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[House Report 116-453]
[From the U.S. Government Publishing Office]


116th Congress  }                                     {  Report
                       HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES
2d Session      }                                     {  116-453        
                                                    
_______________________________________________________________________



            DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE APPROPRIATIONS BILL, 2021

                               ----------                              

                              R E P O R T

                                 of the

                      COMMITTEE ON APPROPRIATIONS

                             together with

                             MINORITY VIEWS

                        [to accompany H.R. 7617]
                        
                        






 July 16, 2020.--Committed to the Committee of the Whole House on the 
              State of the Union and ordered to be printed
              
              
              
              
              

            DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE APPROPRIATIONS BILL, 2021
            
            
            
            
            
            
116th Congress  }                                            {  Report
                         HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES                 
2d Session      }                                            {  116-453
_______________________________________________________________________

                                     



            DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE APPROPRIATIONS BILL, 2021

                               __________

                              R E P O R T

                                 of the

                      COMMITTEE ON APPROPRIATIONS

                             together with

                             MINORITY VIEWS

                        [to accompany H.R. 7617]
                        
                        
                        







 July 16, 2020.--Committed to the Committee of the Whole House on the 
              State of the Union and ordered to be printed
              
              
              
              
                            ______

             U.S. GOVERNMENT PUBLISHING OFFICE 
40-847                WASHINGTON : 2020              
 
 
              
              
              
                                CONTENTS

                                                                   Page
Bill Totals......................................................     1
Committee Budget Review Process..................................     3
Introduction.....................................................     3
Definition of Program, Project, and Activity.....................     5
Reprogramming Guidance for Base and Overseas Contingency 
  Operations Funding.............................................     5
Funding Increases................................................     6
Congressional Special Interest Items.............................     6
Designated Congressional Special Interest Items..................     6
General Transfer Authority and Special Transfer Authority........     7
Classified Annex.................................................     8
Committee Recommendations by Major Category......................     8
  Active, Reserve, and National Guard Military Personnel.........     8
  Operation and Maintenance......................................     8
  Procurement....................................................     8
  Research, Development, Test and Evaluation.....................     9
  Defense Health Program.........................................    10
  Overseas Contingency Operations/Global War on Terrorism 
    Requirements.................................................    10
Civilian Cyber Workforce.........................................    10
Initiating Operations............................................    11
Coronavirus Disease 2019.........................................    11
Domestic Manufacturing Requirements for Navy Shipbuilding........    13
Littoral Combat Ship Decommissions...............................    13
Compliance with Congressionally Directed Reports.................    14
Buy America and the Berry Amendment..............................    14
Renaming Institutions............................................    14
Law Enforcement Training.........................................    15
TITLE I. MILITARY PERSONNEL......................................    17
  Military Personnel Overview....................................    19
  Summary of End Strength........................................    19
  Overall Active End Strength....................................    19
  Overall Selected Reserve End Strength..........................    19
  Reprogramming Guidance for Military Personnel Accounts.........    20
    (Including Base and Overseas Contingency Operations Funding).
  Military Personnel Special Interest Items......................    20
  Minority Outreach and Officer Accessions.......................    20
  Recognizing Diversity in the Military..........................    21
  Cultural Sensitivity Training..................................    21
  Trauma Training Program........................................    21
  Sexual Assault Prevention and Response.........................    22
  Suicide Prevention and Outreach................................    23
  Military Personnel, Army.......................................    24
  Military Personnel, Navy.......................................    28
    Cybersecurity Professionals..................................    32
  Military Personnel, Marine Corps...............................    32
  Military Personnel, Air Force..................................    36
  Reserve Personnel, Army........................................    40
  Reserve Personnel, Navy........................................    43
  Reserve Personnel, Marine Corps................................    46
  Reserve Personnel, Air Force...................................    49
  National Guard Personnel, Army.................................    52
  National Guard Personnel, Air Force............................    55
TITLE II. OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE..............................    59
  Reprogramming Guidance for Operation and Maintenance Accounts..    61
    (Including Base and Overseas Contingency Operations Funding).
  Reprogramming Guidance for Special Operations Command..........    62
  Operation and Maintenance Special Interest Items...............    62
  Quarterly Operation and Maintenance Updates....................    63
  Restoring Readiness............................................    63
  Reclaimed Refrigerants.........................................    63
  Meals Ready-To-Eat War Reserve.................................    63
  Advertising....................................................    63
  Minority and Women-Owned Businesses............................    64
  Classified Contracting for Small Businesses....................    64
  Pilot Shortages................................................    64
  Military Funeral Honors........................................    65
  Body Composition Testing.......................................    65
  Inventory Management...........................................    65
  Language Flagship Program......................................    65
  Military Food Transformation...................................    66
  Vieques and Culebra............................................    67
  Indian Financing Act...........................................    67
  PFOS/PFOA Exposure Assessment..................................    68
  Per- and Polyfluoroalkyl Substances Cleanup Cost Reporting.....    68
  Childcare......................................................    69
  Movement of Household Goods....................................    69
  Cold Weather Clothing and Equipment............................    70
  Use of Remote Piloting Systems.................................    71
  Multinational Force and Observers..............................    71
  Energy Resiliency Studies......................................    71
  Operation and Maintenance, Army................................    71
    Small Businesses and Army Futures Command....................    78
    Facilities Reduction Program.................................    78
  Operation and Maintenance, Navy................................    78
    Advanced Skills Management Legacy Systems Upgrades...........    85
    China Lake Naval Air Weapons Station.........................    85
  Operation and Maintenance, Marine Corps........................    85
  Operation and Maintenance, Air Force...........................    89
    Department of the Air Force Budget Justification Documents...    95
    C-17.........................................................    95
    Aircraft Protection..........................................    95
    Air Force Pilot Shortfall....................................    96
  Operation and Maintenance, Space Force.........................    96
  Operation and Maintenance, Defense-Wide........................    99
    Readiness and Environmental Protection Integration Program...   106
    Defense Community Infrastructure Program.....................   106
    Service-Provided Support and Enabling Capabilities to United 
      States Special Operations Forces...........................   106
    Theater Special Operations Command Activities................   107
    Military Information Support Operations......................   107
    Special Operations Command Cold Weather Tactical Outerwear...   108
    137th Special Operations Wing................................   108
    Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency............................   108
    Perfluorinated Chemicals Contamination and First Responder 
      Exposure...................................................   108
    Climate Change Report........................................   109
    Special Measures Agreement...................................   109
    Composting of Shredded Government Documents..................   109
    Defense Security Cooperation Agency Programs.................   109
    Standards and Protocols on Countering Cybersecurity Incidents   113
    Zero Trust Architecture......................................   113
    Noise Mitigation Communities Partnerships....................   113
    Local Media..................................................   114
  Operation and Maintenance, Army Reserve........................   114
  Operation and Maintenance, Navy Reserve........................   117
  Operation and Maintenance, Marine Corps Reserve................   120
  Operation and Maintenance, Air Force Reserve...................   123
  Operation and Maintenance, Army National Guard.................   126
    Joint Force Headquarters Analysis Cells......................   130
  Operation and Maintenance, Air National Guard..................   130
    National Guard Bureau State Website Modernization and 
      Standardization............................................   133
  United States Court of Appeals for the Armed Forces............   133
  Environmental Restoration, Army................................   133
  Environmental Restoration, Navy................................   133
  Environmental Restoration, Air Force...........................   133
  Environmental Restoration, Defense-Wide........................   134
  Environmental Restoration, Formerly Used Defense Sites.........   134
  Overseas Humanitarian, Disaster, and Civic Aid.................   134
    Humanitarian Assistance......................................   134
    Spend Plan...................................................   134
  Cooperative Threat Reduction Account...........................   135
  Department of Defense Acquisition Workforce Development Account   135
TITLE III. PROCUREMENT...........................................   137
  Reprogramming Guidance for Acquisition Accounts................   139
    (Including Base and Overseas Contingency Operations Funding).
  Funding Increases..............................................   139
  Procurement Special Interest Items.............................   139
  Autonomic Logistics Information System.........................   139
  Use of Advanced Procurement Funding............................   140
  Aircraft Procurement, Army.....................................   141
    CH-47F Chinook Block II......................................   145
    Degraded Visual Environment..................................   145
  Missile Procurement, Army......................................   145
  Procurement of Weapons and Tracked Combat Vehicles, Army.......   148
    MK93 Machine Gun Mount.......................................   152
  Procurement of Ammunition, Army................................   152
    Sustainment of Munitions.....................................   156
  Other Procurement, Army........................................   156
    High Mobility Multipurpose Wheeled Vehicles..................   166
  Aircraft Procurement, Navy.....................................   166
    F/A-18 E/F Super Hornet Production...........................   174
    V-22 Nacelle Improvement Program.............................   174
  Weapons Procurement, Navy......................................   174
  Procurement of Ammunition, Navy and Marine Corps...............   179
  Shipbuilding and Conversion, Navy..............................   182
    TAO Fleet Oiler Program......................................   185
    Ship to Shore Connector......................................   185
    DDG-51 Multi Year Procurement................................   185
  Other Procurement, Navy........................................   186
    Private Contracted Ship Maintenance..........................   198
    Explosive Ordnance Disposal Equipment........................   198
  Procurement, Marine Corps......................................   199
    Automated Parts Screening and Selection Tool for Additive 
      Manufacturing..............................................   205
  Aircraft Procurement, Air Force................................   205
    Open Skies Treaty and OC-135 Recapitalization................   211
    Battlefield Airborne Communication Node......................   211
    LC-130H Aircraft.............................................   211
    MQ-Next......................................................   212
    F-15EX.......................................................   212
    C-130 Fleet Management Plan..................................   213
    Critical Infrastructure Investments..........................   213
  Missile Procurement, Air Force.................................   213
  Procurement of Ammunition, Air Force...........................   217
  Other Procurement, Air Force...................................   220
  Procurement, Space Force.......................................   225
  Procurement, Defense-Wide......................................   228
    Chemical Biological Situational Awareness....................   234
  Defense Production Act Purchases...............................   234
TITLE IV. RESEARCH, DEVELOPMENT, TEST AND EVALUATION.............   235
  Reprogramming Guidance for Acquisition Accounts................   237
    (Including Base and Overseas Contingency Operations Funding).
  Funding Increases..............................................   237
  Research, Development, Test and Evaluation Special Interest 
    Items........................................................   237
  Federally Funded Research and Development Centers..............   237
  Human Performance Optimization Research........................   238
  Research, Development, Test and Evaluation, Army...............   238
    Shoulder Launched Munitions..................................   254
    Advanced Manufacturing Center of Excellence..................   254
    Dengue Vaccine Development...................................   254
    Army Artificial Intelligence Innovation Institute............   254
    Future Long-Range Assault Aircraft...........................   254
    Future Vertical Lift Sensor Payloads.........................   255
    Army Command Post............................................   255
    Armored Door Assist Systems..................................   255
  Research, Development, Test and Evaluation, Navy...............   255
    Small Business Innovation Research Program...................   275
    Underground Fuel Storage Tank Research.......................   275
    Advanced Tactical Unmanned Aircraft System...................   275
    Infrared Telescope Technology................................   275
    Anti-Corrosion Nanotechnology................................   275
    Ocean Acoustics..............................................   276
    Foreign Object Damage........................................   276
    Integrated Power and Energy Systems..........................   276
    Stern Tube Seals.............................................   276
    Coastal Environmental Research...............................   277
    Navy Alternative Energy Research.............................   277
    Interference Mitigation Technology Test and Verification.....   277
  Research, Development, Test and Evaluation, Air Force..........   277
    Program Element Consolidation................................   293
    Hypersonics Prototyping......................................   293
    Advanced Battle Management System............................   294
    Minority Leaders Program.....................................   296
    Skyborg and Low-Cost Attritable Aircraft Technology..........   296
    Affordable Multi-Functional Aerospace Composites.............   296
  Research, Development, Test and Evaluation, Space Force........   296
    Space Force Organization and Management......................   301
    Next Generation Overhead Persistent Infrared.................   302
    Overhead Persistent Infrared Enterprise Architecture.........   302
    National Security Space Launch Program.......................   302
    Directed Energy Research Collaboration.......................   303
  Research, Development, Test and Evaluation, Defense-Wide.......   303
    Hypersonic and Ballistic Tracking Space Sensor...............   318
    Distributed Ledger Technology Research and Development.......   318
    Artificial Intelligence Partnerships.........................   318
    PFOS/PFOA Remediation Technologies...........................   318
    5G Telecommunications Technology.............................   319
    Full-Scale Space Test Facilities.............................   319
    Ceramic-Matrix Composites for Hypersonics....................   319
    Global Food Security.........................................   320
    Cyber Education Collaboratives...............................   320
    Joint Hypersonics Transition Office..........................   320
    Mobile Microreactor Strategy.................................   321
    High Energy Laser Endless Magazines..........................   321
    Rapid, Accurate, and Affordable Biodetection System..........   321
    Academic Hypersonic Research, Test and Evaluation Facilities.   322
    Artificial Intelligence Coordination.........................   322
    Women and Minorities in STEM Pipeline........................   322
  Operational Test and Evaluation, Defense.......................   323
TITLE V. REVOLVING AND MANAGEMENT FUNDS..........................   325
  Defense Working Capital Funds..................................   325
  Arsenal Security...............................................   325
  Defense Counterintelligence and Security Agency Working Capital 
    Fund.........................................................   325
TITLE VI. OTHER DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE PROGRAMS...................   327
  Defense Health Program.........................................   327
    Reprogramming Guidance for the Defense Health Program........   332
      (Including Base and Overseas Contingency Operations 
      Funding)...................................................
    Carryover....................................................   332
    Peer-Reviewed Cancer Research Programs.......................   332
    Joint Warfighter Medical Research Program....................   333
    Combat Readiness Medical Research Program....................   334
    Electronic Health Records....................................   334
    Military Health System Transformation........................   335
    Descoping Military Treatment Facilities......................   336
    Reduction of Military Billets................................   337
    Reporting on Medical Readiness...............................   337
    Metastatic Cancer Research...................................   338
    Pancreatic Cancer Early Detection............................   338
    Alcohol and Substance Use Disorders..........................   339
    Maintaining a Highly-Skilled Workforce in Medical Research...   339
    Sexual Assault and Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder............   339
    Traumatic Brain Injury.......................................   339
    Nationwide Cancer Research at the Cancer Center at Walter 
      Reed National Military Medical Center......................   340
    Sleep Disorders..............................................   341
    Tricare Prime Availability...................................   341
    Mental Health Professionals..................................   341
    Armed Forces Retirement Homes and the Defense Health Agency..   341
    Outdoor Recreation for Military Families.....................   341
    Peer-Reviewed Tickborne Disease Research.....................   342
    Biorepositories..............................................   342
    Global Health Security Preparedness..........................   342
    Servicemembers and Veterans with Amyotrophic Lateral 
      Sclerosis..................................................   342
    Traumatic Injury.............................................   343
    National Disaster Medical System Pilot.......................   343
    Collaboration with Minority Serving Health Institutions......   344
  Chemical Agents and Munitions Destruction, Defense.............   344
  Drug Interdiction and Counter-Drug Activities, Defense.........   344
    Drug Interdiction and Counter-Drug Activities................   345
  Office of the Inspector General................................   346
TITLE VII. RELATED AGENCIES......................................   347
  National and Military Intelligence Programs....................   347
    Classified Annex.............................................   347
  Central Intelligence Agency Retirement and Disability System 
    Fund.........................................................   347
  Intelligence Community Management Account......................   347
TITLE VIII. GENERAL PROVISIONS...................................   349
TITLE IX. OVERSEAS CONTINGENCY OPERATIONS/GLOBAL WAR ON TERRORISM   359
  Committee Recommendation.......................................   359
  Reporting Requirements.........................................   359
  Overseas Contingency Operations Justification Documents........   360
  Military Personnel.............................................   360
  Operation and Maintenance......................................   366
    Guantanamo Bay Detention Facility............................   376
    Commanders' Emergency Response Program.......................   376
    Efforts to Minimize Civilian Casualties......................   376
    Ex Gratia Payments...........................................   376
    Afghanistan Security Forces Fund.............................   376
    Counter-Isis Train and Equip Fund............................   378
  Procurement....................................................   380
    National Guard and Reserve Equipment Account.................   389
  Research, Development, Test and Evaluation.....................   389
  Revolving and Management Funds.................................   392
    Defense Working Capital Funds................................   392
  Other Department of Defense Programs...........................   392
    Defense Health Program.......................................   392
    Office of the Inspector General..............................   392
  General Provisions.............................................   392
HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES REPORTING REQUIREMENTS..................   394
  Statement of General Performance Goals and Objectives..........   394
  Rescissions....................................................   394
  Transfer of Funds..............................................   395
  Earmark Disclosure Statement...................................   397
  Compliance with Rule XIII, Cl. 3(e) (Ramseyer Rule)............   397
  Changes in the Application of Existing Law.....................   402
  Appropriations Not Authorized By Law...........................   415
  Comparison with the Budget Resolution..........................   416
  Five-Year Outlay Projections...................................   416
  Financial Assistance to State and Local Governments............   416
  Program Duplication............................................   416
  Committee Hearings.............................................   417
  Full Committee Votes...........................................   419
  
  
  
  
  




116th Congress  }                                              {   Report
                         HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES
 2d Session     }                                              {  116-453

======================================================================



 
            DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE APPROPRIATIONS BILL, 2021

                                _______
                                

 July 16, 2020.--Committed to the Committee of the Whole House on the 
              State of the Union and ordered to be printed

                                _______
                                

    Mr. Visclosky of Indiana, from the Committee on Appropriations, 
                        submitted the following

                              R E P O R T

                             together with

                             MINORITY VIEWS

                        [To accompany H.R. 7617]

    The Committee on Appropriations submits the following 
report in explanation of the accompanying bill making 
appropriations for the Department of Defense, and for other 
purposes, for the fiscal year ending September 30, 2021.

                              BILL TOTALS

    Appropriations for most military functions of the 
Department of Defense are provided for in the accompanying bill 
for fiscal year 2021. This bill does not provide appropriations 
for military construction, military family housing, civil 
defense, and military nuclear warheads, for which requirements 
are considered in connection with other appropriations Acts.
    The President's fiscal year 2021 budget request for 
activities funded in the Department of Defense Appropriations 
Act totals $698,320,572,000 in new budget obligational 
authority.


                    COMMITTEE BUDGET REVIEW PROCESS

    During its review of the fiscal year 2021 budget request 
and execution of appropriations for fiscal year 2020, the 
Subcommittee on Defense held ten hearings and one formal 
briefing during the period of February 2020 to March 2020. 
Hearings were held in open session, except when the security 
classification of the material to be discussed presented no 
alternative but to conduct those hearings in executive or 
closed session.

                              INTRODUCTION

    The Committee recommendation for total fiscal year 2021 
Department of Defense funding is $694,624,692,000, which is an 
increase of $1,294,992,000 above the fiscal year 2020 enacted 
level and a decrease of $3,695,880,000 below the budget 
request. The recommendation includes $626,189,692,000 in base 
funding and $68,435,000,000 for overseas contingency 
operations/global war on terrorism funding in title IX.
    With this bill, the Committee has carried out its 
constitutional responsibility to recommend the appropriations 
necessary to provide for the common defense of the Nation. The 
Committee performed its role in a collegial and bipartisan 
fashion consistent with long-standing traditions.
    Oversight of the management and expenditure of the 
$694,624,692,000 provided to the Department of Defense and the 
Intelligence Community is a core function of the Defense 
Subcommittee. The Subcommittee performed this responsibility 
with a detailed review of the fiscal year 2021 budget request 
and, prior to the ongoing public health crisis, held ten 
hearings with defense and intelligence community witnesses to 
evaluate the budget request.
    While the Subcommittee was forced to truncate its hearing 
schedule, it has thoroughly reviewed the budget request and 
identified programs where reductions are possible without 
adversely affecting the safety and effectiveness of military 
personnel. Examples of such reductions include programs that 
have been restructured since the budget was submitted, savings 
from favorable contract pricing adjustments, contract or 
schedule delays resulting in savings, unjustified new programs 
and cost increases, funds requested ahead of need for the year 
of budget execution, projected or historical underexecution, 
and rescissions of unneeded prior year funds.
    The fiscal year 2021 request for the Department of Defense 
increases funding for modernization, continuing the effort to 
reorient the focus of the Department from counterterrorism to 
preparing for a war with a technologically advanced and well-
equipped peer or near-peer military. The Committee 
recommendation provides the resources to maintain the 
technological advantage which currently exists for the United 
States and provides funding in areas to further these efforts. 
However, the Committee recommendation also reflects the 
importance of the people who may fight these new battles and 
continue prosecuting existing missions.
    The Committee recommendation includes funding for the three 
percent military pay raise. In the fiscal year 2020 request, 
the Committee was concerned by the reduction of funding in 
quality of life areas such as such as childcare, and ultimately 
increased funding for these programs in the enacted 
legislation. Once again, the budget request proposes reductions 
in funding for childcare, as well as reductions in funding for 
teacher-student ratios for the Department of Defense Education 
Agency. The Committee is dismayed by the contradiction of the 
Department rhetorically supporting military families while 
continuing to reduce funding for the very programs on which 
they rely. Within the immense budget of the Department, quality 
of life programs must not be the bill payers for modernization.
    Unfortunately, the cuts to quality of life programs are 
only one example of the Department's mismatch between its 
stated priorities and its fiscal actions. Another example is 
the continued use of defense funding to pay for the border 
wall. Two days after the Administration's release of the budget 
request for fiscal year 2021, the Secretary of Defense directed 
the reprogramming of $3,831,000,000 of fiscal year 2020 funds 
for the purpose of border wall construction. Neither fiscal 
year 2019 nor 2020 included requests from the Department of 
Defense for these activities. These funds, which were 
explicitly appropriated by Congress for the procurement of 
equipment for the Department of Defense, were redirected for 
the construction of additional physical barriers and roads 
along the southern border of the United States. In 2019, the 
amount transferred from the original appropriated Department of 
Defense funding accounts to the Army Corps of Engineers was 
$6,100,000,000. Due to what has become an annual occurrence for 
the Department to transfer funding and circumvent its use for 
purposes other than what the funding was appropriated for, the 
Committee's skepticism about the Defense budget has grown. 
Department leadership has claimed that three to five percent 
annual real growth in the defense budget is necessary to 
support the National Defense Strategy while transferring nearly 
$10,000,000,000 for non-defense activities not enumerated 
within the National Defense Strategy. The Committee condemns 
these decisions, as well as repeated requests for more 
flexibility within the budget structure and reprogramming 
authorities to increase the ability of the Department of 
Defense to realign funding among different activities, with or 
without seeking prior congressional approval. The granting of 
additional budget flexibility to the Department is based on the 
presumption that a state of trust and comity exists between the 
legislative and executive branches regarding the proper use of 
appropriated funds. This presumption presently is false.
    In a continuing effort to circumvent the budget caps in the 
Budget Control Act, the Overseas Contingency Operations (OCO) 
request for fiscal year 2021 once again includes a total of 
$16,000,000,000 for base activities. The budget caps and 
firewall between defense and non-defense funding will cease to 
exist in fiscal year 2022. The Department recognizes this 
impending budget construct in its future years defense program 
with $20,000,000,000 projected in OCO budgets for fiscal years 
2022 and 2023 and $10,000,000,000 for fiscal years 2024 and 
2025. With the possibility of significantly fewer deployed 
American servicemembers in Afghanistan combined with more 
training exercises and less contingencies, activities funded in 
the past by OCO could very well be supported within base 
accounts in the future. For these reasons, the Committee 
believes that the Department should cease requesting funding 
for the OCO accounts following this fiscal year. The 
traditional manner of funding contingency operations through 
supplementals should return. The OCO experiment has been an 
abject failure and has given the Department a budgetary relief 
valve that has allowed it to avoid making difficult decisions.
    Finally, the Committee recommendation expresses concerns 
with various pilot programs, programs of record, the radical 
restructuring of military health care, and the lack of budget 
transparency. The lateness of reports directed by the Committee 
has become more common in fiscal year 2020 and reinforces the 
dismissive attitude toward oversight exhibited by the 
Department. The Department has repeatedly approached the 
expenditure of funding without regard to congressional intent 
or the purpose for which funding has been appropriated. 
Increasingly, the Department is moving away from a partnership 
with the Committee in providing for the common defense. The 
Department of Defense has benefitted from large budget 
increases since fiscal year 2017, and this budgetary growth has 
been accompanied by a decline in transparency and cooperation 
with Congress. When coupled with the Department's disturbing 
actions over the past two years to fund the border wall, the 
contravention of the constitutional authority of the United 
States Congress has now become habitual. The Committee finds 
this to be both unacceptable and unsustainable.

              DEFINITION OF PROGRAM, PROJECT, AND ACTIVITY

    For the purposes of the Balanced Budget and Emergency 
Deficit Control Act of 1985 (Public Law 99-177), as amended by 
the Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit Control Reaffirmation 
Act of 1987 (Public Law 100-119), and by the Budget Enforcement 
Act of 1990 (Public Law 101-508), the terms ``program, project, 
and activity'' for appropriations contained in this Act shall 
be defined as the most specific level of budget items 
identified in the Department of Defense Appropriations Act, 
2021, the related classified annexes and Committee reports, and 
the P-1 and R-1 budget justification documents as subsequently 
modified by congressional action.
    The following exception to the above definition shall 
apply: the military personnel and the operation and maintenance 
accounts, for which the term ``program, project, and activity'' 
is defined as the appropriations accounts contained in the 
Department of Defense Appropriations Act.
    At the time the President submits the budget request for 
fiscal year 2022, the Secretary of Defense is directed to 
transmit to the congressional defense committees budget 
justification documents to be known as the M-1 and O-1, which 
shall identify, at the budget activity, activity group, and 
sub-activity group level, the amounts requested by the 
President to be appropriated to the Department of Defense for 
military personnel and operation and maintenance in any budget 
request, or amended budget request, for fiscal year 2022.

  REPROGRAMMING GUIDANCE FOR BASE AND OVERSEAS CONTINGENCY OPERATIONS 
                                FUNDING

    The Secretary of Defense is directed to continue to follow 
the reprogramming guidance for acquisition accounts as 
specified in the report accompanying the House version of the 
Department of Defense Appropriations bill for Fiscal Year 2008 
(House Report 110-279). The dollar threshold for reprogramming 
funds shall be $10,000,000 for military personnel; operation 
and maintenance; procurement; and research, development, test 
and evaluation.
    Additionally, the Under Secretary of Defense (Comptroller) 
is directed to continue to provide the congressional defense 
committees annual DD Form 1416 reports for titles I and II and 
quarterly, spreadsheet-based DD Form 1416 reports for Service 
and defense-wide accounts in titles III and IV of this Act. 
Reports for titles III and IV shall comply with guidance 
specified in the explanatory statement accompanying the 
Department of Defense Appropriations Act, 2006. The Department 
shall continue to follow the limitation that prior approval 
reprogrammings are set at either the specified dollar threshold 
or 20 percent of the procurement or research, development, test 
and evaluation line, whichever is less. These thresholds are 
cumulative from the base for reprogramming value as modified by 
any adjustments. Therefore, if the combined value of transfers 
into or out of a military personnel (M-1); an operation and 
maintenance (O-1); a procurement (P-1); or a research, 
development, test and evaluation (R-1) line exceeds the 
identified threshold, the Secretary of Defense must submit a 
prior approval reprogramming to the congressional defense 
committees. In addition, guidelines on the application of prior 
approval reprogramming procedures for congressional special 
interest items are established elsewhere in this statement.

                           FUNDING INCREASES

    The funding increases outlined in the tables for each 
appropriation account shall be provided only for the specific 
purposes indicated in the tables.

                  CONGRESSIONAL SPECIAL INTEREST ITEMS

    Items for which additional funds have been provided or 
items for which funding is specifically reduced as shown in the 
project level tables or in paragraphs using the phrase ``only 
for'' or ``only to'' in this report are congressional special 
interest items for the purpose of the Base for Reprogramming 
(DD Form 1414). Each of these items must be carried on the DD 
Form 1414 at the stated amount, as specifically addressed in 
the Committee report.

            DESIGNATED CONGRESSIONAL SPECIAL INTEREST ITEMS

    The Committee is concerned about the prevalence with which 
the Services and Defense agencies utilize congressional program 
increases to fund overhead costs within the Department of 
Defense. Increased program funding inherently requires an 
enhanced level of contracting, program management, and 
engineering costs. However, the Committee is dismayed that 
upwards of forty to fifty percent of certain congressional 
program increases have been applied towards full-time 
equivalents (FTE) and contracting costs to manage relatively 
small program increases. In some cases, the Committee has 
become aware of instances when FTE costs are charged to a 
congressional program increase when it is evident that those 
FTE do not work solely on that program, nor does the program 
require the level of FTE proposed by the Department.
    It has become clear to the Committee that, in some cases, 
the Department is using congressional program increases to 
supplant budgeted overhead costs, which ultimately enables that 
budgeted funding to be used for Department activities not 
necessarily approved by the Committee. Therefore, the Committee 
directs the Secretary of Defense to limit Department overhead 
costs on congressional program increases to not more than 10 
percent of the funding level provided. The Service Secretaries 
and the Under Secretary of Defense (Acquisition and 
Sustainment) may waive this requirement by submitting a prior 
approval request in writing to the House and Senate 
Appropriations Committees.

       GENERAL TRANSFER AUTHORITY AND SPECIAL TRANSFER AUTHORITY

    The Department of Defense, as part of the Executive Branch, 
has historically had a relationship with the Congress based on 
mutual trust, comity, professionalism, and a general desire to 
ensure the public good that is the defense of the United States 
and its interests. While the bounds of this relationship have 
been tested in the past, its tenets have not been blatantly 
forsaken until recently. Given the recent breach of trust 
embodied in the misuse of appropriated funds by the current 
Administration; the Congress, exercising its constitutional 
responsibility to oversee the Executive Branch, must improve 
its understanding of the Department's application of transfer 
authority and reprogramming actions as the Department executes 
the budget authority granted it by the Congress.
    The Committee directs the Secretary of Defense to submit a 
report to the House and Senate Appropriations Committees not 
later than 60 days after the enactment of this Act which shall 
include the following:
    1) The levels of General Transfer Authority (GTA)--granted 
in title VIII in annual defense appropriations acts--and 
Special Transfer Authority (STA)--granted in title IX in annual 
defense appropriations acts--provided to the Department of 
Defense by fiscal year for the last ten fiscal years. In 
addition to the overall levels of appropriated GTA and STA, the 
report shall include the portion of authorized GTA and STA that 
was utilized by the Department by fiscal year and specify the 
percentage of the total GTA and STA that was used for below 
threshold reprogramming actions;
    2) The portion of GTA and STA, by fiscal year for the last 
ten fiscal years, used for reclassification purposes or to make 
technical corrections, where, via reprogramming, the Department 
was not proposing to change the purpose for which the funds 
were appropriated but was merely moving the funding to better 
reflect and obligate consistent with congressional intent;
    3) The portion of GTA and STA, by fiscal year for the last 
ten fiscal years, appropriated to the Department of Defense, 
transferred to, and subsequently implemented by a Department or 
agency other than one funded in this Act;
    4) The level of GTA and STA, by fiscal year for the last 
ten fiscal years, used for actions submitted to address urgent 
mission critical requirements, unforeseen circumstances of an 
urgent nature (such as the unanticipated mobilization and 
movement of military personnel to a conflict zone, or 
investments included in joint urgent operational needs 
statements), or for life safety; and
    5) The portion of GTA and STA, by fiscal year for the last 
ten fiscal years, used to address non-mission critical contract 
awards, to fund initiatives or investments included in 
operational needs statements, to accelerate existing 
acquisition programs, to procure quantities of equipment and/or 
services originally planned for purchase in future years, and/
or to augment previously planned research and development 
efforts.

                            CLASSIFIED ANNEX

    Adjustments to the classified programs are addressed in the 
classified annex accompanying this report.

              COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS BY MAJOR CATEGORY

         ACTIVE, RESERVE AND NATIONAL GUARD MILITARY PERSONNEL

    In title I of the bill, the Committee recommends a total of 
$157,726,652,000 for active, reserve, and National Guard 
military personnel, a decrease of $1,168,452,000 below the 
budget request, and an increase of $7,463,770,000 above the 
fiscal year 2020 enacted level. The Committee recommendation 
provides full funding necessary to increase basic pay for all 
military personnel by three percent, as authorized by current 
law, effective January 1, 2021.

                       OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE

    In title II of the bill, the Committee recommends a total 
of $196,703,001,000 for operation and maintenance support to 
the military Services and other Department of Defense entities, 
an increase of $72,505,000 above the budget request, and a 
decrease of $2,712,414,000 below the fiscal year 2020 enacted 
level. The recommended levels will fund robust operational 
training, readiness, and facilities needs in fiscal year 2021.

