, to ensure the STB has the staffing and expertise 
to undertake such cost-benefit analyses.
    Water carriers.--The STB has jurisdiction over water 
carriers operating in U.S. non-contiguous domestic water 
transportation, including rate review regulation. To better 
understand the STB's role and actions relating to water 
carriers, the Committee directs the Government Accountability 
Office (GAO) to examine the STB's regulatory authorities and 
past and current actions by the STB utilizing its regulatory 
authorities in relation to carriers in U.S. non-contiguous 
domestic water transportation and to assess whether the 
principles and processes the STB has established for 
determining the reasonableness of railroad rates could be 
applied to determining the reasonableness of rates established 
by carriers in U.S. non-contiguous domestic water 
transportation. The Committee directs GAO to report its 
findings and recommendations to the House and Senate Committees 
on Appropriations no later than 18 months after enactment of 
this Act.

           United States Interagency Council on Homelessness


                           OPERATING EXPENSES

 
 
 
Appropriation, fiscal year 2020.......................        $3,800,000
Budget request, fiscal year 2021......................         3,800,000
Recommended in the bill...............................         3,800,000
Bill compared with:
    Appropriation, fiscal year 2020...................             - - -
    Budget request, fiscal year 2021..................             - - -
 

    The mission of the United States Interagency Council on 
Homelessness (USICH) is to coordinate multi-agency Federal 
response to homelessness.

                        COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION

    The Committee recommends $3,800,000 for continued 
operations of the United States Interagency Council on 
Homelessness. The recommendation places a limitation on the 
amount of funds that may be used for travel by the Executive 
Director.
    Housing First.--The Committee reiterates its support for 
the Housing First approach to addressing homelessness. Housing 
First promotes better outcomes for those experiencing 
homelessness, including improved medical and behavioral health 
and lower rates of substance misuse, as well as reduced costs 
to taxpayers related to emergency health care, police, and 
incarceration services. The Committee recommendation prohibits 
funds from being spent to promote homelessness interventions 
unless those interventions include support for evidence-based 
interventions such as the Housing First model.
    Management concerns and GAO report.--The Committee is 
profoundly concerned with the current management of the USICH. 
The Committee reminds the USICH that it is required to comply 
with provisions of title IV in this Act, which includes 
providing the Committee with its operating plan not less than 
60 days after the date of enactment of this Act. The Further 
Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2020 (P.L. 116-94) was enacted 
on December 20, 2019, however, the USICH did not provide the 
Committee with its operating plan until March 11, 2020, 22 days 
after the required date of February 18, 2020, and then only 
upon request by the Committee.
    Further, section 405 of title IV of the Further 
Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2020 requires the USICH to 
obtain approval from the House and Senate Committees on 
Appropriations before it reprograms funds and reorganizes or 
restructures offices. The Committee is concerned that the USICH 
has reorganized personnel and significantly reduced the 
function of the policy team without seeking or receiving 
Committee approval as required by section 405. The Committee 
directs the USICH to comply with title IV of this Act and to 
brief the House and Senate Committees on Appropriations not 
later than 30 days after the enactment of this Act on its plan 
to comply with these provisions in fiscal year 2021.
    Additionally, the Committee is disturbed that the USICH 
inexplicably removed its strategic plan, Home, Together: The 
Federal Strategic Plan to Prevent and End Homelessness (Home, 
Together), from its web site, along with other resources 
related to this plan. Home, Together was adopted by a vote of 
the Council members in April 2018 and released in July 2018, 
and laid out a plan to address homelessness for fiscal years 
2018-2022. The Committee directs the USICH to brief the House 
and Senate Committees on Appropriations on its work to develop 
a new strategic plan not later than 30 days after the enactment 
of this Act.
    Further, the Committee directs the Government 
Accountability Office (GAO) to review the USICH's existing 
policies, procedures, and processes used to ensure compliance 
with the funding conditions and reporting requirements in 
Public Law 116-94 during fiscal year 2020 and to perform its 
statutory duties and functions in furtherance of its statutory 
mission, including the duties and functions related to Home, 
Together. The GAO shall consult with the House and Senate 
Committees on Appropriations on the scope of the report and 
shall report the results of its review to the Committees not 
later than one year after the enactment of this Act.
    Trauma-informed care.--The Committee continues to wait for 
the USICH to provide a report on what steps can be taken to 
improve access to trauma-informed care and housing services 
across all Federal, state, and local homeless services, 
outreach, and prevention programs. The USICH was directed to 
complete this report in House Report 115-750 and it is now more 
than 10 months overdue. The Committee directs the USICH to 
complete this report not later than 30 days after the enactment 
of this Act, and to ensure it reflects current activities, 
including USICH's definition of what constitutes trauma-
informed care, what strategies USICH is undertaking to advance 
trauma-informed care, and how that approach will improve access 
to housing and supportive services.

                                TITLE IV


                      GENERAL PROVISIONS--THIS ACT

    Section 401 prohibits the use of funds for the planning or 
execution of any program to pay the expenses of, or otherwise 
compensate, non-Federal parties intervening in regulatory or 
adjudicatory proceedings.
    Section 402 prohibits the obligation of funds beyond the 
current fiscal year and the transfer of funds to other 
appropriations, unless expressly provided.
    Section 403 limits consulting service expenditures through 
procurement contracts to those contracts contained in the 
public record, except where otherwise provided under existing 
law.
    Section 404 prohibits funds from being used for certain 
types of employee training.
    Section 405 specifies requirements for the reprogramming of 
funds and requires agencies to submit a report in order to 
establish the baseline for the application of reprogramming and 
transfer authorities.
    Section 406 provides that not to exceed fifty percent of 
unobligated balances for salaries and expenses may remain 
available until September 30, 2022, for each account for the 
purposes authorized, subject to the approval of the House and 
Senate Committees on Appropriations.
    Section 407 prohibits the use of funds for any project that 
seeks to use the power of eminent domain, unless eminent domain 
is employed only for a public use.
    Section 408 prohibits funds from being transferred to any 
department, agency, or instrumentality of the U.S. Government, 
except where transfer authority is provided in this or any 
other appropriations Act.
    Section 409 prohibits funds from being used to permanently 
replace an employee intent on returning to his or her past 
occupation following completion of military service.
    Section 410 prohibits funds from being used by an entity 
unless the expenditure is in compliance with the Buy American 
Act.
    Section 411 prohibits funds from being made available to 
any person or entity that has been convicted of violating the 
Buy American Act.
    Section 412 prohibits funds from being used for first-class 
airline accommodations in contravention of sections 301-10.122 
and 301-10.123 of title 41 CFR.
    Section 413 prohibits funds from being used for the 
approval of a new foreign air carrier permit or exemption 
application if that approval would contravene United States law 
or Article 17 bis of the U.S.-E.U.-Iceland-Norway Air Transport 
Agreement.
    Section 414 restricts the number of employees that agencies 
may send to international conferences unless such attendance is 
important to the national interest.
    Section 415 caps the amount of fees the Surface 
Transportation Board can charge or collect for rate or practice 
complaints filed at the amount authorized for district court 
civil suit filing fees.
    Section 416 prohibits the use of funds to purchase or lease 
new light-duty vehicles for any executive fleet or fleet 
inventory, except in accordance with Presidential Memorandum-
Federal Fleet Performance, dated May 24, 2011.
    Section 417 prohibits funds from being used to maintain or 
establish computer networks unless such networks block the 
viewing, downloading, or exchange of pornography.
    Section 418 prohibits funds from being used to deny an 
Inspector General timely access to any records, documents, or 
other materials available to the department or agency over 
which that Inspector General has responsibilities, or to 
prevent or impede that Inspector General's access to such 
records, documents, or other materials.
    Section 419 prohibits funds to be used to pay award or 
incentive fees for contractors whose performance is below 
satisfactory, behind schedule, over budget, or failed to meet 
requirements of the contract, with exceptions.
    Section 420 prohibits funds from being used in 
contravention of section 2635.702 of title 5 CFR.
    Section 421 requires the use of masks and enhanced 
sanitation measures on airplanes, Amtrak trains, and certain 
large public transit systems for the duration of the 
presidentially declared COVID-19 national emergency.

             TITLE V--ADDITIONAL INFRASTRUCTURE INVESTMENTS


                      DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION


                        Office of the Secretary


                  NATIONAL INFRASTRUCTURE INVESTMENTS

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

                        COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION

    The Committee recommendation provides an additional 
$3,000,000,000 for the National Infrastructure Investments 
program.

                       CYBER SECURITY INITIATIVES

                        COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION

    The Committee recommendation provides an additional 
$10,500,000 for the Cyber Security Initiatives account.

                    Federal Aviation Administration


                        FACILITIES AND EQUIPMENT

                        COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION

    The Committee recommendation provides an additional 
$500,000,000 for the Facilities and Equipment account.

                       GRANTS-IN-AID FOR AIRPORTS

                        COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION

    The Committee recommendation provides an additional 
$2,500,000,000 for Grants-in-Aid for Airports.

                    Federal Railroad Administration


        CONSOLIDATED RAIL INFRASTRUCTURE AND SAFETY IMPROVEMENTS

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

                        COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION

    The Committee recommendation provides an additional 
$5,000,000,000 for the Consolidated Rail Infrastructure and 
Safety Improvements grant program.

           MAGNETIC LEVITATION TECHNOLOGY DEPLOYMENT PROGRAM

                        COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION

    The Committee recommendation provides an additional 
$100,000,000 for the Magnetic Levitation Technology Deployment 
Program.

     NORTHEAST CORRIDOR GRANTS TO THE NATIONAL RAILROAD PASSENGER 
                              CORPORATION

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

                        COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION

    The Committee recommendation provides an additional 
$5,000,000,000 for Northeast Corridor (NEC) grants to Amtrak to 
support operating and capital activities for Amtrak's NEC.

 NATIONAL NETWORK GRANTS TO THE NATIONAL RAILROAD PASSENGER CORPORATION

                        COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION

    The Committee recommendation provides an additional 
$3,000,000,000 for National Network grants to Amtrak to support 
operating and capital activities for Amtrak's long-distance and 
State-supported routes, and other non-NEC activities.

                     Federal Transit Administration


                       CAPITAL INVESTMENT GRANTS

                        COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION

    The Committee recommendation provides an additional 
$5,000,000,000 for the Capital Investment Grants program.

                        Maritime Administration


                        OPERATIONS AND TRAINING

                        COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION

    The Committee recommendation provides an additional 
$125,000,000 for the operations and training expenses of the 
Maritime Administration.

                   STATE MARITIME ACADEMY OPERATIONS

                        COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION

    The Committee recommendation provides an additional 
$345,500,000 for State Maritime Academy operations.

                     ASSISTANCE TO SMALL SHIPYARDS

                        COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION

    The Committee recommendation provides an additional 
$100,000,000 for the Assistance to Small Shipyards program.

                PORT INFRASTRUCTURE DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM

                        COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION

    The Committee recommendation provides an additional 
$1,000,000,000 for the Port Infrastructure Development Program.

                      Office of Inspector General


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

                        COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION

    The Committee recommendation provides an additional 
$7,500,000 for the Office of Inspector General.

              DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT


                       Public and Indian Housing


                      PUBLIC HOUSING CAPITAL FUND

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

                        COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION

    The Committee recommendation provides an additional 
$24,250,000,000 for the Public Housing Capital Fund.

                    CHOICE NEIGHBORHOODS INITIATIVE

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

                        COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION

    The Committee recommendation provides an additional 
$300,000,000 for the CHOICE Neighborhoods Initiative program.

                        NATIVE AMERICAN PROGRAMS

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

                        COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION

    The Committee recommendation provides an additional 
$1,000,000,000 for the Native American Programs account.

                  NATIVE HAWAIIAN HOUSING BLOCK GRANT

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

                        COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION

    The Committee recommendation provides an additional 
$20,000,000 for the Native Hawaiian Housing Block Grant 
program.

                   Community Planning and Development


                       COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT FUND

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

                        COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION

    The Committee recommendation provides an additional 
$4,000,000,000 for the Community Development Block Grant 
formula program.

                  HOME INVESTMENT PARTNERSHIPS PROGRAM

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

                        COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION

    The Committee recommendation provides an additional 
$17,500,000,000 for the HOME Investment Partnerships program.

        SELF-HELP AND ASSISTED HOMEOWNERSHIP OPPORTUNITY PROGRAM

                        COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION

    The Committee recommendation provides an additional 
$55,000,000 for the Self-Help and Assisted Homeownership 
Opportunity Program.

                            Housing Programs


                      ASSISTED HOUSING INVESTMENTS

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

                        COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION

    The Committee recommendation provides $750,000,000 for 
capital improvements for properties receiving project-based 
rental assistance.