                              PROCUREMENT

    In title III of the bill, the Committee recommends a total 
of $133,633,757,000 for procurement.
    Major initiatives and modifications include:
    $866,296,000 for the procurement of 42 UH/HH 60M Blackhawk 
helicopters, an increase of six helicopters designated for the 
National Guard;
    $1,164,152,000 for the Stryker combat vehicle including 
$375,000,000 above the request to upgrade an additional 105 
vehicles;
    $792,027,000 for the procurement of 50 remanufactured AH 64 
Apache helicopters;
    $198,000,000 for the first five CH-47F Block II Chinook 
aircraft;
    $1,020,389,000 for the upgrade of 89 Abrams tanks to the 
M1A2 SEPv3 tank variant;
    $1,725,400,000 for the procurement of 24 F/A-18E/F Super 
Hornet aircraft;
    $510,000,000 for the procurement of three P-8A Poseidon 
multi-mission aircraft for the Navy Reserve; an increase of 
three aircraft and $429,866,000 above the President's request;
    $791,140,000 for the procurement of five E-2D Advanced 
Hawkeye aircraft, an increase of one aircraft and $165,031,000 
above the President's request;
    $1,142,732,000 for the procurement of 11 V-22 aircraft, an 
increase of two aircraft and $207,939,000 above the President's 
request;
    $1,050,634,000 for the procurement of nine CH-53K 
helicopters, an increase of two aircraft and $237,310,000 above 
the President's request;
    $577,638,000 for the procurement of five VH-92 executive 
helicopters; $9,254,291,000 for the procurement of 91 F-35 
aircraft, an increase of $1,396,100,000 and 12 aircraft above 
the President's request: 10 short take-off and vertical landing 
variants for the Marine Corps, 21 carrier variants for the Navy 
and Marine Corps, and 60 conventional variants for the Air 
Force;
    $22,157,938,000 for the procurement of nine Navy ships, 
including two DDG-51 guided missile destroyers, one Columbia 
class submarine, two SSN-774 attack submarines, one Frigate, 
one LPD-17 Flight II, and two Towing, Salvage, and Rescue 
Ships; a total increase of $2,355,181,000 and one SSN-774 above 
the President's request;
    $1,242,247,000 for the procurement of 12 F-15EX aircraft;
    $965,496,000 for the procurement of 11 C/MC/KC-130J 
aircraft, an increase of $184,574,000 and two C-130J aircraft 
above the President's request;
    $343,600,000 for the procurement of 16 MQ-9 Reaper unmanned 
aerial vehicles, an increase of 16 aircraft above the 
President's request;
    $2,707,380,000 for the procurement of 15 KC-46 tanker 
aircraft;
    $1,083,909,000 for the procurement of 19 combat rescue 
helicopters;
    $194,016,000 for the procurement of eight MH-139 
helicopters;
    $933,271,000 for the procurement of three space launch 
services;
    $622,796,000 for the procurement of two Global Positioning 
System satellites; and
    $200,000,000 for the Israeli Cooperative Programs under the 
Missile Defense Agency.

               RESEARCH, DEVELOPMENT, TEST AND EVALUATION

    In title IV of the bill, the Committee recommends a total 
of $104,348,089,000 for research, development, test and 
evaluation.
    Major initiatives and modifications include:
    $306,682,000 for the continued development of the Columbia 
class ballistic missile submarine;
    $1,052,792,000 for the continued development of the 
precision strike weapons development program;
    $256,970,000 for the continued development of the unmanned 
carrier aviation program;
    $406,406,000 for the continued development of the CH-53K 
helicopter;
    $1,717,223,000 for the continued development of the F-35 
Lightning Joint Strike Fighter aircraft;
    $2,848,410,000 for the continued development of the B-21 
bomber;
    $800,889,000 for the development of a Presidential Aircraft 
Replacement;
    $513,501,000 for the design, build, and test of prototypes 
for the Army's Future Attack Reconnaissance Aircraft;
    $811,417,000 for planning, prototype manufacturing, and 
testing of the Army's Long Range Hypersonic Weapon;
    $420,963,000 for the Army's Extended Range Cannon Artillery 
(ERCA) modernization effort;
    $560,978,000 for space launch services;
    $258,496,000 for the Global Positioning System IIIF;
    $481,999,000 for the Global Positioning System III 
Operational Control Segment;
    $2,318,864,000 for the Next-Generation Overhead Persistent 
Infrared system;
    $3,511,848,000 for the Defense Advanced Research Projects 
Agency; and
    $300,000,000 for the Israeli Cooperative Programs under the 
Missile Defense Agency.

                         DEFENSE HEALTH PROGRAM

    The Committee recommends a total of $33,297,902,000 for the 
Defense Health Program to support worldwide medical and dental 
services for active forces and other eligible beneficiaries.

  OVERSEAS CONTINGENCY OPERATIONS/GLOBAL WAR ON TERRORISM REQUIREMENTS

    In title IX of the bill, the Committee recommends a total 
of $68,435,000,000 for overseas contingency operations/global 
war on terrorism (OCO/GWOT) requirements.
    Military Personnel: The Committee recommends a total of 
$4,602,593,000 for military personnel OCO/GWOT requirements in 
title IX of the bill.
    Operation and Maintenance: The Committee recommends a total 
of $57,824,499,000 for operation and maintenance OCO/GWOT 
requirements in title IX of the bill.
    Procurement: The Committee recommends a total of 
$6,473,543,000 for procurement OCO/GWOT requirements in title 
IX of the bill.
    Research, Development, Test and Evaluation: The Committee 
recommends a total of $321,508,000 for research, development, 
test and evaluation OCO/GWOT requirements in title IX of the 
bill.

                        CIVILIAN CYBER WORKFORCE

    The Committee recognizes that the Department of Defense has 
challenges hiring individuals with the necessary security 
clearances to work in the cyber environment and encourages the 
Secretary of Defense to find innovative solutions to increase 
the civilian cyber workforce. The Committee believes that the 
Department of Defense should collaborate with colleges and 
universities to recruit college students during their junior or 
senior years, with the intent that upon graduation the student 
will have a completed security clearance.
    The Committee notes the Secretary of Defense is required to 
submit a report on Department-wide efforts to increase 
recruitment of cyber-focused individuals and to increase the 
throughput of security clearances to grow the number of 
approved requisite applicants as directed in House Report 116-
84. The Committee understands the Department expects to develop 
an implementation plan and provide an interim report by the end 
of September 2020. The Committee expects the Secretary of 
Defense to update the congressional defense committees with any 
changes to the anticipated date of completion for the 
implementation plan and interim report.

                         INITIATING OPERATIONS

    The Committee is concerned about the lack of information 
the Department of Defense provides to the Congress prior to and 
after initiating new operations and has been disappointed with 
the timeliness and completeness of the reports the Department 
is required to provide about troop deployments and new named 
and unnamed operations. The Committee recommendation includes 
language in section 8131 to address this disconnect by 
requiring the Secretary of Defense to provide a report to the 
congressional defense committees within three days after such 
deployments. The language pertains to ``significant'' 
deployments; in this case, significant is defined as 
deployments of 100 personnel or more. The Committee 
recommendation includes language which allows for the report to 
include a classified annex, if necessary.

                        CORONAVIRUS DISEASE 2019

    With the advent of the recent novel coronavirus pandemic, 
much has changed in the United States and across the world. The 
Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) has impacted every aspect 
of society and the United States military and industrial base 
have not been immune from the pandemic. The Committee is 
grateful to the servicemembers and the civilians on the front 
lines fighting and protecting the American people against this 
disease.
    The Committee has worked with the Department to determine 
the appropriate level of supplemental funding required to 
address unforeseen requirements facing the Department in 
response to COVID-19. As such, for fiscal year 2020, Congress 
provided the Department of Defense $82,000,000 in the Families 
First Coronavirus Response Act and $10,503,674,000 in the 
Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (CARES) Act.
    The Committee appreciates the updates the Department has 
provided on the obligation and execution of these supplemental 
funds and understands there may be additional costs to address 
the pandemic in the future. Therefore, the Committee 
recommendation for fiscal year 2021 includes $758,000,000 in 
procurement for COVID-19 recovery for second, third, and fourth 
tier suppliers; $450,000,000 in operation and maintenance for 
COVID-19 recovery and resupply; and $150,000,000 in the Defense 
Health Program for COVID-19 response. The Committee directs the 
Secretary of Defense and the Service Secretaries to provide 
quarterly updates to the congressional defense committees, 
beginning October 20, 2020, on COVID-19-related expenses 
incurred in the previous quarter. The report shall include a 
breakout of obligations by account, budget activity, and sub-
activity; and the number of personnel deployed to assist in 
mitigation efforts. The Committee also understands COVID-19 has 
caused schedule delays in several programs and in some cases 
has adversely impacted the Department's ability to execute 
funding. Therefore, due to the lack of historical data or 
metrics to accurately project when funds may obligate or when 
schedules may resume, the report shall include any savings the 
Department and Services may attain through delayed or cancelled 
events or activities, such as training, exercises, or 
deployments.
    Related to the defense industrial base (DIB), the CARES Act 
included funding for the Defense Production Act (DPA) of 1950, 
which provides a broad set of authorities to ensure that 
domestic industry can meet national defense requirements. Of 
the amounts appropriated to the Department of Defense, 
$1,000,000,000 was provided for DPA to prevent, prepare for, 
and respond to coronavirus, domestically or internationally. 
While the Department plans to execute a portion of that funding 
for personal protective equipment (PPE) as intended by 
Congress, most of the funds will be used to address the impact 
of COVID-19 on the DIB, which was not the original intent of 
the funds. The Department's own estimates indicate that the 
total domestic consumption of N95 masks is as high as 
3,300,000,000. The Committee's expectation was that the 
Department would address the need for PPE industrial capacity 
rather than execute the funding for the DIB. Furthermore, the 
Department plans to execute $100,000,000 of CARES Act DPA 
funding to make loans to private companies which has not been 
done for several decades under the DPA. The Committee is 
concerned that this funding will not support increased medical 
supply production, as intended by the additional CARES Act 
funding. The Committee recommends $191,931,000 in this Act to 
support DPA activities to expand production capacity and supply 
and to incentivize the domestic industrial base to grow the 
production and supply of critical materials and goods. The 
recommendation does not include additional DPA funding to 
support COVID-19 efforts.
    Beyond the obligation and expenditure reports, leaders 
across the Department of Defense have made an effort to keep 
the Committee informed on the impacts of COVID-19. While the 
Committee appreciates the level of engagement on the 
Department's efforts to respond to COVID-19, the Department's 
planning and preparation for such a health emergency is of 
concern. Despite having longstanding policies and plans for 
pandemic response, it is unclear if these have been effective. 
For example, the Department of Defense Instruction on the 
National Disaster Medical System (NDMS) is in place to guide 
the Department in responding to or providing assistance during 
other disasters, but little mention of the NDMS has been made 
in responding to COVID-19, and it is unclear what role, if any, 
the NDMS has had. The Secretary of Defense must capture lessons 
learned from this pandemic and update policy and planning 
documents to ensure that the most relevant and actionable 
instructions are published and updated for future health 
emergencies.
    It is also concerning that the Department continues to move 
forward with the most significant medical restructuring of the 
Military Health System in decades. Prior to the pandemic, the 
Committee expressed concerns about the Department's plans to 
shed medical military billets and descope military treatment 
facilities (MTFs), and those concerns are more acute now. The 
Committee recommendation denies the Department's fiscal year 
2021 request of $334,613,000 to replace uniformed medical 
providers with civilians or contractors, and restores 
$36,260,000 for the Department to continue supporting MTFs that 
had been proposed to be descoped.
    Lastly, the COVID-19 global pandemic has exposed 
vulnerabilities in America's ability to prevent, prepare for, 
and respond to future pandemics. For example, the Committee is 
aware of vulnerabilities in America's reliance on foreign-
sourced supplies of active pharmaceutical ingredients and their 
chemical components, and more generally, the nation's reliance 
on off-shore drug production. The Committee encourages the 
Secretary of Defense, the Director of the Defense Advanced 
Research Projects Agency, and the Director of the Biomedical 
Advanced Research and Development Authority to cooperatively 
research areas of mutual interest to address public health 
vulnerabilities, secure a national stockpile of life-saving 
drugs, and address vulnerability points for the military.
    As the Committee's fiscal year 2021 recommendation is 
written in the pandemic's midst, the Committee notes that, in 
just a few months, COVID-19 has claimed more American lives 
than were lost during World War I. The economic destruction is 
stark enough to draw comparisons to the Great Depression of the 
1930s. Only time will tell what ultimate damage will be done, 
but the Committee will not waiver in its support for the men 
and women in uniform as well as civilians working to protect 
the United States from this or any other enemy.

       DOMESTIC MANUFACTURING REQUIREMENTS FOR NAVY SHIPBUILDING

    The Committee consistently has expressed its concern with 
the Department of the Navy sourcing surface ship components 
from foreign industry partners rather than promoting a robust 
domestic industrial base. To address these concerns, the 
Committee retains several provisions from fiscal year 2020 and 
a new provision that expands the domestic manufacturing 
requirement for several classes of ships under development. 
Absent stringent contract requirements in these future surface 
ship classes, the Committee lacks confidence that the Navy will 
make the necessary decisions and provide the required resources 
to support a robust domestic industrial base.

                   LITTORAL COMBAT SHIP DECOMMISSIONS

    The Committee is concerned with the Navy's proposal to 
decommission the first four Littoral Combat Ships well before 
the end of their service lives. The Navy continues to assert a 
goal of 355 ships, even though annual budget requests do not 
support this position. Additionally, the Committee believes it 
is shortsighted for the Navy to always procure new ships, 
rather than effectively maintaining and upgrading the ships 
currently in the Navy's inventory. Therefore, the Committee 
recommendation includes a provision which prohibits the use of 
funds for the purpose of decommissioning any Littoral Combat 
Ships.
    The Committee is also concerned with the lack of a United 
States naval ship presence in Central and South America and 
believes that Littoral Combat Ships could be effective for the 
missions required in the Southern Command area of 
responsibility. The Committee directs the Secretary of the Navy 
to submit a report to the congressional defense committees not 
later than 30 days after the enactment of this Act on what 
upgrades would be required for these ships to effectively 
conduct operations in the Southern Command area of 
responsibility.

            COMPLIANCE WITH CONGRESSIONALLY DIRECTED REPORTS

    The Committee is concerned the Department of Defense 
consistently does not comply with many of the reporting 
requirements contained in prior Department of Defense 
Appropriations Acts. Such reports are often submitted beyond 
the deadline or, in some cases, not at all. These reports are 
essential to the Committee's ability to carry out its 
legislative and oversight responsibilities. The Committee 
encourages the Secretary of Defense to review the Department's 
processes with respect to such requirements and make management 
changes necessary for the Department to submit these reports in 
a complete and timely manner.

                  BUY AMERICA AND THE BERRY AMENDMENT

    The Committee supports the Berry Amendment which promotes 
the purchase of goods that are produced in the United States 
and requires the Department of Defense to purchase items such 
as fabrics, textiles, clothing, food, and hand tools from 
domestic sources. The importance of this requirement is 
underscored by the COVID-19 pandemic and the need to ensure 
domestic production of personal protective equipment. The 
purchase of noncompliant items may result in a violation of the 
Antideficiency Act. The Berry Amendment applies unless 
acquisitions are at or below the simplified acquisition 
threshold, there is a domestic non-availability determination, 
or an exception of compliance applies. Requests for a waiver to 
the Berry Amendment based on national security interests may be 
submitted to the Under Secretary of Defense (Acquisition and 
Sustainment). However, a listing of the waivers received, and 
the determination decisions of those waivers has not been 
shared with the Committee, and a reporting mechanism has not 
been established. Therefore, the Committee directs the Under 
Secretary of Defense (Acquisition and Sustainment) to submit a 
report to the House and Senate Appropriations Committees, not 
later than 90 days after the enactment of this Act and 
quarterly thereafter, which includes all Berry amendment waiver 
requests submitted during the previous quarter and the 
determination of each waiver request. The report shall include, 
at a minimum, the Service or defense-wide account impacted, the 
date of the decision, and the reasons for approval or denial of 
the waiver request.

                         RENAMING INSTITUTIONS

    The Committee directs the Secretary of Defense, in 
conjunction with the Service Secretaries, not later than one 
year after the enactment of this Act to:
          1) complete the renaming process of any military 
        installation (as defined in section 2801(c) of title 
        10, United States Code) or real property, that is 
        currently named after any person who served in the 
        political or military leadership of any armed rebellion 
        against the United States;
          2) commence the renaming of each covered military 
        installation and covered defense property; and
          3) provide a report to the congressional defense 
        committees that includes a detailed description of the 
        process to be used by the respective Service Secretary 
        to develop a list of potential names for renaming 
        covered military installations and covered defense 
        property; and an explanation regarding whether or not 
        the respective Service Secretary established, or will 
        establish, an advisory panel to support the review 
        process to make recommendations to the respective 
        Secretary. If the respective Secretary has established, 
        or will establish, an advisory panel, the report shall 
        include the names and positions of the individuals who 
        will serve on the advisory panel.
    If the Secretary of Defense, in conjunction with the 
relevant Service Secretaries, creates advisory panels to assist 
in the renaming process, the advisory panels shall consist of 
military leadership from covered military installations; 
military leadership from military installations containing 
covered defense property; state leaders and leaders of the 
locality in which a covered military installation or covered 
defense property is located; representatives from military 
museums, military historians, or relevant historians from the 
impacted states and localities with relevant expertise; and 
community civil rights leaders.
    The Committee is certain the necessary funds exist in the 
budget to effect these changes with sufficient haste.

                        LAW ENFORCEMENT TRAINING

    The Committee notes that the Commerce, Justice, Science, 
and Related Agencies Appropriations Act, 2021 directs the 
Attorney General to establish a training program to cover the 
use of force and de-escalation, racial profiling, implicit 
bias, and procedural justice, to include training on the duty 
of federal law enforcement officers to intervene in cases where 
another law enforcement officer is using excessive force, and 
make such training a requirement for federal law enforcement 
officers. The Committee further notes that each of the 
Services, the civilian entities that provide security, and the 
Pentagon Force Protection Agency (PFPA) funded by this Act are 
considered federal law enforcement officers and Federal Law 
Enforcement Training Centers partner organizations. The 
Committee directs the Secretary of Defense, the Service 
Secretaries, the civilian entities, and the PFPA to adopt and 
follow the training program established by the Attorney 
General, and to make such training a requirement for its 
federal law enforcement officers and any contractors providing 
security. The Committee further directs the Secretary of 
Defense, the Service Secretaries, and the PFPA to brief the 
House and the Senate Appropriations Committees on their efforts 
relating to training not later than 90 days after the Attorney 
General has established such a training program.
    In addition, the Committee directs the Service Secretaries, 
the civilian entities, and the PFPA, to the extent that each 
have not already done so, to develop policies and procedures to 
submit their use of force data to the Federal Bureau of 
Investigation (FBI)'s National Use of Force Data Collection 
database. The Committee further directs the Secretary of 
Defense and the Service Secretaries to brief the House and the 
Senate Appropriations Committees not later than 90 days after 
the enactment of this Act on their current efforts to tabulate 
and submit its use of force data to the FBI.

                                TITLE I

                           MILITARY PERSONNEL

    The fiscal year 2021 Department of Defense military 
personnel budget request totals $158,895,104,000. The Committee 
recommendation provides $157,726,652,000 for the military 
personnel accounts. The table below summarizes the Committee 
recommendations:


                      MILITARY PERSONNEL OVERVIEW

    The Committee recommendation provides $157,726,652,000 for 
the military personnel accounts, which funds military pay and 
allowances, recruitment and retention initiatives, and overall 
quality of life programs for active duty, National Guard, and 
reserve personnel. The recommendation provides increased basic 
pay for all military personnel by 3 percent as authorized by 
current law, effective January 1, 2021. The Committee continues 
to encourage constructive evaluations of recruitment and 
retention programs, bonus and special pay incentives, and 
personnel benefit programs for fiscal year 2021. The Committee 
remains supportive of programs intended to enhance the morale 
and quality of life of military personnel and their families.

                        SUMMARY OF END STRENGTH

    The fiscal year 2021 budget request includes an increase of 
12,000 in total end strength for the active forces and an 
increase of 1,200 in total end strength for the Selected 
Reserve as compared to the fiscal year 2020 authorized levels. 
The following tables summarize the Committee recommendations 
for end strength levels, both in the aggregate and for each 
active and Selected Reserve component.

                      OVERALL ACTIVE END STRENGTH

 
 
 
Fiscal year 2020 authorized...........................         1,339,500
Fiscal year 2021 budget request.......................         1,351,500
Fiscal year 2021 recommendation.......................         1,351,500
    Compared with fiscal year 2020....................            12,000
    Compared with fiscal year 2021 budget request.....             - - -
 

                 OVERALL SELECTED RESERVE END STRENGTH

 
 
 
Fiscal year 2020 authorized...........................           800,800
Fiscal year 2021 budget request.......................           802,000
Fiscal year 2021 recommendation.......................           802,000
    Compared with fiscal year 2020....................             1,200
    Compared with fiscal year 2021 budget request.....             - - -
 


                                   SUMMARY OF MILITARY PERSONNEL END STRENGTH
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                               Fiscal year 2021
                                                    Fiscal   ---------------------------------------------------
                                                  year 2020                             Change from  Change from
                                                  authorized     Budget     Committee     request    fiscal year
                                                                Request    Recommended                   2020
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Active Forces (End Strength)
    Army.......................................      480,000      485,900      485,900        - - -        5,900
    Navy.......................................      340,500      347,800      347,800        - - -        7,300
    Marine Corps...............................      186,200      184,100      184,100        - - -       -2,100
    Air Force..................................      332,800      333,700      333,700        - - -          900
                                                ----------------------------------------------------------------
        Total, Active Forces...................    1,339,500    1,351,500    1,351,500        - - -       12,000
Guard and Reserve Forces (End Strength)
    Army Reserve...............................      189,500      189,800      189,800        - - -          300
    Navy Reserve...............................       59,000       58,800       58,800        - - -         -200
    Marine Corps Reserve.......................       38,500       38,500       38,500        - - -            0
    Air Force Reserve..........................       70,100       70,300       70,300        - - -          200
    Army National Guard........................      336,000      336,500      336,500        - - -          500
    Air National Guard.........................      107,700      108,100      108,100        - - -          400
                                                ----------------------------------------------------------------
        Total, Selected Reserve................      800,800      802,000      802,000        - - -        1,200
                                                ----------------------------------------------------------------
Total, Military Personnel......................    2,140,300    2,153,500    2,153,500            0       13,200
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

         REPROGRAMMING GUIDANCE FOR MILITARY PERSONNEL ACCOUNTS

      (INCLUDING BASE AND OVERSEAS CONTINGENCY OPERATIONS FUNDING)

    The Secretary of Defense is directed to submit the Base for 
Reprogramming (DD Form 1414) for each of the fiscal year 2021 
appropriations accounts not later than 60 days after the 
enactment of this Act. The Secretary of Defense is prohibited 
from executing any reprogramming or transfer of funds for any 
purpose other than originally appropriated until the 
aforementioned report is submitted to the House and Senate 
Defense Appropriations Subcommittees.
    The Secretary of Defense is directed to use the normal 
prior approval reprogramming procedures to transfer funds in 
the Services' military personnel accounts between budget 
activities in excess of $10,000,000.

               MILITARY PERSONNEL SPECIAL INTEREST ITEMS

    Items for which additional funds have been provided or have 
been specifically reduced as shown in the project level tables 
or in paragraphs using the phrase ``only for'' or ``only to'' 
in this report are congressional special interest items for the 
purpose of the Base for Reprogramming (DD Form 1414). Each of 
these items must be carried on the DD Form 1414 at the stated 
amount as specifically addressed in the Committee report. Below 
threshold reprogrammings may not be used to either restore or 
reduce funding from congressional special interest items as 
identified on the DD Form 1414.

                MINORITY OUTREACH AND OFFICER ACCESSIONS

    Minorities remain underrepresented in the general officer 
ranks across the Services. To build a more diverse 
organization, the Committee supports efforts to conduct 
effective outreach and recruiting programs focused on 
increasing officer accessions in minority communities and 
encourages the Secretary of Defense and the Service Secretaries 
to support efforts, with both personnel and resources, to 
improve diversity in the military.

                 RECOGNIZING DIVERSITY IN THE MILITARY

    The Committee believes that the Department of Defense 
should recognize diversity in the military and ensure that the 
entertainment and publishing industries accurately depict this 
reality. The Committee encourages the Secretary of Defense to 
work with the production and publishing companies to which the 
Department provides consultation services to ensure an accurate 
portrayal of diversity in the military. The Committee directs 
the Secretary of Defense to submit a report to the 
congressional defense committees not later than 120 days after 
the enactment of this Act that details the production and 
publishing companies the Department worked with in fiscal year 
2020, with an accounting of the diversity of the film set for 
all workers broken down by ``above-the-line'' workers including 
but not limited to the directors, producers, and actors, as 
well as the ``below-the-line'' workers like set designers, 
camera operators, and sound engineers. This data shall be 
presented in a disaggregated manner by race, ethnicity, and 
gender to provide a clear depiction of diversity on set.

                     CULTURAL SENSITIVITY TRAINING

    The Committee recognizes that the Department of Defense and 
the military Services have multiple cultural sensitivity 
training programs for military personnel and is concerned that 
the fiscal year 2021 budget request reduces funding for some of 
these important programs. The Committee also believes in the 
importance of protecting servicemembers' rights regarding 
exercise of religion and ethnic heritage. As such, the 
Committee supports efforts to identify resource and personnel 
gaps that may exist in the Office for Diversity, Equity, and 
Inclusion of the Department of Defense as well as efforts to 
identify existing gaps in protections for new and prospective 
servicemembers.

                        TRAUMA TRAINING PROGRAM

    The Committee recognizes the valuable support that 
universities, hospitals, and other military partners provide by 
offering civilian based emergency response trauma and critical 
care training including public health, bio-environmental, and 
biomedical instruction to sustain capabilities of the National 
Guard Enhanced Response Forces Packages, National Guard 
Homeland Response Forces, and Army Reserve Consequence 
Management Response Forces. The Committee encourages the 
Director of the National Guard Bureau and the Chiefs of the 
reserve components to continue pursuing advanced trauma and 
public health training with these civilian partners in order to 
maintain unit readiness. The Committee also encourages the 
development of enhanced medical and critical care preparedness 
programs.

                 SEXUAL ASSAULT PREVENTION AND RESPONSE

    The Committee is troubled by the ongoing epidemic of sexual 
assault in the military and at the Service academies and 
believes that this will persist until a change in culture 
occurs across all Services at every level. The Department of 
Defense provides an annual report to Congress which provides 
details on sexual assaults involving servicemembers. However, 
the most recent report's findings make it clear that more 
action by the Department is necessary to combat this widespread 
problem. In addition to the annual report, the Committee 
directs the Director of the Department of Defense Sexual 
Assault Prevention and Response Office (SAPRO) to brief the 
House and Senate Appropriations Committees not later than 30 
days after the enactment of this Act and quarterly thereafter, 
on the initiatives the Department is implementing to reform how 
the military prevents, responds to, and adjudicates sexual 
assault cases, as well as the efforts underway to develop 
robust research, evaluation, and analytics to assess the 
effectiveness of its prevention efforts.
    The Committee recognizes SAPRO's efforts to implement a 
comprehensive policy to ensure the safety, dignity and well-
being of all members of the military. Despite seeing promising 
outcomes from some newly implemented SAPRO programs, the most 
recent Department report from 2019 on the prevalence of sexual 
assault in the military is disturbing. The report found the 
number of sexual assaults in the military rose by 38 percent 
from 2016 to 2018 with roughly 20,500 servicemembers 
experiencing sexual assault, up from an estimated 14,900 in 
2016. The report also found the sexual assault rate for women 
jumped a shocking 50 percent. While the Department touts 
increased reporting as a measure of success, only a third of 
all sexual assaults in the military were reported according to 
the 2019 report. Despite these dire findings and rhetoric from 
leadership in the Department and the Services, the budget for 
sexual assault prevention and response remains stagnant. The 
fiscal year 2021 budget proposes to cut funding for SAPRO by 
$5,000,000 at the Department level. The Committee is appalled 
by the Department's failure to prioritize funding to address 
the systemic cultural problems associated with sexual assault 
in the military and the Service academies.
    The Department of Defense has failed to address the sexual 
assault crisis and failed to protect the men and women who 
serve every day in the United States military. Sexual assault 
remains the most underreported crime in the military. The 
Department's 2019 report on sexual assault in the military 
found only one third of sexual assaults were reported and of 
the women who did report 43 percent said they had a negative 
experience doing so. Still, the Department remains resistant to 
reforming how sexual assault is reported, requiring sexual 
assault victims to report to an internal entity to receive 
health care access or to the command to be referred to military 
law enforcement. Neither option relieves the victim of fear of 
reprisal or stigma, nor does it offer the victim much hope for 
justice or recourse. Of the roughly 6,000 unrestricted reports 
referred to command only 300 were prosecuted, according to the 
report.
    The Committee believes the current SAPRO reporting policy 
fails servicemembers, diminishes military readiness, and harms 
recruitment and retention efforts. The Committee directs the 
Comptroller General to conduct a review of the Department's 
policy for reporting sexual assault and its effectiveness in 
protecting victims' privacy, ensuring their safety, and holding 
offenders accountable. The Committee directs the Comptroller 
General to brief the House and Senate Appropriations Committees 
on its preliminary findings not later than 90 days after the 
enactment of this Act and to provide a full report to the same 
Committees at a date agreed upon at the time of the preliminary 
briefing.
    In recent years, Congress has given the Services numerous 
new tools and responsibilities to improve the military justice 
system. In particular, the Special Victims' Counsel program was 
created to provide sexual assault survivors with attorneys to 
represent their interests in criminal proceedings. The program 
has proved so critical and successful that it was expanded to 
serve survivors of domestic violence in the National Defense 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2020. Despite the inherent 
importance of the Special Victims' Counsel program and the 
growing caseload of Special Victim Advocates, the Department 
fails to request dedicated funding in its annual budget 
request. Although the Services have taken the role of the 
Special Victims' Counsel program seriously, the Committee is 
disappointed by the Department's apparent apathy towards 
providing adequate funding to sustain a longstanding program.
    The Committee recommends $282,934,000, an increase of 
$5,000,000 above the budget request, for sexual assault 
prevention and response programs at the Department and Service 
levels and provides an additional $40,000,000 for the 
Department of Defense SAPRO for the Special Victims' Counsel 
program for transfer to the Services, including the National 
Guard and reserve components.

                    SUICIDE PREVENTION AND OUTREACH

    The Committee is alarmed by the growing number of suicides 
among servicemembers. The Department's first Annual Suicide 
Report, released in 2019, found a statistically significant 
increase in the military's suicide rate among active duty 
servicemembers. The report found in just five years the rate of 
suicide rose by more than one-third, from 18.5 to 24.8 suicides 
per 100,000 active duty members.
    For the National Guard, the report found the rate of 
suicide was statistically higher than that of the American 
population at 30.6 suicides per 100,000 members of the National 
Guard regardless of duty status. The Committee recognizes that 
programs like the National Guard Bureau's national counseling 
and suicide prevention peer-to-peer outreach programs are vital 
to reducing the number of suicides among guardsmen. The 
Committee encourages the Chief of the National Guard Bureau to 
continue supporting such programs.
    The Committee acknowledges the Defense Suicide Prevention 
Office's (DSPO) hard work and dedication to advance holistic, 
data-driven suicide prevention through its partnership with the 
Services. However, the most recent report emphasizes the need 
for a more dedicated response to address the troubling rise of 
suicide among servicemembers. Despite statements by the 
Secretary of Defense that the military, ``has the means and the 
resources to get ahead of this and do better than our civilian 
counterparts,'' the Department's investment in DSPO is 
negligible at best. The budget for staffing and programming of 
DSPO has remained flat despite the uptick in suicides among 
servicemembers. Instead of seeking to expand resources 
available to the Services, the Department has prioritized 
finding nominal cuts through the Defense-Wide Review for this 
office. The Committee is disappointed by the Department's 
failure to prioritize appropriate resources for DSPO and invest 
in efforts to understand the efficacy and effectiveness of its 
own suicide prevention programs.
    In addition to the Annual Suicide Report, the Committee 
directs the Director of the DSPO to brief the House and Senate 
Appropriations Committees not later than 30 days after the 
enactment of this Act and quarterly thereafter, on the 
initiatives the Department is implementing to prevent military 
suicide, as well as the efforts underway to develop robust 
research, evaluation, and analytics to assess the effectiveness 
of its prevention efforts.
    Further, the Committee directs the Secretary of Defense to 
submit to the House and Senate Appropriations Committees, not 
later than 90 days after the enactment of this Act, and monthly 
thereafter, a report on suicide among members of the armed 
forces. The report shall provide the number of suicides, 
attempted suicides, and occurrences of suicidal ideation 
involving a member of the armed forces, including the reserve 
components. The report shall include the gender, age, rank, and 
method of suicide for each.

                        MILITARY PERSONNEL, ARMY


 
 
 
Fiscal year 2020 appropriation........................   $42,746,972,000
Fiscal year 2021 budget request.......................    45,087,813,000
Committee recommendation..............................    44,936,603,000
Change from budget request............................      -151,210,000
 

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of 
$44,936,603,000 for Military Personnel, Army which will provide 
the following program in fiscal year 2021:


                        MILITARY PERSONNEL, NAVY


 
 
 
Fiscal year 2020 appropriation........................   $31,710,431,000
Fiscal year 2021 budget request.......................    33,892,369,000
Committee recommendation..............................    33,757,999,000
Change from budget request............................      -134,370,000
 

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of 
$33,757,999,000 for Military Personnel, Navy which will provide 
the following program in fiscal year 2021:


                      CYBERSECURITY PROFESSIONALS

    The Committee notes the importance of cybersecurity 
programs for the advancement of cybersecurity professionals in 
the Department of Defense. The Committee encourages the 
Secretary of the Navy to work with higher education 
institutions, including Historically Black Colleges and 
Universities, Hispanic Serving Institutions, and other Minority 
Serving Institutions, to develop programs for Navy Reserve 
Officer Training Corps midshipmen to prepare more students in 
critical cybersecurity skillsets.