                        HOUSING FOR THE ELDERLY

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

                        COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION

    The Committee recommendation provides an additional 
$750,000,000 for the Housing for the Elderly program.

                 HOUSING FOR PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

                        COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION

    The Committee recommendation provides an additional 
$179,000,000 for the Housing for Persons with Disabilities 
program.

            Office of Lead Hazard Control and Healthy Homes


                         LEAD HAZARD REDUCTION

                        COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION

    The Committee recommendation provides an additional 
$100,000,000 for the programs of the Office of Lead Hazard 
Control and Healthy Homes.

             Cybersecurity and Information Technology Fund


                        COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION

    The Committee recommendation provides an additional 
$100,000,000 for the Cybersecurity and Information Technology 
Fund.

                      Office of Inspector General


                        COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION

    The Committee recommendation provides an additional 
$7,500,000 for the Office of Inspector General.

                             RELATED AGENCY


                 Neighborhood Reinvestment Corporation


          PAYMENT TO THE NEIGHBORHOOD REINVESTMENT CORPORATION

                        COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION

    The Committee recommendation provides an additional 
$300,000,000 for the activities of the Neighborhood 
Reinvestment Corporation (NeighborWorks).

       GENERAL PROVISIONS--ADDITIONAL INFRASTRUCTURE INVESTMENTS

    Section 501 applies subchapter IV of chapter 31 of title 
40, United States Code, to activities funded in this title, 
with exceptions.
    Section 502 specifies conditions for the use of funding 
made available in this title under the headings ``Northeast 
Corridor Grants to the National Railroad Passenger 
Corporation'' and ``National Network Grants to the National 
Railroad Passenger Corporation''.
    Section 503 specifies conditions for the use of amounts in 
this Act by Congress for an emergency requirement pursuant to 
section 251(b)(2)(A)(i) of the Balanced Budget and Emergency 
Control Act of 1985.

            House of Representatives Reporting Requirements


         STATEMENT OF GENERAL PERFORMANCE GOALS AND OBJECTIVES

    Pursuant to clause 3(c)(4) of rule XIII of the Rules of the 
House of Representatives, the following is a statement of 
general performance goals and objectives for which this measure 
authorizes funding:
    The Committee on Appropriations considers program 
performance, including a program's success in developing and 
attaining outcome-related goals and objectives, in developing 
funding recommendations.

                          RESCISSION OF FUNDS

    Pursuant to clause 3(f)(2) of rule XIII of the Rules of the 
House of Representatives, the following table lists the 
rescissions in the accompanying bill:
           Section 106 rescinds the remaining 
        unobligated balances as of September 30, 2020 from 
        amounts made available for the national infrastructure 
        investments program in fiscal years 2017 and 2018, the 
        remaining unobligated balances as of September 30, 2021 
        from amounts made available for the national 
        infrastructure investments program in fiscal year 2019, 
        and the remaining unobligated balances as of September 
        30, 2022 from amounts made available for the national 
        infrastructure investments program in fiscal year 2020;
           Section 154 rescinds $10,414,449.82 from the 
        Capital and Debt Service Grants to the National 
        Railroad Passenger Corporation, $613,252.29 from the 
        Railroad Safety Technology Program, $9,867,630.69 from 
        the Capital Assistance to States--Intercity Passenger 
        Rail Service, $12,650,365.14 from the Rail Line 
        Relocation and Improvement Program, and $3,019,483.21 
        from the Next Generation High-Speed Rail accounts under 
        the Federal Railroad Administration;
           Section 168 rescinds $1,606,849 from the 
        Formula Grants account under the Federal Transit 
        Administration;
           Section 169 rescinds $320,230 from the Job 
        Access and Reverse Commute account under the Federal 
        Transit Administration;
           Section 169A rescinds $31,634 from the 
        Research, Training and Human Resources account under 
        the Federal Transit Administration; and
           Section 238 rescinds all unobligated 
        balances from the Rental Housing Assistance account 
        under Housing Programs, Department of Housing and Urban 
        Development.

                           TRANSFER OF FUNDS

    Pursuant to clause 3(f)(2) of rule XIII of the Rules of the 
House of Representatives, the following statements are 
submitted describing the transfer of funds provided in the 
accompanying bill.
    In title I, under National Infrastructure Investments, 
language is included to transfer funds to the Federal Highway 
Administration, the Federal Transit Administration, the Federal 
Railroad Administration, and the Maritime Administration to 
fund the award and oversight of grants and credit assistance 
made under the national infrastructure investments program.
    In title I, under Transportation Planning, Research, and 
Development, language is included to transfer funds into this 
account from other Federal agencies for expenses incurred by 
the Interagency Infrastructure Permitting Improvement Center 
that are not related to transportation infrastructure.
    In title I, under Working Capital Fund, language is 
included to limit the transfer of funds into this account from 
any agency of the Department.
    In title I, under Grant-in-Aid to Airports (Airport and 
Airway Trust Fund), language is included to transfer funds to 
the Office of the Secretary to carry out the Small Community 
Air Service Development Program.
    In title I, under Federal Highway Administration, 
Limitation on Administrative Expenses (Highway Trust Fund), 
language is included to transfer funds to the Appalachian 
Regional Commission.
    In title I, under Consolidated Rail Infrastructure and 
Safety Improvements, language is included to transfer funds for 
projects selected for commuter rail passenger transportation to 
the appropriate agencies of the Department for administration.
    In title I, under Operations and Training, language is 
included to transfer unobligated balances and obligated 
balances not yet expended from previous appropriations to the 
State Maritime Academy Operations account for programs and 
activities supporting State Maritime Academies.
    In title I, under Maritime Guaranteed Loan (Title XI) 
Program Account, language is included to transfer funds to the 
Operations and Training account for program administration.
    In title II, under Working Capital Fund, language is 
included to transfer funds into this account from any other 
offices or agencies of the Department.
    In title II, under Native American Programs, language is 
included to transfer funds to the Program Offices--Public and 
Indian Housing account for program administration.
    In title II, under the Office of Lead Hazard Control and 
Healthy Homes, language is included to transfer funds to Policy 
Development and Research.
    In title II, under Cybersecurity and Information Technology 
Fund, language is included to transfer funds into this account 
from any other offices or agencies of the Department.
    In title II, language is included in section 218 to 
transfer funds between the Administrative Support Offices and 
Program Offices, with certain exceptions and limitations.
    In title V, under Department of Transportation, Office of 
the Secretary, National Infrastructure Investments, language is 
included to transfer funds to the Federal Highway 
Administration, the Federal Transit Administration, the Federal 
Railroad Administration, and the Maritime Administration to 
fund the award and oversight of grants and credit assistance 
made under the national infrastructure investments program.
    In title V, under Department of Transportation, Federal 
Railroad Administration, Consolidated Rail Infrastructure and 
Safety Improvements, language is included to transfer funds for 
projects selected for commuter rail passenger transportation to 
the appropriate agencies of the Department for administration.
    In title V, under Department of Transportation, Federal 
Railroad Administration, Northeast Corridor Grants to the 
National Railroad Passenger Corporation, language is included 
to transfer funds to the National Railroad Passenger 
Corporation-Office of Inspector General-Salaries and Expenses 
account to conduct audits and investigations of projects and 
activities.
    In title V, under Department of Housing and Urban 
Development, Public and Indian Housing, Public Housing Capital 
Fund, language is included to transfer funds to the Department 
of Housing and Urban Development, Program Offices-Public and 
Indian Housing for program administration.
    In title V, under Department of Housing and Urban 
Development, Public and Indian Housing, Choice Neighborhoods 
Initiative, language is included to transfer funds to the 
Department of Housing and Urban Development, Program Offices-
Public and Indian Housing for program administration.
    In title V, under Department of Housing and Urban 
Development, Public and Indian Housing, Native American 
Programs, language is included to transfer funds to the 
Department of Housing and Urban Development, Program Offices-
Public and Indian Housing account for program administration.
    In title V, under Department of Housing and Urban 
Development, Public and Indian Housing, Native Hawaiian Housing 
Block Grant, language is included to transfer funds to the 
Department of Housing and Urban Development, Program Offices-
Public and Indian Housing account for program administration.
    In title V, under Department of Housing and Urban 
Development, Community Planning and Development, Community 
Development Fund, language is included to transfer funds to the 
Department of Housing and Urban Development, Program Offices-
Community Planning and Development for program administration.
    In title V, under Department of Housing and Urban 
Development, Community Planning and Development, HOME 
Investment Partnerships Program, language is included to 
transfer funds to the Department of Housing and Urban 
Development, Program Offices-Community Planning and Development 
for program administration.
    In title V, under Department of Housing and Urban 
Development, Housing Programs, Assisted Housing Investments, 
language is included to transfer funds to the Department of 
Housing and Urban Development, Program Offices-Office of 
Housing for program administration.
    In title V, under Department of Housing and Urban 
Development, Housing Programs, Housing for the Elderly, 
language is included to transfer funds to the Department of 
Housing and Urban Development, Program Offices-Office of 
Housing for program administration.
    In title V, under Department of Housing and Urban 
Development, Housing Programs, Housing for Persons with 
Disabilities, language is included to transfer funds to the 
Department of Housing and Urban Development, Program Offices-
Office of Housing for program administration.

   DISCLOSURE OF EARMARKS AND CONGRESSIONALLY DIRECTED SPENDING ITEMS

    Neither the bill nor the report contains any Congressional 
earmarks, limited tax benefits, or limited tariff benefits as 
defined in clause 9 of rule XXI.

          COMPLIANCE WITH RULE XIII, CL. 3(E) (RAMSEYER RULE)

    In compliance with clause 3(e) of rule XIII of the Rules of 
the House of Representatives, changes in existing law made by 
the bill, as reported, are shown as follows (existing law 
proposed to be omitted is enclosed in black brackets, new 
matter is printed in italics, existing law in which no change 
is proposed is shown in roman):

                 CONSOLIDATED APPROPRIATIONS ACT, 2019


(Public Law 116-6, division G)

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


DIVISION G--TRANSPORTATION, HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT, AND RELATED 
                   AGENCIES APPROPRIATIONS ACT, 2019


                                TITLE I


DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *



Federal Railroad Administration

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *



        CONSOLIDATED RAIL INFRASTRUCTURE AND SAFETY IMPROVEMENTS

    For necessary expenses related to Consolidated Rail 
Infrastructure and Safety Improvements Grants, as authorized by 
section 24407 of title 49, United States Code, $255,000,000, to 
remain available until expended: Provided, That section 
24405(f) of title 49, United States Code, shall not apply to 
projects for the implementation of positive train control 
systems otherwise eligible under section 24407(c)(1) of title 
49, United States Code: Provided further, That amounts 
available under this heading for projects selected for commuter 
rail passenger transportation may be transferred by the 
Secretary, after selection, to the appropriate agencies to be 
administered in accordance with chapter 53 of title 49, United 
States Code: Provided further, That the Secretary shall not 
limit eligible projects from consideration for funding for 
planning, engineering, environmental, construction, and design 
elements of the same project in the same application: Provided 
further, That unobligated balances remaining after [4 years] 6 
years from the date of enactment may be used for any eligible 
project under section 24407(c) of title 49, United States Code: 
Provided further, That the Secretary may withhold up to one 
percent of the amount provided under this heading for the costs 
of award and project management oversight of grants carried out 
under section 24407 of title 49, United States Code: Provided 
further, That the Secretary shall issue the Notice of Funding 
Opportunity that encompasses previously unawarded funds 
provided under this heading in fiscal year 2018 by Public Law 
115-141 and funds provided under this heading in this Act no 
later than 30 days after enactment of this Act: Provided 
further, That the Secretary shall announce the selection of 
projects to receive awards for the funds in the previous 
proviso no later than 120 days after enactment of this Act.