                    MILITARY PERSONNEL, MARINE CORPS


 
 
 
Fiscal year 2020 appropriation........................   $14,098,666,000
Fiscal year 2021 budget request.......................    14,840,871,000
Committee recommendation..............................    14,534,551,000
Change from budget request............................      -306,320,000
 

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of 
$14,534,551,000 for Military Personnel, Marine Corps which will 
provide the following program in fiscal year 2021:


                     MILITARY PERSONNEL, AIR FORCE


 
 
 
Fiscal year 2020 appropriation........................   $31,239,149,000
Fiscal year 2021 budget request.......................    32,901,670,000
Committee recommendation..............................    32,675,965,000
Change from budget request............................      -225,705,000
 

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of 
$32,675,965,000 for Military Personnel, Air Force which will 
provide the following program in fiscal year 2021:


                        RESERVE PERSONNEL, ARMY


 
 
 
Fiscal year 2020 appropriation........................    $4,922,087,000
Fiscal year 2021 budget request.......................     5,106,956,000
Committee recommendation..............................     5,025,216,000
Change from budget request............................       -81,740,000
 

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $5,025,216,000 
for Reserve Personnel, Army which will provide the following 
program in fiscal year 2021:


                        RESERVE PERSONNEL, NAVY


 
 
 
Fiscal year 2020 appropriation........................    $2,115,997,000
Fiscal year 2021 budget request.......................     2,240,710,000
Committee recommendation..............................     2,223,690,000
Change from budget request............................       -17,020,000
 

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $2,223,690,000 
for Reserve Personnel, Navy which will provide the following 
program in fiscal year 2021:


                    RESERVE PERSONNEL, MARINE CORPS


 
 
 
Fiscal year 2020 appropriation........................      $833,604,000
Fiscal year 2021 budget request.......................       868,694,000
Committee recommendation..............................       857,394,000
Change from budget request............................       -11,300,000
 

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $857,394,000 
for Reserve Personnel, Marine Corps which will provide the 
following program in fiscal year 2021:


                      RESERVE PERSONNEL, AIR FORCE


 
 
 
Fiscal year 2020 appropriation........................    $2,014,190,000
Fiscal year 2021 budget reques........................     2,207,823,000
Committee recommendation..............................     2,179,763,000
Change from budget request............................       -28,060,000
 

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $2,179,763,000 
for Reserve Personnel, Air Force which will provide the 
following program in fiscal year 2021:


                     NATIONAL GUARD PERSONNEL, ARMY


 
 
 
Fiscal year 2020 appropriation........................    $8,704,320,000
Fiscal year 2021 budget request.......................     8,830,111,000
Committee recommendation..............................     8,639,005,000
Change from budget request............................      -191,106,000
 

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $8,639,005,000 
for National Guard Personnel, Army which will provide the 
following program in fiscal year 2021:


                  NATIONAL GUARD PERSONNEL, AIR FORCE


 
 
 
Fiscal year 2020 appropriation........................    $4,060,651,000
Fiscal year 2021 budget request.......................     4,547,087,000
Committee recommendation..............................     4,525,466,000
Change from budget request............................       -21,621,000
 

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $4,525,466,000 
for National Guard Personnel, Air Force which will provide the 
following program in fiscal year 2021:



                                TITLE II

                       OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE

    The fiscal year 2021 Department of Defense operation and 
maintenance budget request totals $196,630,496,000. The 
Committee recommendation provides $196,703,001,000 for the 
operation and maintenance accounts. The table below summarizes 
the Committee recommendations:


     REPROGRAMMING GUIDANCE FOR OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE ACCOUNTS

      (INCLUDING BASE AND OVERSEAS CONTINGENCY OPERATIONS FUNDING)

    The Secretary of Defense is directed to submit the Base for 
Reprogramming (DD Form 1414) for each of the fiscal year 2021 
appropriation accounts not later than 60 days after the 
enactment of this Act. The Secretary of Defense is prohibited 
from executing any reprogramming or transfer of funds for any 
purpose other than originally appropriated until this report is 
submitted to the House and Senate Defense Appropriations 
Subcommittees.
    The Secretary of Defense is directed to use the normal 
prior approval reprogramming procedures to transfer funds in 
the Services' operation and maintenance accounts between O-1 
budget activities, or between sub-activity groups in the case 
of Operation and Maintenance, Defense-Wide, in excess of 
$10,000,000. In addition, the Secretary of Defense shall follow 
prior approval reprogramming procedures for transfers in excess 
of $10,000,000 out of the following readiness sub-activity 
groups:

    Army:
    Maneuver units
    Modular support brigades
    Land forces operations support
    Aviation assets
    Force readiness operations support
    Land forces depot maintenance
    Base operations support
    Facilities sustainment, restoration, and modernization
    Specialized skill training
    Flight training

    Navy:
    Mission and other flight operations
    Fleet air training
    Aircraft depot maintenance
    Mission and other ship operations
    Ship depot maintenance
    Combat support forces
    Facilities sustainment, restoration, and modernization
    Base operating support

    Marine Corps:
    Operational forces
    Field logistics
    Depot maintenance
    Facilities sustainment, restoration, and modernization

    Air Force:
    Primary combat forces
    Combat enhancement forces
    Depot purchase equipment maintenance
    Facilities sustainment, restoration, and modernization
    Contractor logistics support and system support
    Flying hour program
    Global C3I and early warning
    Base support

    Space Force:
    Global C3I and early warning
    Space operations
    Depot maintenance
    Contractor logistics support and system support
    Administration

    Defense-Wide:
    Office of the Secretary of Defense

    Air National Guard:
    Aircraft operations

    Additionally, the Secretary of Defense is directed to use 
normal prior approval reprogramming procedures when 
implementing transfers in excess of $10,000,000 into the 
following budget sub-activities:

    Operation and Maintenance, Army National Guard:
    Base operations support
    Facilities sustainment, restoration, and modernization

    Operation and Maintenance, Air National Guard:
    Aircraft operations
    Contractor logistics support and systems support

         REPROGRAMMING GUIDANCE FOR SPECIAL OPERATIONS COMMAND

    The Committee directs the Secretary of Defense to submit a 
baseline report that shows the Special Operations Command's 
operation and maintenance funding by sub-activity group for the 
fiscal year 2021 appropriation not later than 60 days after the 
enactment of this Act. The Secretary of Defense is further 
directed to submit quarterly execution reports to the 
congressional defense committees not later than 45 days after 
the end of each fiscal quarter that addresses the rationale for 
the realignment of any funds within and between budget sub-
activities and the movement of any base funds used to support 
overseas contingency operations. Finally, the Secretary of 
Defense is directed to notify the congressional defense 
committees 30 days prior to the realignment of funds in excess 
of $10,000,000 between sub-activity groups.

            OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE SPECIAL INTEREST ITEMS

    Items for which additional funds have been provided or have 
been specifically reduced as shown in the project level tables 
or in paragraphs using the phrase ``only for'' or ``only to'' 
in this report are congressional special interest items for the 
purpose of the Base for Reprogramming (DD Form 1414). Each of 
these items must be carried on the DD Form 1414 at the stated 
amount as specifically addressed in this report. Below 
Threshold Reprogrammings may not be used to either restore or 
reduce funding from congressional special interest items as 
identified on the DD Form 1414.

              QUARTERLY OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE UPDATES

    Regular interaction with each of the Service's financial 
management offices enhances the ability of the Committee to 
perform its essential oversight responsibilities. Through these 
interactions, the Committee gains a better understanding of the 
challenges each of the Services face with the obligation and 
execution of their programs and contracts. The Committee notes 
the successful quarterly meetings this year with each of the 
Services and directs the Director of each of the Service's 
Operations Divisions (Financial Management and Budget) to 
continue to provide quarterly briefings to the House and Senate 
Appropriations Committees on their respective operation and 
maintenance execution rates in fiscal year 2021.

                          RESTORING READINESS

    The Committee recommendation includes additional readiness 
funds for each of the Services within the operation and 
maintenance accounts which shall only be used to improve 
military readiness, including providing for increased training 
and depot maintenance activities. None of the funding provided 
may be used for recruiting, marketing, or advertising programs. 
The additional funding is a congressional special interest 
item. The Committee directs the Secretary of Defense and the 
Service Secretaries to submit a detailed spend plan by sub-
activity group not less than 30 days prior to the obligation of 
these funds.

                         RECLAIMED REFRIGERANTS

    Reclaiming refrigerant mitigates the need to create new and 
potentially contaminating refrigerants and ensures the safe 
disposal of chemicals. Considering the large number of 
Department of Defense facilities and the widespread use of 
refrigerants, the Committee urges the Under Secretary of 
Defense (Acquisition and Sustainment) to give preference to the 
use of reclaimed refrigerants to service existing equipment in 
Department of Defense facilities.

                     MEALS READY-TO-EAT WAR RESERVE

    The Committee recommendation fully supports the fiscal year 
2021 request for the Defense Logistics Agency for a minimum of 
2,500,000 cases of meals ready-to-eat and reaffirms support for 
the War Reserve stock objective of 5,000,000 cases and the 
minimum sustaining rate for the industrial base.

                              ADVERTISING

    The Committee notes that, as the largest advertiser in the 
United States, the federal government should work to ensure 
fair access to its advertising contracts for small 
disadvantaged businesses and businesses owned by minorities and 
women. The Committee directs the Secretary of Defense to 
include with the fiscal year 2022 budget submission the total 
level of expenditures for fiscal year 2021 and the requested 
level of funding for fiscal year 2022 for all contracts for 
advertising services; contracts for advertising services by 
minority or women owned businesses; and contracts for 
advertising services by socially and economically disadvantaged 
small businesses (as defined in section 8(a)(4) of the Small 
Business Act (15 U.S.C. 637(a)(4)).

                  MINORITY AND WOMEN-OWNED BUSINESSES

    The Committee is concerned that the Department of Defense 
does not take full advantage of the products and services 
available to the Department from minority and women-owned small 
businesses. The Committee directs the Secretary of Defense to 
submit a report to the congressional defense committees on the 
Department's efforts to work with minority and women-owned 
small businesses not later than 180 days after the enactment of 
this Act. The report shall specify the number and value of 
Department of Defense contracts for minority and women-owned 
small businesses and include a description of specific outreach 
programs the Department uses to reach minority and women-owned 
small businesses.

              CLASSIFIED CONTRACTING FOR SMALL BUSINESSES

    The Committee recognizes the vital role small businesses 
play in fostering technological innovation and expedited or 
novel approaches to acquisition within the national security 
enterprise. The Department of Defense and Intelligence 
Community benefit from these relationships that promote faster, 
more efficient, and cost-effective solutions to critical 
national security problems. Small businesses, however, can be 
disadvantaged given the non-trivial expenses associated with 
handling, transmitting, protecting, and storing classified 
information. These additional costs often manifest themselves 
as barriers to entry, giving rise to conditions that favor 
large and established contractors by providing them an implicit 
advantage over smaller potential entrants and existing small 
business contractors who cannot afford the added expense.
    The Committee seeks solutions that allow new and non-
traditional entrants, as well as smaller firms who have 
existing relationships with the Department of Defense and/or 
the Intelligence Community, to compete for classified 
contracts. The Committee, therefore, directs the Secretary of 
Defense and the Director of National Intelligence to submit a 
report to the House and Senate Appropriations Committees not 
later than 60 days after the enactment of this Act which 
surveys programs and initiatives in both the Department of 
Defense and the Intelligence Community that incentivize 
outreach to small businesses and lessen the burden and need for 
dedicated, company-specific classified infrastructure and 
provide additional options for small business contractors who 
have existing relationships with the Department of Defense and 
Intelligence Community. The report shall also address how the 
Department and the Intelligence Community can expand 
relationships with small businesses that may or may not include 
access to secure compartmentalized information facilities.

                            PILOT SHORTAGES

    The Committee supports efforts throughout the Department of 
Defense to address the shortage of pilots across the Services. 
The Committee encourages the Secretary of Defense to work with 
higher education institutions, including Historically Black 
Colleges and Universities, Hispanic Serving Institutions, and 
other Minority Serving Institutions, to develop programs that 
will prepare more students to meet the eligibility requirements 
for pilot training. In addition, the Committee encourages the 
Secretary of the Air Force to examine university-based training 
for Air Force ROTC cadets and civilian aviation students as 
pilots and sensor operators for remotely piloted aircraft.

                        MILITARY FUNERAL HONORS

    The Committee is concerned that military funeral honors are 
not provided to eligible veterans due to the absence of the 
required DD 214 form. The Committee encourages the Secretary of 
Defense to consider accepting alternative proof of service in 
the event the family of a deceased veteran is unable to locate 
or provide the DD 214 form in a timely manner in accordance 
with their cultural funeral procedures.

                        BODY COMPOSITION TESTING

    The Committee recognizes the need for body composition 
testing for servicemembers to be based on medically tested and 
scientifically accurate indicators of health and fitness. The 
Committee directs the Secretary of Defense, in coordination 
with the Service Secretaries, to submit a report to the 
congressional defense committees not later than 90 days after 
the enactment of this Act on the status of changes to military 
fitness testing and the scientific evidence that led to the 
changes.

                          INVENTORY MANAGEMENT

    The Committee remains concerned by the lack of accurate 
inventory management controls in place at the Department of 
Defense which often result in lost material, parts, and 
funding. The Committee directs the Secretary of Defense, in 
coordination with the Directors of the Defense Logistics 
Agency, the Defense Contract Management Agency, and the Defense 
Contract Audit Agency, to submit a report to the congressional 
defense committees not later than 60 days after the enactment 
of this Act that describes how the Department can better track 
its inventory. The report shall include possible 
recommendations on how to hold contractors liable for lost or 
unaccounted parts and materials, especially when contractors 
are on contract to provide inventory management.

                       LANGUAGE FLAGSHIP PROGRAM

    The Committee recognizes the National Security Education 
Program provides training for servicemembers and civilians in 
languages and cultures critical to national security. The 
Committee is disappointed that the Secretary of Defense 
targeted the Language Flagship program for reduction during the 
Defense-Wide Review.
    The Committee recommendation restores the funding removed 
in the budget request for this critical program and includes a 
total of $16,000,000 for the program. The Committee encourages 
the Secretary of Defense to continue supporting programs that 
ensure warfighters receive the language and culture training 
needed to effectively complete missions. Additionally, the 
Committee directs the Secretary of Defense to submit a spend 
plan for this program's funding to the House and Senate 
Appropriations Committees not later than 15 days before the 
obligation of funds.
    The Committee is concerned about the lack of military 
personnel with advanced language skills and believes this could 
be addressed by promoting foreign language study programs 
targeting elementary and secondary students. The National 
Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2020 authorized the 
development of a competitive grant program to provide support 
to eligible entities, including Department of Defense Education 
Activity schools, for the establishment, improvement, or 
expansion of world language study for this population. In 
support of this program, the Committee recommendation includes 
an additional $15,000,000 for Department of Defense Education 
Activity schools. The Committee directs the Secretary of 
Defense to provide a detailed spend plan to the House and 
Senate Appropriations Committees for the implementation of the 
program, which should commence with the 2021 2022 academic 
year, not later than 45 days after the enactment of this Act.
    Additionally, the Committee directs the Secretary of 
Defense to submit a report to the congressional defense 
committees not later than October 1, 2021 which lists the 
schools that receive funds, in what amount, how the funds were 
executed, as well as how the Department plans to expand the 
program to public schools in a local education agency that 
hosts a unit of the Junior Reserve Officers Corps Training 
Center, in the following academic year.

                      MILITARY FOOD TRANSFORMATION

    The Committee remains concerned about the growing obesity 
crisis in the Department of Defense and its impact on military 
recruitment, readiness, and retention. The Committee is also 
concerned that the Department's current food system is overly 
complex and inefficient, which may result in higher costs per 
meal at dining facilities, unnecessary internal competition 
between on-base food service providers, and poor food service 
planning. Emphasis should be placed on providing nutritious 
food options at dining facilities and modernizing the on-base 
food system by using best practices from universities and 
industry partners.
    The Committee directs the Secretary of Defense to submit a 
report to the congressional defense committees not later than 
90 days after the enactment of this Act on food transformation 
efforts. The report should include details of the Department's 
ongoing efforts, costs associated with each effort, and an 
outline for a potential demonstration pilot program at multiple 
military installations. The Committee also anticipates 
submission of the completed audit by the Comptroller General of 
a sample of the Services' dining facilities to determine 
whether the Services are accurately measuring meal card holder 
utilization rates, costs per meal, and all input costs such as 
food, operating, capital expenditures, facility sustainment, 
and military labor.
    The Committee also notes that funds are collected from 
servicemembers' pay in order to provide government furnished 
meals to military personnel. The Committee is concerned that 
the Department is not using those funds efficiently or 
exclusively for the intended purpose. The Committee directs the 
Service Secretaries to submit a report to the congressional 
defense committees not later than December 1, 2020 with the 
following information from the previous fiscal year: the 
average daily number of servicemembers on essential station 
messing (ESM); the total aggregate amount of Basic Allowance 
for Subsistence withheld from the pay of these same 
servicemembers for the purposes of providing them a government 
meal; the total number of meals consumed by ESM servicemembers 
using their meal entitlement; the total actual cost of the food 
purchased for the government-provided meals consumed by ESM; 
and to the extent the amount collected from ESM exceeds the 
amount spent on purchasing food for the meals consumed by these 
ESM, a detailed accounting of the difference to include the 
rationale for any spending for other purposes.

                          VIEQUES AND CULEBRA

    The Committee remains concerned with the pace and scope of 
environmental restoration on the island municipalities of 
Culebra and Vieques in Puerto Rico. The Committee encourages 
the Secretary of the Army and the Secretary of the Navy to work 
closely with the Environmental Protection Agency, the Fish and 
Wildlife Service, and the Puerto Rico Environmental Quality 
Board to maximize public participation and transparency in the 
decontamination process in order to achieve a thorough 
decontamination result on both islands.
    The Committee also is concerned about public safety on the 
northwest peninsula of Culebra due to unexploded ordnance 
identified there by the Army. The Committee encourages the 
Secretary of the Army to exercise available authorities, 
including the authority clarified in the National Defense 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2015, to decontaminate the 
northwest peninsula. Additionally, the Committee directs the 
Secretary of the Army and the Secretary of the Navy each to 
submit a report to the congressional defense committees not 
later than 90 days after the enactment of this Act detailing 
all respective decontamination authorities and plans applicable 
to Culebra and Vieques, to include particular emphasis on the 
decontamination of the northwest peninsula of Culebra.
    The Committee also notes that there are gaps in information 
about the types and amounts of ordnance used on Vieques and 
Culebra, as well as potential links between the ordnance used 
and threats to public health. The Committee directs the 
Secretary of the Army and the Secretary of the Navy to provide 
a report to the congressional defense committees not later than 
60 days after the enactment of this Act on previously released 
information related to the ordnance on the two islands. The 
Committee also urges the Secretaries to publish the relevant 
documents on the internet in a single location and in a user-
friendly format.

                          INDIAN FINANCING ACT

    The Committee recommendation includes funds for activities 
authorized in the Indian Financing Act of 1974 and directs the 
Secretary of Defense to obligate such funds not later than 90 
days after the enactment of this Act.

                     PFOS/PFOA EXPOSURE ASSESSMENT

    The National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2020 
authorized a study and assessment of the health implications of 
perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) and perfluorooctanoic acid 
(PFOA) contamination in drinking water. The Committee 
recommendation includes $15,000,000 for the study and 
assessment. The Committee also directs the Assistant Secretary 
of Defense (Energy, Installations, and Environment) to submit a 
report to the House and Senate Appropriations Committees not 
later than 30 days after the enactment of this Act on the 
Department's strategy to execute this funding.
    The Committee remains deeply concerned about PFOS/PFOA 
contamination on current and former domestic military 
installations. As the Department conducts its exposure 
assessment on all installations known to have PFOS/PFOA 
drinking water contamination, the Committee directs the 
Assistant Secretary of Defense (Energy, Installations, and 
Environment) to publicly release the measured levels of 
contamination found at each installation. For all remediation 
activities, the Department is directed to achieve a drinking 
water cleanup standard no higher than the threshold of the 
Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) health advisory level 
(currently 70 parts per trillion) for federally controlled 
sites and surrounding communities whose water sources were 
contaminated as a result of Department activities. 
Additionally, the Committee directs the Department to comply 
with the provisions of section 322 of the National Defense 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2020. The Committee notes 
that today's currently available Aqueous Film Forming Foams 
(AFFF) contain Per- and Polyfluoroalkyl Substances (PFAS) and 
currently, none of the commercially available PFAS-free foams 
meet the Department's strict safety standards to rapidly 
extinguish dangerous fuel fires. The Committee understands that 
a prohibition on the use of current versions of AFFF would 
drastically reduce the ability of the Department's firefighters 
to fight fuel fires and increase risk to servicemembers and 
firefighters. However, due to the significant and salient 
public health risks associated with PFOS/PFOA contamination, 
the Committee urges the Secretary of Defense to expedite 
replacement of fluorinated AFFF throughout all branches of the 
military and cease use of AFFF prior to October 1, 2024.

       PER- AND POLYFLUOROALKYL SUBSTANCES CLEANUP COST REPORTING

    The Committee notes the creation of a Per- and 
Polyfluoroalkyl Substances (PFAS) Task Force to address the 
growing health concerns over releases of these substances and 
their effects on military installations and the surrounding 
communities. To support the Department's efforts, the Committee 
directs the Secretary of Defense to submit to the House and 
Senate Appropriations Committees, not later than 90 days after 
the enactment of this Act, and quarterly thereafter, a report 
on costs associated with investigating and cleaning up PFAS at 
sites with funding provided by either the environmental 
restoration or operation and maintenance appropriation 
accounts. The report shall provide, for each component and by 
installation name, for the investigation and cleanup of PFAS: 
the actual obligations through the end of fiscal year 2018; the 
actual obligations in fiscal year 2019; the planned and actual 
obligations in fiscal year 2020; the planned obligations for 
fiscal year 2021; and the estimated cost after fiscal year 
2021.

                               CHILDCARE

    The Committee commends the Navy and the Air Force for 
increasing funding in their respective fiscal year 2021 budget 
requests for childcare programs, but notes with concern the 
proposed reductions by the Marine Corps and the Army in their 
budget requests for childcare. The Committee continues to 
believe that delays in providing affordable and acceptable 
childcare negatively impact the quality of life for 
servicemembers, Department of Defense civilian employees, and 
their families. Funding for these programs needs to be a 
priority for all components. The Committee recommendation 
provides additional funds for the Army and the Marine Corps and 
directs the Secretaries of the Army and the Navy to provide 
spend plans to the House and Senate Appropriations Committees 
not later than 30 days after the enactment of this Act.
    The Committee was disappointed that it did not receive the 
report requested in House Report 116-84 and again directs the 
Service Secretaries to provide a report to the House and Senate 
Appropriations Committees not later than 60 days after the 
enactment of this Act on their respective plans to address 
obstacles to childcare, whether it be additional childcare 
development centers, additional staff, pay rates for staff, or 
acceptable alternatives for fiscal year 2020 and in the future 
year defense program to ensure that these challenges are met.
    The Committee is also concerned by reports of the impromptu 
closure of childcare facilities and directs the respective 
Service Secretary to notify the congressional defense 
committees not later than 30 days prior to a closure of any 
childcare facility, with the reason for closure and the number 
of children and families affected. The Committee further 
instructs the Service Secretaries to delay any proposed closure 
until the congressional defense committees are provided with 
documentation as to the specific fiscal limitations that the 
respective Service has from keeping the proposed childcare 
development center open.

                      MOVEMENT OF HOUSEHOLD GOODS

    Last year the Committee expressed concern with the plans by 
the United States Transportation Command (USTRANSCOM) to award 
the global household goods contract to only one provider. On 
April 30, 2020, USTRANSCOM executed this plan; however, the 
Committee notes that on June 10, 2020, USTRANSCOM rescinded the 
award due to allegations of misinformation by the awardee in 
its application documents.
    For these and other reasons, the Committee continues to 
have concerns and notes issues highlighted by a recent 
Government Accountability Office report related to the Global 
Household Goods Contract. The report recommends USTRANSCOM 
develop methodologies for adequate data collection during the 
first three years of the contract; outline a detailed plan on 
retraining and transferring current USTRANSCOM personnel, 
including precise funding and staffing needs; and provide a 
clear strategy for providing counseling services. Due to these 
highlighted deficiencies, the Committee directs the Secretary 
of Defense to provide a report to the congressional defense 
committees not later than September 30, 2021 on the execution 
of servicemember moves under the Global Household Goods 
Contract during fiscal year 2021. The report shall include move 
timelines, customer claims and compensation related to damaged 
goods and missed moving windows, customer satisfaction surveys 
and survey response rates, data on moves provided by 
Transportation Service Providers (TSPs) versus Personally 
Procured Moves (PPM), the number and type of trainings and 
transfers of USTRANSCOM personnel and transportation 
specialists, and counseling services provided by government 
personnel vice TSPs.
    The Committee is concerned that servicemembers may not 
receive the same access to choose PPM, also known as do-it-
yourself moves, under the Global Household Goods Contract. 
Counseling services provided by TSPs are solely informational. 
When providing counseling services, nothing in the Global 
Household Goods Contract permits TSPs to influence 
servicemember choice of provider or moving method for PPM 
beyond providing information on the difference between a TSP 
move and a PPM. The contract also does not permit TSPs to 
restrict access to a specific PPM provider or option if that 
option was available to the servicemember prior to the 
Contract. The Committee encourages the Commander, USTRANSCOM to 
ensure that counseling for servicemembers is offered no matter 
what methodology of move a servicemember may choose to make.
    Finally, the Committee notes that delays associated to 
COVID-19 could result in changes to possible savings originally 
stipulated in its fiscal year 2021 report and overall execution 
of the program. The Committee directs the Commander, USTRANSCOM 
to submit a report to the congressional defense committees, not 
later than 45 days after the enactment of this Act, and again, 
180 days after the initial report, detailing the implementation 
effort and an update of possible savings broken out by Service 
across the future years defense program.

                  COLD WEATHER CLOTHING AND EQUIPMENT

    The Committee commends the Services for providing cold 
weather and mountaineering clothing and equipment to 
servicemembers stationed abroad. Cold weather items including 
handwear, footwear, socks, balaclavas, water bottle parkas, 
canteens, and clothing layers manufactured with innovative, 
domestically-produced fabrics and textiles provide the 
warfighter with a distinct combat advantage. The Committee is 
concerned that procurement timelines for these items have been 
slowed by research, development, testing, and evaluation delays 
that prevent cold weather units from being issued the most 
effective items in a timely manner. The Committee encourages 
the Service Secretaries to review and accelerate procurement 
timelines for organizational clothing and individual equipment 
to all eligible servicemembers and utilize the domestic defense 
industrial base to provide the necessary clothing and 
equipment.

                     USE OF REMOTE PILOTING SYSTEMS

    The Committee believes there should be parity between 
active and reserve components regarding the use of remotely 
piloted and unmanned aircraft systems for domestic emergency, 
search and rescue, and civil support activities. The Committee 
directs the Secretary of Defense to submit a report to the 
congressional defense committees not later than 90 days after 
the enactment of this Act on the Department's policies for all 
aspects of use of remote piloting for both active and reserve 
components. Aspects shall include use of remote and unmanned 
air systems for training, search and rescue, and support to 
other federal agencies. If differences exist between the active 
and reserve components in these areas, the report shall detail 
these reasons, to include the policy explanations and if there 
is a plan to examine, and possibly, change these differences.

                   MULTINATIONAL FORCE AND OBSERVERS

    The Committee is concerned that a decision to remove United 
States forces from the Multinational Force and Observers in 
Egypt would be a mistake. Notwithstanding the priorities of the 
National Defense Strategy, the United States should maintain 
adequate support for this organization, which has bolstered 
regional stability through its peacekeeping role for almost 
forty years. The Committee directs the Secretary of Defense to 
provide notification to the congressional defense committees 
not less than 30 days prior to any permanent reduction in 
United States forces deployed to the Multinational Force and 
Observers.

                       ENERGY RESILIENCY STUDIES

    The Committee is aware that military installations are 
required to evaluate their energy resiliency in relation to 
their vulnerability of the utility grid. The Committee directs 
the Service Secretaries to provide a report not later than 90 
days after the enactment of this Act to the congressional 
defense committees on the requirement and the plan to conduct 
energy resiliency studies on military installations.

                    OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE, ARMY


 
 
 
Fiscal year 2020 appropriation........................   $39,597,083,000
Fiscal year 2021 budget request.......................    40,312,968,000
Committee recommendation..............................    40,424,428,000
Change from budget request............................      +111,460,000
 

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of 
$40,424,428,000 for Operation and Maintenance, Army which will 
provide the following program in fiscal year 2021:


               SMALL BUSINESSES AND ARMY FUTURES COMMAND

    The Committee is concerned with findings by the Government 
Accountability Office in its ``Army Futures Command Should Take 
Steps to Improve Small Business Engagement for Research and 
Development'' report, notably lack of coordination between the 
Army Futures Command and small businesses. The Committee 
recognizes the importance of small businesses to the entire 
Department of Defense enterprise and encourages the Commanding 
General, Army Futures Command, to develop methods to improve 
small business engagement for research and development. In 
addition, the Committee encourages the Commanding General, Army 
Futures Command, to coordinate with the Army Office of Small 
Business Programs in its engagement efforts.

                      FACILITIES REDUCTION PROGRAM

    The Committee is encouraged by the commitment of the Army 
to continue funding the complete disposal of potentially 
hazardous facilities at Aberdeen Proving Ground, including 
decommissioning, decontamination, and demolition through a 
phased approach under the Facilities Reduction Program. The 
Army has obligated funds, begun demolition, and programmed 
additional funds in the future to continue these efforts. The 
Committee encourages the Secretary of the Army to continue 
these efforts to ensure demolition activities continue. The 
Committee believes demolition of these facilities will result 
in cost savings on infrastructure, maintenance, and security of 
these unusable buildings; reduce the risk of contamination; and 
have a positive impact on other missions.

                    OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE, NAVY


 
 
 
Fiscal year 2020 appropriation........................   $47,622,510,000
Fiscal year 2021 budget request.......................    49,692,742,000
Committee recommendation..............................    49,248,117,000
Change from budget request............................      -444,625,000
 

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of 
$49,248,117,000 for Operation and Maintenance, Navy which will 
provide the following program in fiscal year 2021:


           ADVANCED SKILLS MANAGEMENT LEGACY SYSTEMS UPGRADES

    The Committee is concerned by the lack of progress in 
transitioning the Advanced Skills Management (ASM) software 
system into a commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) software system. 
The Committee is concerned that sustainment costs for this 
software system are unsustainable and that commercial software 
solutions currently being utilized by the Navy's Fleet 
Readiness Centers offer greater capability at reduced costs. 
Further, the Committee is increasingly concerned about the 
availability of the current ASM system to the user community 
given the antiquated nature of the software and need for 
increased remote telework capacity.
    The Committee recommendation includes $500,000 for the Navy 
to establish updated requirements for a COTS software solution 
to replace the existing ASM system. The Navy shall consider 
commercial solutions that are already developed, that need 
minimal customization work, and that are currently being 
fielded by industry partners who are conducting similar job 
functions at the NAVAIR Fleet Readiness Centers. The Navy shall 
also work with the entire ASM user community to incorporate 
feedback on capabilities that are needed in ASM that are 
available in a COTS product.
    The Committee recommendation also includes $10,000,000 in 
Other Procurement, Navy for the procurement, consistent with 
federal acquisition regulations, of a COTS solution to replace 
the ASM software system.
    The Committee directs the Secretary of the Navy to submit a 
spend plan for the $10,500,000 to the House and Senate 
Appropriations Committees not later than 60 days after the 
enactment of this Act.

                  CHINA LAKE NAVAL AIR WEAPONS STATION

    The Committee continues to monitor efforts by the 
Department of the Navy to rebuild China Lake Naval Air Weapons 
Station after two earthquakes damaged the installation in July 
2019. To further the recovery effort, the Navy requires the 
purchase of equipment, components, materials, services, and 
test and evaluation support. The Committee commends the 
Department of the Navy's recovery efforts to date and 
appreciates inclusion of validated funding requirements in the 
fiscal year 2021 budget submission. The Committee directs the 
Secretary of the Navy to provide the congressional defense 
committees with quarterly updates, beginning not later than 90 
days after the enactment of this Act, on repair efforts, 
including any refinements to validated funding requirements.

                OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE, MARINE CORPS


 
 
 
Fiscal year 2020 appropriation........................    $7,868,468,000
Fiscal year 2021 budget request.......................     7,328,607,000
Committee recommendation..............................     7,512,336,000
Change from budget request............................      +183,729,000
 

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $7,512,336,000 
for Operation and Maintenance, Marine Corps which will provide 
the following program in fiscal year 2021:


                  OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE, AIR FORCE


 
 
 
Fiscal year 2020 appropriation........................   $42,736,365,000
Fiscal year 2021 budget request.......................    34,750,597,000
Committee recommendation..............................    33,595,328,000
Change from budget request............................    -1,155,269,000
 

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of 
$33,595,328,000 for Operation and Maintenance, Air Force which 
will provide the following program in fiscal year 2021:


       DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE BUDGET JUSTIFICATION DOCUMENTS

    The Committee is disappointed with the quality of the 
justification material and responses to inquiries received from 
all components of the Air Force for its operation and 
maintenance programs. Information was frequently vague and ill 
defined. For example, prior year baseline levels are not 
included for each requested increase; depot level increases are 
presented with overall baselines, instead of each airframe 
presented by baseline; and decreasing levels of activities are 
intermingled with lines requesting increases.
    The Committee expects the Air Force to present a clearer 
picture of its budgetary requirements. Therefore, the Committee 
directs the Secretary of the Air Force to include the following 
changes in its fiscal year 2022 budget submission for operation 
and maintenance programs: (1) any request for an increase 
within a sub-activity group must include a baseline level for 
the specific program being increased, not the overall baseline 
of the sub-activity group; (2) depot and contractor maintenance 
activities should include baselines for each airframe; and (3) 
if activities are labeled ``classified,'' information on the 
increase should be presented in a classified format upon 
submission of the budget request.

                                  C-17

    The C-17 aircraft is a strategic transport aircraft, able 
to airlift heavy cargo close to a battle area or an area in 
need of humanitarian assistance. The Committee understands that 
the Air Force is considering changing the mix of depot level 
heavy maintenance for its C-17 fleet from a contractor-managed, 
near equal split of organic and contractor depot heavy 
maintenance to all organic depot heavy maintenance. The 
Committee has reservations about this change in strategy 
because the current product support strategy for the C-17 has 
consistently demonstrated a mission capable rate above eighty 
percent. The Committee is also aware that the Air Force 
acknowledges that this change would result in a negative impact 
to performance.
    Therefore, prior to obligating any funds to change the 
current C-17 product support strategy, the Committee directs 
the Secretary of the Air Force, in consultation with the 
Director of Cost Assessment and Program Evaluation, the 
Commander of United States Transportation Command, and the 
Chief of the National Guard Bureau, to certify to the 
congressional defense committees that such a change in product 
strategy will result in no additional costs to the Air Force 
over the next ten years as compared to the current product 
strategy.