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

                                ------                                


FURTHER CONSOLIDATED APPROPRIATIONS ACT, 2020

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *



DIVISION H--TRANSPORTATION, HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT, AND RELATED 
                   AGENCIES APPROPRIATIONS ACT, 2020


                                TITLE I


DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *



Federal Railroad Administration

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *



        CONSOLIDATED RAIL INFRASTRUCTURE AND SAFETY IMPROVEMENTS

    For necessary expenses related to Consolidated Rail 
Infrastructure and Safety Improvements Grants, as authorized by 
section 22907 of title 49, United States Code, $325,000,000, to 
remain available until expended: Provided, That section 
22905(f) of title 49, United States Code, shall not apply to 
projects for the implementation of positive train control 
systems otherwise eligible under section 22907(c)(1) of title 
49, United States Code: Provided further, That amounts 
available under this heading for projects selected for commuter 
rail passenger transportation may be transferred by the 
Secretary, after selection, to the appropriate agencies to be 
administered in accordance with chapter 53 of title 49, United 
States Code: Provided further, That the Secretary shall not 
limit eligible projects from consideration for funding for 
planning, engineering, environmental, construction, and design 
elements of the same project in the same application: Provided 
further, That unobligated balances remaining after [4 years] 6 
years from the date of enactment may be used for any eligible 
project under section 22907(c) of title 49, United States Code: 
Provided further, That the Secretary may withhold up to one 
percent of the amount provided under this heading for the costs 
of award and project management oversight of grants carried out 
under section 22907 of title 49, United States Code: Provided 
further, That of the sums appropriated under this heading, 
$45,000,000 shall be available for projects eligible under 
section 22907(c)(2) of title 49, United States Code, that 
require the acquisition of rights-of-way, track, or track 
structure to support the development of new intercity passenger 
rail service routes: Provided further, That for amounts 
available under this heading eligible recipients under section 
22907(b) of title 49, United States Code, shall include any 
holding company of a Class II railroad or Class III railroad 
(as those terms are defined in section 20102 of title 49, 
United States Code): Provided further, That the Secretary shall 
issue the Notice of Funding Opportunity that encompasses funds 
provided under this heading in this Act no later than 120 days 
after enactment of this Act and announce the selection of 
projects to receive awards for such funds no later than 300 
days after the enactment of this Act: Provided further, That 
the Notice of Funding Opportunity under the previous proviso 
shall require application submissions 60 days after the 
publishing of such Notice.

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


               CHANGES IN THE APPLICATION OF EXISTING LAW

    Pursuant to clause 3(f)(1)(A) of rule XIII of the Rules of 
the House of Representatives, the following statements are 
submitted describing the effect of provisions in the 
accompanying bill that directly or indirectly change the 
application of existing law.

                 TITLE I--DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION

    Language is included under Office of the Secretary, 
`Salaries and Expenses' specifying certain amounts for 
individual offices of the Office of the Secretary and official 
reception and representation expenses, specifying transfer 
authority among individual offices of the Office of the 
Secretary, allowing up to $2,500,000 in user fees to be 
credited to the account, and preventing funds for certain 
activities.
    Language is included under the Office of the Secretary, 
`Research and Technology' which limits the availability of 
funds, changes the availability of funds, provides funds for 
specified activities, allows funds received from other entities 
to be credited to the account, and deems the title of the 
office.
    Language is included under the Office of the Secretary, 
`National Infrastructure Investments' which authorizes and 
appropriates grant funding for surface transportation 
infrastructure to be competitively awarded at the discretion of 
the Secretary, limits the availability of funds, specifies 
grantee and project eligibility requirements, authorizes a 
portion of funds for planning, preparation, and design of 
projects, authorizes a portion of the funds for Federal credit 
assistance awards, specifies requirements for how the Secretary 
shall prioritize funding and select projects, specifies minimum 
and maximum grants sizes and sets limits on awards per project 
and per state, specifies a limit on Federal share of projects 
receiving awards, establishes minimum funding amounts for rural 
and urban projects, authorizes the Secretary to use funds for 
departmental administrative costs, and establishes requirements 
and deadlines for when and how the Secretary shall solicit 
applications for grants and make awards.
    Language is included under the Office of the Secretary, 
`National Surface and Innovative Finance Bureau' which makes 
funding available until expended, authorizes and appropriates 
planning grant funding to assist areas of persistent poverty, 
specifies grantee and project eligibility requirements, 
specifies a limit on Federal share of projects receiving 
awards, specifies minimum and maximum grant sizes, specifies 
requirements for how the Secretary shall prioritize funding, 
and authorizes the Secretary to use funds for departmental 
administrative costs.
    Language is included under Office of the Secretary, 
`Railroad Rehabilitation and Improvement Financing Program' 
which authorizes and appropriates funding to repay the credit 
risk premium of certain loans, authorizes the Secretary to 
issue direct loans and loan guarantees under sections 501 
through 504 of the Railroad Revitalization and Regulatory 
Reform Act, and provides authority availability.
    Language is included under the Office of the Secretary, 
`Financial Management Capital' which provides funds for 
financial systems and business process upgrades and changes the 
availability of funds.
    Language is included under the Office of the Secretary, 
`Cyber Security Initiatives' which provides funds for 
information technology security upgrades and changes the 
availability of funds.
    Language is included under the Office of the Secretary, 
`Transportation Planning, Research, and Development' which 
provides funds for conducting transportation planning, 
research, and development activities and making grants; changes 
the availability of funds; and specifies funding minimums for 
and authorities related to the Interagency Infrastructure 
Permitting Improvement Center.
    Language is included that limits operating costs and 
capital outlays of the Working Capital Fund for the Department 
of Transportation (DOT); provides that services shall be 
provided on a competitive basis, except for non-DOT entities; 
restricts the transfer for any funds to the Working Capital 
Fund with certain approvals; and limits special assessments or 
reimbursable agreements levied against any program, project, or 
activity funded in this Act to only those assessments or 
reimbursable agreements that are presented to and approved by 
the House and Senate Committees on Appropriations.
    Language is included under Office of the Secretary, `Small 
and Disadvantaged Business Utilization and Outreach' limiting 
the availability of funds, specifying that funds may be used 
for business opportunities related to any mode of 
transportation, and specifying that funds may be used for 
activities previously under the heading ``Office of the 
Secretary--Minority Business Resource Center''.
    Language is included under the Office of the Secretary, 
``Payments to Air Carriers'' that allows the Secretary of 
Transportation to consider subsidy requirements when 
determining service to a community, eliminates the requirement 
that carriers use at least 15-passenger aircraft, prohibits 
funds for communities within a certain distance of a small hub 
airport without a cost-share, allows amounts to be made 
available from the Federal Aviation Administration, and allows 
the reimbursement of such amounts from overflight fees.
    Section 101 prohibits the Office of the Secretary of 
Transportation from approving assessments or reimbursable 
agreements pertaining to funds appropriated to the operating 
administrations in this Act, unless such assessments or 
agreements have completed the normal reprogramming process for 
Congressional notification.
    Section 102 requires the Secretary to post on the internet 
a schedule of all Council on Credit and Finance meetings, 
agendas, and meeting minutes.
    Section 103 allows the Department's Working Capital Fund 
(WCF) to provide payments in advance to vendors for the Federal 
transit pass fringe benefit program and to provide full or 
partial payments to, and to accept reimbursements from, Federal 
agencies for transit benefit distribution services.
    Section 104 allows the Department's WCF to provide payments 
in advance to commercial vendors for the Federal transit pass 
fringe benefit program and requires the Department to include 
safeguards in the contract with vendors.
    Section 105 allows the Department's WCF to utilize not more 
than $1,000,000 in fiscal year 2021 unused van pool benefits to 
provide contractual services in support of section 190 of this 
Act.
    Section 106 extends the obligation date for the amounts 
made available for the national infrastructure investments 
program for fiscal years 2017, 2018, 2019, and 2020.
    Language is included under the Federal Aviation 
Administration, ``Operations'' that specifies funds for certain 
activities; limits the availability of funds; derives funds 
from the general fund, specifies reprogramming authorities 
among activities; requires various staffing plans by a certain 
date with financial penalties for late submissions; permits the 
use of funds to enter into a grant agreement with a nonprofit 
standard setting organization to develop aviation safety 
standards; prohibits the use of funds for new applicants of the 
second career training program; prohibits funds to plan, 
finalize, or implement any regulation that would promulgate new 
aviation user fees not specifically authorized by law; credits 
funds received from other entities for expenses incurred in the 
provision of agency services; specifies funds for the contract 
tower program; prohibits funds from certain activities 
coordinated through the Working Capital Fund; and prohibits 
funds to eliminate the Contract Weather Observer program.
    Language is included under Federal Aviation Administration, 
``Facilities and Equipment'' that funds various activities from 
the general fund, limits the availability of funds, credits 
funds received from other entities for expenses incurred in the 
modernization of air navigation systems, and requires a capital 
investment plan.
    Language is included under Federal Aviation Administration, 
``Research, Engineering and Development'' that provides funds 
from the general fund; limits the availability of funds; 
credits funds received from other entities for expenses 
incurred for in research, engineering and development to the 
account; requires funds to be used in accordance with the 
report accompanying this Act; and specifies reprogramming 
authorities among amounts in the report subject to section 405 
of this Act.
    Language is included under Federal Aviation Administration, 
``Grants-in-aid for Airports'' that provides funds from the 
Airport and Airway Trust Fund and from the general fund; 
specifies the availability of funds; prohibits funds for 
certain activities; sets a cost share requirement on certain 
airport construction projects; limits the availability of funds 
for certain activities; allows the participation of certain 
additional airports; allows the Federal share of certain grants 
to be 95 percent; allows funds to be used for administrative 
expenses, research, and the ``Small Community Air Service 
Development Program''; and defines airport eligibility.
    Section 110 allows no more than 600 technical staff-years 
at the center for advanced aviation systems development.
    Section 111 prohibits funds from being used to adopt 
guidelines or regulations requiring airport sponsors to provide 
the FAA ``without cost'' building construction or space.
    Section 112 allows reimbursement for fees collected and 
credited under 49 U.S.C. 45303.
    Section 113 allows reimbursement of funds for providing 
technical assistance to foreign aviation authorities to be 
credited to the operations account.
    Section 114 prohibits funds from being used for Sunday 
premium pay unless work was actually performed on a Sunday.
    Section 115 prohibits funds from being used to buy store 
gift cards with government issued credit cards.
    Section 116 prohibits funds from being obligated or 
expended for retention bonuses for FAA employees without prior 
written approval of the DOT Assistant Secretary for 
Administration.
    Section 117 requires, upon the request of an owner or 
operator, the Secretary to block the display of an owner or 
operator's aircraft registration number in the aircraft 
situational display to industry program.
    Section 118 prohibits funds from being used for salaries 
and expenses of more than nine political and Presidential 
appointees in the FAA.
    Section 119 prohibits funds from being used to increase 
fees under 49 U.S.C. 44721 until the FAA provides a report to 
the House and Senate Committees on Appropriations that 
justifies all fees related to aeronautical navigation products 
and explains how such fees are consistent with Executive Order 
13642.
    Section 119A requires the FAA to notify the House and 
Senate Committees on Appropriations at least 90 days before 
closing a regional operations center or reducing the services 
provided.
    Section 119B prohibits funds from being used to change 
weight restrictions or prior permission rules at Teterboro 
Airport in New Jersey.
    Section 119C prohibits funds from being used to withhold 
from consideration and approval certain applications for 
participation in the contract tower program or for certain 
reevaluations of cost-share program participation.
    Section 119D prohibits funds from being used to open, 
close, redesignate, or reorganize a regional office, the 
aeronautical center, or the technical center subject to the 
normal reprogramming requirements outlined under section 405 of 
this Act.
    Language is included under the Federal Highway 
Administration, `Limitation on Administrative Expenses' that 
limits the amount to be paid, together with advances and 
reimbursements received, for the administrative expenses of the 
agency. In addition to this limitation, an amount is specified 
that is to be made available to the Appalachian Regional 
Commission for administrative expenses.
    Language is included under the Federal Highway 
Administration, `Federal-aid Highways' that limits the 
obligations for Federal-aid highways and highway safety 
construction programs; allows the Secretary to charge, collect 
and spend fees for the costs of underwriting and servicing 
Federal credit instruments; and provides that such amounts are 
in addition to administrative expenses, and not subject to any 
obligation limitation or limitation on administrative expenses 
under section 608 of title 23, U.S.C., and are available until 
expended.
    Language is included under the Federal Highway 
Administration, `Federal-aid Highways' that liquidates contract 
authority from the Highway Trust Fund.
    Language is included under the Federal Highway 
Administration, `Highway Infrastructure Programs' that 
authorizes and appropriates additional amounts for activities 
eligible under sections 133(b), 130(a), 151, 165(b)(2), 
165(c)(6), and section 202 of title 23, U.S.C., the Appalachian 
Development Highway System, the Nationally Significant Federal 
lands and tribal projects program, the Regional Infrastructure 
Accelerator Demonstration Program, and an Advanced Digital 
Construction Management System, as authorized under the FAST 
Act, a National Road Network Pilot Program, and a research 
study on Tribal populations. Language specifies the formula 
distribution of funding, applies and waives various statutory 
requirements for each subset of funding, and changes the 
availability of funds.
    Section 120 distributes obligation authority among Federal-
aid highways programs, contingent on enactment of authorization 
legislation.
    Section 121 credits funds received by the Bureau of 
Transportation Statistics to the Federal-aid highways account.
    Section 122 provides requirements for any waiver of the Buy 
America Act.
    Section 123 requires Congressional notification before the 
Department provides credit assistance under section 603 and 604 
of title 23, U.S.C.
    Section 124 requires 60-day notification to the House and 
Senate Committees on Appropriations of any grants as authorized 
under 23 U.S.C. 117.
    Section 125 allows state departments of transportation to 
repurpose certain highway project funding to be used within 5 
miles of its original designation.
    Section 126 requires the Federal Highway Administration to 
adjudicate Buy America waivers based on the rules and 
regulations in effect before April 17, 2017, and to process 
those requests within 90 days of their receipt.
    Language is included under the Federal Motor Carrier Safety 
Administration, `Motor Carrier Safety Operations and Programs' 
that provides a limitation on obligations and liquidation of 
contract authorization; changes the availability of funds; and 
specifies amounts available for specific activities.
    Language is included under the Federal Motor Carrier Safety 
Administration, `Motor Carrier Safety Grants' that provides 
limitation on obligations and liquidation of contract 
authorization; modifies the availability of certain funds; and 
specifies amounts available for various programs.
    Section 130 requires the Federal Motor Carrier Safety 
Administration to send notices of certain violations such that 
the receipt of such notice is confirmed.
    Section 131 requires the Federal Motor Carrier Safety 
Administration to require rear underride guards be inspected 
annually.
    Language is included under National Highway Traffic Safety 
Administration, `Operations and Research' that provides funds 
for vehicle safety activities; and modifies the period of 
availability of certain funds.
    Language is included under National Highway Traffic Safety 
Administration, `Operations and Research' that provides a 
limitation on obligations and a liquidation of contract 
authorization from the Highway Trust Fund; specifies amounts 
for various programs; and modifies the period of availability 
of certain funds.
    Language is included under the National Highway Traffic 
Safety Administration `Highway Traffic Safety Grants' that 
provides a limitation on obligations; changes the availability 
of funds; provides a liquidation of contract authorization from 
the Highway Trust Fund; specifies the amounts for various 
programs; prohibits and limits funds for specific purposes; and 
requires certain Congressional notifications.
    Section 140 provides funding for travel and related 
expenses for state management reviews and highway safety core 