                          AIRCRAFT PROTECTION

    The Committee recognizes the adverse impact that sunlight 
and hail can have on the readiness and service life of 
aircraft. Unprotected aircraft can sustain significant damage 
during hailstorms and long-term damage due to extensive sun 
exposure, creating additional, yet preventable, maintenance 
costs. The Committee encourages the Secretary of the Air Force 
to prioritize maintenance that may provide protection for 
aircraft to prevent damage caused by weather.

                       AIR FORCE PILOT SHORTFALL

    During the current fiscal year, the Air Force's pilot 
shortfall will increase to over 2,000, including more than 
1,000 fewer fighter and bomber pilots than required. The 
Committee supports initiatives such as Pilot Training Next and 
other efforts to increase training throughput but is concerned 
that the differences between total force pilot requirements and 
actual output may be widening. The Committee will continue to 
monitor the Air Force's plan to grow undergraduate pilot 
training and increase programmed flying time. With these 
concerns in mind, the Committee believes augmenting existing 
pilot training with commercial capacity and expertise could 
create a scalable, rapidly deployable, temporary solution. To 
properly realize the benefits and value of a turn-key approach 
at a new location, any proposed program should maximize 
previous investments by the Air Force including, but not 
limited to, established special use airspace, required 
environmental studies, and locations previously investigated 
and approved for operations. To ensure the Air Force is 
developing plans to partner with industry and increase 
undergraduate pilot training, the Committee directs the 
Secretary of the Air Force to submit a report to the 
congressional defense committees not later than 30 days after 
the enactment of this Act which includes a five-year spend plan 
for establishing a contractor-operated undergraduate pilot 
training program.

                 OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE, SPACE FORCE


 
 
 
Fiscal year 2020 appropriation........................       $40,000,000
Fiscal year 2021 budget request.......................     2,531,294,000
Committee recommendation..............................     2,498,544,000
Change from budget request............................       -32,750,000
 

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $2,498,544,000 
for Operation and Maintenance, Space Force which will provide 
the following program in fiscal year 2021:


                OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE, DEFENSE-WIDE


 
 
 
Fiscal year 2020 appropriation........................   $37,491,073,000
Fiscal year 2021 budget request.......................    38,649,079,000
Committee recommendation..............................    38,967,817,000
Change from budget request............................      +318,738,000
 

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of 
$38,967,817,000 for Operation and Maintenance, Defense-Wide 
which will provide the following program in fiscal year 2021:


       READINESS AND ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION INTEGRATION PROGRAM

    The Committee continues to support the Readiness and 
Environmental Protection Integration (REPI) program. The REPI 
program advances important military goals by implementing 
conservation easements to buffer the off-base impacts of 
military activities. The Committee sees positive examples of 
how productive the program can be by looking at progress along 
the Chesapeake Bay and encourages the Secretary of Defense to 
replicate these activities nation-wide. The Committee also 
encourages the Secretary of Defense to prioritize REPI projects 
that leverage other federal and non-federal funding sources to 
deploy best management practices on lands conserved through 
REPI.

                DEFENSE COMMUNITY INFRASTRUCTURE PROGRAM

    The Committee recommendation includes $50,000,000 for the 
Defense Community Infrastructure Program. The Committee is 
disappointed that the Secretary of Defense did not swiftly 
allocate funds to specific projects with the $50,000,000 
provided in the Department of Defense Appropriations Act, 2020, 
waiting until mid-May, or over five months from date of 
enactment, to provide direction to the Office of Economic 
Adjustment for execution. The Committee is also dismayed about 
the parameters the Secretary of Defense has instituted for 
execution of this program in fiscal year 2020, particularly the 
distinct lack of interaction with military communities, the 
exact group this program was created to assist. The parameters 
determined for use of the Defense Community Infrastructure 
Program seem to fund activities not funded in other sections of 
the bill, for example, daycare facilities and hospitals. The 
Committee is also disappointed to learn that the Department 
does not expect to include funding for this program in its 
fiscal year 2022 budget request.
    Given this divergence from congressional intent, the 
Committee directs that, prior to the obligation of funds, yet 
not later than 30 days after the enactment of this Act, the 
Secretary of Defense provide a spend plan to the congressional 
defense committees on the use of the fiscal year 2021 funding.

  SERVICE-PROVIDED SUPPORT AND ENABLING CAPABILITIES TO UNITED STATES 
                       SPECIAL OPERATIONS FORCES

    The Committee directs the Service Secretaries and the 
Secretary of Defense on behalf of the defense agencies to 
include with the fiscal year 2022 budget submission and each 
subsequent year thereafter, a consolidated budget justification 
display showing Service-common support and enabling 
capabilities contributed from each of the military Services and 
defense agencies to special operations forces. The report shall 
include a detailed accounting of the resources allocated by 
each Service or defense agency at the appropriation and line 
item level to provide combat support, combat service support, 
training, base operating support, pay and allowances, and 
enabling capabilities or other common services and support for 
special operations forces. The exhibit shall also include an 
identification of any changes in the level or type of support 
in the current fiscal year when compared to the preceding year.

             THEATER SPECIAL OPERATIONS COMMAND ACTIVITIES

    The Committee directs the Assistant Secretary of Defense 
(Special Operations/Low Intensity Conflict), in coordination 
with the Commander of United States Special Operations Command, 
the Service Secretaries, and the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs 
of Staff, to provide a report on the activities of Theater 
Special Operations Commands (TSOCs). The report shall be 
provided with the fiscal year 2022 budget request submission 
and include a detailed accounting of activities performed by 
the TSOCs in the preceding year, current fiscal year, and 
current budget request submission at the budget line item level 
of detail. The report shall include a detailed accounting of 
resources allocated by the military Services, United States 
Special Operations Command, and the combatant commands.

                MILITARY INFORMATION SUPPORT OPERATIONS

    Over the past decade, the bulk of activities under Military 
Information Support Operations (MISO) focused on countering 
violent extremist organizations (VEO). While VEOs remain an 
ongoing threat and require continued vigilance, peer and near-
peer adversaries like China and Russia are using social media 
and other vectors to weaken domestic and international 
institutions and undermine United States interests. This new 
information environment and the difficulty of discriminating 
between real and fake information heightens the importance of 
enhancing and coordinating United States government 
information-related capabilities as a tool of diplomatic and 
military strategy.
    The Committee recognizes the efforts and accomplishments of 
the United States Special Operations Command and other agencies 
within the executive branch to operate in the digital domain. 
However, it is difficult to view individual agency activities 
as a coordinated whole of government effort. Over the past 
several years, the classified annex accompanying annual 
Department of Defense Appropriations Acts included direction 
focusing on the individual activities of geographic combatant 
commands. However, information messaging strategies to counter 
Chinese and Russian malign influences cuts across these 
geographic boundaries and requires coordination between 
multiple government agencies using different authorities.
    Therefore, in order to better understand how MISO 
activities support a whole of government messaging strategy, 
the Committee directs the Assistant Secretary of Defense 
(Special Operations/Low Intensity Conflict) to submit a report 
for MISO activities for the individual geographic combatant 
commands justified by the main pillars of the National Defense 
Strategy to the House and Senate Appropriations Committees not 
later than 15 days after submission of the fiscal year 2022 
budget request and annually thereafter. The report shall 
include spend plans identifying the requested and enacted 
funding levels for both voice and internet activities and how 
those activities are coordinated with the Intelligence 
Community and the Department of State. The enacted levels will 
serve as the baseline for reprogramming in accordance with 
section 8007 of this Act. Furthermore, the Committee directs 
the Assistant Secretary of Defense (Special Operations/Low 
Intensity Conflict) to submit to the congressional defense 
committees, not later than 90 days after the end of the fiscal 
year, an annual report that provides details on each combatant 
commands' MISO activities by activity name, description, goal 
or objective, target audience, dissemination means, executed 
funds, and assessments of their effectiveness. Additional 
details for the report are included in the classified annex 
accompanying this Act.

       SPECIAL OPERATIONS COMMAND COLD WEATHER TACTICAL OUTERWEAR

    The United States Special Operations Command's (USSOCOM) 
Lost Arrow Project has developed technical outerwear that 
reduces burden on the operator while extending capability at 
lower extreme temperatures. The Committee understands that 
USSOCOM has identified a critical need for this system to 
address near-term operational requirements and encourages the 
Commander, USSOCOM to accelerate procurement of these systems.

                     137TH SPECIAL OPERATIONS WING

    The Committee supports the 137th Special Operations Wing 
(SOW) and believes that reductions to the unit were misguided 
as part of the Defense Wide Review. Therefore, the Committee 
recommendation includes $22,000,000 to support the MC-12 
mission in fiscal year 2021. Furthermore, the Committee 
recognizes the unique role the 137th SOW serves and directs the 
Commander, United States Special Operations Command, to 
internally resource deployment costs in fiscal year 2021.

                   DEFENSE POW/MIA ACCOUNTING AGENCY

    The Committee commends the work of the Defense POW/MIA 
Accounting Agency (DPAA) and appreciates its continual efforts 
to return the remains of fallen servicemembers, even as 
challenges inhibit its ability to execute its mission, such as 
foreign government obstruction or COVID-19. However, the 
Committee is concerned that the Services are not prioritizing 
activities that directly support DPAA. The Committee believes 
that the Services must ensure that their efforts to collect DNA 
family reference samples are as swift as possible to ensure 
that the DPAA can execute its mission and give the families of 
fallen heroes the closure they seek.

  PERFLUORINATED CHEMICALS CONTAMINATION AND FIRST RESPONDER EXPOSURE

    The Committee remains concerned with the health 
implications of exposure to perfluorinated chemicals (PFCs), 
including the increased rate of cancer in Department of Defense 
firefighter and first responder personnel. The Committee 
understands there are ongoing efforts to develop an alternative 
firefighting foam that meets military requirements and is free 
from PFCs that have been linked to higher rates of certain 
cancers. Given the lack of definitive guidance around exposure 
levels, the Committee encourages the Secretary of Defense to 
accelerate adoption of other forms of foam that meet military 
specifications and do not contain PFCs. Further, the Committee 
understands that testing for firefighters for exposure to PFCs 
has begun. The Committee is encouraged by these efforts but 
believes that additional measures need to be taken. The 
Committee directs the Assistant Secretary of Defense (Health 
Affairs) to update the House and Senate Appropriations 
Committees not later than 180 days after the enactment of this 
Act on the Department's plan to test and track potential first 
responder exposure to these chemicals as part of their 
existing, annual medical surveillance exams.

                         CLIMATE CHANGE REPORT

    The Committee notes the Secretary of Defense is required to 
submit a report which contains a list of the top ten most 
climate-vulnerable bases within each Service and provides a 
cost estimate to mitigate the risks at each of these bases to 
the congressional defense committees as directed in House 
Report 116-84. The Committee understands the Department is 
working with the Army Corps of Engineers to develop a tool to 
meet this requirement and better assess exposure to extreme 
weather and climate impacts. The Committee understands the 
Department expects to complete this tool and report by the end 
of September 2020. The Committee expects the Secretary of 
Defense to update the congressional defense committees with any 
changes to the anticipated date of completion for the tool and 
report.

                       SPECIAL MEASURES AGREEMENT

    The Committee recognizes the United States-South Korea 
alliance as foundational for peace and security on the Korean 
Peninsula and throughout the region. The Committee encourages 
the Secretary of Defense to coordinate with the Secretary of 
State to support good faith negotiations with the Republic of 
Korea government that result in a fair and equitable five-year 
Special Measures Agreement.

              COMPOSTING OF SHREDDED GOVERNMENT DOCUMENTS

    The Committee encourages the Secretary of Defense to study 
the financial and environmental impacts of composting shredded 
government documents.

              DEFENSE SECURITY COOPERATION AGENCY PROGRAMS

    The Committee recommendation provides $659,225,000 for base 
programs administered by the Defense Security Cooperation 
Agency (DSCA) and an additional $1,651,296,000 in title IX for 
overseas contingency operations. The Committee notes the 
significant unobligated balances from prior appropriations and 
the disruption of programs due to the COVID-19 pandemic.
    Section 8120 of the Act requires that a spend plan be 
submitted prior to the initial obligation of funds. The 
Committee expects the Director of DSCA to ensure the 
appropriate distribution of funds with two-year availability, 
which accounts for more than half of the funding provided. The 
Act also requires quarterly reports on the use and status of 
funds, which shall include amounts appropriated, obligated, and 
expended for each budget activity and sub-activity for DSCA, 
including base and overseas contingency operations funding. The 
spend plan and quarterly reports should include such 
information for each program listed in the OP-5 budget 
justification document for DSCA as modified by this Act and 
report.
    The Committee does not recommend funding for a proposed 
National Defense Strategy Implementation Account and notes that 
the implementation of the National Defense Strategy extends 
well beyond the scope of programs funded under this heading. 
Instead, the Committee recommends funding for International 
Security Cooperation Programs, the Combating Terrorism and 
Irregular Warfare Fellowship Program, and the Ministry of 
Defense Advisors Program.
    The Committee recommendation provides $1,141,048,000 for 
International Security Cooperation Programs. The Committee 
directs that congressional notifications submitted for such 
programs specify the funding source (including fiscal year and 
base or overseas contingency operations), whether such funds 
support ongoing or new programs, and the duration and expected 
cost over the life of each program.
    The Committee recommendation rejects several reductions 
proposed in the budget request. The recommendation provides not 
less than $160,000,000, an increase of $63,377,963 above the 
request, for International Security Cooperation Programs with 
countries in the Africa Command area of responsibility. The 
recommendation also provides not less than $130,000,000, an 
increase of $60,553,073 above the request, for International 
Security Cooperation Programs with countries in the Southern 
Command area of responsibility.
    The Committee recommendation transfers $26,006,000 
requested for international programs under Drug Interdiction 
and Counter-Drug Activities, Defense to this heading to build 
the capacity of countries in the Northern Command and Southern 
Command areas of responsibility to counter illicit drug 
trafficking. More broadly, the Committee notes that counter-
illicit drug trafficking programs supported under this heading 
should complement, not replace programs supported by the 
Department of State, and urges close coordination between both 
departments. The Committee directs that notifications submitted 
by DSCA for counter-illicit drug trafficking programs include 
information on related programs being conducted by other 
federal agencies.
    The Committee recommendation provides $220,000,000, an 
increase of $10,928,776 above the request, for International 
Security Cooperation Programs with countries in the Central 
Command area of responsibility. Not less than $105,250,000 is 
included for Jordan, which is the same as the budget request. 
The Committee directs that such amounts be specified in the 
spend plan required by this Act. The Committee also supports 
programs to enhance security along the Tajikistan-Afghanistan 
border.
    The Committee directs that such funds provided above the 
request for International Security Cooperation Programs be used 
to enhance existing programs with countries such as Colombia, 
and to continue programs for countries that would otherwise not 
receive funding under the budget request submission, including 
Morocco, Oman, and Costa Rica.
    The Committee recommendation provides $290,662,471 for 
International Security Cooperation Programs with countries in 
the Indo-Pacific Command area of responsibility, as requested, 
including for maritime security programs.
    The Committee notes the ongoing conflict in eastern Ukraine 
due to Russian aggression. Last year, the Organization for 
Security and Cooperation in Europe Special Monitoring Mission 
to Ukraine recorded 299,633 cease-fire violations, 3,373 
explosions, and 148 civilian casualties. The Committee also 
notes Ukraine's contributions to NATO operations and welcomes 
the selection of Ukraine as one of six enhanced opportunities 
partners, which will increase access to programs, exercises, 
and information sharing.
    The Committee recommendation continues support for the 
defense of Ukraine by providing $275,000,000 for the Ukraine 
Security Assistance Initiative, an increase of $25,000,000 
above the request. The recommendation does not provide 
additional funding for Ukraine under International Security 
Cooperation Programs. The Committee expects the Government of 
Ukraine to continue to adopt and implement reforms in the 
security sector and to reduce corruption in the security 
services and directs the Secretary of Defense to update the 
report required by House Report 116-84 not later than 90 days 
after the enactment of this Act.
    The Committee is concerned with the inability of the 
Department of Defense to obligate funds for the Ukraine 
Security Assistance Initiative in a timely manner. The 
recommendation includes language exempting funds from 
apportionment and requires the Secretary of Defense to inform 
the congressional defense committees if funds have not been 
obligated 60 days after a congressional notification is 
submitted. Furthermore, the Committee directs the Secretary of 
Defense, in coordination with the Director of DSCA, to review 
the Department's policies and procedures with respect to 
funding for the Ukraine Security Assistance Initiative, and to 
submit a report to the House and Senate Appropriations 
Committees not later than 60 days after the enactment of this 
Act on steps taken to improve the delivery and timeliness of 
assistance.
    The Committee recommendation provides $292,612,243, an 
increase of $6,174,901 above the request, for International 
Security Cooperation Programs with countries in the European 
Command area of responsibility. The Committee supports efforts 
to strengthen deterrence against Russian aggression. The 
Committee recommendation provides $150,000,000 for 
International Security Cooperation Programs with Estonia, 
Latvia and Lithuania through the Baltic Security Initiative, 
including $50,000,000 to enhance the integrated air defense of 
such countries. Such amounts shall be included under the 
European Command area of responsibility in the spend plan 
required by this Act. Additionally, not later than 90 days 
after the enactment of this Act and prior to the initial 
obligation of funds for the Baltic Security Initiative, the 
Secretary of Defense, in coordination with the Secretary of 
State, is directed to submit a strategy to the congressional 
defense committees for the Baltic Security Initiative, which 
shall include goals, objectives, and milestones for programs 
supported by the initiative, as well as information on the 
capabilities of each country and their financial contributions 
towards their own security, the NATO alliance, and programs 
supported by the initiative.
    The Committee recommends a focus on programs that advance 
the recruitment, employment, development, retention, and 
promotion of women in foreign security forces. Not later than 
90 days after the enactment of this Act, the Committee directs 
the Secretary of Defense to submit a report to the 
congressional defense committees on DSCA programs and policies 
that advance such goals. The report shall include information 
on current programs, including funding that supports such 
programs, and the results. The Secretary shall consult with the 
House and Senate Appropriations Committees prior to the 
obligation of additional funding provided for International 
Security Cooperation Programs women's programs.
    The Committee supports training for foreign security forces 
in human rights, which is a required component of building 
partnership capacity programs. The Committee directs that 
notifications submitted for such programs include information 
on the subject matter, type, duration, and cost of such 
training.
    The Committee supports the provision of Department of 
Defense excess defense articles to enhance the security of 
partners countries but notes that such programs could operate 
in a more strategic manner. The Secretary of Defense is 
currently required to submit a report that contains a list of 
expected defense articles that are likely to become available 
for transfer during the next 12 months, and another report that 
contains a list of countries eligible for such transfers. The 
Committee recommends greater integration of the information 
contained in these two reports, as well as how proposed 
transfers can be integrated into an overall country security 
cooperation plan. The Committee directs the Director of DSCA to 
consult with the House and Senate Appropriations Committees not 
later than 45 days after the enactment of this Act on efforts 
to improve such programs.
    The Committee recommendation includes funds above the 
request for DSCA Regional Centers and notes the important role 
that these centers play in building strong and sustainable 
international networks of security leaders, which furthers 
United States objectives and leadership.
    The Committee recommendation includes $21,814,000 for DSCA 
headquarters. The Committee is concerned with the apparent lack 
of budget controls to ensure DSCA adheres to congressionally 
directed levels for headquarters expenses and includes language 
limiting such costs.
    The Committee recommendation includes funding requested 
under this heading for the Lift and Sustain program, which 
provides support to allied forces participating in a combined 
operation with the armed forces of the United States and 
coalition forces supporting military and stability operations. 
The Committee is concerned, however, with the proper management 
and execution of prior year funds by the Department of Defense. 
The Committee directs the Secretary of Defense to assess the 
policies and procedures in place for this program and, not 
later than 60 days after the enactment of this Act and prior to 
the initial obligation of funds provided in this Act for these 
purposes, to submit a report to the House and Senate 
Appropriations Committees detailing changes made to address 
such problems, including those made at the recommendation of 
the Government Accountability Office. The Committee also 
expects the Secretary of Defense to promptly notify the 
Committees upon any finding of a similar issue in the future.
    The Committee recommendation includes requested funding for 
border security, including support to Jordan and Tunisia.

     STANDARDS AND PROTOCOLS ON COUNTERING CYBERSECURITY INCIDENTS

    The Committee notes that in July 2016 the North Atlantic 
Treaty Organization (NATO) recognized cyberspace as a domain of 
operations in which NATO must defend itself as it does in other 
operational domains. The Committee directs the Secretary of 
Defense, in consultation with the Secretary of State, to submit 
a report to the House and Senate Appropriations Committees not 
later than 180 days after the enactment of this Act on common 
NATO standards and protocols for countering cybersecurity 
incidents.

                        ZERO TRUST ARCHITECTURE

    The Committee encourages the Secretary of Defense to 
implement a Zero Trust Architecture to increase its 
cybersecurity posture and enhance the Department's ability to 
protect its systems and data.

               NOISE MITIGATION COMMUNITIES PARTNERSHIPS

    The Committee is aware of the negative effects that jet 
noise has on communities near installations with 
airfields.Given the concerns raised by communities, the 
Committee directs the Secretary of Defense to utilize the noise 
assessments found in environmental impact studies (EIS) to 
measure the level of jet noise generated by aviation assets and 
to make that noise measurement data available to affected 
communities. If an EIS assessment has already determined the 
effects of noise to the surrounding community to be damaging to 
the local community, that assessment should be used as the 
underlying data for consideration of relief. Data should be 
assessed from communities near both active and reserve 
installations with airfields.
    After reviews of the EIS are completed, the Committee 
directs the Office of Economic Adjustment to work with 
communities and the Service Secretaries to find measures that 
would mitigate any impacts from noise caused by defense 
aviation activities, with special attention to communities with 
new airframes.All types of mitigation efforts should be 
considered for implementation.The Committee directs the Office 
of Economic Adjustment to submit a report to the congressional 
defense committees not later than 180 days after the enactment 
of this Act on the progress it has made reviewing each of the 
assessments, to date, with a list of the communities involved, 
the timeline for completion of all of the assessments for each 
of the communities with installations with airfields,examples 
of tools to mitigate the impact of jet noise, and the costs 
involved in each of these steps.
    To ensure the program is resourced for success, the 
Committee recommendation includes $50,000,000, to be used over 
two years, to provide grants to communities affected by 
excessive noise. Grants to communities shall be provided on a 
priority basis determined by the participating communities to 
entities such as hospitals, daycare facilities, schools, senior 
citizen facilities, and private homes within a mile of the 
airfield.

                              LOCAL MEDIA

    The Committee directs the Secretary of Defense and the 
Service Secretaries that of the funds allocated for 
advertising, public relations, and marketing in this Act, funds 
shall be designated for local media, consisting of local 
television and radio broadcast stations and local newspapers. 
The Committee also directs the Secretary of Defense and the 
Service Secretaries to provide a report not later than 90 days 
after the enactment of this Act, and quarterly thereafter 
throughout fiscal year 2021, to the congressional defense 
committees, detailing how the Department of Defense and the 
military Services are spending advertising, public relations, 
and marketing related appropriations and what portion of these 
budgets are being spent on local media. The Committee further 
directs each Department and agency funded by this Act with 
annual advertising budgets in excess of $500,000 to include in 
its fiscal year 2022 budget justification submission details on 
expenditures on local media advertising for fiscal years 2020 
and 2021.

                OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE, ARMY RESERVE


 
 
 
Fiscal year 2020 appropriation........................    $2,984,494,000
Fiscal year 2021 budget request.......................     2,934,717,000
Committee recommendation..............................    $3,004,717,000
Change from budget request............................       +70,000,000
 

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $3,004,717,000 
for Operation and Maintenance, Army Reserve which will provide 
the following program in fiscal year 2021:


    OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE, NAVY RESERVE

 
 
 
Fiscal year 2020 appropriation........................    $1,102,616,000
Fiscal year 2021 budget request.......................     1,127,046,000
Committee recommendation..............................     1,155,746,000
Change from budget request............................       +28,700,000
 

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $1,155,746,000 
for Operation and Maintenance, Navy Reserve which will provide 
the following program in fiscal year 2021:


            OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE, MARINE CORPS RESERVE


 
 
 
Fiscal year 2020 appropriation........................      $289,076,000
Fiscal year 2021 budget request.......................       284,656,000
1Committee recommendation.............................       322,706,000
Change from budget request............................       +38,050,000
 

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $322,706,000 
for Operation and Maintenance, Marine Corps Reserve which will 
provide the following program in fiscal year 2021:


              OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE, AIR FORCE RESERVE


 
 
 
Fiscal year 2020 appropriation........................    $3,227,318,000
Fiscal year 2021 budget request.......................     3,350,284,000
Committee recommendation..............................     3,300,284,000
Change from budget request............................       -50,000,000
 

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $3,300,284,000 
for Operation and Maintenance, Air Force Reserve which will 
provide the following program in fiscal year 2021:


             OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE, ARMY NATIONAL GUARD


 
 
 
Fiscal year 2020 appropriation........................    $7,461,947,000
Fiscal year 2021 budget request.......................     7,420,014,000
Committee recommendation..............................     7,611,147,000
Change from budget request............................      +191,133,000
 

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $7,611,147,000 
for Operation and Maintenance, Army National Guard which will 
provide the following program in fiscal year 2021:


                JOINT FORCE HEADQUARTERS ANALYSIS CELLS

    Intelligence fusion centers are information sharing hubs 
that provide threat-related information to federal, state, and 
local agencies. These centers allow the flexibility to 
determine which critical infrastructure areas merit the 
dedication of resources on each governmental level. The 
Committee recognizes that the National Guard Bureau is 
developing a Joint Force Headquarters Analysis Cell concept to 
expand state-level intelligence capabilities. As this work 
progresses, the Committee encourages the Chief, National Guard 
Bureau to consult with state-level entities, particularly 
individual state National Guard units who specialize in this 
area, to integrate key aspects of concepts that have already 
proved successful at the state level.

             OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE, AIR NATIONAL GUARD


 
 
 
Fiscal year 2020 appropriation........................    $6,655,292,000
Fiscal year 2021 budget request.......................     6,753,642,000
Committee recommendation..............................     6,853,942,000
Change from budget request............................      +100,300,000
 

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $6,853,942,000 
for Operation and Maintenance, Air National Guard which will 
provide the following program in fiscal year 2021:


 NATIONAL GUARD BUREAU STATE WEBSITE MODERNIZATION AND STANDARDIZATION

    The Committee believes the Air National Guard must 
continuously strive to reach its recruitment and sustainment 
goals to meet the personnel needs of the National Guard Bureau. 
Meeting these goals requires improved technological outreach 
via a modernized digital experience. Website standardization, 
digital asset management, and workflow modernization are all 
elements required for effective recruitment and sustainment of 
National Guard forces in the 21st century. Currently, the 
Committee believes the Adjutant Generals for individual states 
lack the tools needed to refine and mirror the capabilities 
present at the federal level. Therefore, the Committee 
encourages the Chief of the Air National Guard to provide 
robust funding for recruiting and advertising programs to 
improve the digital experience, implement state specific 
website modernization, expand digital asset management, and 
modernize forms to improve workflow.

          UNITED STATES COURT OF APPEALS FOR THE ARMED FORCES


 
 
 
Fiscal year 2020 appropriation........................       $14,771,000
Fiscal year 2021 budget request.......................        15,211,000
Committee recommendation..............................        15,211,000
Change from budget request............................             - - -
 

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $15,211,000 
for the United States Court of Appeals for the Armed Forces.

                    ENVIRONMENTAL RESTORATION, ARMY


 
 
 
Fiscal year 2020 appropriation........................      $251,700,000
Fiscal year 2021 budget request.......................       207,518,000
Committee recommendation..............................       264,285,000
Change from budget request............................       +56,767,000
 

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $264,285,000 
for Environmental Restoration, Army.

                    ENVIRONMENTAL RESTORATION, NAVY


 
 
 
Fiscal year 2020 appropriation........................      $385,000,000
Fiscal year 2021 budget request.......................       335,932,000
Committee recommendation..............................       404,250,000
Change from budget request............................       +68,318,000
 

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $404,250,000 
for Environmental Restoration, Navy.

                  ENVIRONMENTAL RESTORATION, AIR FORCE


 
 
 
Fiscal year 2020 appropriation........................      $485,000,000
Fiscal year 2021 budget request.......................       303,926,000
Committee recommendation..............................       509,250,000
Change from budget request............................      +205,324,000
 

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $509,250,000 
for Environmental Restoration, Air Force.

                ENVIRONMENTAL RESTORATION, DEFENSE-WIDE


 
 
 
Fiscal year 2020 appropriation........................       $19,002,000
Fiscal year 2021 budget request.......................         9,105,000
Committee recommendation..............................        19,952,000
Change from budget request............................       +10,847,000
 

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $19,952,000 
for Environmental Restoration, Defense-Wide.

         ENVIRONMENTAL RESTORATION, FORMERLY USED DEFENSE SITES


 
 
 
Fiscal year 2020 appropriation........................      $275,000,000
Fiscal year 2021 budget request.......................       216,587,000
Committee recommendation..............................       288,750,000
Change from budget request............................       +72,163,000
 

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $288,750,000 
for Environmental Restoration, Formerly Used Defense Sites. The 
Committee expects the Secretary of Defense and the Service 
Secretaries to execute the Military Munitions Response Program 
in a manner consistent with the budget request.

             OVERSEAS HUMANITARIAN, DISASTER, AND CIVIC AID


 
 
 
Fiscal year 2020 appropriation........................      $135,000,000
Fiscal year 2021 budget request.......................       109,900,000
Committee recommendation..............................       147,500,000
Change from budget request............................       +37,600,000
 

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $147,500,000 
for Overseas Humanitarian, Disaster, and Civic Aid, which will 
provide the following program in fiscal year 2021:

                                    EXPLANATION OF PROJECT LEVEL ADJUSTMENTS
                                            [In thousands of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                        Budget       Committee      Change from
                                                                       Request      Recommended       Request
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
FOREIGN DISASTER RELIEF............................................       20,000          35,000          15,000
    Program increase...............................................                       15,000
HUMANITARIAN ASSISTANCE............................................       74,900          90,000          15,100
    Program increase...............................................                       15,100
HUMANITARIAN MINE ACTION PROGRAM...................................       15,000          22,500           7,500
    Program increase...............................................                        7,500
                                                                    --------------------------------------------
    TOTAL, OVERSEAS HUMANITARIAN, DISASTER, AND CIVIC AID..........      109,900         147,500          37,600
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

                        HUMANITARIAN ASSISTANCE

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $90,000,000 
for Humanitarian Assistance, which is $15,100,000 above the 
budget request. The Committee supports the use of such 
assistance to strengthen basic education in host countries, 
which should be coordinated with other federal agencies and 
non-government organizations, as appropriate.

                               SPEND PLAN

    The Committee remains interested in the details of funds 
provided for Humanitarian Assistance and the Humanitarian Mine 
Program. As such, the Committee directs the Secretary of 
Defense to submit a spend plan to the House and Senate 
Appropriations Committees not later than 45 days after the 
enactment of this Act for funds for Humanitarian Assistance and 
the Humanitarian Mine Action Program. The plan shall include 
amounts planned for each combatant command and country and a 
comparison to such amounts provided in the previous two fiscal 
years. The Committee also directs the Secretary of Defense to 
include this detailed information as part of the Department's 
fiscal year 2022 budget request submission.

                  COOPERATIVE THREAT REDUCTION ACCOUNT


 
 
 
Fiscal year 2020 appropriation........................      $373,700,000
Fiscal year 2021 budget request.......................       238,490,000
Committee recommendation..............................       360,190,000
Change from budget request............................      +121,700,000
 

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $360,190,000 
for the Cooperative Threat Reduction Account which will provide 
the following program in fiscal year 2021:

                                    EXPLANATION OF PROJECT LEVEL ADJUSTMENTS
                                            [In thousands of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                        Budget       Committee      Change from
                                                                       Request      Recommended       Request
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Strategic Offensive Arms Elimination...............................        2,924           2,924               0
Chemical Weapons Destruction.......................................       11,806          11,806               0
Global Nuclear Security............................................       20,152          35,852          15,700
    Program increase--Global Nuclear Security......................                       15,700
Biological Threat Reduction Program................................      127,396         225,396          98,000
    Program increase--Biological Threat Reduction Program..........                       98,000
Proliferation Prevention Program...................................       52,064          60,064           8,000
    Program increase--Proliferation Prevention Program.............                        8,000
Other Assessments/Admin Costs......................................       24,148          24,148               0
                                                                    --------------------------------------------
    TOTAL, COOPERATIVE THREAT REDUCTION ACCOUNT....................      238,490         360,190         121,700
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE ACQUISITION WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT ACCOUNT


 
 
 
Fiscal year 2020 appropriation........................      $400,000,000
Fiscal year 2021 budget request.......................        58,181,000
Committee recommendation..............................       198,501,000
Change from budget request............................      +140,320,000
 

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $198,501,000 
for the Department of Defense Acquisition Workforce Development 
Account which will provide the following program in fiscal year 
2021:

                                    EXPLANATION OF PROJECT LEVEL ADJUSTMENTS
                                            [In thousands of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                        Budget       Committee      Change from
                                                                       Request      Recommended       Request
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT                                                  55,386         174,801         119,415
    Transfer from OM,A line 435; OM,N line 4B3N, and OM,AF line 41B                      119,415
RETENTION AND RECOGNITION                                                  1,358           3,445           2,087
    Transfer from OM,AF line 41B...................................                        2,087
RECRUITING AND HIRING                                                      1,437          20,255          18,818
    Transfer from OM,AF line 41B...................................                       18,818
                                                                    --------------------------------------------
        TOTAL, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE ACQUISITION WORKFORCE                58,181         198,501         140,320
         DEVELOPMENT ACCOUNT.......................................
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


                               TITLE III

                              PROCUREMENT

    The fiscal year 2021 Department of Defense procurement 
budget request totals $130,866,091,000. The Committee 
recommendation provides $133,633,757,000 for the procurement 
accounts. The table below summarizes the Committee 
recommendations:


            REPROGRAMMING GUIDANCE FOR ACQUISITION ACCOUNTS

      (INCLUDING BASE AND OVERSEAS CONTINGENCY OPERATIONS FUNDING)

    The Secretary of Defense is directed to continue to follow 
the reprogramming guidance as specified in the report 
accompanying the House version of the Department of Defense 
Appropriations bill for Fiscal Year 2008 (House Report 110-
279). Specifically, the dollar threshold for reprogramming 
funds shall be $10,000,000 for procurement and research, 
development, test and evaluation.
    Also, the Under Secretary of Defense (Comptroller) is 
directed to continue to provide the congressional defense 
committees quarterly, spreadsheet-based DD Form 1416 reports 
for Service and defense-wide accounts in titles III and IV of 
this Act. Reports for titles III and IV shall comply with the 
guidance specified in the explanatory statement accompanying 
the Department of Defense Appropriations Act, 2006. The 
Department shall continue to follow the limitation that prior 
approval reprogrammings are set at either the specified dollar 
threshold or 20 percent of the procurement or research, 
development, test and evaluation line, whichever is less. These 
thresholds are cumulative from the base for reprogramming value 
as modified by any adjustments. Therefore, if the combined 
value of transfers into or out of a procurement (P-1) or 
research, development, test and evaluation (R-1) line exceeds 
the identified threshold, the Secretary of Defense must submit 
a prior approval reprogramming to the congressional defense 
committees. In addition, guidelines on the application of prior 
approval reprogramming procedures for congressional special 
interest items are established elsewhere in this report.

                           FUNDING INCREASES

    The funding increases outlined in these tables shall be 
provided only for the specific purposes indicated in the 
tables.

                   PROCUREMENT SPECIAL INTEREST ITEMS

    Items for which additional funds have been recommended or 
items for which funding is specifically reduced as shown in the 
project level tables detailing recommended adjustments or in 
paragraphs using the phrase ``only for'' or ``only to'' in this 
report are congressional special interest items for the purpose 
of the Base for Reprogramming (DD Form 1414). Each of these 
items must be carried on the DD Form 1414 at the stated amount, 
as specifically addressed elsewhere in this report.

                 AUTONOMIC LOGISTICS INFORMATION SYSTEM

    The budget justification documents submitted with the 
fiscal year 2021 budget request indicate that the Department of 
Defense has received $394,017,000 through fiscal year 2020 for 
equipment related to the Autonomic Logistics Information System 
(ALIS) for the F-35 Joint Strike Fighter. The request for ALIS 
equipment in fiscal year 2021 is $59,361,000 across all 
variants of the F-35, an increase of $17,498,000 over fiscal 
year 2020.
    The Committee recommends funding this request only because 
there is little choice but to sustain the F-35 enterprise with 
the existing ALIS until the Department determines a clear path 
to transitioning to a new system. Although ALIS is an integral 
part of the F-35 weapon system, the evidence to date indicates 
the initial design and implementation of ALIS has failed to 
meet its intended purpose. Rather than facilitating the 
maintenance and readiness of F-35 aircraft, ALIS perversely 
absorbs additional personnel and time to remedy its common 
problems and institute workarounds. The Government 
Accountability Office has reported continuing problems with 
ALIS such as a lack of trustworthy data and a high number of 
deficiency reports.
    The parallels to the Air Force's recent experience with the 
Remote Visual System (RVS) on the KC-46 are noticeable. Like 
the RVS system until recently, the development of the ALIS 
system has suffered from vague requirements, lack of objective 
performance measures, a design based on hardware and software 
that has been overtaken by technological innovation during the 
program's prolonged development, overreliance on the assumption 
that the prime contractor is properly incentivized to deliver a 
system that meets the needs of the warfighter, and a lack of 
senior leadership intervention until the problems became too 
large to ignore.
    The Committee acknowledges that the Department currently is 
pursuing efforts to improve the existing ALIS while planning to 
transition to a new system known as the Operational Data 
Integrated Network (ODIN), the plan for which has not been 
fully developed. It is unclear whether this new approach is 
adequately resourced, and the Committee is concerned that the 
present attention to ALIS again will be overcome by the demands 
of managing changes to the air vehicle itself as the Department 
proceeds through follow-on modernization. Based on the 
information provided thus far, it appears that ODIN likely will 
result in significant dematerialization of the ALIS system by 
transitioning capabilities currently hosted on individual 
servers to a cloud-based environment, therefore rendering much 
of the currently procured equipment unnecessary.
    Therefore, the Committee directs the Director of the F-35 
Joint Program Office to submit a report that includes an 
estimate of the full procurement cost of equipment required to 
support the legacy ALIS for all aircraft in the program of 
record, as well as an estimate of the cost savings in equipment 
procurement that can be derived from the transition to ALIS 
Next and subsequent transition to ODIN. This report shall be 
submitted to the congressional defense committees not later 
than 90 days after the enactment of this Act.

                  USE OF ADVANCED PROCUREMENT FUNDING

    In many instances the Committee supports departmental 
requests for advanced procurement (AP) funding. As reflected in 
the Department's Financial Management Regulation (FMR), AP 
funding is provided in a fiscal year prior to the year in which 
the related end item is to be procured. This allows for the 
early funding of long-lead components in order to preserve an 
orderly delivery schedule for that major end item. When 
authorized, AP may also be used to fund economic quantity 
orders under a multiyear contract in order to promote supplier 
stability and save money compared to annual contracting.
    The Committee notes that there have been recent instances 
in which the Department has not used AP funding for its 
intended and legitimate purpose, but instead has treated it 
either as incremental funding or as a fungible source of money 
that can be used for any and all purposes within the related 
program. This situation has arisen in cases where AP funding 
has been requested and received, but the quantities of end 
items to be procured in the succeeding year has changed.
    The Committee directs the Under Secretary of Defense 
(Comptroller) to ensure that AP funds are both requested and 
executed properly according to the FMR. The Committee will 
continue to exercise its proper role by denying or rescinding 
funds for AP that are not used appropriately.

                       AIRCRAFT PROCUREMENT, ARMY


 
 
 
Fiscal year 2020 appropriation........................    $3,771,329,000
Fiscal year 2021 budget request.......................     3,074,594,000
Committee recommendation..............................     3,503,013,000
Change from budget request............................      +428,419,000
 

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $3,503,013,000 
for Aircraft Procurement, Army which will provide the following 
program in fiscal year 2021:


                        CH-47F CHINOOK BLOCK II

    The Committee remains concerned with the Army's lack of 
support for the CH-47F Block II program. The Chief of Staff of 
the Army certified the need for this capability less than three 
years ago and the Department of Defense Appropriations Act, 
2020 outlined certain expectations for future CH-47F Block II 
funding. The Committee recommendation includes an additional 
$198,000,000 for the first five F Block II aircraft in fiscal 
year 2021, and an additional $29,000,000 in advanced 
procurement to enable the second lot of five F Block II 
aircraft in fiscal year 2022. The Committee expects the 
Secretary of the Army to restore funding for the CH-47F Block 
II program across the next future years defense program when 
the fiscal year 2022 budget request is submitted.

                      DEGRADED VISUAL ENVIRONMENT

    The Degraded Visual Environment Pilotage System (DVEPS) is 
a quick reaction capability on MH-60, MH-47, and HH-60 
rotorcraft. The Committee is concerned that the Army has not 
developed a comprehensive strategy to transition DVEPS to a 
Degraded Visual Environment program of record for enduring 
future vertical lift platforms. Operational testing of DVEPS 
has demonstrated increased situational awareness of hazards 
during all phases of flight, a key enabler for aircraft to fly 
in multi-domain operations using tactics, techniques, and 
procedures to counter anti-access, area denial threats. The 
Committee directs the Secretary of the Army to submit a report 
to the congressional defense committees not later than 120 days 
after the enactment of this Act which outlines DVEPS role in 
future vertical lift platforms.

                       MISSILE PROCUREMENT, ARMY


 
 
 
Fiscal year 2020 appropriation........................    $2,995,673,000
Fiscal year 2021 budget request.......................     3,491,507,000
Committee recommendation..............................     3,419,333,000
Change from budget request............................       -72,174,000
 

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $3,419,333,000 
for Missile Procurement, Army which will provide the following 
program in fiscal year 2021:


        PROCUREMENT OF WEAPONS AND TRACKED COMBAT VEHICLES, ARMY


 
 
 
Fiscal year 2020 appropriation........................    $4,663,597,000
Fiscal year 2021 budget request.......................     3,696,740,000
Committee recommendation..............................     3,696,263,000
Change from budget request............................          -477,000
 

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $3,696,263,000 
for Procurement of Weapons and Tracked Combat Vehicles, Army 
which will provide the following program in fiscal year 2021:


                         MK93 MACHINE GUN MOUNT

    The Committee believes that the MK93 machine gun mount 
upgrade will improve existing systems and supports Army 
modernization investments that rely on the performance of the 
MK93 mount. The Committee encourages the Secretary of the Army 
to include funding for the MK93 machine gun mount upgrade in 
future budget requests, as well as details on the Army's plan 
to develop and deploy the previously funded upgrade.

                    PROCUREMENT OF AMMUNITION, ARMY


 
 
 
Fiscal year 2020 appropriation........................    $2,578,575,000
Fiscal year 2021 budget request.......................     2,777,716,000
Committee recommendation..............................     2,789,898,000
Change from budget request............................       +12,182,000
 

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $2,789,898,000 
for Procurement of Ammunition, Army which will provide the 
following program in fiscal year 2021:


                        SUSTAINMENT OF MUNITIONS

    The Joint Munitions Command provides the Army and the Joint 
Force with ready, reliable, lethal munitions to sustain global 
operations. However, challenges exist to the organic industrial 
base in securing the supply chain for a wide range of systems, 
including munitions. The Committee believes that additional 
steps must be taken to ensure the continued implementation of 
life-cycle needs for ammunition. Therefore, the Committee 
directs the Secretary of the Army to submit a report to the 
House and Senate Appropriations Committees, not later than 90 
days after the enactment of this Act, which outlines the Army's 
sustainment efforts as part of the overall life-cycle 
management of all munitions programs. The report shall include 
a review of potential cost savings and operational efficiencies 
gained by centralizing the sustainment of munitions and explore 
how an automated process could determine the critical levels of 
requirements and resources necessary to fulfill them.

                        OTHER PROCUREMENT, ARMY


 
 
 
Fiscal year 2020 appropriation........................    $7,581,524,000
Fiscal year 2021 budget request.......................     8,625,206,000
Committee recommendation..............................     8,453,422,000
Change from budget request............................      -171,784,000
 

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $8,453,422,000 
for Other Procurement, Army which will provide the following 
program in fiscal year 2021:


              HIGH MOBILITY MULTIPURPOSE WHEELED VEHICLES

    The Committee recommends a transfer of funds for the 
purpose of obtaining new High Mobility Multipurpose Wheeled 
Vehicles (HMMWVs) or ``like-new'' HMMWVs fully restored to 
zero-hours, zero-miles condition by the installation of a new 
powered chassis. The HMMWVs obtained with this funding shall 
incorporate any necessary safety or capability improvements, 
including Anti-Lock Braking and Electronic Stability Control 
systems. Obtaining HMMWVs with a new, up-to-date chassis will 
enable future technology insertions and capability upgrades to 
the fleet and will reduce future sustainment costs and 
logistical challenges. Installing safety enhancements on new 
production vehicles or new production chassis will ensure that 
appropriate quality control and testing is performed before 
vehicles are fielded.

                       AIRCRAFT PROCUREMENT, NAVY


 
 
 
Fiscal year 2020 appropriation........................   $19,605,513,000
Fiscal year 2021 budget request.......................    17,127,378,000
Committee recommendation..............................    17,710,109,000
Change from budget request............................      +582,731,000
 

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of 
$17,710,109,000 for Aircraft Procurement, Navy which will 
provide the following program in fiscal year 2021:


                   F/A-18 E/F SUPER HORNET PRODUCTION

    The Committee appreciates the focus that the Navy has 
recently placed on reducing the strike fighter shortfall and 
improving the readiness of its tactical aviation fleet. As 
such, the Committee continues to support the F/A-18 E/F Super 
Hornet program and funds the request for 24 aircraft in fiscal 
year 2021. However, the Committee notes that the future years 
defense program eliminates the further procurement of F/A-18 E/
F aircraft, resulting in a reduction of three years of 
production and three squadrons of aircraft from the previously 
planned future years defense program. The Committee believes 
that the Navy's decision to eliminate future production of F/A-
18 E/F aircraft is premature and requires further analysis. The 
Navy states that this elimination of new aircraft is offset by 
the startup of the F/A-18E/F Service Life Modification (SLM) 
program, which will extend the life of the Super Hornet fleet 
and maintain tactical aviation readiness. While this is 
somewhat true, the SLM program is in its nascent stage and will 
take time to contribute to fleet readiness levels. SLM also 
relies on a production line of new Super Hornets for on-time 
parts and production expertise. It is unclear if the Navy has 
assessed the impact of eliminating new Super Hornets on SLM 
cost, effectiveness, and the long-term cost of sustaining an 
increasingly aging fleet.
    The Committee directs the Secretary of the Navy to submit a 
report to the congressional defense committees not later than 
45 days after the enactment of this Act that provides an update 
on the Navy's strike fighter shortfall projected over the next 
20 years, the impact of these previously mentioned outyear 
aircraft reductions on this shortfall, and an updated schedule 
of inductions and deliveries of aircraft in the SLM program. 
Further, the Committee directs the Director of the Office of 
Cost Assessment and Program Evaluation to provide a report to 
the congressional defense committees not later than 45 days 
after the enactment of this Act on the life-cycle cost 
assessment of aircraft inducted through SLM and new aircraft, 
including procurement, personnel, and cost-per-flight hour 
comparisons.

                    V-22 NACELLE IMPROVEMENT PROGRAM

    The nacelle improvement program modifies MV-22 and CV-22 
aircraft to improve mission capable rates by ten percent per 
aircraft. The program is one of the Marine Corps' highest 
priorities for V-22 readiness. The Committee encourages the 
Secretary of the Navy to increase the program beyond the 
current common configuration readiness and modernization effort 
to accelerate readiness and maintainability of the Marine Corps 
V-22 fleet.

                       WEAPONS PROCUREMENT, NAVY


 
 
 
Fiscal year 2020 appropriation........................    $4,017,470,000
Fiscal year 2021 budget request.......................     4,884,995,000
Committee recommendation..............................     4,378,594,000
Change from budget request............................      -506,401,000
 

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $4,378,594,000 
for Weapons Procurement, Navy which will provide the following 
program in fiscal year 2021:


            PROCUREMENT OF AMMUNITION, NAVY AND MARINE CORPS


 
 
 
Fiscal year 2020 appropriation........................      $843,401,000
Fiscal year 2021 budget request.......................       883,602,000
Committee recommendation..............................       795,134,000
Change from budget request............................       -88,468,000
 

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $795,134,000 
for Procurement of Ammunition, Navy and Marine Corps which will 
provide the following program in fiscal year 2021:


                   SHIPBUILDING AND CONVERSION, NAVY


 
 
 
Fiscal year 2020 appropriation........................   $23,975,378,000
Fiscal year 2021 budget request.......................    19,902,757,000
Committee recommendation..............................    22,257,938,000
Change from budget request............................    +2,355,181,000
 

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of 
$22,257,938,000 for Shipbuilding and Conversion, Navy which 
will provide the following program in fiscal year 2021:


                        TAO FLEET OILER PROGRAM

    The Committee recognizes that Navy TAO Fleet Oilers are 
essential for providing fuel to deployed ships, allowing them 
and their embarked aircraft to remain combat ready and 
extending the reach of naval forces worldwide. However, while 
the Committee remains supportive of the TAO Fleet Oiler 
program, it understands there are long term affordability 
concerns with the program due to aggregate capability and 
material choices made during the post-contract award phase. The 
Committee also believes that ship costs must be reduced in 
order to build the required fleet of ships. Therefore, the 
Committee recommendation includes $20,000,000 for non-recurring 
engineering costs to execute cost reduction initiatives and 
requirements changes that should be inserted into the TAO 
design as soon as practical.
    Additionally, the Committee directs the Secretary of the 
Navy to submit a report to the congressional defense committees 
not later than 45 days after the enactment of this Act that 
details how these changes will be implemented and the savings 
they will produce.

                        SHIP TO SHORE CONNECTOR

    The Committee remains supportive of the Ship to Shore 
Connector (SSC) acquisition program which aims to replace the 
rapidly aging Landing Craft Air Cushion vehicle fleet. While 
the Committee is concerned with program delays, it is 
encouraged by the first craft delivery and the award to build 
the next 15 SSCs. This award, which includes an additional SSC 
provided by Congress in the Department of Defense 
Appropriations Act, 2020, helps fulfill an important 
``Operational Maneuver from the Sea'' requirement. This will 
allow the Navy and Marine Corps to fulfill future amphibious 
assault and humanitarian missions. The Committee encourages the 
Secretary of the Navy to ensure next-generation SSC craft 
continue to be an integral element of the fleet's 
responsibilities for ensuring personnel and equipment are 
supplied from amphibious ships to the shore.

                     DDG-51 MULTI YEAR PROCUREMENT

    The Committee continues to support the Navy's stated goal 
of a 355-ship fleet, which is an essential part of the National 
Defense Strategy and its emphasis on near-peer competitors. The 
Committee recognizes that DDG-51 Destroyers are the backbone of 
the surface fleet, providing multi-mission flexibility and 
increasing capability with the introduction of the Flight III 
variant. The Committee understands the Navy has plans to 
develop and procure a future Large Surface Combatant in the 
near future, and notes that the current multi-year procurement 
of DDG-51s will end in fiscal year 2022. The Committee believes 
that a follow-on DDG-51 multi-year procurement contract awarded 
for fiscal year 2023 will ensure that Flight III capability 
will be available to the fleet and the domestic industrial base 
will be sustained until the award of the Large Surface 
Combatant contract. The Committee encourages the Secretary of 
the Navy to review the potential benefits of awarding a multi-
year contract for DDG-51 Flight IIIs in fiscal year 2023.

                        OTHER PROCUREMENT, NAVY


 
 
 
Fiscal year 2020 appropriation........................   $10,075,257,000
Fiscal year 2021 budget request.......................    10,948,518,000
Committee recommendation..............................     9,986,796,000
Change from budget request............................      -961,722,000
 

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $9,986,796,000 
for Other Procurement, Navy which will provide the following 
program in fiscal year 2021:


                  PRIVATE CONTRACTED SHIP MAINTENANCE

    The Committee is disappointed that the Department of the 
Navy did not analyze the results of its private contracted ship 
maintenance pilot program before requesting an additional 
$1,260,721,000 for the continuation of the program. The 
Committee also notes that the quarterly updates do not include 
viable metrics to determine whether the program is successful 
and should be continued. Therefore, the Committee 
recommendation includes $815,945,000 for the pilot program.
    The funding provided in Other Procurement, Navy line 24 
Ship Maintenance, Repair and Modernization shall only be for 
such activities executed in the United States and is hereby 
designated a congressional special interest item. The Committee 
directs the Secretary of the Navy to provide the congressional 
defense committees the following in relation to the pilot--
    1. An execution plan for the funding in Other Procurement, 
Navy line 24, Ship Maintenance, Repair and Modernization. This 
shall be submitted to the congressional defense committees 
prior to the execution of funding and shall include the 
following data points for each ship included in the pilot 
program:
          a. Ship class, hull number and name of each ship;
          b. Type of availability;
          c. Location of the work;
          d. Execution plan start date;
          e. Execution plan end date; and
          f. Execution plan funded amount (in thousands).
    2. Not later than 15 days after the end of each fiscal 
quarter, an updated plan to the first report showing:
          a. Ship class, hull number and name of each ship;
          b. Type of availability;
          c. Location of the work;
          d. Actual or current estimate of start date;
          e. Actual or current estimate of end date;
          f. Actual funded amount and estimate to complete (in 
        thousands); and
the quarterly update shall also include an execution review of 
the funding in line 1B4B Ship Depot Maintenance in Operation 
and Maintenance, Navy.
    Additionally, the Committee directs the Secretary of the 
Navy to establish performance metrics for the program, to 
measure against the metrics quarterly, and to submit a written 
analysis to the congressional defense committees not later than 
45 days after each quarterly performance evaluation.

                 EXPLOSIVE ORDNANCE DISPOSAL EQUIPMENT

    The Committee is concerned with the potential lack of 
availability of standard, qualified explosive ordnance disposal 
(EOD) equipment for Navy divers.
    The Committee directs the Secretary of the Navy to submit a 
report to the congressional defense committees not later than 
90 days after the enactment of this Act on the standard 
equipment provided to EOD divers, the age of such equipment, 
the process through which EOD diving teams acquire new 
equipment, and whether additional resources are required to 
provide more up-to-date and technologically advanced equipment.

                       PROCUREMENT, MARINE CORPS


 
 
 
Fiscal year 2020 appropriation........................    $2,898,422,000
Fiscal year 2021 budget request.......................     2,903,976,000
Committee recommendation..............................     2,693,354,000
Change from budget request............................      -210,622,000
 

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $2,693,354,000 
for Procurement, Marine Corps which will provide the following 
program in fiscal year 2021:


AUTOMATED PARTS SCREENING AND SELECTION TOOL FOR ADDITIVE MANUFACTURING

    The automated parts screening and selection tool for 
additive manufacturing is an innovative advancement for the use 
of additive manufacturing throughout the Department of Defense. 
The tool will create an automated methodology for additive 
manufacturing parts selection in support of sustainment 
operations, particularly for ground combat and combat support 
vehicles, and will identify the best parts candidates for 
additive manufacturing that will have the greatest impact on 
readiness. As part of the development of the tool, a select 
group of identified parts will be additively manufactured, 
installed, and field tested. The Committee encourages the 
Secretary of the Navy to resource these innovations to improve 
readiness and enhance warfighter capabilities.

                    AIRCRAFT PROCUREMENT, AIR FORCE


 
 
 
Fiscal year 2020 appropriation........................   $17,512,361,000
Fiscal year 2021 budget request.......................    17,908,145,000
Committee recommendation..............................    19,587,853,000
Change from budget request............................    +1,679,708,000
 

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of 
$19,587,853,000 for Aircraft Procurement, Air Force which will 
provide the following program in fiscal year 2021:


             OPEN SKIES TREATY AND OC-135 RECAPITALIZATION

    The Department of Defense Appropriations Act, 2019 included 
$146,374,000 to begin the recapitalization of the two OC-135 
aircraft that perform United States flights under the Open 
Skies Treaty. These funds were approved despite the Committee's 
concerns that the Air Force was unready to execute the program; 
congressional approval was based on the insistence by the 
Office of the Secretary of Defense that the funds were urgently 
required and that the Air Force would be able to execute the 
acquisition within the year of appropriation. The Committee's 
concerns about execution proved well-founded and as of May 2020 
little of the funding had been spent; however, the Air Force 
finally appeared positioned to award a contract for the program 
within the calendar year. On May 21, the Administration 
announced its decision to withdraw from the Open Skies Treaty 
and submitted the notice of intent under the Treaty on the 
following day. This abrupt announcement violated section 1234 
of the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2020, 
which requires the Secretaries of Defense and State to notify 
Congress 120 days prior to any such action. The Committee views 
this action as further confirmation of the Department of 
Defense's increasing disregard for the law and the Congress. 
The Committee opposes the Administration's decision to withdraw 
from the Open Skies Treaty and is concerned with the 
Administration's apparent contempt for arms control measures. 
The Committee further notes that the Department has signaled 
its intent to reprogram the funding appropriated for the OC-135 
recapitalization effort for other purposes. The Committee will 
not approve any such reprogramming and the recommendation 
rescinds $158,448,000 of fiscal year 2019 and 2020 funding for 
OC-135 recapitalization.

                BATTLEFIELD AIRBORNE COMMUNICATION NODE

    The Department of Defense Appropriations Act, 2019 included 
$100,000,000 to procure an additional RQ-4 aircraft modified 
for the Battlefield Airborne Communication Node (BACN) mission. 
To date that funding remains unexecuted, and the Air Force has 
proposed in its fiscal year 2021 budget submission to divest 
the RQ-4 Block 20 BACN aircraft and procure manned E-11 
aircraft to replace them. The Committee supports the use of the 
fiscal year 2019 funding to execute the Air Force's new plan 
for BACN and to expedite the replacement of the January 2020 E-
11 operational aircraft loss.

                            LC-130H AIRCRAFT

    The Air National Guard operates a unique fleet of ski-
equipped LC-130H aircraft capable of operating in the arctic 
and Antarctic regions. In addition to supporting vital 
scientific research, the capabilities of these aircraft have 
increasing relevance due to growing national interests in the 
arctic region. As the Department of Defense's 2019 report on 
arctic strategy notes, the arctic region is gaining importance 
through the combined effects of climate change and geopolitical 
competition for territorial claims, waterways and underlying 
resources, with attendant implications for homeland security. 
The report identifies the LC-130H wing as the only unit of its 
kind capable of operating from ice locations in the arctic. 
While the Committee notes that these aircraft have benefited 
from recent propulsion upgrades, it is concerned that these 
aircraft are becoming degraded by age and operational use.
    Therefore, the Committee directs the Secretary of the Air 
Force to submit a report to the congressional defense 
committees on the status of these LC-130H aircraft not later 
than 90 days after the enactment of this Act. The report shall 
include information on the age and estimated service life of 
the aircraft, trends in operating costs and mission capable 
rate, known sustainment and safety problems, and the benefits 
of both completed and planned aircraft modifications. Finally, 
the report shall include an estimate of the cost of replacing 
these aircraft with C-130Js, including the cost of 
modifications required to support the LC-130 wing's unique 
mission.

                                MQ-NEXT

    The Air Force's fiscal year 2021 budget request proposes to 
terminate production of MQ-9 aircraft, citing an excess of 
aircraft compared to projected operational requirements. The 
Committee does not accept this proposal and recommends 
additional funding for 16 MQ-9 aircraft. The Committee is 
concerned that the Air Force has reached this decision without 
adequate planning for a follow-on system. The Committee is 
aware that the Air Force recently released a request for 
information (RFI) to industry for improved solutions for future 
unmanned aerial systems with both intelligence, surveillance, 
and reconnaissance and strike capabilities, including a 
potential follow-on to the MQ-9. However, this RFI assumes that 
initial operating capability would not be achieved until 2030, 
and the Air Force budget request includes only a small amount 
of funding for concept exploration.
    The Committee therefore directs the Secretary of the Air 
Force to submit a report to the congressional defense 
committees not later than the submission of the fiscal year 
2022 budget request on an MQ-9 follow-on program to be 
designated as MQ-Next. The goal of the MQ-Next program should 
be to accelerate the development and fielding of a next-
generation medium altitude unmanned aerial system. The report 
shall detail the desired features of such a system, the cost 
and timeline required to achieve development and fielding, 
proposed measures to ensure full and open competition, and an 
explanation of how such a system would fulfill the goals of the 
National Defense Strategy.

                                 F-15EX

    The Committee continues to support the F-15EX program, 
which was recently affirmed by the Air Force to be the most 
expedient and cost-effective solution to addressing urgent 
availability problems with the F-15C/D fleet and improving 
fighter force capacity. The Committee notes that the Air Force 
acquisition strategy includes the provision of F-15EX engines 
as government furnished equipment. The Committee understands 
that the Air Force will procure engines for the initial stage 
of the program, which is being executed under middle tier 
acquisition authorities for rapid fielding, using a sole-source 
exception. The Committee is aware that the Air Force recently 
issued a sources sought notice to determine market capacity to 
deliver a fully integrated propulsion system for subsequent 
lots of F-15EX aircraft. The Committee encourages the Secretary 
of the Air Force to use full and open competition methods, 
including transparent selection criteria and due consideration 
of life-cycle costs, consistent with the goals of the F-15EX 
program.

                      C-130 FLEET MANAGEMENT PLAN

    The Committee directs the Secretary of the Air Force to 
submit a report to the congressional defense committees with 
the submission of the fiscal year 2022 budget request, that 
presents the Air Force's long-term fleet management plan for C-
130 aircraft. The report shall address the Air Force's updated 
assessment of the theater airlift requirements and its plans to 
either recapitalize C-130H aircraft or to maintain a split 
fleet with C-130J and modernized C-130H aircraft. The report 
shall include, but is not limited to, planned total active 
aerospace vehicle inventory numbers throughout the future years 
defense program (FYDP) with justifications to any projected 
reduction in fleet size; projections of primary aerospace 
vehicle inventory and backup aerospace vehicle inventory per 
individual unit throughout the FYDP; plans to recapitalize C-
130H aircraft with C-130J aircraft with projected timelines and 
associated funding throughout the FYDP; plans to modernize C-
130H aircraft with projected timelines and associated funding 
throughout the FYDP; and plans to modify proficiency training 
or deployment requirements for units to account for any 
reduction in the number of aircraft assigned to those units.

                  CRITICAL INFRASTRUCTURE INVESTMENTS

    The Committee encourages the Secretary of the Air Force to 
work with local governments to identify needed investments in 
surface transportation projects that will provide additional 
road capacity at congested or dangerous intersections, 
especially involving rail lines, for efficient flow and safety 
of aerospace workforce 213A and materiel deliveries to and from 
major national defense assets involved in research, testing, 
assembly, and manufacturing.

                     MISSILE PROCUREMENT, AIR FORCE


 
 
 
Fiscal year 2020 appropriation........................    $2,575,890,000
Fiscal year 2021 budget request.......................     2,396,417,000
Committee recommendation..............................     2,249,157,000
Change from budget request............................      -147,260,000
 

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $2,249,157,000 
for Missile Procurement, Air Force which will provide the 
following program in fiscal year 2021:


                  PROCUREMENT OF AMMUNITION, AIR FORCE


 
 
 
Fiscal year 2020 appropriation........................    $1,625,661,000
Fiscal year 2021 budget request.......................       596,338,000
Committee recommendation..............................       609,338,000
Change from budget request............................       +13,000,000
 

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $609,338,000 
for Procurement of Ammunition, Air Force which will provide the 
following program in fiscal year 2021:


                      OTHER PROCUREMENT, AIR FORCE


 
 
 
Fiscal year 2020 appropriation........................   $21,410,021,000
Fiscal year 2021 budget request.......................    23,695,720,000
Committee recommendation..............................    23,603,470,000
Change from budget request............................       -92,250,000
 

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of 
$23,603,470,000 for Other Procurement, Air Force which will 
provide the following program in fiscal year 2021:


                        PROCUREMENT, SPACE FORCE


 
 
 
Fiscal year 2020 appropriation........................            $- - -
Fiscal year 2021 budget request.......................     2,446,064,000
Committee recommendation..............................     2,289,934,000
Change from budget request............................      -156,130,000
 

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $2,289,934,000 
for Procurement, Space Force which will provide the following 
program in fiscal year 2021:


                       PROCUREMENT, DEFENSE WIDE


 
 
 
Fiscal year 2020 appropriation........................    $5,332,147,000
Fiscal year 2021 budget request.......................     5,324,487,000
Committee recommendation..............................     5,418,220,000
Change from budget request............................       +93,733,000
 

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $5,418,220,000 
for Procurement, Defense-Wide which will provide the following 
program in fiscal year 2021:


               CHEMICAL BIOLOGICAL SITUATIONAL AWARENESS

    The Committee commends the Joint Program Executive Office 
for Chemical, Biological, Radiological and Nuclear Defense 
(JPEO-CBRND) for the fielding of dismounted reconnaissance 
sets, kits, and system enhancement packages critical for CBRND 
capabilities. These equipment sets provide situational 
awareness and accelerate innovative technologies that extend 
the longevity of these capabilities. The Committee encourages 
the Joint Program Executive Officer for JPEO-CBRND to ensure 
timely fielding of these capabilities.
          

                    DEFENSE PRODUCTION ACT PURCHASES


 
 
 
Fiscal year 2020 appropriation........................       $64,393,000
Fiscal year 2021 budget request.......................       181,931,000
Committee recommendation..............................       191,931,000
Change from budget request............................       +10,000,000
 

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $191,931,000 
for the Defense Production Act Purchases which will provide the 
following program in fiscal year 2021:

                                    EXPLANATION OF PROJECT LEVEL ADJUSTMENTS
                                            [In thousands of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                        Budget       Committee      Change from
                                                                       Request      Recommended       Request
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
DEFENSE PRODUCTION ACT PURCHASES                                         181,931         191,931          10,000
    Program increase--3D carbon hypersonic materials...............                       10,000
                                                                    --------------------------------------------
        TOTAL, DEFENSE PRODUCTION ACT PURCHASES....................      181,931         191,931          10,000
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


                                TITLE IV

               RESEARCH, DEVELOPMENT, TEST AND EVALUATION

    The fiscal year 2021 Department of Defense research, 
development, test and evaluation budget request totals 
$106,224,793,000. The Committee recommendation provides 
$104,348,089,000 for the research, development, test and 
evaluation accounts. The table below summarizes the Committee 
recommendations:


          

            REPROGRAMMING GUIDANCE FOR ACQUISITION ACCOUNTS

      (INCLUDING BASE AND OVERSEAS CONTINGENCY OPERATIONS FUNDING)

    The Secretary of Defense is directed to continue to follow 
the reprogramming guidance as specified in the report 
accompanying the House version of the Department of Defense 
Appropriations bill for Fiscal Year 2008 (House Report 110-
279). Specifically, the dollar threshold for reprogramming 
funds shall be $10,000,000 for procurement and research, 
development, test and evaluation.
    Also, the Under Secretary of Defense (Comptroller) is 
directed to continue to provide the congressional defense 
committees quarterly, spreadsheet-based DD Form 1416 reports 
for Service and defense-wide accounts in titles III and IV of 
this Act. Reports for titles III and IV shall comply with the 
guidance specified in the explanatory statement accompanying 
the Department of Defense Appropriations Act, 2006. The 
Department shall continue to follow the limitation that prior 
approval reprogrammings are set at either the specified dollar 
threshold or 20 percent of the procurement or research, 
development, test and evaluation line, whichever is less. These 
thresholds are cumulative from the base for reprogramming value 
as modified by any adjustments. Therefore, if the combined 
value of transfers into or out of a procurement (P-1) or 
research, development, test and evaluation (R-1) line exceeds 
the identified threshold, the Secretary of Defense must submit 
a prior approval reprogramming to the congressional defense 
committees. In addition, guidelines on the application of prior 
approval reprogramming procedures for congressional special 
interest items are established elsewhere in this report.