competency development training.
    Section 141 exempts obligation authority that was made 
available in previous public laws from limitations on 
obligations set in this Act.
    Section 142 authorizes and appropriates additional funding 
for activities eligible under section 403 of title 23 and 
changes the availability of funds.
    Section 143 prohibits the National Highway Traffic Safety 
Administration from using funds to enforce requirements imposed 
by section 405(a)(9) of title 23.
    Language is included under Federal Railroad Administration, 
`Safety and Operations' which provides funds and funding 
availability.
    Language is included under Federal Railroad Administration, 
`Railroad Research and Development' which provides funds and 
funding availability.
    Language is included under the Federal Railroad 
Administration, `Federal-State Partnership for State of Good 
Repair' which provides funds, provides funding availability, 
allows the Secretary to withhold funds for a specified purpose, 
expands project eligibility, modifies preference relating to 
the Federal share of projects receiving awards, and establishes 
requirements and deadlines for when and how the Secretary shall 
solicit applications for grants and make awards.
    Language is included under the Federal Railroad 
Administration, `Consolidated Rail Infrastructure and Safety 
Improvements' which provides funds and provides funding 
availability. Language sets aside amounts for specified 
purposes, expands applicant eligibility, allows certain funds 
to be transferred based on criteria, expands project 
eligibility, modifies preference relating to the Federal share 
of projects receiving awards, and allows unobligated balances 
remaining after six years to be used for any eligible project. 
Language allows the Secretary to withhold funding for a 
specified purpose and establishes requirements and deadlines 
for when and how the Secretary shall solicit applications for 
grants and make awards.
    Language is included under the Federal Railroad 
Administration, `Magnetic Levitation Technology Deployment 
Program' which provides funds and funding availability.
    Language is included under the Federal Railroad 
Administration, `Northeast Corridor Grants to the National 
Railroad Passenger Corporation' which provides funds and 
funding availability, allows the Secretary to withhold funding 
for specified purposes, and sets aside amounts for specified 
activities.
    Language is included under the Federal Railroad 
Administration, `National Network Grants to the National 
Railroad Passenger Corporation' which provides funding and 
funding availability, allows the Secretary to withhold funding 
for a specified purpose, and prevents funding from being used 
for a specified purpose.
    Section 150 limits overtime to $35,000 per Amtrak employee 
and allows Amtrak's president to waive this restriction for 
specific employees for safety or operational efficiency 
reasons. It also requires Amtrak to submit a report to the 
House and Senate Committees on Appropriations no later than 60 
days after enactment of this Act summarizing overtime payments 
incurred by Amtrak for calendar year 2020 and the 3 prior 
calendar years. The summary shall include the total number of 
employees that received waivers and the total overtime payments 
paid to employees receiving waivers for each month for 2020 and 
the 3 prior calendar years.
    Section 151 prohibits the use of funds made available to 
Amtrak to reduce the total number of Amtrak Police Department 
uniformed officers patrolling on board passenger trains or at 
stations, facilities, or rights-of-way below the staffing level 
on May 1, 2019.
    Section 152 prohibits the use of funds made available by 
this Act by Amtrak in contravention of the Worker Adjustment 
and Retraining Notification Act.
    Section 153 provides that unobligated balances remaining 
for the CRISI grant program after 6 years from the date of 
enactment of P.L. 116-6 and after 6 years from the date of 
enactment of P.L. 116-94 may be used for any eligible project 
under section 22907(c) of title 49, United States Code.
    Section 154 rescinds certain unobligated balances.
    Language is included under Federal Transit Administration, 
`Administrative Expenses' specifying amounts for certain 
activities, modifying the period of availability, prohibiting a 
permanent office of transit security, and directing the 
submission of the annual report on new starts.
    Language is included under Federal Transit Administration, 
`Transit Formula Grants' that provides a limitation on 
obligations from the Highway Trust Fund, and provides for the 
liquidation of contract authority.
    Language is included under Federal Transit Administration, 
`Transit Infrastructure Grants' that specifies amounts for 
certain activities authorized by sections 5339, 5307, and 5312 
of title 49 U.S.C., from the general fund, and are not subject 
to any limitation on obligations.
    Language is included under Federal Transit Administration 
`Technical Assistance and Training' that specifies amounts for 
certain activities.
    Language is included under Federal Transit Administration, 
`Capital Investment Grants' that specifies amounts for specific 
purposes and requires the Secretary to continue to administer 
the capital investment grant program pursuant to 49 U.S.C. 
5309.
    Language is included under Federal Transit Administration, 
`Grants to the Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority' 
that requires the Secretary to review projects before a grant 
is made, requires the Secretary to place the highest priority 
on safety investments, and allows the Secretary to waive the 
requirement for cellular phone service.
    Section 160 exempts previously made transit obligations 
from limitations on obligations.
    Section 161 allows funds appropriated for capital 
investment grants and bus and bus facilities not obligated by a 
certain date, plus other recoveries to be available for other 
projects under 49 U.S.C. 5309.
    Section 162 allows for the transfer of prior year 
appropriations from older accounts to be merged into new 
accounts with similar, current activities.
    Section 163 prohibits the enforcement of the Rostenkowski 
Test.
    Section 164 allows certain recipients of Low and No 
Emission Bus Grants to continue to partner with non-profits and 
companies as part of their grant applications.
    Section 165 prohibits the use of funds to impede or hinder 
project advancement or approval for any project seeking a 
Federal contribution from the Capital Investment Grants program 
of greater than 40 percent of project costs.
    Section 166 prohibits the use of funds to implement the 
June 29, 2018 ``Dear Colleague'' letter distributed by the 
Federal Transit Administration to capital investment grant 
program project sponsors.
    Section 167 prohibits the use of funds by the Department of 
Transportation to implement policies that require a project to 
receive a medium or higher project rating within the Capital 
Investment Grants program before taking actions to finalize an 
environmental impact statement.
    Section 168 rescinds unobligated amounts made available in 
prior fiscal years from the formula grants account.
    Section 169 rescinds unobligated amounts made available in 
prior fiscal years from the job access and reverse commute 
account.
    Section 169A rescinds unobligated amounts made available in 
prior fiscal years from the research, training, and human 
resources account.
    Language is included under the Saint Lawrence Seaway 
Development Corporation which authorizes expenditures, 
contracts, and commitments as may be necessary.
    Language is included under the Saint Lawrence Seaway 
Development Corporation, `Operations and Maintenance' which 
provides funds derived from the Harbor Maintenance Trust Fund 
and specifies a certain amount for the seaway infrastructure 
program.
    Language is included under Maritime Administration, 
`Maritime Security Program' which provides funds and funding 
availability.
    Language is included under Maritime Administration, `Cable 
Security Fleet Program' which provides funds and funding 
availability.
    Language is included under Maritime Administration, 
`Operations and Training' which provides funds for specific 
purposes, limits funding availability, requires submission of 
the annual report on sexual assault and harassment at the 
United States Merchant Marine Academy, allows the use of prior 
year recoveries for specific purposes, and establishes 
deadlines for when the Secretary shall make grants.
    Language is included under Maritime Administration, `State 
Maritime Academy Operations' which provides funds for specific 
purposes and limits funding availability.
    Language is included under Maritime Administration, 
`Assistance to Small Shipyards' which provides funds and 
funding availability.
    Language is included under Maritime Administration, `Ship 
Disposal' which provides funds and funding availability.
    Language is included under Maritime Administration, 
`Maritime Guaranteed Loan (Title XI) Program Account' which 
provides funds, and transfers and merges funds with ``Maritime 
Administration--Operations and Training''.
    Language is included under Maritime Administration, `Port 
Infrastructure Development Program', which provides funds and 
funding availability, sets aside amounts for specified 
purposes, specifies grantee and project eligibility 
requirements, specifies a limit on Federal share of projects 
receiving awards, modifies preference relating to the Federal 
share of projects receiving awards, specifies a minimum grant 
size, specifies requirements for how the Secretary shall 
prioritize funding and select projects, allows proceeds of 
Federal credit assistance to be considered part of the non-
Federal share of project cost under certain circumstances, and 
allows the withholding of funds for a specified purpose.
    Section 170 authorizes the Maritime Administration (MARAD) 
to furnish utilities and services and to make necessary repairs 
in connection with any lease, contract, or occupancy involving 
government property under control of MARAD and allows payments 
received to be credited to the Treasury and to remain available 
until expended.
    Section 171 requires MARAD to use prior year unobligated 
balances from the maritime security program to provide an 
additional $500,000 in fiscal year 2021 for each vessel covered 
by an operating agreement as of the date of enactment of this 
Act and to make such payments no later than 60 days after 
enactment of this Act.
    Language is included under Pipeline and Hazardous Materials 
Safety Administration, `Operational Expenses' which provides 
funding and funding availability.
    Language is included under Pipeline and Hazardous Materials 
Safety Administration, `Hazardous Materials Safety' which 
provides funding and funding availability, allows fees 
collected under 49 U.S.C. 5108(g) to be deposited in the 
general fund of the Treasury, and allows credits to this 
appropriation for funds received from other entities for 
certain expenses.
    Language is included under Pipeline and Hazardous Materials 
Safety Administration, `Pipeline Safety' which specifies 
amounts derived from the Pipeline Safety Fund, the Oil Spill 
Liability Trust Fund, and the Underground Natural Gas Storage 
Facility Safety Account; limits availability of funds; and 
specifies a minimum amount for certain activities.
    Language is included under Pipeline and Hazardous Materials 
Safety Administration, `Emergency Preparedness Grants' which 
specifies the amount derived from the Emergency Preparedness 
Fund, limits the availability of funds, allows up to four 
percent of funds for administrative costs, and allows prior 
year recoveries for certain activities.
    Language is included under Office of Inspector General, 
`Salaries and Expenses' that provides funding and provides the 
Inspector General with all necessary authority to investigate 
allegations of fraud by any person or entity that is subject to 
regulation by the Department of Transportation.
    Section 180 provides authorization for DOT to maintain and 
operate aircraft, hire passenger motor vehicles and aircraft, 
purchase liability insurance, buy uniforms, or allowances 
therefor.
    Section 181 limits appropriations for services authorized 
by section 3109 of title 5, United States Code, to the rate 
permitted for an Executive Level IV.
    Section 182 prohibits recipients of funds in this Act from 
disseminating personal information obtained by State DMVs in 
connection to motor vehicle records with an exception.
    Section 183 prohibits funds in this Act for salaries and 
expenses of more than 125 political and Presidential appointees 
in DOT.
    Section 184 stipulates that revenue collected by the 
Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) and Federal Railroad 
Administration from States, counties, municipalities, other 
public authorities, and private sources for training may be 
credited to specific accounts within the agencies with an 
exception for State rail safety inspectors participating in 
training.
    Section 185 prohibits DOT from using funds to make a loan, 
loan guarantee, line of credit, cooperative agreement, or 
discretionary grant, unless DOT provides a 3-day advance notice 
to the House and Senate Committees on Appropriations. The 
provision requires concurrent notice of any ``quick release'' 
of funds from FHWA's emergency relief program, and prohibits 
notifications from involving funds not available for 
obligation. The provision also requires DOT to provide a 
comprehensive list of all loans, loan guarantees, lines of 
credit, cooperative agreements, or discretionary grants that 
will be announced with a 3-day advance notice to the House and 
Senate Committees on Appropriations.
    Section 186 allows funds received from rebates, refunds, 
and similar sources to be credited to appropriations of DOT.
    Section 187 allows amounts from improper payments to a 
third-party contractor that are lawfully recovered by DOT to be 
made available until expended to cover expenses incurred in 
recovery of such payments.
    Section 188 requires that reprogramming actions have to be 
approved or denied by the House and Senate Committees on 
Appropriations, and reprogramming notifications shall be 
transmitted solely to the Appropriations Committees.
    Section 189 allows funds appropriated to operating 
administrations to be obligated for the Office of the Secretary 
for costs related to assessments only when such funds provide a 
direct benefit to that operating administration.
    Section 190 authorizes the Secretary to carry out a program 
that establishes uniform standards for developing and 
supporting agency transit pass and transit benefits, including 
distribution of transit benefits.
    Section 191 allows the use of funds to assist a contract 
utilizing geographic, economic, or other hiring preference not 
otherwise authorized by law, only if certain requirements are 
met related to availability of local labor, displacement of 
existing employees, and delays in transportation plans.
    Section 192 directs the Secretary of Transportation to work 
with the Secretary of Homeland Security to ensure that best 
practices for Industrial Control Systems procurement are up to 
date and that systems procured with funds provided under this 
title were procured using such practices.
    Section 193 prohibits de-obligated funds associated with 
Cooperative Agreement No. FR-HSR-0118-12-01-01 from being made 
available for any purpose until the final determination of any 
litigation concerning such funds.
    Section 194 prohibits DOT from using funds in this Act to 
consolidate governmental affairs activities across the 
Department in the Office of Governmental Affairs in the Office 
of the Secretary or public affairs activities across the 
Department in the Office of Public Affairs in the Office of the 
Secretary. The provision also prohibits operating 
administrations from transferring personnel to the Office of 
Governmental Affairs in the Office of the Secretary or the 
Office of Public Affairs in the Office of the Secretary.