                           FUNDING INCREASES

    The funding increases outlined in these tables shall be 
provided only for the specific purposes indicated in the 
tables.

   RESEARCH, DEVELOPMENT, TEST AND EVALUATION SPECIAL INTEREST ITEMS

    Items for which additional funds have been recommended or 
items for which funding is specifically reduced as shown in the 
project level tables detailing recommended adjustments or in 
paragraphs using the phrase ``only for'' or ``only to'' in this 
report are congressional special interest items for the purpose 
of the Base for Reprogramming (DD Form 1414). Each of these 
items must be carried on the DD Form 1414 at the stated amount, 
as specifically addressed elsewhere in this report.

           FEDERALLY FUNDED RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT CENTERS

    The Committee was disappointed that the annual report on 
the Department's request for Federally Funded Research and 
Development Centers (FFRDC) was delivered more than three 
months late for the second consecutive year from the Office of 
the Under Secretary of Defense (Research and Engineering). This 
report is due to Congress with the submission of the annual 
budget request. Details of FFRDC funding and staffing levels 
are incorporated into the budget request in various programs, 
projects, and activities; therefore, the Committee is confused 
why the annual summary report, which assists in determining any 
necessary adjustments to the FFRDC legislative provision, is 
consistently delivered late. The Committee is also disturbed by 
the lack of transparency the Under Secretary's office provides 
to the Committee on possible changes it seems to be 
contemplating for the use of FFRDCs. Therefore, the Committee 
directs the Secretary of Defense to provide a report to the 
congressional defense committees not later than 30 days after 
the enactment of this Act, on the methodology and criteria 
being used to assess each of the FFRDCs, the definition of core 
competencies, and what, if any, transitions will take place in 
fiscal years 2021 and 2022. The Secretary is also directed to 
inform the congressional defense committees on possible changes 
to the policy document for the FFRDC program, Department of 
Defense Instruction 5000.77, prior to the implementation of any 
decisions that are made.

                HUMAN PERFORMANCE OPTIMIZATION RESEARCH

    The Committee believes that developmental programs aimed at 
human performance optimization in the physical, cognitive, 
organizational, and social domains could improve military 
readiness. The Committee encourages the Service Secretaries to 
prioritize human performance optimization research efforts and 
encourages utilizing public-private partnerships when possible.

            RESEARCH, DEVELOPMENT, TEST AND EVALUATION, ARMY


 
 
 
Fiscal year 2020 appropriation........................   $12,543,435,000
Fiscal year 2021 budget request.......................    12,587,343,000
Committee recommendation..............................    13,126,499,000
Change from budget request............................      +539,156,000
 

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of 
$13,126,499,000 for Research, Development, Test and Evaluation, 
Army which will provide the following program in fiscal year 
2021:


                      SHOULDER LAUNCHED MUNITIONS

    The Committee is concerned about the increased weight 
carried by soldiers while utilizing shoulder launched 
munitions. The Secretary of the Army is encouraged to consider 
employing mature shoulder fired weapons technology which can 
address threats in a defilade position. Additionally, the 
Committee directs the Secretary of the Army to submit a report 
to the congressional defense committees not later than 90 days 
after the enactment of this Act detailing the Army's shoulder 
launched munitions procurement strategy.

              ADVANCED MANUFACTURING CENTER OF EXCELLENCE

    The Committee commends the Army for establishing a Center 
of Excellence for Advanced Manufacturing. The National Defense 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2019 required the Under 
Secretary of Defense (Acquisition and Sustainment) and the 
Under Secretary of Defense (Research and Engineering) to work 
with each of the Service Secretaries to establish activities 
that demonstrate advanced manufacturing techniques and 
capabilities at depot-level activities or military arsenal 
facilities. The Committee continues to be supportive of this 
effort and directs the Secretary of Defense to submit a report 
to the congressional defense committees not later than 90 days 
after the enactment of this Act providing further detail on the 
activities that have been identified by each Service.

                       DENGUE VACCINE DEVELOPMENT

    Exposure to the dengue virus continues to be one of the 
largest infectious disease threats facing the military. The 
impact of dengue infection on troop health in multiple military 
operations, combined with the continually expanding global 
endemic range makes the lack of an effective tetravalent dengue 
vaccine an urgent issue. The Committee encourages the 
Commanding General, United States Army Medical Research and 
Development Command, to prioritize the research and development 
of such a vaccine in order to reduce the threat of dengue 
infection.

           ARMY ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE INNOVATION INSTITUTE

    The Committee supports the Army Research Laboratory's (ARL) 
Army Artificial Intelligence Innovation Institute (A2I2) and 
its support of ARL's various essential research programs. The 
A2I2 initiative seeks to accelerate innovation in areas such as 
artificial intelligence and machine and deep learning 
technologies that will be critical to the success of future 
Army missions. The Committee recommendation includes an 
additional $20,000,000 to support these efforts and expects the 
additional funds to remain under the purview of ARL.

                   FUTURE LONG-RANGE ASSAULT AIRCRAFT

    The Committee continues to support the Future Long-Range 
Assault Aircraft (FLRAA) program and notes it remains a top 
Army modernization priority. The 2020 Army Aviation Strategic 
Plan and Modernization Roadmap notes that, as a result of the 
funding provided in the Department of Defense Appropriations 
Act, 2020, the Army has been able to accelerate the FLRAA 
program by four years. To continue supporting this acceleration 
effort, the Committee recommendation includes an additional 
$20,000,000 for robust risk-mitigation efforts. The Committee 
expects these additional resources to be used to advance the 
program and shorten the time required to achieve Milestone B of 
the acquisition process.

                  FUTURE VERTICAL LIFT SENSOR PAYLOADS

    The Committee is concerned that the Army has not clearly 
defined the acquisition strategy for Future Vertical Lift (FVL) 
mission equipment payloads and sensors. Due to the accelerated 
FVL schedule and the desire for high technology readiness level 
sensor payloads, the Army risks fielding advanced aircraft 
platforms equipped with outdated payloads that will not meet 
desired operational capabilities. Therefore, the Committee 
directs the Secretary of the Army to submit a report to the 
congressional defense committees not later than 90 days after 
the enactment of this Act, on FVL mission equipment payloads 
and sensors. The report shall include the acquisition strategy 
for FVL mission equipment payloads and sensors, including 
radar, electronic warfare, 360 distributed aperture system, 
missile warning system, and advanced electro-optical infrared 
system; planned risk reduction activities for the sensor 
payloads; and an estimate of the cost and schedule for the 
development and production of the required sensor payloads.

                           ARMY COMMAND POST

    The Committee supports the development of advanced 
materials and technologies in support of the next generation 
command post and the expeditionary maneuver support mission for 
a more mobile and protected forward deployed unit.

                      ARMORED DOOR ASSIST SYSTEMS

    Due to increased armor protection, human operation of 
ground vehicle doors has become increasingly challenging using 
operator strength alone. Even lightly armored doors require a 
significant amount of force to open, close, and hold into 
position. This challenge puts operators at risk, especially 
during emergency exit and entry scenarios on the battlefield. 
The Committee encourages the Secretary of the Army to research 
alternatives including passive and active door assist devices 
which can support the Army in meeting safety and performance 
specifications of any armored vehicle door application.

            RESEARCH, DEVELOPMENT, TEST AND EVALUATION, NAVY


 
 
 
Fiscal year 2020 appropriation........................   $20,155,115,000
Fiscal year 2021 budget request.......................    21,427,048,000
Committee recommendation..............................    20,165,874,000
Change from budget request............................    -1,261,174,000
 

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of 
$20,165,874,000 for Research, Development, Test and Evaluation, 
Navy which will provide the following program in fiscal year 
2021:


               SMALL BUSINESS INNOVATION RESEARCH PROGRAM

    The Small Business Innovation Research Program (SBIR) is 
designed to attract small technology companies to participate 
in federally sponsored research and development in order to 
enable advances in innovative technology disruption. Despite 
significant investment and acquisition preference for SBIR 
companies, there are few signs of creative disruptions. The 
failure of the Department of Defense to capitalize on SBIR 
investments and incorporate disruptive innovation is 
demonstrated by the repeated failure of the Navy to 
sufficiently resource the Automated Test and Retest (ATRT) 
program, which has produced transformative technology, 
including the ATRT/AEGIS Virtual Twin.
    The Committee recommendation includes a total of 
$34,797,000 for the ATRT program. Additionally, the Committee 
directs the Secretary of the Navy to adhere to SBIR law and use 
SBIR awardees to the greatest extent practicable, thus allowing 
and assisting SBIR awardees to commercialize technologies 
related to those developed under SBIR Phase I, II, and III 
awards.

                 UNDERGROUND FUEL STORAGE TANK RESEARCH

    The Committee is concerned with the safety of underground 
fuel storage tanks commonly used on military installations by 
the Department of Defense. The Committee encourages the 
Secretary of the Navy to conduct additional research on the 
safety of underground fuel storage tanks to mitigate any risks 
to drinking water supplies for military bases and surrounding 
communities. Research areas should focus on advanced techniques 
for measuring and controlling corrosion; improved testing, 
inspection, repair, and maintenance of tanks; cost-effective 
secondary containment technology; and groundwater monitoring 
and modeling.

               ADVANCED TACTICAL UNMANNED AIRCRAFT SYSTEM

    The Committee is encouraged by the development of 
technologies to provide secure and resilient battlefield 
networking capability referred to as the Mobile Unmanned/Manned 
Distributed Lethality Airborne Network Joint Capability 
Technology Demonstration project. The Committee encourages the 
Secretary of the Navy to continue development and deployment of 
this technology to provide an affordable capability with 
existing operational Department of Defense systems.

                     INFRARED TELESCOPE TECHNOLOGY

    The Committee recognizes the importance of infrared 
telescope technology for northern sky surveys in the short-wave 
infrared H and K bands, astrophysics observations, Earth 
orbital debris, and space traffic management research. The 
collection of critical stellar data supports future ground- and 
space-based defense systems. The Committee encourages the 
Secretary of the Navy to prioritize research for infrared 
telescope technology.

                     ANTI-CORROSION NANOTECHNOLOGY

    The Committee remains concerned about the high costs 
associated with fixing corrosion on Department of Defense 
platforms. The military, and in particular the Navy, face 
complex threats in the Indo-Pacific region that require 
military equipment and infrastructure to be resilient and have 
maximum operational availability. The Committee urges the Chief 
of Naval Research to pursue lightweight, nanotechnology-based 
materials and coatings that provide high corrosion resistance 
in order to decrease the cost of corrosion and increase 
operational availability of military equipment and 
infrastructure.

                            OCEAN ACOUSTICS

    The Committee recognizes that changes to ocean environments 
and coastlines will create new security concerns and that the 
Navy requires further research in ocean acoustics to be 
prepared to operate successfully and to monitor the changing 
environment. The Committee encourages the Secretary of the Navy 
to work with academia to develop the ocean monitoring 
capabilities necessary to understand the rapidly changing 
ocean.

                         FOREIGN OBJECT DAMAGE

    The Committee recognizes the harmful and expensive effects 
of Foreign Object Damage (FOD) on tactical aircraft in the 
Department of Defense and commends the Naval Air Systems 
Command for attempting to reduce the number of these incidents. 
The Committee supports an integrated, modular approach to 
addressing this issue and supports continued research on the 
integration of a sensor and camera agnostic architecture within 
the Naval Air Systems Command to determine the best solution 
for FOD detection and mitigation. The Committee directs the 
Secretary of the Navy to submit a report to the congressional 
defense committees not later than 90 days after the enactment 
of this Act on the number of incidents involving FOD in the 
last two years that have caused damage and the cost of fixing 
the damage; the process the Navy is taking to establish a FOD 
mitigation approach and architecture; and the cost avoidance 
associated with a comprehensive FOD mitigation architecture.

                  INTEGRATED POWER AND ENERGY SYSTEMS

    The Committee recognizes that the Office of Naval Research 
is researching power and energy alternatives, including 
reviewing current ship design and de-risking of technologies 
for integrated power and energy systems to support future 
growth of electric pulse power demands of advanced electric 
mission loads. The Committee understands that as the Department 
of Defense moves towards a digital engineering paradigm, a 
research effort is required to make partner facilities 
compliant. It is vital to ensure facilities are upgraded to the 
classification standard they require. The Committee encourages 
the Secretary of the Navy to work with partner facilities to 
advance their integration into this new paradigm.

                            STERN TUBE SEALS

    The Committee is aware of data indicating a higher than 
desired failure rate of stern tube seals on some classes of 
Navy ships. Many of these seals are failing prior to major 
maintenance intervals when the ships are in dry dock for the 
scheduled replacement of such equipment. The premature failure 
of these seals while at sea can compromise the combat readiness 
of ships. The Committee encourages the Secretary of the Navy to 
partner with the appropriate shipyards and industry partners to 
design, prototype, and test new designs that are more durable, 
safe, and cost effective.

                     COASTAL ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH

    The Committee understands the importance of the littoral 
region to Navy operations worldwide and believes that testing 
and training must replicate the operational and threat 
environments that submarines and unmanned systems are likely to 
encounter in these areas. The Committee believes that 
additional research of the magnetic, electric, and acoustic 
ambient fields in the littoral regions and the development of 
predictive techniques to distinguish ships and submarines from 
naturally occurring background features would be beneficial for 
littoral operations. The Committee encourages the Secretary of 
the Navy to conduct additional research in this area.

                    NAVY ALTERNATIVE ENERGY RESEARCH

    The Committee recognizes the need for additional research 
by the Navy in its efforts to create a more robust energy 
infrastructure, to reduce the cost of energy, and to increase 
energy security, reliability, and resiliency at Department of 
the Navy facilities and on naval platforms. A broader range of 
experimentation, prototyping, and development is necessary for 
future naval capabilities related to powering maritime systems, 
at-sea persistent surveillance and communications systems, and 
unmanned undersea vehicle charging.
    The Committee encourages the Secretary of the Navy to 
partner with universities, affiliated research facilities, and 
other federal agencies to conduct research on electrical power 
intermittency, integrating renewable energy sources into the 
grid, energy storage, improved micro-grids, local generation of 
zero-carbon fuels, marine hydrokinetic energy converters for 
autonomous systems, tactical energy solutions, and the 
inspection and structural health monitoring of critical energy 
infrastructure.

        INTERFERENCE MITIGATION TECHNOLOGY TEST AND VERIFICATION

    The Committee encourages the Secretary of the Navy to 
establish an independent verification and validation center 
that uses modular, open source hardware that allows new 
technology to be developed, tested, and fielded in a very rapid 
manner.

         RESEARCH, DEVELOPMENT, TEST AND EVALUATION, AIR FORCE


 
 
 
Fiscal year 2020 appropriation........................   $45,566,955,000
Fiscal year 2021 budget request.......................    37,391,826,000
Committee recommendation..............................    36,040,609,000
Change from budget request............................    -1,351,217,000
 

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of 
$36,040,609,000 for Research, Development, Test and Evaluation, 
Air Force which will provide the following program in fiscal 
year 2021:


                     PROGRAM ELEMENT CONSOLIDATION

    The Air Force's fiscal year 2021 budget request for 
research, development, test and evaluation proposes to 
eliminate funding for 14 program elements within the budget 
activities for applied research and advanced technology 
development, and consolidate funding for multiple budget 
program activity codes totaling approximately $955,000,000 into 
one existing and five new program elements.
    The Committee understands that the intent of the Air Force 
proposal is to convert the existing geographically aligned 
budget structure into a more integrated format that better 
serves the Air Force's science and technology strategy. The Air 
Force believes this consolidation will increase the 
transparency of its research and development efforts and 
facilitate more coherent cross-domain solutions to problem 
sets. Additionally, the Air Force proposes to consolidate most 
funding for acquisition workforce civilian pay funded through 
this account into a single line by eliminating five program 
elements and partially reducing another. The Committee 
understands the intent of the Air Force and does not reject it 
outright, but the Committee finds that one effect of this 
consolidation would be the increased ability of the Department 
of Defense to realign funding among different activities 
without seeking prior congressional approval. The granting of 
additional budget flexibility to the Department is based on the 
presumption that a state of trust and comity exists between the 
legislative and executive branches regarding the proper use of 
appropriated funds. This presumption presently is false. Since 
the Department has repeatedly demonstrated its willingness to 
disregard congressionally mandated reprogramming procedures, 
the Committee cannot agree to provide the additional budget 
flexibility the Air Force requested. The recommendation 
therefore restores funding for these activities to the program 
elements and budget lines in which they were previously funded. 
The Committee is open to reconsidering this proposal once the 
Department's leadership recommits to honoring Congress's 
constitutional power of the purse.

                        HYPERSONICS PROTOTYPING

    The Committee recommendation fully funds the Air Force's 
request of $381,862,000 for hypersonics prototyping; however, 
the Committee continues to have concerns with the Air Force's 
repeated failure to adequately budget for this program. The Air 
Force received full funding for the fiscal year 2020 request of 
$576,000,000 to continue two efforts: the air-launched rapid 
response weapon (ARRW) and the hypersonic conventional strike 
weapon (HCSW). The Committee noted in House Report 116-84 that 
HCSW had no programmed funding in fiscal year 2021 and 
thereafter. The Committee was notified by the Air Force at the 
time of the fiscal year 2021 budget submission that the HCSW 
effort would be terminated upon the conclusion of the critical 
design review. The Committee views this decision as a direct 
consequence of the Air Force's failure to properly budget for 
the continuation of the HCSW effort.
    At the same time, the remaining ARRW effort has seen 
dramatic growth in cost estimates. A March 2018 non-advocate 
cost assessment produced an estimate of $854,700,000; the most 
recent estimate from March 2020 is $1,364,000,000, a growth of 
nearly 60 percent. Entailed in this cost growth is a further 
increase to the previously known budget shortfall for ARRW in 
fiscal year 2020, which the Air Force intends to remedy by 
realigning $146,700,000 from the HCSW effort.
    The Committee understands that the cost growth in ARRW is 
attributable to cost elements that were not previously captured 
in earlier estimates, yet these estimates have been used to 
establish baselines for congressional reporting. The May 2019 
``804 Triannual Report'' submitted to the congressional defense 
committees by the Assistant Secretary of the Air Force 
(Acquisition, Technology and Logistics) used the March 2018 
cost estimate as the baseline for the ARRW effort, and a ten 
percent growth from this baseline was established as a 
``guardrail'' triggering congressional notification. Even 
though the Air Force produced an updated cost estimate of 
$1,213,000,000 in March 2019, an increase of nearly 42 percent 
over the previously reported figure, the October 2019 
``Triannual Report'' simply substituted the new baseline for 
the prior one. The latest estimate from March 2020 is more than 
12 percent above even this revised baseline. These facts call 
into question the value of existing reporting mechanisms for 
middle-tier acquisition (MTA) programs. Even though the ARRW 
program now appears to be fully funded in the fiscal year 2021 
budget request, it still projects relatively smaller shortfalls 
in fiscal years 2022 and 2023.
    The Committee increasingly finds that the Department-wide 
mantra of increasing speed and accepting greater risk in 
acquisition programs has not been matched by the necessary 
discipline when it comes to programming, budgeting, and 
transparency. The Government Accountability Office has found 
that most major MTA programs are planning for transition to 
another MTA or a more traditional major defense acquisition 
program. The Committee believes that the Air Force, and the 
Department in general, need to plan for success by ensuring 
that the proper resources are programmed. Otherwise, future 
decision makers will be forced into sub-optimal decisions for 
lack of resources, such as terminating an effort prematurely, 
abruptly cancelling or reducing other programs to find the 
necessary funds, or simply accepting ``residual capability'' of 
questionable long-term value. This has been acutely illustrated 
by the recent experience with the hypersonics prototyping 
program.
    While the Committee recommendation fully funds the ARRW 
program, the Committee does not intend to approve funding for 
further cost increases for the section 804 effort beyond the 
March 2020 estimate, whether through future budget submissions 
or reprogramming requests. The Committee also strongly urges 
the Secretary of the Air Force to program funding for the 
transition of the ARRW effort to production beginning with the 
submission of the fiscal year 2022 request.

                   ADVANCED BATTLE MANAGEMENT SYSTEM

    The budget request includes $302,323,000 for the Advanced 
Battle Management System (ABMS). The requested funding is more 
than double the comparable level for fiscal year 2020, and the 
Committee notes that this program is projected to grow to 
$1,087,601,000 by 2024 in the current future years defense plan 
(FYDP). While the Committee acknowledges the need for a robust 
and agile ``sensor-to-shooter'' network to meet the challenges 
of future operating environments, and supports broad principles 
of the ABMS approach such as open architecture and the 
avoidance of ``vendor lock,'' the Committee currently lacks 
enough confidence in the Air Force's structuring and execution 
of ABMS to support the rate of budget growth beginning with the 
fiscal year 2021 request.
    The Committee notes several weaknesses within the current 
ABMS program that should be addressed before the Committee 
agrees to the budget growth for ABMS envisioned in the current 
FYDP. The Government Accountability Office (GAO) has identified 
several of these weaknesses, such as the absence of firm 
requirements, acquisition strategy, or cost estimate, as well 
as the unclear definition of responsibilities of the Chief 
Architect of the Air Force and other offices involved in 
executing the ABMS program. While the Air Force emphasizes that 
ABMS is being executed as a ``non-traditional'' acquisition 
program, this reinforces rather than reduces the need for 
discipline in what GAO refers to as the control environment. In 
addition, the Committee believes that the Air Force needs to 
articulate a strategy for transitioning technologies that are 
successfully developed by the ABMS program to existing weapon 
systems and other programs of record. It is unclear how the 
costs of fully integrating elements of the ABMS family of 
systems will be accounted for through their lifecycles across 
multiple programs without simply being handed down as unfunded 
mandates to individual program managers. Finally, the Committee 
is not confident that existing Air Force programs of record 
have been adequately reviewed to ensure that they are 
consistent with the Air Force's vision for ABMS and its 
requirements, to the extent they are actually known.
    The budget justification documentation for the fiscal year 
2021 request poorly describes how the requested funds will be 
executed, but from additional information provided by the Air 
Force the Committee understands that the request includes 
approximately $75,000,000 for ``on ramp'' exercises that are 
intended to demonstrate potential technologies and 
capabilities. The Air Force intends to conduct three such 
exercises in the fiscal year and sustain this pace 
indefinitely. The Committee cannot ascertain any specific 
requirement or other programmatic justification for conducting 
this number of exercises, nor does the Committee have adequate 
confidence in the cost estimate of $25,000,000 per exercise. It 
is unclear if the ABMS program intends to limit the scope of 
exercises to the allocated funds, if other Air Force funds 
would be used to augment such exercises as necessary, or if 
other efforts within the ABMS program would be reduced in order 
to support the exercises if their actual costs exceed the 
budgeted amounts. The Committee therefore recommends a 
reduction of $50,000,000 to the ABMS program and directs the 
Secretary of the Air Force to limit the total cost of ``on 
ramp'' exercises to no more than $25,000,000 in fiscal year 
2021.

                        MINORITY LEADERS PROGRAM

    The Committee supports the Minority Leaders Program, which 
enables and enhances collaborative research partnerships 
between Historically Black Colleges and Universities, Hispanic 
Serving Institutions, and other Minority Serving Institutions 
and the Air Force Research Laboratory. A critical aspect of the 
program is to increase the core competencies of these 
institutions to make them more competitive with academia and 
industry within their fields. The Committee encourages the 
Secretary of the Air Force to execute the program in a manner 
that maximizes the funding and participation of these 
institutions and the students that they serve.

          SKYBORG AND LOW-COST ATTRITABLE AIRCRAFT TECHNOLOGY

    The Committee supports the Air Force's Skyborg effort, 
which will develop and demonstrate an autonomy-focused suite of 
capabilities enabling the Air Force to produce and sustain 
effective combat mass using low-cost attritable aircraft 
technology (LCAAT) teamed with manned platforms. An additional 
$100,000,000 for LCAAT was provided in the Department of 
Defense Appropriations Act, 2020 and accompanying language 
directed the Secretary of the Air Force to execute that funding 
according to the spend plan submitted in March 2020. The 
Committee recommendation includes an additional $25,000,000 for 
the Skyborg program and associated LCAAT efforts. The Committee 
directs the Secretary of the Air Force to submit a spend plan 
to the congressional defense committees encompassing this 
additional funding, as well as funding for the Skyborg and 
LCAAT efforts included in the underlying fiscal year 2021 
budget request, not later than 90 days after the enactment of 
this Act. The Committee encourages the Secretary of the Air 
Force to pursue further prototyping of LCAAT systems consistent 
with this spending plan and the Skyborg effort.

            AFFORDABLE MULTI-FUNCTIONAL AEROSPACE COMPOSITES

    The Committee recognizes that the development of scalable 
and affordable multi-functional aerospace composites and 
nanocomposite manufacturing have great potential to contribute 
to improved warfighter capabilities. The Committee encourages 
the Secretary of the Air Force to engage in partnerships with 
public universities to rapidly advance scalable manufacturing 
of multi-functional aerospace nanocomposites.

        RESEARCH, DEVELOPMENT, TEST AND EVALUATION, SPACE FORCE


 
 
 
Fiscal year 2020 appropriation........................             - - -
Fiscal year 2021 budget request.......................   $10,327,595,000
Committee recommendation..............................    10,187,840,000
Change from budget request............................      -139,755,000
 

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of 
$10,187,840,000 for Research, Development, Test and Evaluation, 
Space Force which will provide the following program in fiscal 
year 2021:


                SPACE FORCE ORGANIZATION AND MANAGEMENT

    The Committee believes the primary mission of the United 
States Space Force is to provide capabilities from space in 
support of all combatant commands, and views protecting and 
defending the assets operating in the space domain as a 
necessary, but derived, mission to assure space capabilities 
are available to support all combatant commands during 
conflict. The Committee views the Space Force investment 
priorities through this lens and expects the Space Force will 
devote more time, attention, and funding to critical support 
capabilities, particularly with the weather satellite program 
and future strategic satellite communications program.
    The Committee, however, is most concerned that the 
Department of the Air Force has no Senate-confirmed senior 
civilian leader solely focused on space with authority over 
acquisition, budget, and long-term planning. The Committee 
believes this is a fundamental problem which must be addressed 
for the Space Force to succeed. Unlike the other Services, the 
Space Force budget is dominated by unique technology-driven 
investments and system acquisitions with research and 
development and procurement accounting for more than 80 percent 
of the Space Force budget, with only 16 percent for operations. 
A key challenge for the Space Force is addressing the slow pace 
of acquisition, accelerating the delivery of next-generation 
capabilities, and improving its systems engineering and 
programmatic discipline, particularly with respect to cost and 
schedule. The unique nature of space program management and 
systems engineering require dedicated civilian oversight and 
control for space programs. However, the Space Force does not 
yet have a dedicated Service Acquisition Executive to focus 
exclusively on these unique acquisition challenges. Therefore, 
the Committee strongly urges the Secretary of the Air Force to 
accelerate the transition of the Service Acquisition Executive 
authority to the Assistant Secretary of the Air Force for Space 
Acquisition and Integration and to seek a space acquisition 
professional to serve in this position. Further, the Committee 
recommendation includes $15,000,000 for use by the Assistant 
Secretary of the Air Force for Space Acquisition and 
Integration for systems engineering and planning to ensure the 
integration of Space Force capabilities across the national 
security space enterprise and user community.
    Finally, the Committee is aware that the Department intends 
to eventually transfer space elements of the Army, Navy, and 
defense agencies into the Space Force. The Committee is 
concerned about potential disruption and unintended 
consequences of such transfers, and cautions that it will not 
be supportive of such transfers without convincing 
justifications that they will not adversely impact the Army, 
Navy, and affected defense agencies, and that the transfers are 
necessary to improve national security. The Committee 
recommendation includes a general provision directing the 
Secretary of Defense to provide a certification to the House 
and Senate Appropriations Committees not less than 60 days 
before making such transfers.

              NEXT GENERATION OVERHEAD PERSISTENT INFRARED

    The Committee recommendation fully funds the budget request 
of $2,318,864,000 for the Next-Generation Overhead Persistent 
Infrared (OPIR) program. The Committee appreciates that the 
fiscal year 2021 request provides sufficient funding to 
continue the planned program without relying on reprogramming 
requests as has been the case in recent years. However, the 
Committee continues to be concerned that the Space Force is not 
adequately planning and budgeting for the program over the next 
five years. The fiscal year 2021 budget request relies on 
significant realignments of funds to fix near-term budget 
shortfalls at the expense of increasing technical, schedule, 
and budget risk over the next five years, especially for the 
polar satellite and ground segments of the program. Further, 
the Committee is concerned that the decision to fund the ground 
segment to a level that will only deliver the minimum viable 
capability, with performance comparable to the legacy systems, 
raises questions about the return on the investments made in 
the Next-Generation OPIR Block 0 system and the soundness of 
the program plan. Therefore, the Committee directs the Director 
of Cost Assessment and Program Evaluation to provide the 
congressional defense committees, not later than 60 days after 
the enactment of this Act, with its most recent analyses and 
cost estimates for the program.

          OVERHEAD PERSISTENT INFRARED ENTERPRISE ARCHITECTURE

    The Department of Defense Appropriations Act, 2020 directed 
the Secretary of Defense to develop an integrated enterprise 
architecture to clearly articulate a realistic and affordable 
plan to meet the requirements for strategic and tactical 
missile warning, missile defense, battlespace awareness, and 
technical intelligence mission areas. The Committee reiterates 
its expectation that this plan will be delivered to the 
congressional defense committees by the September 2020 
deadline.

                 NATIONAL SECURITY SPACE LAUNCH PROGRAM

    The Committee supports the Space Force's National Security 
Space Launch (NSSL) program acquisition strategy and plan to 
award launch service procurement contracts to no more than two 
launch providers. This meets the statutory guidance for two 
launch providers for assured access to space, enables continued 
competition, and maximizes efficiency through economies of 
scale. The Committee is aware that transitioning from the 
legacy launch vehicles to new systems entails potential risks. 
Therefore, the Committee directs the Secretary of the Air Force 
to provide the congressional defense committees, not later than 
60 days after the enactment of this Act, with a detailed 
transition plan on how the Space Force intends to manage 
program and mission risks over this transition period.
    The Committee recommendation fully funds the budget request 
of $560,978,000 for research, development, test, and 
evaluation, but notes that this assumes the maximum amount 
needed to continue funding the current launch service 
agreements and is subject to revision once the source selection 
is made.
    The Committee recommendation provides $933,271,000 for NSSL 
procurement, a reduction of $109,900,000. The Committee is 
concerned with the cost of the NSSL procurements, which account 
for more than 40 percent of the Space Force procurement budget. 
The Committee is aware that the cost of launch services has 
dropped significantly in recent years as a result of increased 
competition from new entrants, yet the requested budget does 
not follow this downward trend, and remains stubbornly high, 
raising questions about the government's cost to manage and 
oversee the program. The Committee believes commercial 
practices must remain the cornerstone of the launch program and 
should only incorporate mission assurance practices that 
improve it.
    Furthermore, the Committee believes the level of detail 
provided in the budget justification materials for the NSSL 
program is lacking and needs an overhaul to provide greater 
consistency, clarity, and finer granularity to justify the 
costs of the program. Therefore, the Committee directs the 
Secretary of the Air Force to provide the congressional defense 
committees, not later than 90 days after the enactment of this 
Act, a plan to revamp the budget structure and improve the 
quality of justification materials in future budget 
submissions.

                 DIRECTED ENERGY RESEARCH COLLABORATION

    The Committee supports the Department's increased focus on 
the threats and challenges posed by directed energy systems, 
including directed energy microwaves and lasers. Given the 
large, skilled workforce needed in this critical area in the 
future, the Committee encourages the Secretary of Defense to 
increase collaboration with universities and defense 
laboratories focused on directed energy research, education, 
testing, and technology transfer.

        RESEARCH, DEVELOPMENT, TEST AND EVALUATION, DEFENSE-WIDE


 
 
 
Fiscal year 2020 appropriation........................   $25,938,027,000
Fiscal year 2021 budget request.......................    24,280,891,000
Committee recommendation..............................    24,617,177,000
Change from budget request............................      +336,286,000
 

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of 
$24,617,177,000 for Research, Development, Test and Evaluation, 
Defense-Wide which will provide the following program in fiscal 
year 2021:


             HYPERSONIC AND BALLISTIC TRACKING SPACE SENSOR

    Hypersonic weapons pose a serious threat to national 
security, which makes detecting and tracking them a top 
priority of the Department of Defense. The Department of 
Defense Appropriations Act, 2020 included $108,000,000 for the 
Missile Defense Agency (MDA) to begin development of the 
Hypersonic and Ballistic Missile Tracking Space Sensor (HBTSS) 
to meet the Department's requirements. However, the Committee 
does not support the funding and management approach proposed 
in the fiscal year 2021 budget request. The request does not 
include any funding for MDA to continue the development of the 
HBTSS sensor and proposes a token amount of funding for a 
HBTSS-derived sensor as a secondary priority in the Space 
Development Agency's (SDA) planned space tracking layer. While 
the Committee supports cooperation between MDA and SDA, the 
Committee disagrees with this proposed plan which prioritizes 
funding for SDA's other programs over HBTSS. Therefore, the 
Committee recommends a transfer of $120,000,000 from SDA to MDA 
to develop and demonstrate on-orbit the HBTSS by the end of 
fiscal year 2022.
    The Committee recognizes this funding transfer will have a 
significant impact on SDA's plans for its multi-layer 
constellation. The Committee supports SDA's aggressive approach 
to rapidly develop and demonstrate space capabilities and 
encourages SDA to focus the $168,416,000 recommended in the 
bill to developing and demonstrating its proposed transport 
layer.