         TITLE II--DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT

    Language is included under Department of Housing and Urban 
Development, ``Management and Administration'', ``Executive 
Offices'' that limits funds available for reception and 
representation and requires a report.
    Language is included under Department of Housing and Urban 
Development, ``Management and Administration'', 
``Administrative Support Offices'' that specifies funds for the 
Office of the Chief Financial Officer, the Office of the 
General Counsel, the Office of the Assistant Secretary for 
Administration, the Office of Field Policy and Management, the 
Office of Departmental Equal Employment Opportunity, and the 
Office of the Chief Information Officer; allows funds for 
certain administrative expenses; requires a quarterly reports 
on congressional reports; requires congressional reports to be 
submitted electronically; applies a condition to obligation of 
funds for the financial transformation initiative; and requires 
an expenditure plan for the financial transformation 
initiative.
    Language is included under Department of Housing and Urban 
Development, ``Management and Administration'', ``Program 
Offices'' that specifies funds for the Office of Public and 
Indian Housing, Office of Community Planning and Development, 
Office of Housing, Office of Policy Development and Research, 
Office of Fair Housing and Equal Opportunity, and Office of 
Lead Hazard Control and Healthy Homes.
    Language is included under Department of Housing and Urban 
Development, ``Management and Administration'', ``Working 
Capital Fund'' which specifies the shared services to be used 
by the Department, specifies the conditions for reimbursement, 
and allows for additional salaries and expenses amounts to be 
merged with the Working Capital Fund.
    Language is included under Department of Housing and Urban 
Development, `Tenant-Based Rental Assistance' which specifies 
funds for certain programs, activities and purposes and limits 
the use and availability of certain funds; specifies the 
methodology for allocation of renewal funding (including 
renewals of enhanced vouchers); directs the Secretary to 
provide renewal funding based on validated voucher system 
leasing and cost data for the prior year; directs the 
Secretary, to the extent necessary, to prorate each public 
housing agency's (PHA) allocation; directs the Secretary to 
notify PHAs of their annual budget the later of 60 days after 
enactment of the Act or March 1, 2021; allows the Secretary to 
extend the notification period with the prior approval of the 
House and Senate appropriations committees; specifies the 
amounts available to the Secretary to allocate to PHAs that 
need additional funds and for fees; specifies the amount for 
additional rental subsidy due to unforeseen emergencies and 
portability; provides funding for public housing agencies with 
vouchers that were not in use during the previous 12 month 
period in order to be available to meet a commitment pursuant 
to section 8(o)(13); provides funding for various adjustments 
in the allocations for public housing agencies; provides 
funding for public housing agencies that despite taking 
reasonable measures, would otherwise be required to terminate 
assistance for families as a result of insufficient funding; 
and provides funding for public housing agencies that have 
experienced increased costs or loss of units in an area with a 
Presidentially declared disaster.
    Language is included under Department of Housing and Urban 
Development, `Tenant-Based Rental Assistance' which provides 
funds for tenant protection vouchers; sets certain conditions 
for the Secretary to provide such vouchers; provides funds for 
residents of multi-family properties that would not otherwise 
have been eligible for tenant-protection vouchers; sets 
eligibility requirements for multi-family properties to 
participate in the program; requires the Secretary to issue 
guidance on requirements; sets conditions for the reissuance of 
vouchers; and allows the Secretary to use unobligated and 
recaptured funds from prior years.
    Language is included under Department of Housing and Urban 
Development, `Tenant-Based Rental Assistance' which provides 
funds for administrative and other expenses of public housing 
agencies to administer the section 8 tenant-based rental 
assistance program; sets an amount to be available to PHAs that 
need additional funds to administer their section 8 programs, 
including fees to administer tenant protection assistance, 
disaster related vouchers, Veterans Affairs Supportive Housing 
vouchers and other special purpose vouchers; provides for the 
distribution of funds; provides for a uniform percentage 
decrease of amounts to be allocated if funds are not 
sufficient; establishes that `Moving to Work' (MTW) agencies be 
funded pursuant to their MTW agreements and in accordance with 
the requirements of the MTW program; provides funds for section 
811 mainstream vouchers (and allows for adjustments in 
allocations for public housing agencies under certain 
circumstances); provides funds for incremental HUD-VASH; 
provides funds for rental assistance and administrative costs 
associated with tribal veteran vouchers subject to certain 
conditions; provides funding for Family Unification Program 
vouchers, subject to certain conditions; provides funding for 
incremental vouchers for individuals and families who are 
experiencing homelessness, at risk of homelessness, or fleeing 
or attempting to flee domestic violence, dating violence, 
sexual assault, or stalking or for veterans and families that 
include a veteran family member, under certain conditions; and 
requires the Secretary to track special purpose vouchers.
    Language is included under Department of Housing and Urban 
Development, `Housing Certificate Fund' which rescinds prior 
year funds and allows the Secretary to use recaptures to fund 
project-based contracts and contract administrators.
    Language is included under Department of Housing and Urban 
Development, `Public Housing Capital Fund' which specifies the 
total amount available for certain activities; limits the 
availability of funds; limits the delegation of certain waiver 
authorities; specifies an amount for ongoing public housing 
financial and physical assessment activities; specifies an 
amount for administrative and judicial receiverships; specifies 
an amount for emergency capital needs, including for public 
housing agencies under administrative and judicial 
receiverships or under the control of a Federal monitor, and 
for safety and security measures; specifies an amount for 
competitive grants to public housing agencies to evaluate and 
reduce lead-based paint hazards and other housing-related 
hazards including carbon monoxide and mold in public housing, 
specifies an amount for competitive grants to public housing 
agencies for full service lead line replacement; specifies an 
amount for radon testing and mitigation in public housing; 
specifies an amount for competitive grants to public housing 
agencies for the installation of automatic sprinkler systems; 
establishes a limitation on amounts that can be transferred; 
makes funds available for bonuses for high performing PHAs; and 
establishes requirements for the notification to public housing 
agencies of their formula allocations.
    Language is included under Department of Housing and Urban 
Development, `Public Housing Operating Fund' which specifies 
the total amount available for certain activities; and modifies 
the period of availability.
    Language is included under Department of Housing and Urban 
Development, `Choice Neighborhoods Initiative' which allows the 
Secretary to make competitive grants for neighborhood 
rehabilitation; changes the availability of funds; allows funds 
to be used for services, development, and housing; declares 
funds not for ``public housing''; requires a period of 
affordability; requires local planning and cost share; allows 
local governments, tribal entities, public housing authorities 
and non-profits to be grantees; allows for-profits to partner 
and apply with a public entity; requires grantees to partner 
with local organizations; establishes conditions for 
environmental review; requires grantees to create partnerships 
with other local organizations; requires the Secretary to 
consult with other Federal agencies; allows prior year program 
funds and HOPE VI funds to be used for this program; specifies 
that the Secretary shall issue the NOFA for these funds no 
later than 90 days after the enactment of this Act; and 
establishes the period during which the Secretary shall make 
grant awards and obligate unobligated balances.
    Language is included under Department of Housing and Urban 
Development, `Self-Sufficiency Programs' which allows the 
Secretary to waive or specify certain requirements, establishes 
entities eligible to compete for funding, allows the 
establishment of escrow funds, allows the use of residual 
receipt accounts to hire coordinators for a number of 
sufficiency programs, and expands eligibility for Family Self-
Sufficiency Programs to include Project-Based Rental Assistance 
properties.
    Language is included under Department of Housing and Urban 
Development, `Native American Programs' which provides funding 
and funding availability. Language specifies amounts and 
conditions for the Native American Housing Block Grants formula 
program, guaranteed notes and obligations as defined in section 
502 of the Congressional Budget Act of 1974, the Indian 
Community Development Block Grant program, and training and 
technical assistance. Language authorizes and appropriates 
funding for competitive grants through the Native American 
Housing Block Grant program to be awarded at the discretion of 
the Secretary, specifies considerations for the Secretary in 
making funding awards, establishes minimum and maximum grant 
award sizes, and authorizes transfers of funds for 
administrative expenses.
    Language is included under Department of Housing and Urban 
Development, `Indian Housing Loan Guarantee Fund Program 
Account' which specifies the amount and availability of funds 
to subsidize total loan principal, specifies how to define the 
costs of modifying loans, provides a specific amount for 
administrative expenses, sets a total loan principal for fiscal 
year 2021, and allows the use of unobligated balances remaining 
from amounts made available under prior Acts for the cost of 
guaranteed loans.
    Language is included under Department of Housing and Urban 
Development, `Native Hawaiian Housing Block Grant' which 
provides funding and funding availability. Language prevents 
and authorizes certain activities.
    Language is included under Department of Housing and Urban 
Development, `Housing Opportunities for Persons with AIDS' 
which limits availability of funds and sets forth certain 
requirements for the allocation of funds, renewal of contracts, 
and grantee notification.
    Language is included under Department of Housing and Urban 
Development, `Community Development Fund' which limits the use 
and availability of certain funds; specifies the allocation of 
certain funds; prohibits grant recipients from selling, trading 
or transferring funds; prohibits the provision of funds to for-
profit entities for economic development projects unless 
certain conditions are met; specifies an amount for activities 
authorized under section 8071 of the SUPPORT Act; requires 
grantee notification of formula allocations within 60 days of 
enactment; includes a reporting requirement on certain 
emergency designated funds; modifies apportionment requirements 
for certain emergency designated funds; and designates such 
repurposing as an emergency requirement.
    Language is included under Department of Housing and Urban 
Development, `Community Development Loan Guarantees Program 
Account' which limits the principal amount of loan guarantees; 
directs the Secretary to collect fees from borrowers adequate 
to result in credit subsidy cost of zero; and allows the 
Section 108 loan guarantee program to guarantee notes or other 
obligations issued by any State on behalf of non-entitlement 
communities in the State.
    Language is included under Department of Housing and Urban 
Development, `Home Investment Partnerships Program' which 
limits the availability of funds; specifies the allocation of 
certain funds for certain purposes; requires grantee 
notification within 60 days of enactment; and prohibits 
sections 218(g) and 231(b) of the Cranston-Gonzalez National 
Affordable Housing Act from applying with respect to the right 
of a jurisdiction to draw HOME funds that otherwise expired or 
would expire in 2016 through 2023, and to uninvested funds that 
otherwise were deducted or would be deducted in 2018 through 
2023, respectively.
    Language is included under Department of Housing and Urban 
Development, `Self-help and Assisted Homeownership Opportunity 
Program' which specifies funding amounts for certain programs, 
limits the period of availability, and specifies certain 
amounts for rural activities and organizations.
    Language is included under Department of Housing and Urban 
Development, `Homeless Assistance Grants' which limits the 
availability of funds; specifies the allocation of certain 
funds for certain purposes; specifies matching requirements; 
requires the Secretary to establish minimum performance 
thresholds for projects; requires the Secretary to prioritize 
funding to grant applicants that demonstrate a capacity to 
reallocate funding to higher performing projects; requires 
grantees to integrate homeless programs with other social 
service providers; requires notification of formula allocations 
within 60 days of enactment.
    Language is included under Department of Housing and Urban 
Development, `Project-Based Rental Assistance' which provides 
funds, limits the availability of funds, specifies the 
allocation of certain funds for certain purposes, and allows 
the Secretary to recapture residual receipts from certain 
properties.
    Language is included under Department of Housing and Urban 
Development, `Housing for the Elderly' which limits the 
availability of funds; specifies the allocation of certain 
funds; designates certain funds to be used only for certain 
grants; allows funds to be used for specified inspections or 
inspection-related activities; allows funds to be used to renew 
certain contracts; allows the Secretary to waive certain 
provisions governing contract terms; allows excess funds held 
in residual receipts accounts, after contract termination, to 
be deposited in this account; and limits the availability and 
use of these funds.
    Language is included under Department of Housing and Urban 
Development, `Housing for Persons with Disabilities' which 
limits the availability of funds; specifies the allocation of 
certain funds; allows funds to be used for inspections or 
inspection-related activities; allows funds to be used to renew 
certain contracts; allows funds held in residual account, after 
contract termination, to be deposited in this account; and 
limits the availability and use of these funds.
    Language is included under Department of Housing and Urban 
Development, `Housing Counseling Assistance' that provides 
funds for described purposes, limits the availability of funds, 
specifies amounts to be used for specified purposes, requires 
the Secretary to make grants within a specified time frame, and 
allows multiyear agreements subject to the availability of 
annual appropriations.
    Language is included under Department of Housing and Urban 
Development, `Payment to Manufactured Housing Fees Trust Fund' 
that permits fees to be assessed, modified, and collected for 
dispute resolution and installation programs; permits temporary 
borrowing authority from the general fund of the Treasury; 
provides that general fund amounts from collections offset the 
appropriation so that the resulting appropriation is a 
specified amount; directs a rulemaking; requires fees collected 
to be deposited into the Manufactured Housing Fees Trust Fund; 
allows fees to be used for necessary expenses and limits their 
availability; and allows the Secretary to use approved service 
providers.
    Language is included under the Department of Housing and 
Urban Development, `Mutual Mortgage Insurance Program Account' 
which limits new commitments to issue guarantees, limits new 
obligations to make direct loans, specifies funds for 
administrative contract expenses, specifies that the Secretary 
may insure specific mortgages only under certain conditions, 
specifies the extent that the commitment levels allow for 
additional contract expenses, and limits the availability of 
funds.
    Language is included under Department of Housing and Urban 
Development, `General and Special Risk Program Account' which 
limits new commitments to issue guarantees, limits new 
obligations to make direct loans, and limits the availability 
of funds.
    Language is included under Department of Housing and Urban 
Development, `Government National Mortgage Association' which 
limits new commitments to issue guarantees, provides funds for 
salaries and expenses, allows specified receipts to be credited 
as offsetting collections, allows for additional contract 
expenses as guaranteed loan commitments exceed certain levels, 
and limits the availability of funds.
    Language is included under Department of Housing and Urban 
Development, `Policy Development and Research' which limits the 
availability of funds, specifies authorized uses, allows the 
Secretary to enter into cooperative agreements under specified 
circumstances; directs the submission of a spend plan; and 
prohibits funding for a specified use.
    Language is included under Department of Housing and Urban 
Development, `Fair Housing and Equal Opportunity' which 
provides funds for certain purposes, limits the availability of 
funds, requires the Secretary to make grants within a specified 
time frame, authorizes the Secretary to assess and collect 
fees, and provides funds for programs that support the 
assistance of persons with limited English proficiency.
    Language is included under Department of Housing and Urban 
Development, `Office of Lead Hazard Control and Healthy Homes' 
which changes the period of availability of funds, specifies 
the amount of funds for specific purposes, specifies the 
treatment of certain grants, specifies a matching requirement 
for grants, requires a certification of adequate capacity, and 
authorizes the transfer of funds for the purposes of conducting 
research and studies.
    Language is included under Department of Housing and Urban 
Development, `Cybersecurity and Information Technology Fund' 
which changes the period of availability and purpose of funds, 
including funds transferred, and requires a plan for 
expenditure.
    Language is included under Department of Housing and Urban 
Development, `Office of Inspector General' which specifies the 
use of funds and directs that the Inspector General shall have 
independent authority over all personnel issues within the 
office.
    Section 201 splits overpayments evenly between Treasury and 
State HFAs.
    Section 202 prohibits funds from being used to investigate 
or prosecute lawful activities under the Fair Housing Act.
    Section 203 requires any grant or cooperative agreement to 
be made on a competitive basis, unless otherwise provided, in 
accordance with Section 102 of the Department of Housing and 
Urban Development Reform Act of 1989.
    Section 204 relates to the availability of funds for 
services and facilities for GSEs and others subject to the 
Government Corporation Control Act and the Housing Act of 1950.
    Section 205 prohibits the use of funds in excess of the 
budget estimates, unless provided otherwise.
    Section 206 relates to the expenditure of funds for 
corporations and agencies subject to the Government Corporation 
Control Act.
    Section 207 requires the Secretary to provide quarterly 
reports on uncommitted, unobligated, recaptured, and excess 
funds in each departmental program and activity.
    Section 208 exempts GNMA from certain requirements of the 
Federal Credit Reform Act of 1990.
    Section 209 authorizes HUD to transfer debt and use 
agreements from an obsolete project to a viable project, 
provided that no additional costs are incurred and other 
conditions are met.
    Section 210 sets forth requirements for Section 8 voucher 
assistance eligibility, and includes consideration for persons 
with disabilities.
    Section 211 distributes Native American Housing Block 
Grants to the same Native Alaskan recipients as in fiscal year 
2005.
    Section 212 instructs HUD on managing and disposing of any 
multifamily property that is owned or held by HUD.
    Section 213 allows PHAs that own and operate 400 or fewer 
units of public housing to be exempt from asset management 
requirements.
    Section 214 restricts the Secretary from imposing any 
requirements or guidelines relating to asset management that 
restrict or limit the use of capital funds for central office 
costs, up to the limits established in law.
    Section 215 requires that no employee of the Department 
shall be designated as an allotment holder unless the CFO 
determines that such employee has received certain training.
    Section 216 requires the Secretary to publish all notices 
of funding availability that are competitively awarded on the 
internet for fiscal year 2021.
    Section 217 requires attorney fees for programmatic 
litigation to be paid from the individual program office and 
Office of General Counsel salaries and expenses appropriations.
    Section 218 allows the Secretary to transfer up to 10 
percent of funds or $5,000,000, whichever is less, appropriated 
under the headings ``Administrative Support Offices'' or 
``Program Offices'' to any other offices funded under such 
headings with certain exceptions.
    Section 219 requires HUD to take certain actions against 
owners receiving rental subsidies that do not maintain safe 
properties.
    Section 220 places a salary and bonus limit on public 
housing agency officials and employees.
    Section 221 requires the Secretary to notify the House and 
Senate Committees on Appropriations at least 3 full business 
days before grant awards are announced.
    Section 222 prohibits funds to be used to require or 
enforce the Physical Needs Assessment (PNA).
    Section 223 prohibits funds for HUD financing of mortgages 
for properties that have been subject to eminent domain.
    Section 224 prohibits the use of funds to terminate the 
status of a unit of general local government as a metropolitan 
city with respect to grants under section 106 of the Housing 
and Community Development Act of 1974.
    Section 225 allows funding for research, evaluation, and 
statistical purposes that is unexpended at the time of 
completion of the contract, grant, or cooperative agreement to 
be reobligated for additional research.
    Section 226 authorizes the Secretary on a limited basis to 
use funds available under the ``Homeless Assistance Grants'' 
heading to participate in the multiagency performance 
partnership pilots program for fiscal year 2021.
    Section 227 allows program income as an eligible match for 
continuum of care funds.
    Section 228 permits HUD to provide one year transition 
grants under the continuum of care program.
    Section 229 prohibits the use of funds to direct a grantee 
to undertake specific changes to existing zoning laws as part 
of carrying out the final rule entitled, ``Affirmatively 
Furthering Fair Housing'' or the notice entitled, 
``Affirmatively Further Fair Housing Assessment Tool''.
    Section 230 maintains current promise zone designations and 
agreements.
    Section 231 prohibits funds from being used to establish 
review criteria, including rating factors or preference points, 
for competitive grants programs for envision center 
participation or coordination.
    Section 232 prohibits funds from being used to make changes 
to the Annual Contributions Contract that was in effect on 
December 31, 2017.
    Section 233 addresses the establishment of reserves for 
public housing agencies designated as Moving to Work agencies.
    Section 234 prohibits funds from being used to make certain 
eligibility limitations as part of a notice of funding 
availability for competitive grant awards under the Public 
Housing Capital Fund.
    Section 235 prohibits funds in this or any other Act from 
being used to repeal or revise the ``Equal Access in Accordance 
With an Individual's Gender Identity in Community Planning and 
Development Programs'' rule.
    Section 236 codifies the sub-regulatory guidance issued by 
the Department of Housing and Urban Development on February 20, 
2015, entitled ``Appropriate Placement for Transgender Persons 
in Single-Sex Emergency Shelters and Other Facilities''.
    Section 237 prohibits funds from being used to implement, 
administer, enforce, or in any way make effective the proposed 
rule entitled ``Housing and Community Development Act of 1980: 
Verification of Eligible Status'', issued by the Department on 
May 10, 2019 (Docket No. FR-6124-P-01), or any final rule based 
substantively on such proposed rule.
    Section 238 rescinds all remaining balances from the Rental 
Housing Assistance account.
    Section 239 changes the availability of certain funding in 
the Disaster Relief Appropriations Act, 2013 (Public Law 113-2, 
division A; 127 Stat. 36) and specifies conditions for certain 
waivers.

                      TITLE III--RELATED AGENCIES

    Language is included for the Access Board, `Salaries and 
Expenses' that limits funds for necessary expenses and allows 
for the credit to the appropriation of funds received for 
publications and training expenses.
    Language is included for the Federal Maritime Commission, 
`Salaries and Expenses' which provides funds for services 
authorized by 5 U.S.C. 3109, the hire of passenger motor 
vehicles, uniforms and allowances; and limits funds for 
official reception and representation expenses.
    Language is included for the National Railroad Passenger 
Corporation, Office of Inspector General, `Salaries and 
Expenses' which provides funds for an independent, objective 
unit responsible for detecting and preventing fraud, waste, 
abuse, and violations of law. Language allows the Inspector 
General (IG) to enter into contracts; allows the IG to select, 
appoint, or employ officers and employees to carry out its 
functions; and requires the IG to submit its budget request 
concurrently with the President's budget and in a similar 
format.
    Language is included under National Transportation Safety 
Board, `Salaries and Expenses' that provides funds for hire of 
passenger motor vehicles and aircraft, services authorized by 5 
U.S.C. 3109, uniforms or allowances therefore, limits funds for 
official reception and representation expenses, and allows 
funds to be used to pay for costs associated with a capital 
lease.
    Language is included in the Neighborhood Reinvestment 
Corporation (NRC), `Payment to the Neighborhood Reinvestment 
Corporation' that specifies the allocation of funds, including 
for competitive grants to carry out neighborhood revitalization 
support activities in eligible localities under certain 
conditions.
    Language is included under Surface Transportation Board, 
`Salaries and Expenses' which provides funds, allows the 
collection of a specified level of fees established by the 
Surface Transportation Board, and provides that the sum 
appropriated from the general fund of the Treasury shall be 
reduced on a dollar-for-dollar basis as such fees are received.
    Language is included under the United States Interagency 
Council on Homelessness, `Operating Expenses' that provides 
funds to carry out functions pursuant to title II of the 
McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Act, and places limitations 
on the use of funds.

                 TITLE IV--GENERAL PROVISIONS, THIS ACT

    Section 401 prohibits the use of funds for the planning or 
execution of any program to pay the expenses of, or otherwise 
compensate, non-Federal parties intervening in regulatory or 
adjudicatory proceedings.
    Section 402 prohibits the obligation of funds beyond the 
current fiscal year and the transfer of funds to other 
appropriations, unless expressly provided.
    Section 403 limits consulting service expenditures through 
procurement contracts to those contracts contained in the 
public record, except where otherwise provided under existing 
law.
    Section 404 prohibits funds from being used for certain 
types of employee training.
    Section 405 specifies requirements for the reprogramming of 
funds and requires agencies to submit a report in order to 
establish the baseline for the application of reprogramming and 
transfer authorities.
    Section 406 provides that not to exceed fifty percent of 
unobligated balances for salaries and expenses may remain 
available until September 30, 2022, for each account for the 
purposes authorized, subject to the approval of the House and 
Senate Committees on Appropriations.
    Section 407 prohibits the use of funds for any project that 
seeks to use the power of eminent domain, unless eminent domain 
is employed only for a public use.
    Section 408 prohibits funds from being transferred to any 
department, agency, or instrumentality of the U.S. Government, 
except where transfer authority is provided in this or any 
other appropriations Act.
    Section 409 prohibits funds from being used to permanently 
replace an employee intent on returning to his or her past 
occupation following completion of military service.
    Section 410 prohibits funds from being used by an entity 
unless the expenditure is in compliance with the Buy American 
Act.
    Section 411 prohibits funds from being made available to 
any person or entity that has been convicted of violating the 
Buy American Act.
    Section 412 prohibits funds from being used for first-class 
airline accommodations in contravention of sections 301-10.122 
and 301-10.123 of title 41 CFR.
    Section 413 prohibits funds from being used for the 
approval of a new foreign air carrier permit or exemption 
application if that approval would contravene United States law 
or Article 17 bis of the U.S.-E.U.-Iceland-Norway Air Transport 
Agreement.
    Section 414 restricts the number of employees that agencies 
may send to international conferences unless such attendance is 
important to the national interest.
    Section 415 caps the amount of fees the Surface 
Transportation Board can charge or collect for rate or practice 
complaints filed at the amount authorized for district court 
civil suit filing fees.
    Section 416 prohibits the use of funds to purchase or lease 
new light-duty vehicles for any executive fleet or fleet 
inventory, except in accordance with Presidential Memorandum-
Federal Fleet Performance, dated May 24, 2011.
    Section 417 prohibits funds from being used to maintain or 
establish computer networks unless such networks block the 
viewing, downloading, or exchange of pornography.
    Section 418 prohibits funds from being used to deny an 
Inspector General timely access to any records, documents, or 
other materials available to the department or agency over 
which that Inspector General has responsibilities, or to 
prevent or impede that Inspector General's access to such 
records, documents, or other materials.
    Section 419 prohibits funds to be used to pay award or 
incentive fees for contractors whose performance is below 
satisfactory, behind schedule, over budget, or failed to meet 
requirements of the contract, with exceptions.
    Section 420 prohibits funds from being used in 
contravention of section 2635.702 of title 5 CFR.
    Section 421 requires the use of masks and enhanced 
sanitation measures on airplanes, Amtrak trains, and certain 
large public transit systems for the duration of the 
presidentially declared COVID-19 national emergency.

             TITLE V--ADDITIONAL INFRASTRUCTURE INVESTMENTS

    Language is included under Office of the Secretary, 
`National Infrastructure Investments' which authorizes and 
appropriates grant funding for surface transportation 
infrastructure to be competitively awarded and subject to the 
provisions in title I of this Act; limits the availability of 
funds; authorizes a portion of funds for planning, preparation, 
and design of projects; authorizes a portion of funds for 
eligible projects located in or directly benefiting areas of 
persistent poverty; specifies minimum and maximum grants sizes; 
limits awards per State; establishes minimum funding amounts 
for rural and urban projects; authorizes the Secretary to use 
funds for departmental administrative costs; and establishes 
deadlines for when and how the Secretary solicits applications 
for grants and makes awards.
    Language is included under Office of the Secretary, `Cyber 
Security Initiatives' which provides funds and funding 
availability.
    Language is included under Federal Aviation Administration, 
`Facilities and Equipment' which funds certain activities from 
the general fund and limits the availability of funds.
    Language is included under Federal Aviation Administration, 
`Grants-in-aid for Airports' which provides funds from the 
general fund; specifies the availability and priorities of 
funds; specifies the use of certain funds; and allows funds to 
be used for administrative expenses.
    Language is included under Federal Railroad Administration, 
`Consolidated Rail Infrastructure and Safety Improvements' 
which provides funds and funding availability, specifies that 
the funds are subject to the provisions in title I of this Act, 
sets aside amounts for specified purposes, and establishes 
deadlines for when and how the Secretary solicits applications 
for grants and makes awards.
    Language is included under Federal Railroad Administration, 
`Magnetic Levitation Technology Deployment Program' which 
provides funds, limits the availability of funds, and allows 
the Secretary to withhold funding for a specified purpose.
    Language is included under Federal Railroad Administration, 
`Northeast Corridor Grants to the National Railroad Passenger 
Corporation' which provides funds and funding availability, 
specifies that the funds are subject to the provisions in title 
I of this Act, establishes deadlines for when the Secretary 
makes awards, allows the use of funds for specific purposes, 
and sets aside amounts for specified activities.
    Language is included under Federal Railroad Administration, 
`National Network Grants to the National Railroad Passenger 
Corporation' which provides funding and funding availability, 
specifies that the funds are subject to the provisions in title 
I of this Act, established deadlines for when the Secretary 
makes awards, allows the use of funds for specific purposes, 
and sets aside amounts for specified activities.
    Language is included under Federal Transit Administration, 
`Capital Investment Grants' which specifies amounts for 
specific purposes under 49 U.S.C. 5309 and specifies the period 
of availability and the priority of such funds.
    Language is included under Maritime Administration, 
`Operations and Training' which provides funds for specific 
purposes, limits funding availability, and establishes 
deadlines for when the Secretary makes grants.
    Language is included under Maritime Administration, `State 
Maritime Academy Operations' which provides funds for specific 
purposes and limits funding availability.
    Language is included under Maritime Administration, 
`Assistance to Small Shipyards' which provides funds and 
funding availability, establishes deadlines for when the 
Secretary makes grants and obligates funding, and allows the 
Secretary to withhold funding for a specified purpose.
    Language is included under Maritime Administration, `Port 
Infrastructure Development Program', which provides funds and 
funding availability, specifies that the funds are subject to 
the provisions in title I of this Act, sets aside amounts for 
specified purposes, establishes deadlines for when and how the 
Secretary solicits applications for grants and makes awards, 
and allows the withholding of funds for a specified purpose.
    Language is included under Department of Housing and Urban 
Development, `Public Housing Capital Fund' which specifies the 
total amount available for certain activities subject to the 
provisions in title II of this Act; limits the availability of 
funds; limits the delegation of certain waiver authorities; 
specifies the funds available by competition for certain 
activities, including those that improve water and energy 
efficiency, reduce the risk of harm due to natural hazards, 
mitigate threats to health and safety of residents, reduce 
lead-based paint hazards and other housing related hazards 
including carbon monoxide, mold, or radon; allows the Secretary 
to waive or specify requirements except those related to fair 
housing, nondiscrimination, labor standards, and the 
environment; and allows a transfer for program administration.
    Language is included under Department of Housing and Urban 
Development, `Choice Neighborhoods Initiative' which allows the 
Secretary to make competitive grants for neighborhood 
rehabilitation subject to the provisions in title II of this 
Act; limits the availability of funds; provides for an amount 
to be used for activities that improve water and energy 
efficiency or reduce the risk of harm due to natural hazards; 
provides that all construction, rehabilitation, and related 
activities funded under this heading shall comply with the 
latest published editions of relevant national consensus-based 
codes (and defines the term) or a higher standard; and allows a 
transfer for program administration.
    Language is included under Department of Housing and Urban 
Development, `Native American Programs' which provides funding 
and funding availability. Language specifies amounts and 
conditions for the Native American Housing Block Grants formula 
program and the Indian Community Development Block Grant 
program. Language authorizes and appropriates funding for 
competitive grants through the Native American Housing Block 
Grant program to be awarded at the discretion of the Secretary, 
specifies considerations for the Secretary in making funding 
awards, and establishes minimum and maximum grant award sizes. 
Language establishes deadlines for when and how the Secretary 
solicits applications for grants and makes awards; allows the 
Secretary to waive or specify requirements except those related 
to fair housing, nondiscrimination, labor standards, and the 
environment; sets aside amounts for specified activities; and 
authorizes transfers of funds for administrative expenses.
    Language is included under Department of Housing and Urban 
Development, `Native Hawaiian Housing Block Grant' which 
provides funding and funding availability. Language specifies 
that the funds are subject to the provisions in title II of 
this Act, sets aside amounts for specified activities, and 
authorizes transfers of funds for administrative expenses.
    Language is included under Department of Housing and Urban 
Development, `Community Development Fund' which limits the use 
and availability of certain funds; specifies the allocation of 
certain funds subject to the provisions in title II of this 
Act; specifies the time in which allocations shall be made; 
provides for an amount to be used for activities that improve 
water and energy efficiency or reduce the risk of harm due to 
natural hazards; and allows a transfer for program 
administration.
    Language is included under Department of Housing and Urban 
Development, `HOME Investment Partnerships Program' which 
limits the availability of funds; specifies the allocation of 
certain funds for certain purposes subject to the provisions in 
title II of this Act; specifies an amount available to areas of 
persistent poverty, defines the term, and indicates that 
expenditure of these funds shall not be subject to a minimum 
grant size; provides for an amount to be used for activities 
that improve water and energy efficiency or reduce the risk of 
harm due to natural hazards; and allows a transfer for program 
administration.
    Language is included under Department of Housing and Urban 
Development, `Self-help and Assisted Homeownership Opportunity 
Program' which specifies funding amounts for certain programs, 
limits the period of availability, and specifies certain 
amounts for rural activities and organizations.
    Language is included under Department of Housing and Urban 
Development, `Assisted Housing Investments' which specifies the 
allocation of certain funds for certain purposes, limits the 
period of availability of funds, and authorizes the transfer of 
funds for program administration.
    Language is included under Department of Housing and Urban 
Development, `Housing for the Elderly' which specifies the 
allocation of certain funds for certain purposes, limits the 
period of availability of funds, and authorizes the transfer of 
funds for program administration.
    Language is included under Department of Housing and Urban 
Development, `Housing for Persons with Disabilities' which 
specifies the allocation of certain funds for certain purposes, 
limits the period of availability of funds, and authorizes the 
transfer of funds for program administration.
    Language is included under Department of Housing and Urban 
Development, `Office of Lead Hazard Control and Healthy Homes' 
which limits the period of availability of funds and specifies 
funding amounts for certain purposes.
    Language is included under Department of Housing and Urban 
Development, `Cybersecurity and Information Technology Fund' 
which limits the availability and purpose of the funds.
    Language is included in the Neighborhood Reinvestment 
Corporation (NRC), `Payment to the Neighborhood Reinvestment 
Corporation' that specifies the allocation of funds subject to 
the provisions in title III of this Act, including for 
competitive grants for certain neighborhood reinvestment 
activities and associated administrative expenses; and provides 
for an amount to be used for activities that improve water and 
energy efficiency or reduce the risk of harm due to natural 
hazards.
    Section 501 applies subchapter IV of chapter 31 of title 
40, United States Code, to activities funded in this title, 
with exceptions.
    Section 502 specifies conditions for the use of funding 
made available in this title under the headings ``Northeast 
Corridor Grants to the National Railroad Passenger 
Corporation'' and ``National Network Grants to the National 
Railroad Passenger Corporation''.
    Section 503 specifies conditions for the use of amounts in 
this Act by Congress for an emergency requirement pursuant to 
section 251(b)(2)(A)(i) of the Balanced Budget and Emergency 
Control Act of 1985.