         DISTRIBUTED LEDGER TECHNOLOGY RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT

    The Committee is aware that distributed ledger 
technologies, such as blockchain, may have potentially useful 
applications for the Department of Defense, which include but 
are not limited to distributed computing, cybersecurity, 
logistics, and auditing. Therefore, the Committee encourages 
the Under Secretary of Defense (Research and Engineering) to 
consider research and development to explore the use of 
distributed ledger technologies for defense applications.

                  ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE PARTNERSHIPS

    The Committee is aware of the United States-Singapore 
partnership focusing on applying artificial intelligence in 
support of humanitarian assistance and disaster relief 
operations, which will help first responders better serve those 
in disaster zones. The Committee encourages the Secretary of 
Defense to pursue similar partnerships with additional partners 
in different regions, including the Middle East.

                   PFOS/PFOA REMEDIATION TECHNOLOGIES

    The Committee remains concerned about the prevalence of 
PFOS/PFOA contamination on current and former domestic military 
installations and continues to support groundwater remediation 
activities undertaken by the Department. However, the Committee 
notes that current methods of PFOS/PFOA remediation are both 
costly and time consuming. As the Department continues PFOS/
PFOA remediation activities, the Committee encourages the 
Assistant Secretary of Defense (Energy, Installations, and 
Environment) to continue to explore innovative technological 
solutions for treating PFOS/PFOA contamination and to develop a 
competitive process for industry and academia to develop and 
utilize promising PFOS/PFOA remediation technologies to treat 
contaminated groundwater.

                    5G TELECOMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGY

    The Committee is concerned about reports that foreign 
manufacturers are significantly ahead of United States 
companies in the development and deployment of 5G 
telecommunications technologies, which poses a national 
security risk to the United States and its allies. Without a 
robust domestic 5G supply chain, the United States will be 
vulnerable to 5G systems that facilitate cyber intrusion from 
hostile actors. In order to secure a reliable 5G system and a 
domestic supply chain that meets the national security needs of 
the United States and its allies, the Committee encourages the 
Secretary of Defense to accelerate engagement with domestic 
industry partners that are developing 5G systems.
    Additionally, the Committee is aware of the significant 
investments being made in 5G efforts but is concerned with the 
level of detail provided for congressional oversight. The 
Committee directs the Under Secretary of Defense (Research and 
Engineering) to conduct quarterly execution briefings with the 
House and Senate Appropriations Committees beginning not later 
than 90 days after the enactment of this Act.

                    FULL-SCALE SPACE TEST FACILITIES

    The Committee is aware that space systems provide critical 
capabilities essential to national security and that these 
systems face increasing threats from potential adversaries. The 
Committee understands that aggressive ground testing of space 
systems is crucial to gain confidence that new technologies 
will perform as expected before they are launched in space. 
However, the Committee is concerned that the nation lacks 
adequate space test infrastructure to meet its needs, 
especially facilities capable of performing full-scale system 
level tests.
    The Committee directs the Under Secretary of Defense 
(Research and Engineering) to submit a report to the House and 
Senate Appropriations Committees not later than 120 days after 
the enactment of this Act that assesses the current state of 
existing federal, full-scale testing facilities, including 
those with electromagnetic interference test capability, and to 
provide options for investments to enhance capabilities and 
infrastructure necessary to meet projected needs.

               CERAMIC-MATRIX COMPOSITES FOR HYPERSONICS

    The Committee is encouraged by the potential of high and 
ultra-high temperature ceramic-matrix composites in extreme 
environments experienced during hypersonic flight. The 
Committee encourages the Under Secretary of Defense (Research 
and Engineering) to explore the value of these materials for 
Department of Defense hypersonic efforts.

                          GLOBAL FOOD SECURITY

    The Committee encourages the Secretary of Defense, in 
cooperation with the Secretary of State and the Secretary of 
Agriculture, to conduct research to evaluate the risks and 
national security implications of foreign reliance and control 
of the United States and global food supply. The research 
should examine likely offensive threats and postures resulting 
in potential food supply disruptions, particularly in the 
context of great power competition, climate change, and 
pandemics. The research should establish methodologies and 
metrics to assess indications and warnings of food supply 
threats and recommend protocols to mitigate these threats.

                     CYBER EDUCATION COLLABORATIVES

    The Committee remains concerned by widespread shortages in 
cybersecurity talent across both the public and private sector. 
In accordance with the recommendations of the Cyberspace 
Solarium Commission, the Committee encourages the Under 
Secretary of Defense (Research and Engineering) to direct 
cyber-oriented units to collaborate with local colleges and 
universities on research, fellowships, internships, and 
cooperative work experiences to expand cyber-oriented education 
opportunities and grow the cybersecurity workforce. The 
Committee also appreciates that veterans and transitioning 
servicemembers could serve as a valuable recruiting pool to 
fill gaps in the cybersecurity workforce. Accordingly, the 
Committee encourages the Under Secretary to prioritize 
collaboration with colleges and universities near military 
installations as well as the veteran population and state cyber 
ranges in executing these workforce training programs. The 
partnership of the Air Force Research Laboratory with the 
Center for Hardware and Embedded Systems Security and Trust is 
an example of such a collaboration and the Committee encourages 
the Under Secretary to continue to support such efforts.

                  JOINT HYPERSONICS TRANSITION OFFICE

    The Committee recommendation includes $90,000,000 for the 
Joint Hypersonics Transition Office (JHTO) to fund applied and 
interdisciplinary research and workforce development to advance 
United States hypersonics capabilities. In fiscal year 2020, 
the Committee noted its concerns that the Department's 
expanding hypersonic research portfolio had the potential to 
develop proprietary systems that duplicate capabilities and 
increase costs. While the Committee is aware of efforts 
underway in the Department to develop the required integrated 
hypersonics science and technology roadmap and to establish a 
university consortium for hypersonics research and workforce 
development, the concerns with inefficient overlapping efforts 
expressed in the prior fiscal year remain. Therefore, the 
Committee strongly encourages the Under Secretary of Defense 
(Research and Engineering) to expeditiously implement the JHTO, 
and to seek involvement from all Department agencies and 
military Services with activities in hypersonics, consistent 
with the Inter-Service Memorandum of Agreement for Hypersonic 
Boost Glide Technology Development dated August 2019. The 
Committee believes this agreement represents the most mature 
approach for a common hypersonic glide body system. 
Additionally, the Committee has been disappointed in the 
timeliness and depth of the quarterly updates provided to the 
Committee, and expects that the Under Secretary of Defense 
(Research and Engineering) will ensure that future reports are 
timely and complete.

                      MOBILE MICROREACTOR STRATEGY

    The Committee supports efforts by the Department of Defense 
to explore new methods of power production for use in 
operational needs, future weapon systems, force protection, 
asset protection, and humanitarian and disaster response. The 
Committee recommendation provides $40,000,000 to support the 
development of a prototype mobile microreactor and $10,000,000 
to support the production of fuel for the prototype.
    The Committee is concerned, however, that the Department 
has not established an executive agent to direct the 
microreactor program and has not secured fuel stocks. The 
Committee directs the Under Secretary of Defense (Research and 
Engineering) to submit a report to the congressional defense 
committees not later than thirty days after the enactment of 
this Act, on the Department's plans for the mobile microreactor 
program. The report shall address whether the Department has 
identified an executive agent for mobile energy; plans to 
include mobile energy solutions, such as microreactors, in 
force modernization initiatives; the strategy for deploying 
microreactors, including site identification processes, 
fielding, personnel training, and deployment timelines; the 
procurement strategy to acquire feed material for 
microreactors; the plan to identify and use existing 
authorities to provide appropriate indemnities; and the status 
of pilot programs for microreactors, including suitable 
locations for pilot activities.

                  HIGH ENERGY LASER ENDLESS MAGAZINES

    The Committee notes the investments by the Department of 
Defense in directed energy systems capable of countering 
incoming threats, including the development of systems with 
endless or near endless magazines to ensure capability to 
counter salvos or swarms of any size.
    However, the Committee is concerned that while the 
Department of Defense has included reference to near endless 
magazines in its budget justification for high energy laser 
systems, it has not adequately defined the term in order to 
facilitate predictable requirements development or guide 
internal investment. Therefore, the Committee directs the 
Secretary of the Defense to submit a report to the 
congressional defense committees not later than 180 days after 
the enactment of this Act, which details capabilities, cost, 
and logistical implications of endless or near endless 
magazines.

          RAPID, ACCURATE, AND AFFORDABLE BIODETECTION SYSTEM

    The Committee is encouraged by the progress of the Defense 
Threat Reduction Agency in developing a prototype sensor that 
enables real-time detection of aerosolized biological threat 
agents. The Committee encourages the Secretary of Defense to 
field these critical capabilities to Department of Defense 
facilities and operational commands. The Committee directs the 
Director of the Joint Program Executive Office for Chemical, 
Biological, Radiological and Nuclear Defense to provide a 
report to the congressional defense committees not later than 
90 days after the enactment of this Act, which details efforts 
to fund, test, and field a reliable, cost-effective, near real-
time detection/identification capability for aerosolized 
biological threats.

      ACADEMIC HYPERSONIC RESEARCH, TEST AND EVALUATION FACILITIES

    The Committee recognizes the importance of higher-education 
institutions in establishing high-quality test facilities and 
training the future workforce for the development and 
evaluation of hypersonic weapon platforms. The Committee 
encourages the Under Secretary of Defense (Research and 
Engineering) to partner with academia as key contributors in 
the research, testing and evaluation of hypersonic vehicle 
platforms.

                  ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE COORDINATION

    The Committee notes the widespread interest and large 
number of artificial intelligence projects and programs across 
all facets of the operations and activities of the Department 
of Defense. While the Committee understands that the Department 
believes artificial intelligence shows great promise to 
revolutionize and improves its operations, the Committee is 
concerned that there is a lack of coordination of the myriad 
ongoing artificial intelligence activities. Therefore, the 
Committee directs the Director of the Joint Artificial 
Intelligence Center to provide the congressional defense 
committees, not later than 60 days after the enactment of this 
Act, an inventory of all significant artificial intelligence 
activities in the Department, including, but not limited to, 
for each activity: the annual funding requested for the next 
five years; the source of funds identifying appropriation 
account, program, project, and line number; an identification 
of mission partners, including academia and industry; and the 
planned partner to whom the capability will be transitioned.

                 WOMEN AND MINORITIES IN STEM PIPELINE

    The Committee believes the Department of Defense faces 
challenges recruiting and retaining a workforce skilled in 
science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM). While 
this is a nationwide concern, the Committee supports Department 
of Defense efforts to grow the STEM workforce pipeline, 
particularly for women and minorities. The Committee encourages 
the Under Secretary of Defense (Research and Engineering) to 
continue these efforts by partnering with Hispanic Serving 
Institutions, Historically Black Colleges and Universities, and 
other Minority Serving Institutions on research, fellowships, 
internships, and cooperative work experiences at defense 
laboratories. Additionally, the Committee encourages the Under 
Secretary of Defense (Research and Engineering) to collaborate 
with Hispanic Serving Institutions, Historically Black Colleges 
and Universities, and other Minority Serving Institutions to 
build a pipeline for scientists and engineers to enter the 
cyber workforce upon graduation.

                OPERATIONAL TEST AND EVALUATION, DEFENSE


 
 
 
Fiscal year 2020 appropriation........................      $227,700,000
Fiscal year 2021 budget request.......................       210,090,000
Committee recommendation..............................       210,090,000
Change from budget request............................             - - -
 

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $210,090,000 
for Operational Test and Evaluation, Defense which will provide 
the following program in fiscal year 2021:

                EXPLANATION OF PROJECT LEVEL ADJUSTMENTS
                        [In thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                             Change from
                                      Budget     Committee     Request
                                     Request    Recommended
------------------------------------------------------------------------
OPERATIONAL TEST AND EVALUATION..      100,021      100,021            0
LIVE FIRE TESTING................       70,933       70,933            0
OPERATIONAL TEST ACTIVITIES AND         39,136       39,136            0
 ANALYSIS........................
                                  --------------------------------------
    TOTAL, OPERATIONAL TEST &          210,090      210,090            0
     EVALUATION, DEFENSE.........
------------------------------------------------------------------------


                                TITLE V

                     REVOLVING AND MANAGEMENT FUNDS

                     DEFENSE WORKING CAPITAL FUNDS

 
 
 
Fiscal year 2020 appropriation........................    $1,564,211,000
Fiscal year 2021 budget request.......................     1,348,910,000
Committee recommendation..............................     1,348,910,000
Change from budget request............................             - - -
 

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $1,348,910,000 
for the Defense Working Capital Funds accounts which will 
provide the following program in fiscal year 2021:

                EXPLANATION OF PROJECT LEVEL ADJUSTMENTS
                        [In thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                      Budget     Committee   Change from
                                     Request    Recommended    Request
------------------------------------------------------------------------
WORKING CAPITAL FUND, ARMY.......       56,717       56,717            0
    Industrial Operations........       32,551       32,551
        Arsenal Supply Chain                        [3,500]
         Security Pilot Program..
    Supply Management............       24,166       24,166
WORKING CAPITAL FUND, AIR FORCE..       95,712       95,712            0
WORKING CAPITAL FUND, DEFENSE-          49,821       49,821            0
 WIDE............................
DEFENSE WORKING CAPITAL FUND,        1,146,660    1,146,660            0
 DECA............................
                                  --------------------------------------
    TOTAL, DEFENSE WORKING           1,348,910    1,348,910            0
     CAPITAL FUNDS...............
------------------------------------------------------------------------

                            ARSENAL SECURITY

    The Committee believes that maintaining security, including 
threats from cyber-attacks, data piracy, and other 
technological risks, of Department of Defense arsenals is 
essential. The Committee directs that of the funds included 
under Industrial Operations, $3,500,000 is to implement efforts 
to combat these types of threats.

  DEFENSE COUNTERINTELLIGENCE AND SECURITY AGENCY WORKING CAPITAL FUND

    The Committee recognizes the challenges facing the Defense 
Counterintelligence and Security Agency (DCSA) as it combines 
and assumes the roles and responsibilities of other Department 
of Defense and Office of Personnel Management offices and 
missions. While the creation of a dedicated DCSA Working 
Capital Fund (WCF) provides ample and necessary flexibility 
aimed at achieving efficiencies, the creation of such a 
function can also lead to mission creep--where activities not 
directly related to those originally intended for the WCF end 
up being funded with WCF receipts. The Committee believes that 
steps should be taken to avoid this unintended consequence and 
expects that obligations from the DCSA WCF will only reimburse 
costs specifically associated with conducting background 
investigations.
    The Committee directs the Under Secretary of Defense 
(Comptroller), in consultation with the Under Secretary of 
Defense (Intelligence and Security), to provide quarterly 
updates to the House and Senate Appropriations Committees, 
beginning not later than 30 days after the enactment of this 
Act, on the status of the DCSA WCF. These updates shall include 
appropriations (direct and reimbursable), obligations, and 
expenses by WCF line of business to and from the Fund. The 
first update shall also include the prior six months' 
historical monthly cash flow analysis by line item receipt and 
expense, and the first and subsequent updates shall include a 
prospective monthly cash flow analysis by line item receipt and 
expense updated on a quarterly basis.

                                TITLE VI

                  OTHER DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE PROGRAMS

                         DEFENSE HEALTH PROGRAM

 
 
 
Fiscal year 2020 appropriation........................   $34,074,119,000
Fiscal year 2021 budget request.......................    32,690,372,000
Committee recommendation..............................    33,297,902,000
Change from budget request............................      +607,530,000
 

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of 
$33,297,902,000 for the Defense Health Program which will 
provide the following program in fiscal year 2021:


         REPROGRAMMING GUIDANCE FOR THE DEFENSE HEALTH PROGRAM

      (INCLUDING BASE AND OVERSEAS CONTINGENCY OPERATIONS FUNDING)

    The Committee includes a provision which caps the funds 
available for Private Sector Care under the TRICARE program 
subject to prior approval reprogramming procedures. The 
provision and accompanying report language should not be 
interpreted as limiting the amount of funds that may be 
transferred to the In-House Care budget sub-activity from other 
budget sub-activities within the Defense Health Program. In 
addition, funding for the In-House Care budget sub-activity 
continues to be designated as a congressional special interest 
item. Any transfer of funds from the In-House Care budget sub-
activity into the Private Sector Care budget sub-activity or 
any other budget sub-activity requires the Secretary of Defense 
to follow prior approval reprogramming procedures for operation 
and maintenance funds.
    The Committee directs the Secretary of Defense to provide 
written notification to the congressional defense committees of 
cumulative transfers in excess of $10,000,000 out of the 
Private Sector Care budget sub-activity not later than fifteen 
days after such a transfer. Furthermore, the Committee directs 
the Secretary of Defense to provide a report to the 
congressional defense committees not later than 30 days after 
the enactment of this Act that delineates transfers of funds, 
and the dates any transfers occurred, from the Private Sector 
Care budget sub-activity to any other budget sub-activity.
    The Committee further directs the Assistant Secretary of 
Defense (Health Affairs) to provide quarterly reports to the 
congressional defense committees on budget execution data for 
all Defense Health Program budget activities and to adequately 
reflect changes to the budget activities requested by the 
Services in future budget submissions. These reports should 
also be provided to the Government Accountability Office.

                               CARRYOVER

    For fiscal year 2021, the Committee recommends one percent 
carryover authority for the operation and maintenance account 
of the Defense Health Program. The Committee directs the 
Assistant Secretary of Defense (Health Affairs) to submit a 
detailed spending plan for any fiscal year 2020 designated 
carryover funds to the congressional defense committees not 
less than 30 days prior to executing the carryover funds.

                 PEER-REVIEWED CANCER RESEARCH PROGRAMS

    The Committee recommends $150,000,000 for the peer-reviewed 
breast cancer research program, $110,000,000 for the peer-
reviewed prostate cancer research program, $35,000,000 for the 
peer-reviewed ovarian cancer research program, $50,000,000 for 
the peer-reviewed kidney cancer research program, $20,000,000 
for the peer-reviewed lung cancer research program, $10,000,000 
for the peer-reviewed pancreatic cancer research program, 
$7,500,000 for the peer-reviewed rare cancer research program, 
and $110,000,000 for the peer-reviewed cancer research program 
that would research cancers not addressed in the aforementioned 
programs currently executed by the Department of Defense.
    The funds provided in the peer-reviewed cancer research 
program are directed to be used to conduct research in the 
following areas: cancers associated with the use of beryllium, 
bladder cancer, blood cancers, brain cancer, colorectal cancer, 
endometrial cancer, esophageal cancer, germ cell cancers, head 
and neck cancer, liver cancer, lymphoma, melanoma and other 
skin cancers, mesothelioma, metastatic cancers, neuroblastoma, 
pediatric brain tumors, sarcoma, stomach cancer, thyroid 
cancer, the link between scleroderma and cancer, and cancer in 
children, adolescents, and young adults. The inclusion of the 
individual rare cancer research program shall not prohibit the 
peer-reviewed cancer research program from funding the 
previously mentioned cancers or cancer subtypes that may be 
rare by definition.
    The funds provided under the peer-reviewed cancer research 
program shall be used only for the purposes listed above. The 
Committee directs the Assistant Secretary of Defense (Health 
Affairs) to provide a report not later than 180 days after the 
enactment of this Act to the congressional defense committees 
on the status of the peer-reviewed cancer research program. For 
each research area, the report shall include the funding amount 
awarded, the progress of the research, and the relevance of the 
research to servicemembers and their families.
    The Committee commends the Department of Defense for 
ensuring that projects funded through the various peer-reviewed 
cancer research programs maintain a focus on issues of 
significance to military populations and the warfighter. This 
includes promoting collaborative research proposals between 
Department of Defense researchers and non-military research 
institutions. These collaborations leverage the knowledge, 
infrastructure and access to clinical populations that the 
partners bring to the research effort. Additionally, promoting 
these collaborations provides a valuable recruitment and 
retention incentive for military medical and research 
personnel. The Committee encourages the Commanding General, 
United States Army Medical Research and Development Command, to 
continue to emphasize the importance of these collaborations 
between military and non-military researchers throughout the 
peer-review process.

               JOINT WARFIGHTER MEDICAL RESEARCH PROGRAM

    The Committee recommendation includes $40,000,000 for the 
continuation of the joint warfighter medical research program. 
The funding shall be used to augment and accelerate high 
priority Department of Defense and Service medical requirements 
and to continue prior year initiatives that are close to 
achieving their objectives and yielding a benefit to military 
medicine. The funding shall not be used for new projects nor 
for basic research, and it shall be awarded at the discretion 
of the Secretary of Defense following a review of medical 
research and development gaps as well as unfinanced medical 
requirements of the Services. Further, the Committee directs 
the Assistant Secretary of Defense (Health Affairs) to submit a 
report not later than 180 days after the enactment of this Act 
to the congressional defense committees that lists the projects 
that receive funding. The report should include the funding 
amount awarded to each project, a thorough description of each 
project's research, and the benefit the research will provide 
to the Department of Defense.

               COMBAT READINESS MEDICAL RESEARCH PROGRAM

    The Committee recommendation includes $10,000,000 for the 
Combat Readiness Medical Research program. The program should 
focus on medical needs of the warfighter on the battlefield. 
Research should address the ``golden hour'' for servicemembers 
with life threatening injuries, battlefield diagnostics, and 
medical threats and treatments for warfighters deployed around 
the world.
    The Committee expects the Assistant Secretary of Defense 
(Health Affairs) to identify current gaps in medical planning 
and resources, consider medical capabilities that may mitigate 
fatalities, enhance battlefield diagnostics, and find solutions 
for life threatening complications after battlefield injury.
    The funding in the Combat Readiness Medical Research 
program should be used for research and development of rapidly 
deployable, all-in-one acute and chronic wound care therapy 
engineered to address complex trauma and start tissue 
regeneration; repairing or restoring damaged or missing 
genitourinary organs and tissue; freeze dried plasma and 
platelets; portable neurological devices in support of mild 
traumatic brain injury assessment; ruggedized oxygen generation 
systems; medical simulation technology; sleep disorders; 
Myalgic Encephalomyelitis/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome; preventing 
and relieving service-related arthritis; telemedicine; and 
infectious diseases.
    Additionally, the Committee is concerned with the lack of 
standardization in the delivery of the Joint Trauma System 
Tactical Combat Casualty Care (TCCC) curriculum. The Committee 
directs the Director of the Defense Health Agency, in 
coordination with the Service Surgeons General, not later than 
120 days after the enactment of this Act, to provide a briefing 
to the congressional defense committees on the coordination 
between the Defense Health Agency and the Services to ensure 
the curriculum is taught by qualified personnel; the plan to 
validate that TCCC training is standard across the Services; 
the impact of expanding TCCC on the Services' readiness 
training; and the funding requirements for the Services to 
support the delivery of the TCCC curriculum.

                       ELECTRONIC HEALTH RECORDS

    The Committee continues to support the efforts that the 
Department of Defense and the Department of Veterans Affairs 
are undertaking with regard to electronic health records and 
the health record system. It is the Committee's ongoing 
expectation that the Departments' electronic health record 
systems must be completely and meaningfully interoperable with 
seamless compatibility.
    The Committee acknowledges that the response to COVID-19 
has superseded many planned efforts in the Military Health 
System, including the deployment of the Department of Defense's 
electronic health record system, MHS GENESIS. As sustainment 
continues at sites where MHS GENESIS is currently operating, 
delays in future deployments are expected. Though the 
Department of Defense had been making strides in its 
deployment, with the shift in focus to COVID-19 response the 
Committee understands that there will be several factors that 
will contribute to the system being successfully implemented.
    One factor is the need to improve informational technology 
and related infrastructure prior to deployment of the 
electronic health record system. The Committee directs the 
Secretary of Defense to provide a report to the congressional 
defense committees not later than 90 days after the enactment 
of this Act on the status of the installation of all remaining 
information technology and related infrastructure required to 
complete the deployment of the electronic health record system, 
including the timeline to complete installation, and costs 
associated if the Department accelerated the deployment 
timeline.
    Another critical factor in the success of deployments will 
be the quality of training for users of the system. The 
Committee directs the Director, Operational Test and Evaluation 
to conduct an evaluation of change management strategies and 
training programs related to the deployment of MHS GENESIS and 
provide a briefing to the House and Senate Appropriations 
Subcommittees not later than 90 days after the enactment of 
this Act on related findings and recommendations for 
improvement.
    The Committee continues to direct the Comptroller General 
to perform quarterly performance reviews of the Department of 
Defense electronic health record deployment so that the 
Committee can further monitor implementation of the system and 
whether it is meeting predicted costs.
    Additionally, the Committee directs the Director of the 
Interagency Program Office (IPO) to continue to provide 
quarterly reports on the progress of interoperability between 
the two Departments to the House and Senate Defense 
Appropriations Subcommittees and the House and Senate Military 
Construction, Veterans Affairs, and Related Agencies 
Appropriations Subcommittees. The Program Executive Office 
(PEO) for Defense Healthcare Management Systems (DHMS), in 
conjunction with the Director of the IPO and the Director of 
the Defense Health Agency, is directed to provide quarterly 
reports to the congressional defense committees on the cost of 
the program, including indirect costs being funded outside of 
the DHMS Modernization Electronic Health Record program; and 
schedule of the program, to include milestones, knowledge 
points, and acquisition timelines, as well as quarterly 
obligation reports. The Committee directs the PEO DHMS to 
continue briefing the House and Senate Defense Appropriations 
Subcommittees on a quarterly basis, coinciding with the report 
submission.

                 MILITARY HEALTH SYSTEM TRANSFORMATION

    The Committee remains concerned with the implementation of 
medical restructuring mandated by the National Defense 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2017. The restructuring 
represents the most significant changes to the military health 
system in decades, and the Committee believes it is critical to 
implement the restructuring in such a way that minimizes risk 
for servicemembers and beneficiaries.
    Prior to implementation, both medical readiness and 
healthcare benefits were intertwined, managed by the Service 
Surgeons General. Under that model, there was no separation 
between benefits and readiness, and the Services had a holistic 
picture in treating servicemembers and their families. The 
Committee has followed implementation efforts of the 
restructuring closely, to include management of the military 
treatment facilities transitioning from the Services to the 
Defense Health Agency; descoping military treatment facilities; 
and the Department's evaluation that fewer military medical 
providers in non-combat critical specialties may be required.
    The impact of these changes on servicemembers and eligible 
beneficiaries is important. It is unclear whether readiness 
levels or healthcare benefits will be negatively affected. The 
future is uncertain due to COVID-19 and the Committee 
acknowledges the difficulty in predicting how beneficiaries' 
behaviors may change in the near or long term and also 
understands the challenges in assessing the impact on mental 
health and medical care professions in both the direct care and 
private sector care settings, as a result of the virus. 
Important questions remain about each aspect of the 
implementation, and the Committee is unsatisfied with the 
Department's inadequate responses to Committee inquiries.
    Additionally, in order to start accounting for the funding 
and details related to medical readiness and healthcare 
benefits, Congress directed the Secretary of Defense, in 
coordination with the Service Secretaries and the Assistant 
Secretary of Defense (Health Affairs), to submit separate 
annual budget justification materials for readiness related 
care and healthcare benefits beginning with the fiscal year 
2021 budget submission. In the fiscal year 2021 budget request, 
medical readiness was budgeted for in the Services' operation 
and maintenance accounts, while the operating budgets of the 
military treatment facilities and healthcare benefits were 
budgeted for in the Defense Health Program account. Separating 
medical readiness from the benefit was not seamless, and what 
was submitted was a Defense Health Program budget that 
transferred $1,891,488,000 to Service medical readiness 
activities and the Services' operation and maintenance budgets 
that struggled to provide the level of detail that the 
Committee requires to evaluate these activities. Therefore, the 
Committee expects the fiscal year 2022 budget request 
submission to provide greater detail for medical readiness 
efforts, as detailed under the ``Reporting on Medical 
Readiness'' heading in this title of the report.

                DESCOPING MILITARY TREATMENT FACILITIES

    The Committee notes that the report required by section 703 
of the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2017 
was submitted to Congress on February 19, 2020. After a review 
of the military treatment facilities that met screening and 
evaluation criteria, 50 were identified for a change of scope, 
while an additional six await a final decision. In the majority 
of the 50 military treatment facilities, healthcare services 
would be reduced or eliminated, and, in many cases, non-
servicemember beneficiaries would have to find new providers in 
the TRICARE network. The Committee questions several of the 
assumptions made about the quality and accessibility of private 
sector care, the cost of changing the venue of care, and the 
relationship to other restructuring efforts, such as reducing 
the number of military medical billets. The Committee is also 
concerned with the Department's approach in responding to this 
provision, which was not a de-facto medical base realignment 
and closure process. Congress must be a partner in these 
decisions going forward.
    The Committee directs the Assistant Secretary of Defense 
(Health Affairs), in coordination with the Director of the 
Defense Health Agency and the Service Surgeons General, to 
brief the congressional defense committees on the 
implementation plan prior to the obligation of funds in fiscal 
year 2021 to close or descope any military treatment 
facilities, including an update to the market analysis 
conducted, cost implications, timeline, impact on providers, 
and benefits or risks to the served population.

                     REDUCTION OF MILITARY BILLETS

    The fiscal year 2020 budget request included a proposal to 
decrease medical billets for the Services to increase the 
number of operational billets needed for lethality. Reductions 
would have major ramifications throughout the military health 
system, yet leaders across the Department of Defense have been 
ill-prepared to articulate the consequences of these 
reductions.
    In order to mitigate potential access to care issues caused 
by the reduction of military providers, the Department 
requested $250,000,000 in the fiscal year 2020 budget that was 
not adequately justified, and therefore Congress did not 
appropriate the requested funds. Despite requests for 
additional information, the Committee still has not been 
provided with a detailed mitigation plan for beneficiary care 
or medical readiness. Serious questions remain about the 
quality and availability of care for beneficiaries, as well as 
the negative impact on readiness that may be caused by an 
unnecessary reduction of military medical providers. As a 
result, the Committee is disappointed that the fiscal year 2021 
budget request includes an increase of $334,613,000 with wholly 
insufficient detail to evaluate the request, and therefore 
denies the request.
    Additionally, with lessons learned about the capacity and 
capability of both military and civilian medical care in the 
shadow of the novel coronavirus pandemic, the Committee expects 
the Secretary of Defense, the Service Secretaries, and the 
Service Surgeons General will reevaluate the military medical 
personnel required to respond to all operational requirements, 
including in support of the homeland defense mission. The 
Committee directs the Assistant Secretary of Defense (Health 
Affairs), in coordination with the Service Secretaries, the 
Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, and the Director of Cost 
Assessment and Program Evaluation to brief the congressional 
defense committees on the Department's reevaluation plan not 
later than 120 days after the enactment of this Act.

                     REPORTING ON MEDICAL READINESS

    In the fiscal year 2021 budget request, military medical 
readiness funding and activities transferred from the Defense 
Health Program budget into the Services' operation and 
maintenance and research, development, test and evaluation 
accounts. In the Department of Defense Appropriations Act, 
2020, the Department was directed to provide separate budget 
justification for medical readiness and the healthcare benefit; 
it was not the intent of the Committee to lose the ability to 
locate and evaluate medical funding across the Department in a 
meaningful or detailed way.
    The Committee notes its concern with the level of 
justification provided for the $1,891,488,000 that transferred 
from the Defense Health Program to the Services' operation and 
maintenance accounts for medical readiness, and while the 
Committee is supportive of the military departments' ability to 
better manage and plan for readiness requirements holistically, 
the Services must provide adequate details for congressional 
oversight. Therefore, the Committee directs the Service 
Secretaries to account for medical readiness activities in 
financial management systems and to submit a quarterly report 
on the execution of medical readiness activities. The reports 
shall be consolidated and submitted with the Defense Health 
Program quarterly reports. Additionally, the Committee directs 
the Under Secretary of Defense (Comptroller), in coordination 
with the Service Secretaries, Assistant Secretary of Defense 
(Health Affairs), and the Director of the Defense Health 
Agency, to submit a comprehensive, consolidated, and detailed 
Unified Medical Budget exhibit with the Defense Health Program 
budget justification material for fiscal year 2022, and to 
provide a proposal for the exhibit to the House and Senate 
Appropriations Committees, not later than 90 days after the 
enactment of this Act.

                       METASTATIC CANCER RESEARCH

    While recent research has revealed that there is a genetic 
basis for susceptibility to metastatic cancer or resistance to 
metastasis, more research is required to develop a 
comprehensive understanding of this complex process. Clinical 
trials are an important aspect of that progress, and diverse 
representation of patients in clinical trials is integral to 
the development of medications and therapies that effectively 
treat disease. Ethnicity, gender, age and genetics all play a 
role in the safety and efficacy of a treatment for an 
individual. Therefore, as recommended in April 2018 by the Task 
Force Report to Congress on Metastatic Cancer, the Committee 
encourages the Director, Congressionally Directed Medical 
Research Program to partner with outside experts and other 
federal agencies, as appropriate, to achieve representation of 
the demographics of the United States population in these 
trials.

                   PANCREATIC CANCER EARLY DETECTION

    The Committee recommendation includes $10,000,000 for 
pancreatic cancer research. Despite being the third leading 
cause of cancer-related death in the United States, early 
detection of pancreatic cancer requires additional research. 
The Committee encourages the Director, Congressionally Directed 
Medical Research Program, to expand early detection research 
for pancreatic cancer, to include the prevalence in pre-
diabetic and diabetic individuals, as well as those in 
underserved ethnic and minority communities.