                  APPROPRIATIONS NOT AUTHORIZED BY LAW

    Pursuant to clause 3(f)(1)(B) of rule XIII of the Rules of 
the House of Representatives, the following table lists the 
appropriations in the accompanying bill which are not 
authorized by law for the period concerned:

                        Appropriations Not Authorized by Law and Expiring Authorizations
                                             [Dollars in Thousands]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                         Appropriations
                                          Last year of    Authorization   in last year    Appropriations in this
                Program                  authorization        level            of                  bill
                                                                          authorization
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                    Title I--Department of Transportation\1\
 
Office of the Secretary:
    National Infrastructure                        N/A   not applicable  not applicable               $1,000,000
     Investments......................
Federal Highway Administration:
    Limitation on Administrative                  2020         $456,797        $456,799                  478,897
     Expenses\1\......................
    Federal-Aid Highways\1\...........            2020       47,104,092      47,104,092               61,869,000
    Highway Infrastructure Programs...             N/A   not applicable  not applicable                1,000,000
Federal Motor Carrier Safety
 Administration:
    Motor Carrier Safety Operations               2020          288,000         288,000                  379,500
     and Programs\1\..................
    Motor Carrier Safety Grants\1\....            2020          387,800         391,136                  506,200
National Highway Traffic Safety
 Administration:
    Operations and Research: General              2020          214,073         194,000                  214,073
     Fund.............................
    Operations and Research: Highway              2020          155,300         155,300                  170,612
     Trust Fund\1\....................
    Highway Traffic Safety Grants\1\..            2020          623,017         623,017                  855,488
Federal Railroad Administration:
    Safety and Operations.............            2013          293,000         169,254                  236,134
    Railroad Research and Development.             N/A   not applicable  not applicable                   41,000
    Federal-State Partnership for                 2020          300,000         200,000                  200,000
     State of Good Repair.............
    Consolidated Rail Infrastructure              2020          330,000         325,000                  500,000
     and Safety Improvements..........
    Magnetic Levitation Technology                2009           45,000  not applicable                    5,000
     Deployment Program...............
    Northeast Corridor Grants to the              2020          600,000         700,000                  750,000
     National Railroad Passenger
     Corporation......................
    National Network Grants to the                2020        1,200,000       1,300,000                1,300,000
     National Railroad Passenger
     Corporation......................
Federal Transit Administration:
    Administrative Expenses...........            2020          115,017         117,000                  121,052
    Transit Formula Grants\1\.........            2020       10,150,348      10,150,348               15,945,200
    Transit Infrastructure Grants.....             N/A   not applicable  not applicable                  510,000
    Technical Assistance and Training.            2020            5,000           5,000                    7,000
    Capital Investment Grants.........            2020        2,301,786       1,978,000                2,175,000
    Grants to the Washington                      2020          150,000         150,000                  150,000
     Metropolitan Area Transit
     Authority........................
Maritime Administration:
    Operations and Training...........            2020          156,386         152,589                  161,417
    State Maritime Academy Operations.            2020          650,280         342,280                  431,700
    Assistance to Small Shipyards.....            2020           40,000          20,000                   20,000
    Ship Disposal.....................            2020            5,000           5,000                    5,000
    Maritime Guaranteed Loan (Title               2020           33,000           3,000                    3,000
     XI) Program Account..............
    Port Infrastructure Development               2020          500,000         225,000                  300,000
     Program..........................
Pipeline and Hazardous Materials
 Safety Administration:
    Operational Expenses..............            2019           23,000          23,710                   25,715
    Hazardous Materials Safety........            2020           60,000          61,000                   62,000
    Pipeline Safety:
        Oil Spill Liability Trust Fund            2019           23,000          23,000                   23,000
        Pipeline Safety Fund..........            2019          134,000         134,000                  140,000
        Underground Natural Gas                   2019            8,000           8,000                   10,000
         Storage Facility Safety
         Account......................
    Emergency Preparedness Grants.....            2020           27,763          28,318                   28,318
 
                              Title II--Department of Housing and Urban Development
 
Management and Administration.........            1994       $1,029,496        $916,963               $1,524,595
Rental Assistance:
    Section 8 Voucher Renewals and                1994        8,446,173       5,458,106               25,006,812
     Administrative Expenses..........
    Public Housing Capital Fund.......            2003        3,000,000       2,712,555                3,180,000
    Public Housing Operating Fund.....            2003        2,900,000       3,576,600                4,649,000
Native American Housing Block                     2013     Such sums as         616,001                  765,000
 Grants\2\............................                        necessary
Indian Housing Loan Guarantee Fund                2014           50,000           1,000                    1,600
 Program Account......................
Native Hawaiian Housing Block Grant...            2004     Such sums as  not applicable                    4,000
                                                              necessary
Housing Opportunities for Persons with            1994          156,300         156,000                  430,000
 AIDS.................................
Community Development Fund\3\.........            1994        4,168,000       4,877,389                3,595,000
Community Development Loan Guarantee              1994   not applicable  not applicable           not applicable
 Limitation...........................
Home Investment Partnerships Program..            1994        2,173,612       1,275,000                1,700,000
Choice Neighborhoods Initiatives......             N/A   not applicable  not applicable                  250,000
Self-Help Homeownership Opportunity               2001     Such sums as          48,000                   60,000
 Program..............................                        necessary
Homeless Assistance...................            2011     Such sums as       1,901,190                3,415,000
                                                              necessary
Housing for the Elderly...............            2003     Such sums as         783,286                  893,000
                                                              necessary
Housing for Persons with Disabilities.            2015          300,000         135,000                  227,000
FHA General and Special Risk Program
 Account:
    Limitations on Guaranteed Loans...            1995     Such sums as    [20,885,072]             [30,000,000]
                                                              necessary
    Limitation on Direct Loans........            1995     Such sums as       [220,000]                  [1,000]
                                                              necessary
GNMA Mortgage Backed Securities Loan
 Guarantee Program Account:
    Limitations on Guaranteed Loans...            1996    [110,000,000]   [110,000,000]      [1,500,000,000,000]
    Administrative Expenses...........            1996     Such sums as           9,101                   55,500
                                                              necessary
Policy Development and Research.......            1994           36,470          35,000                  118,000
Fair Housing Activities, Fair Housing             1994           26,000          20,481                   80,300
 Program..............................
Lead Hazard Reduction Program.........            1994          250,000         150,000                  340,000
Cybersecurity and Information                      N/A   not applicable  not applicable                  293,000
 Technology Fund......................
 
                                           Title III--Related Agencies
 
Federal Maritime Commission...........            2019           28,545          27,490                   29,800
National Railroad Passenger                       2020           22,000          24,274                   26,248
 Corporation Office of Inspector
 General..............................
Neighborhood Reinvestment Corporation.            1994           30,714          31,715                  208,500
Surface Transportation Board..........            2020           36,000          37,100                   37,500
United States Interagency Council on              2011     Such sums as           2,680                    3,800
 Homelessness.........................                        necessary
                                 Title V--Additional Infrastructure Investments
Department of Transportation
Office of the Secretary
National Infrastructure Investments...             N/A   not applicable  not applicable               $3,000,000
Federal Railroad Administration
Consolidated Rail Infrastructure and              2020         $330,000        $325,000                5,000,000
 Safety Improvements..................
Magnetic Levitation Technology                    2009           45,000  not applicable                  100,000
 Deployment Program...................
Northeast Corridor Grants to the                  2020          600,000         700,000                5,000,000
 National Railroad Passenger
 Corporation..........................
National Network Grants to the                    2020        1,200,000       1,300,000                3,000,000
 National Railroad Passenger
 Corporation..........................
Federal Transit Administration
Capital Investment Grants.............            2020        2,301,786       1,978,000                5,000,000
Maritime Administration
Operations and Training...............            2020          156,386         152,589                  125,000
State Maritime Academy Operations.....            2020          650,280         342,280                  345,500
Assistance to Small Shipyards.........            2020           40,000          20,000                  100,000
Port Infrastructure Development                   2020          500,000         225,000                1,000,000
 Program..............................
Department of Housing and Urban
 Development
Rental Assistance:
Public Housing Capital Fund...........            2003        3,000,000       2,712,555               24,250,000
Choice Neighborhoods Initiatives......             N/A   not applicable  not applicable                  300,000
Native American Housing Block                     2013     Such sums as         616,001                  750,000
 Grants\2\............................                        necessary
Native Hawaiian Housing Block Grant...            2004     Such sums as  not applicable                   20,000
                                                              necessary
Community Development Fund\3\.........            1994        4,168,000       4,877,389                4,250,000
Home Investment Partnerships Program..            1994        2,173,612       1,275,000               17,500,000
Self-Help Homeownership Opportunity               2001     Such sums as          48,000                   55,000
 Program..............................                        necessary
Assisted Housing Investments..........             N/A   not applicable  not applicable                  750,000
Housing for the Elderly...............            2003     Such sums as         783,286                  750,000
                                                              necessary
Housing for Persons with Disabilities.            2015          300,000         135,000                  179,000
Lead Hazard Reduction Program.........            1994          250,000         150,000                  100,000
Cybersecurity and Information                      N/A   not applicable  not applicable                  100,000
 Technology Fund......................
Related Agency
Neighborhood Reinvestment Corporation.            1994           30,714          31,715                  300,000
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
\1\For programs funded by the Highway Trust Fund, the table reflects the authorized and appropriated obligation
  limitations. Those programs receive contract authority, a mandatory form of budget authority, from the
  authorizing statute.
\2\Reflects amounts associated with Native American Housing Block Grants appropriated within the Native American
  Programs account.
\3\Reflects amounts associated with Indian Community Development Block Grants appropriated within the Native
  American Programs account.

                          PROGRAM DUPLICATION

    Pursuant to clause 3(c)(5) of rule XIII of the Rules of the 
House of Representatives, no provision of this bill establishes 
or reauthorizes a program of the Federal Government known to be 
duplicative of another Federal program, a program that was 
included in any report from the Government Accountability 
Office to Congress pursuant to section 21 of Public Law 111-
139, or a program related to a program identified in the most 
recent Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance.


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                           COMMITTEE HEARINGS

    In compliance with Sec. 103(i) of H. Res. 6 (116th 
Congress) the following hearings were used to develop the 
fiscal year 2021 Transportation, Housing and Urban Development, 
and Related Agencies Appropriations Bill:

------------------------------------------------------------------------
              Date                 Title of Hearing        Witnesses
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Feb. 27, 2020...................  Department of       The Honorable
                                   Transportation      Elaine L. Chao,
                                   Budget Request      Secretary,
                                   for Fiscal Year     Department of
                                   2021.               Transportation
March 4, 2020...................  Department of       The Honorable
                                   Housing and Urban   Benjamin S.
                                   Development         Carson,
                                   Budget Request      Secretary,
                                   for Fiscal Year     Department of
                                   2021.               Housing and Urban
                                                       Development
March 11, 2020..................  Federal Aviation    The Honorable
                                   Administration      Steve Dickson,
                                   Budget Request      Administrator,
                                   for Fiscal Year     Federal Aviation
                                   2021.               Administration
------------------------------------------------------------------------

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                             MINORITY VIEWS

    The Fiscal Year 2021 Transportation, Housing and Urban 
Development, and Related Agencies bill supports programs and 
policies that will benefit communities across the nation by 
improving our transportation infrastructure and expanding 
housing opportunities.
    The investments in transportation will help facilitate the 
movement of American goods, both domestically and 
internationally, and will improve the safety of the traveling 
public.
    We commend the majority for including funding for grant 
programs that will directly benefit states and local 
communities, including funding for Better Utilizing Investment 
to Leverage Development (BUILD), airport, highway, rail, and 
transit grants. We are particularly pleased that the bill 
includes strong support for port infrastructure, the maritime 
security program, and maritime academy training ships.
    We are disappointed that the bill excludes a provision from 
prior years that exempts agriculture haulers from electronic 
logging device requirements. This common-sense regulatory 
relief has a proven record of enhancing safety on our roadways, 
protecting animal welfare, and safeguarding the food supply 
chain.
    We strongly object to a provision that prohibits the 
Department of Transportation from reallocating funds that have 
been deobligated due to the cancelled grant agreement between 
the Department and the California High Speed Rail Authority.
    We support funding in the bill for housing programs that 
provide a crucial safety net and expand opportunities for our 
citizens, including the elderly and disabled. We also support 
initiatives in the bill that continue to make progress on our 
bipartisan efforts to end homelessness in America, and 
appreciate policies that focus resources on families, victims 
of domestic violence, and veterans.
    We are concerned that the bill includes provisions that 
limit rulemaking authorities of the Department of Housing and 
Urban Development.
    Our most significant concern with this bill is that it was 
written outside of the Bipartisan Budget Act of 2019 (P.L. 116-
37), which set discretionary spending levels for fiscal years 
2020 and 2021. The discretionary spending increase in this bill 
is made possible through off-budget emergency spending in 
Veterans programs. In addition, this bill provides $75 billion 
in new infrastructure spending that is designated as an 
emergency. With these emergency designations, the majority is 
avoiding the tough choices we must make as responsible 
legislators and stewards of the American taxpayer and future 
generations.
    We hope that we can return to a bipartisan, collaborative 
process to address these spending and policy concerns. This is 
the only path to enacted legislation that meets our shared 
transportation and housing priorities.

                                   Kay Granger.
                                   Mario Diaz-Balart.

                                  [all]