                  ALCOHOL AND SUBSTANCE USE DISORDERS

    The Committee recognizes the ongoing threat posed to 
warfighters and the general public by the opioid epidemic. 
Those who may develop an opioid dependency following an injury 
generally struggle with addiction, or those servicemembers who 
have family members that struggle with addiction are often not 
positioned to dedicate themselves entirely to the required 
military mission. The Committee encourages the Assistant 
Secretary of Defense (Health Affairs) to prioritize 
congressionally directed medical research on substance use 
disorders aimed at reducing the overall number of opioid-
related overdose deaths.

       MAINTAINING A HIGHLY-SKILLED WORKFORCE IN MEDICAL RESEARCH

    As the Administration implements a government-wide response 
to COVID-19, the disease caused by the novel coronavirus, the 
Committee encourages the Assistant Secretary of Defense (Health 
Affairs), the Director of the Defense Health Agency, and the 
Commander of Army Futures Command to prioritize maintaining a 
strong workforce of highly-skilled scientists and researchers 
vital to conducting the medical research necessary to protect 
warfighters and contribute to the nation-wide response to this 
and future pandemics.

           SEXUAL ASSAULT AND POST-TRAUMATIC STRESS DISORDER

    The Committee believes that providing servicemembers access 
to outpatient programs designed to treat individuals suffering 
from post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) resulting from 
sexual assault trauma could improve outcomes received for 
military sexual assault survivors experiencing PTSD. The 
Committee encourages the Assistant Secretary of Defense (Health 
Affairs) to collaborate with research institutions currently 
investigating treatment strategies for PTSD resulting from 
sexual trauma.

                         TRAUMATIC BRAIN INJURY

    The Committee recognizes that traumatic brain injury (TBI), 
including mild-TBI and concussion, continues to be a 
significant health issue affecting servicemembers both in 
training and during combat operations. More than 402,000 brain 
injuries have occurred since the beginning of operations in 
Afghanistan and Iraq. Most recently, the attack at Ayn al Asad 
Air Base in Iraq impacted more than 109 servicemembers. While 
the Committee recommendation includes $175,000,000 to continue 
research on traumatic brain injury and psychological health, 
the Committee believes additional efforts would help advance 
the understanding of TBI injuries sustained by servicemembers.
    The Committee believes the Department should have better 
metrics and data on military personnel prior to the possibility 
of injury in training or combat. Therefore, the Committee 
directs the Assistant Secretary of Defense (Health Affairs), in 
coordination with the Director of the Defense Health Agency, 
and the Service Surgeons General, to develop a cost analysis 
plan for conducting uniform traumatic brain injury baseline 
testing for all new recruits across each military Service. The 
plan shall provide for a screening program for any already-
existing traumatic brain injuries which shall inform healthcare 
professionals should a servicemember be subject to any 
circumstances in the future that might result in a traumatic 
brain injury. The Committee directs the Assistant Secretary of 
Defense (Health Affairs) to submit a report on its plan to the 
congressional defense committees not later than 180 days after 
the enactment of this Act.
    For injuries experienced during training or operations, the 
Committee is encouraged by research and development initiatives 
to advance expeditionary, non-invasive medical devices for 
analyzing the full spectrum of traumatic brain injuries that 
have received clearance by the Food and Drug Administration. 
Portable devices capable of rapidly providing a comprehensive 
and objective clinical picture should be fully utilized to 
effectively enable clinicians to identify the full spectrum of 
brain injuries immediately after injury. The Committee 
encourages the Assistant Secretary of Defense (Health Affairs) 
and the Service Surgeons General to deploy mild-TBI/concussion 
multi-modal diagnostic devices in support of both readiness and 
beneficiary care.
    Additionally, the Committee recognizes efforts by the 
Department of Defense to leverage partnerships with academia 
and the private sector to understand and improve prevention and 
treatment of traumatic brain injuries for servicemembers and 
cadets at the United States military academies. The Committee 
encourages the Assistant Secretary of Defense (Health Affairs) 
to continue to leverage partnerships with academia and the 
private sector to support long-term studies of traumatic brain 
injuries to gain a deeper understanding, including at the 
cellular level through efforts such as the PANTHER program, of 
concussive injuries, including how they impact the brain, how 
and to what extent the brain recovers, and how prevention and 
treatment methods may be improved.
    Lastly, the Committee is supportive of ongoing research 
examining the increased risk of certain conditions after an 
individual experiences TBI. The Committee is aware of research 
into the relationship between traumatic brain injury and 
neurodegenerative diseases, such as chronic traumatic 
encephalopathy and Parkinson's disease, and encourages the 
Assistant Secretary of Defense (Health Affairs) to continue to 
invest in research and development efforts aimed at halting the 
neurodegenerative processes that follow traumatic brain injury.

NATIONWIDE CANCER RESEARCH AT THE CANCER CENTER AT WALTER REED NATIONAL 
                        MILITARY MEDICAL CENTER

    The Committee commends the Assistant Secretary of Defense 
(Health Affairs) for continuing to support the John P. Murtha 
Cancer Center Research Program of the Uniformed Services 
University of the Health Sciences and at the Walter Reed 
National Military Medical Center in its partnership with the 
Oncology Research Information Exchange Network (ORIEN). This 
partnership enables the Murtha Cancer Center Research Program 
to collaborate with eighteen major academic cancer centers to 
improve outcomes for servicemembers with cancer. The ORIEN 
protocol is now being implemented at Walter Reed, with the 
potential to expand to other facilities in the military health 
system. The Committee encourages the Assistant Secretary of 
Defense (Health Affairs) to support this program.

                            SLEEP DISORDERS

    The Committee notes the leadership of the National 
Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) in 
advancing research into under-represented sleep disorders, such 
as narcolepsy and restless leg syndrome. The Committee 
encourages the Director of the Defense Health Agency to work 
with NINDS to bolster these activities and advance initiatives 
that advance scientific understanding of sleep disorders 
impacting servicemembers.

                       TRICARE PRIME AVAILABILITY

    The Committee directs the Assistant Secretary of Defense 
(Health Affairs) to review the feasibility of TRICARE Prime 
being made available to eligible Department of Defense 
beneficiaries across all states and territories and to submit a 
report to the congressional defense committees not later than 
90 days after the enactment of this Act.

                      MENTAL HEALTH PROFESSIONALS

    The Committee remains concerned about the shortage of 
current and prospective mental health care professionals for 
servicemembers and their families, including social workers, 
clinical psychologists, and psychiatrists. The Committee 
directs the Assistant Secretary of Defense (Health Affairs), in 
coordination with the Service Surgeons General, to brief the 
House and Senate Appropriations Committees not later than 180 
days after the enactment of this Act on an assessment of 
eligible beneficiaries' demand for behavioral health services, 
including services provided through telehealth, and funding 
required to adequately recruit and retain behavioral health 
professionals required to meet such demand. The assessment 
shall include a review of tools, such as pay grade increases, 
use of special and incentive pays, and the pipeline development 
of increasing the number of professionals in this field through 
scholarships or programs through the Uniformed Services 
University.

      ARMED FORCES RETIREMENT HOMES AND THE DEFENSE HEALTH AGENCY

    The Committee notes the important role that the military 
health system plays for the care of the military retiree 
population, especially those living in the two Armed Forces 
Retirement Homes. As the Defense Health Agency continues to 
make recommendations for the rescoping of certain military 
treatment facilities, the Committee encourages the Director of 
the Defense Health Agency to take necessary steps to ensure in-
patient care is available at a military treatment facility 
within 20 miles of each Armed Forces Retirement Home.

                OUTDOOR RECREATION FOR MILITARY FAMILIES

    The Committee honors the service and sacrifice of military 
spouses and their children and recognizes the psychological and 
emotional stress placed on families of servicemembers. Research 
shows children of military parents who have deployed are more 
likely than civilian peers to have a behavioral health 
diagnosis. It is a priority of the Committee to support the 
physical, emotional, and psychological health of military 
families. The Committee also recognizes the wellness and health 
benefits of organized outdoor recreation and education 
activities for the children of military parents.

                PEER-REVIEWED TICKBORNE DISEASE RESEARCH

    The Committee encourages the Director of the 
Congressionally Directed Medical Research Program to prioritize 
research on Lyme disease by including additional Lyme disease 
experts on its tickborne disease programmatic panel. Doctors 
and researchers with experience in chronic Lyme issues should 
be considered for inclusion on the panel and the scientific 
review panel to ensure the burden of Lyme disease is 
appropriately addressed.

                            BIOREPOSITORIES

    The Committee is encouraged by efforts within the medical 
research community to better understand chronic diseases 
through biorepositories which store and catalogue medical 
tissue for scientific understanding. Collecting and cataloguing 
samples from a diverse population allows the medical community 
to perform research into health disparities in those 
populations. The Committee encourages the Assistant Secretary 
of Defense (Health Affairs) to adequately resource efforts to 
increase the number of samples collected from a diverse 
population.

                  GLOBAL HEALTH SECURITY PREPAREDNESS

    The Committee continues to support Department of Defense 
contributions to biosecurity and the global health security 
agenda. The Department possesses unique capabilities that 
contribute to interagency efforts to prevent, detect, and 
respond to outbreaks of infectious disease worldwide. Response 
to global public health threats such as pandemic influenza, 
Ebola, and COVID-19 requires a robust national approach across 
all federal agencies and private partners. The Committee 
directs the Secretary of Defense to brief the House and Senate 
Appropriations Committees, not later than 120 days after the 
enactment of this Act, on the Department's efforts to 
collaborate with federal agencies and private partners to 
ensure the United States is prepared to respond to the next 
infectious disease outbreak.

     SERVICEMEMBERS AND VETERANS WITH AMYOTROPHIC LATERAL SCLEROSIS

    The Committee directs the Assistant Secretary of Defense 
(Health Affairs), in coordination with the Secretary of the 
Department of Veterans Affairs, to submit a report to the House 
and Senate Appropriations Committees not later than 90 days 
after the enactment of this Act on the costs to each Department 
to treat servicemembers and veterans with Amyotrophic Lateral 
Sclerosis.

                            TRAUMATIC INJURY

    The Committee understands the uniqueness of traumatic 
injuries and neurological diseases sustained by servicemembers 
in combat. Extramural research focused on accelerating 
functional recovery and rehabilitation of sensorimotor function 
that is also personalized to the needs of the patient would 
have value to injured servicemembers and their caregivers. The 
Committee is aware of the promising technology of wirelessly 
activated implantable biomedical technologies capable of focal 
stimulation inside nerves and encourages the Assistant 
Secretary of Defense (Health Affairs) to explore research into 
such technologies to offset the effects of limb amputation, 
orthopedic injury and disease, and other neurodegenerative 
diseases.

                 NATIONAL DISASTER MEDICAL SYSTEM PILOT

    The Committee is concerned with the fracturing of the 
military health system and its primary focus of readiness and 
survivability of servicemembers in combat operations. While 
this fundamental cornerstone of defense health is undisputed, 
the Committee is concerned that not enough attention has been 
placed on medical capabilities and capacity required for the 
homeland defense mission.
    Section 740 of the National Defense Authorization Act for 
Fiscal Year 2020 authorized a pilot program on civilian and 
military partnerships to enhance interoperability and medical 
surge capability and capacity of the National Disaster Medical 
System (NDMS). The Committee recommendation includes additional 
funds in fiscal year 2021 to accelerate this pilot program, and 
directs that the first location selected for inclusion in the 
pilot program is underway not later than 180 days after the 
enactment of this Act. The Committee directs the Secretary of 
Defense to work collaboratively with members of the NDMS and 
selected private partners to accelerate the planning and 
execution of the pilot programs. Funds provided shall support 
the work of the agencies in the NDMS and include an allocation 
to private partners to assure they can move quickly to achieve 
the determined goals of Section 740.
    The Committee directs the Secretary of Defense to submit a 
report to the congressional defense committees not later than 
180 days after the enactment of this Act on a description of 
the pilot program, including partnerships established and 
evaluation metrics. The report shall also include a threat 
assessment of the most likely homeland defense scenarios 
requiring medical surge capability and capacity; an evaluation 
of departmental resources that are most likely to be required 
in response, and projected shortages of equipment, supplies, or 
personnel; how the NDMS could be better leveraged in future 
emergencies; current and projected medical surge plans; and a 
detailed cost estimate for the Department to plan, prepare for 
or respond to the most likely emergencies requiring medical 
surge capability and capacity. The Committee further expects 
the fiscal year 2022 budget submission to include sufficient 
funding for the pilot program.

        COLLABORATION WITH MINORITY SERVING HEALTH INSTITUTIONS

    The Committee encourages the Assistant Secretary of Defense 
(Health Affairs) to work collaboratively in the health research 
field with Hispanic Serving Institutions, Historically Black 
Colleges and Universities, and other Minority Serving 
Institutions.

           CHEMICAL AGENTS AND MUNITIONS DESTRUCTION, DEFENSE


 
 
 
Fiscal year 2020 appropriation........................      $985,499,000
Fiscal year 2021 budget request.......................       889,500,000
Committee recommendation..............................       889,500,000
Change from budget request............................             - - -
 

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $889,500,000 
for Chemical Agents and Munitions Destruction, Defense which 
will provide the following program in fiscal year 2021:

                                    EXPLANATION OF PROJECT LEVEL ADJUSTMENTS
                                            [In thousands of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                        Budget       Committee      Change from
                                                                       Request      Recommended       Request
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE..........................................      106,691         106,691               0
PROCUREMENT........................................................          616             616               0
RESEARCH, DEVELOPMENT, TEST AND EVALUATION.........................      782,193         782,193               0
                                                                    --------------------------------------------
    TOTAL, CHEMICAL AGENTS AND MUNITIONS DESTRUCTION, DEFENSE......      889,500         889,500               0
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

         DRUG-INTERDICTION AND COUNTER DRUG ACTIVITIES, DEFENSE


 
 
 
Fiscal year 2020 appropriation........................      $893,059,000
Fiscal year 2021 budget request.......................       769,629,000
Committee recommendation..............................       746,223,000
Change from budget request............................       -23,406,000
 

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $746,223,000 
for Drug Interdiction and Counter-Drug Activities, Defense 
which will provide the following program in fiscal year 2021:

                                    EXPLANATION OF PROJECT LEVEL ADJUSTMENTS
                                            [In thousands of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                        Budget       Committee      Change from
                                                                       Request      Recommended       Request
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
COUNTER-NARCOTICS SUPPORT..........................................      546,203         421,029        -125,174
    Transfer to National Guard Counter-Drug Program................                      -31,768
    Transfer to International Security Cooperation Programs........                      -26,006
    Program decrease--no continuation of projects reduced in fiscal                      -47,400
     year 2020 for southwest border barrier construction...........
    Program decrease--southwest border barrier construction........                      -20,000
DRUG DEMAND REDUCTION PROGRAM......................................      123,704         123,704               0
NATIONAL GUARD COUNTER-DRUG PROGRAM................................       94,211         195,979         101,768
    Transfer from Counter-Narcotics Support........................                       31,768
    Program increase...............................................                       70,000
NATIONAL GUARD COUNTER-DRUG SCHOOLS................................        5,511           5,511               0
                                                                    --------------------------------------------
        TOTAL, DRUG INTERDICTION AND COUNTER-DRUG ACTIVITIES,            769,629         746,223         -23,406
         DEFENSE...................................................
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

             DRUG INTERDICTION AND COUNTER-DRUG ACTIVITIES

    The Committee recommendation includes $421,029,000 for 
Counter-Narcotics Support, which supports the counter-narcotics 
activities of United States Northern Command and United States 
Southern Command, including the Joint Interagency Task Force 
South. The Committee also supports the provision of 
intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance assets to these 
combatant commands to support their counter-drug operations.
    The Committee recommendation transfers $31,768,000 from 
Counter-Narcotics Support to the National Guard Counter-Drug 
Program. The Committee recommendation also transfers 
$26,006,000 requested for international programs under Counter-
Narcotics Support to International Security Cooperation 
Programs managed by the Defense Security Cooperation Agency to 
build the capacity of countries in the Northern Command and 
Southern Command areas of responsibility to counter illicit 
drug trafficking. The budget request for fiscal year 2022 
should request funding for these programs in a manner similar 
to the Committee recommendation for this fiscal year.
    The Committee is concerned with the misrepresentation by 
the Department of Defense regarding the purposes for which 
funds were requested under this heading in fiscal year 2020. 
The Department of Defense has reallocated $47,400,000 from 
Counter-Narcotics Support for activities that were neither 
requested by the Department nor appropriated by Congress, 
namely to fund southwest border barrier construction. Such 
actions deny the Committee its constitutional and oversight 
responsibilities and the Committee recommendation for fiscal 
year 2021 does not continue funding programs that were reduced 
as a result of the Department's actions.
    The Committee is also concerned with the proper management 
of funds appropriated under this heading. The Committee 
understands that the Department of Defense delayed transfers 
from this account to other appropriations for months while 
estimates for border construction were being developed. In lieu 
of the intended source, other appropriations were used to 
implement programs normally funded under this heading. The 
Committee expects the Secretary of Defense to ensure that 
funding provided under this heading is properly managed and 
executed in a timely manner.
    The Committee recommendation does not include the 
$20,000,000 requested in fiscal year 2021 for southwest border 
barrier construction, and section 8134 prohibits funds in this 
Act from being used for that purpose. Moreover, section 8135 of 
the Act returns any unobligated funds, which were transferred 
by the Department of Defense on February 13, 2020 for southwest 
border barrier constriction, to their original accounts to be 
used for the original purposes for which they were appropriated 
by Congress.
    The Committee recognizes the important role of the National 
Guard Counter-Drug program in assisting local and state 
agencies in addressing national drug-related challenges. The 
Committee encourages the administrators of the National Guard 
Counter-Drug program to continue their coordination with 
communities, regions, and other organizations to help alleviate 
the national drug problem. The Committee notes the 
recommendations contained in Government Accountability Office 
report 19-27 and encourages the Chief of the National Guard 
Bureau to issue guidance on the operation and administration of 
the National Guard Counterdrug Program in order to improve 
program performance.

                    OFFICE OF THE INSPECTOR GENERAL


 
 
 
Fiscal year 2020 appropriation........................      $363,499,000
Fiscal year 2021 budget request.......................       371,439,000
Committee recommendation..............................       387,696,000
Change from budget request............................       +16,257,000
 

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $387,696,000 
for the Office of the Inspector General which will provide the 
following program in fiscal year 2021:

                                    EXPLANATION OF PROJECT LEVEL ADJUSTMENTS
                                            [In thousands of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                        Budget       Committee      Change from
                                                                       Request      Recommended       Request
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE..........................................      369,483         385,740          16,257
    Program increase--oversight of PL 116-136 funding..............                       16,257
PROCUREMENT........................................................          858             858               0
RESEARCH, DEVELOPMENT, TEST AND EVALUATION.........................        1,098           1,098               0
                                                                    --------------------------------------------
    TOTAL, OFFICE OF THE INSPECTOR GENERAL.........................      371,439         387,696          16,257
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


                               TITLE VII

                            RELATED AGENCIES

              NATIONAL AND MILITARY INTELLIGENCE PROGRAMS

    The National Intelligence Program and the Military 
Intelligence Program budgets funded in this Act consist 
primarily of resources for the Director of National 
Intelligence, including the Intelligence Community Management 
staff, the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA), the Defense 
Intelligence Agency, the National Reconnaissance Office, the 
National Security Agency, the National Geospatial-Intelligence 
Agency, the intelligence services of the Departments of the 
Army, Navy, and Air Force, and the CIA Retirement and 
Disability fund.

                            CLASSIFIED ANNEX

    Adjustments to classified programs are addressed in a 
separate, detailed, and comprehensive classified annex. The 
Intelligence Community, the Department of Defense, and other 
organizations are expected to fully comply with the 
recommendations and directions in the classified annex 
accompanying the Department of Defense Appropriations Act, 
2021.

   CENTRAL INTELLIGENCE AGENCY RETIREMENT AND DISABILITY SYSTEM FUND


 
 
 
Fiscal year 2020 appropriation........................      $514,000,000
Fiscal year 2021 budget request.......................       514,000,000
Committee recommendation..............................       514,000,000
Change from budget request............................             - - -
 

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $514,000,000 
for the Central Intelligence Agency Retirement and Disability 
System Fund. This is a mandatory account.
    This appropriation provides payments of benefits to 
qualified beneficiaries in accordance with the Central 
Intelligence Agency Retirement Act of 1964 for Certain 
Employees (P.L. 88-643), as amended by Public Law 94-522. This 
statute authorized the establishment of the CIA Retirement and 
Disability System for certain employees and authorized the 
establishment and maintenance of a fund from which benefits 
would be paid to those beneficiaries.

               INTELLIGENCE COMMUNITY MANAGEMENT ACCOUNT


 
 
 
Fiscal year 2020 appropriation........................      $556,000,000
Fiscal year 2021 budget request.......................       663,000,000
Committee recommendation..............................       619,728,000
Change from budget request............................       -43,272,000
 

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $619,728,000 
for the Intelligence Community Management Account.

                               TITLE VIII

                           GENERAL PROVISIONS

    Title VIII of the accompanying bill includes 139 general 
provisions. A brief description of each provision follows.
    Section 8001 provides that no funds made available in this 
Act may be used for publicity or propaganda purposes not 
authorized by Congress.
    Section 8002 provides for conditions and limitations on the 
payment of compensation to, or employment of, foreign 
nationals.
    Section 8003 provides that no funds made available in this 
Act may be obligated beyond the end of the fiscal year unless 
expressly provided for a greater period of availability 
elsewhere in the Act.
    Section 8004 limits the obligation of certain funds 
provided in this Act during the last two months of the fiscal 
year.
    Section 8005 has been amended and provides for the general 
transfer authority of funds to other military functions.
    Section 8006 provides that the tables titled ``Explanation 
of Project Level Adjustments'' in the Committee report and 
classified annex shall be carried out in the manner provided by 
the tables to the same extent as if the tables were included in 
the text of this Act.
    Section 8007 has been amended and provides for the 
establishment of a baseline for application of reprogramming 
and transfer authorities for the current fiscal year.
    Section 8008 provides for limitations on the use of 
transfer authority of working capital fund cash balances.
    Section 8009 provides that none of the funds appropriated 
in this Act may be used to initiate a special access program 
without prior notification to the congressional defense 
committees.
    Section 8010 provides limitations and conditions on the use 
of funds made available in this Act to initiate multiyear 
procurement contracts.
    Section 8011 has been amended and provides for the use and 
obligation of funds for humanitarian and civic assistance 
costs.
    Section 8012 has been amended and provides that civilian 
personnel of the Department of Defense may not be managed on 
the basis of end strength or be subject to end strength 
limitations.
    Section 8013 prohibits funding from being used to influence 
congressional action on any matters pending before the 
Congress.
    Section 8014 prohibits compensation from being paid to any 
member of the Army who is participating as a full-time student 
and who receives benefits from the Education Benefits Fund when 
time spent as a full-time student is counted toward that 
member's service commitment.
    Section 8015 provides for the transfer of funds 
appropriated in title III of this Act for the Department of 
Defense Pilot Mentor-Protege Program.
    Section 8016 has been amended and provides for the 
Department of Defense to purchase anchor and mooring chains 
manufactured only in the United States.
    Section 8017 provides that no funds made available in this 
Act shall be used for the support of any non-appropriated funds 
activity of the Department of Defense that procures malt 
beverages and wine except under certain conditions.
    Section 8018 prohibits funds made available to the 
Department of Defense from being used to demilitarize or 
dispose of certain surplus firearms and small arms ammunition 
or ammunition components.
    Section 8019 provides a limitation on funds being used for 
the relocation of any Department of Defense entity into or 
within the National Capital Region.
    Section 8020 has been amended and provides for incentive 
payments authorized by section 504 of the Indian Financing Act 
of 1974 (25 U.S.C. 1544).
    Section 8021 provides that no funding for the Defense Media 
Activity may be used for national or international political or 
psychological activities.
    Section 8022 provides for the obligation of funds for 
purposes specified in section 2350j(c) of title 10, United 
States Code, in anticipation of receipt of contributions from 
the Government of Kuwait.
    Section 8023 is new and requires notification of the 
receipt of contributions from foreign governments.
    Section 8024 has been amended and provides funding for the 
Civil Air Patrol Corporation.
    Section 8025 has been amended and prohibits funding from 
being used to establish new Department of Defense Federally 
Funded Research and Development Centers (FFRDC), with certain 
limitations, and increases funding provided for FFRDCs.
    Section 8026 provides for the Department of Defense to 
procure carbon, alloy, or armor steel plate melted and rolled 
only in the United States and Canada.
    Section 8027 defines the congressional defense committees 
as the Armed Services Committees of the House and Senate and 
the Subcommittees on Defense of the House and Senate 
Appropriations Committees.
    Section 8028 provides for competitions between private 
firms and Department of Defense depot maintenance activities.
    Section 8029 has been amended and provides for the 
revocation of blanket waivers of the Buy American Act.
    Section 8030 provides for the availability of funds 
contained in the Department of Defense Overseas Military 
Facility Investment Recovery Account.
    Section 8031 provides for the conveyance, without 
consideration, of relocatable housing units that are excess to 
the needs of the Air Force.
    Section 8032 provides authority to use operation and 
maintenance appropriations to purchase items having an 
investment item unit cost of not more than $250,000.
    Section 8033 has been amended and provides authority to use 
operation and maintenance appropriations for the Asia Pacific 
Regional Initiative Program.
    Section 8034 prohibits the sale of tobacco products in 
military resale outlets below the most competitive price in the 
local community.
    Section 8035 has been amended and prohibits the use of 
Working Capital Funds to purchase specified investment items.
    Section 8036 has been amended and provides that none of the 
funds appropriated for the Central Intelligence Agency shall 
remain available for obligation beyond the current fiscal year 
except for funds appropriated for the Reserve for 
Contingencies, the Working Capital Fund, or other programs as 
specified.
    Section 8037 provides for the availability of funds for the 
mitigation of environmental impacts on Indian lands resulting 
from Department of Defense activities.
    Section 8038 requires the Department of Defense to comply 
with the Buy American Act, chapter 83 of title 41, United 
States Code.
    Section 8039 places certain limitations on the use of funds 
made available in this Act to establish field operating 
agencies.
    Section 8040 places restrictions on converting to 
contractor performance an activity or function of the 
Department of Defense unless it meets certain guidelines 
provided.

                             (RESCISSIONS)

    Section 8041 has been amended and provides for the 
rescission of $2,491,100,000 from the following programs:

 
 
 
2019 Appropriations:
    Procurement of Weapons and Tracked Combat
     Vehicles, Army:
        Bradley program mods..........................       $14,250,000
    Other Procurement, Army:
        Family of weapon sights.......................        12,953,000
    Aircraft Procurement, Navy:
        MQ 4 Triton AP................................         7,983,000
    Other Procurement, Navy:
        Aircraft support equipment....................         2,226,000
    Aircraft Procurement, Air Force:
        B-52 1760 IWBU................................        14,100,000
        C-135B........................................       125,000,000
        Combat Rescue Helicopter......................        25,000,000
        MC-130J recap.................................        41,124,000
        RQ-4 mods.....................................        12,200,000
        RQ-4 post-production support..................        17,100,000
        RQ-4 spares...................................         2,100,000
    Other Procurement, Air Force:
        Classified....................................        12,400,000
2020 Appropriations:
    Operation and Maintenance, Defense-Wide:
        Defense Security Cooperation Account..........        20,000,000
    Procurement of Weapons and Tracked Combat
     Vehicles, Army:
        Armored multipurpose vehicle..................        87,840,000
        Bradley program mods..........................         6,000,000
    Other Procurement, Army:
        Spider family of networked munitions..........        10,878,000
    Aircraft Procurement, Navy:
        Joint Strike Fighter STOVL AP.................        83,185,000
        CH-53K field activities.......................        13,315,000
        CH-53K (Heavy Lift) AP........................        53,753,000
        P-8A Poseidon.................................        77,600,000
        Advanced helicopter training system...........        56,071,000
        KC-130J.......................................        14,878,000
        MQ-4 Triton AP................................        10,070,000
        F-18 series...................................        42,137,000
    Shipbuilding and Conversion, Navy:
        CVN Refueling Overhauls.......................        13,100,000
        TAO Fleet Oiler AP............................        73,000,000
    Other Procurement, Navy:
        CG modernization..............................        22,920,000
        LSD midlife and modernization.................        28,000,000
        Aviation support equipment....................        10,000,000
    Procurement, Marine Corps:
        Modification kits.............................        20,139,000
        Ground air/task oriented radar................        13,400,000
    Aircraft Procurement, Air Force:
        C-130 AMP 1...................................         4,700,000
        C-17 BLOS.....................................         4,800,000
        C-5 CNS/ATM...................................         7,900,000
        Combat Rescue Helicopter......................        65,000,000
        E-11 BACN Gateway UON.........................        43,000,000
        KC-46.........................................       209,588,000
        MC-130J recap.................................        79,874,000
        RQ-4 post-production support..................        23,896,000
        RQ-4 spares...................................           700,000
    Missile Procurement, Air Force:
        ALCM..........................................        19,500,000
        ICBM fuze mod.................................         5,000,000
    Other Procurement, Air Force:
        GCSS-AF FOS (LOGIT)...........................        11,226,000
    Research, Development, Test and Evaluation, Army:
        Indirect fire protection capability inc 2             74,286,000
         block 1......................................
        Mobile medium range missile...................         5,000,000
        Improved turbine engine program...............        49,527,000
        Manned ground vehicle.........................       130,415,000
        Long range precision fires....................        51,394,000
    Research, Development, Test and Evaluation, Navy:
        New design SSN................................        70,000,000
    Research, Development, Test and Evaluation, Air
     Force:
        ALCM..........................................         6,000,000
        Arms control implementation...................        33,448,000
        B-52 ATP display..............................         3,000,000
        B-52 CERP.....................................        10,000,000
        B-52 RMP......................................         5,800,000
        Combat Rescue Helicopter......................        30,000,000
        Hypersonics prototyping.......................       115,000,000
        KC-46.........................................        16,093,000
    Research, Development, Test and Evaluation,
     Defense-Wide:
        Ballistic missile defense enabling programs...         2,031,000
        BMD targets...................................           300,000
        Technology maturation initiatives.............         6,400,000
        Hypersonic defense............................        12,500,000
        Improved homeland defense interceptors........       302,000,000
    Defense Working Capital Fund:
        Defense Counter-Intelligence and Security            150,000,000
         Agency Working Capital Fund..................
 

    Section 8042 prohibits funds made available in this Act 
from being used to reduce authorized positions for military 
technicians (dual status) of the Army National Guard, Air 
National Guard, Army Reserve, and Air Force Reserve unless such 
reductions are a direct result of a reduction in military force 
structure.
    Section 8043 has been amended and prohibits funding from 
being obligated or expended for assistance to the Democratic 
People's Republic of Korea unless specifically appropriated for 
that purpose.
    Section 8044 provides for reimbursement to the National 
Guard and reserve when members of the National Guard and 
reserve provide intelligence or counterintelligence support to 
the combatant commands, defense agencies, and joint 
intelligence activities.
    Section 8045 prohibits the transfer of Department of 
Defense and Central Intelligence Agencies drug interdiction and 
counter-drug activities funds to other agencies.
    Section 8046 prohibits funding from being used for the 
procurement of ball and roller bearings other than those 
produced by a domestic source and of domestic origin.
    Section 8047 has been amended and provides funding for Red 
Cross and United Services Organization grants.
    Section 8048 prohibits funding from being used to purchase 
supercomputers which are not manufactured in the United States.
    Section 8049 provides funds for the Small Business 
Innovation Research program and the Small Business Technology 
Transfer program.
    Section 8050 prohibits funding from being used for 
contractor bonuses being paid due to business restructuring.
    Section 8051 provides transfer authority for the pay of 
military personnel in connection with support and services for 
eligible organizations and activities outside the Department of 
Defense.
    Section 8052 has been amended and provides for the 
Department of Defense to dispose of negative unliquidated or 
unexpended balances for expired or closed accounts.
    Section 8053 provides conditions for the use of equipment 
of the National Guard Distance Learning Project on a space-
available, reimbursable basis.
    Section 8054 has been amended and provides funding for 
Sexual Assault Prevention and Response Programs.
    Section 8055 has been amended and provides for the 
limitation on the use of funds appropriated in title IV to 
procure end-items for delivery to military forces for 
operational training, operational use or inventory 
requirements.
    Section 8056 provides for a waiver of ``Buy American'' 
provisions for certain cooperative programs.
    Section 8057 prohibits funding in this Act from being used 
for repairs or maintenance to military family housing units.
    Section 8058 provides obligation authority for new starts 
for advanced concept technology demonstration projects only 
after notification to the congressional defense committees.
    Section 8059 has been amended and provides that the 
Secretary of Defense shall provide a classified quarterly 
report on certain matters as directed in the classified annex 
accompanying this Act.
    Section 8060 provides for the use of National Guard 
personnel to support ground-based elements of the National 
Ballistic Missile Defense System.
    Section 8061 prohibits the use of funds made available in 
this Act to transfer to any nongovernmental entity ammunition 
held by the Department of Defense that has a center-fire 
cartridge and is designated as ``armor piercing'' except for 
demilitarization purposes.
    Section 8062 provides for a waiver by the Chief of the 
National Guard Bureau or his designee for all or part of 
consideration in cases of personal property leases of less than 
one year.
    Section 8063 has been amended and provides for the transfer 
of funds made available in this Act under Operation and 
Maintenance, Army to other activities of the federal government 
for classified purposes.
    Section 8064 has been amended and prohibits funding to 
separate, or to consolidate from within, the National 
Intelligence Program budget from the Department of Defense 
budget.
    Section 8065 has been amended and provides grant authority 
for the construction and furnishing of additional Fisher Houses 
to meet the needs of military family members when confronted 
with the illness or hospitalization of an eligible military 
beneficiary.
    Section 8066 provides for the transfer of funds made 
available in this Act under Operation and Maintenance, Navy to 
the John C. Stennis Center for Public Service Development Trust 
Fund.
    Section 8067 has been amended and prohibits the 
modification of command and control relationships to give Fleet 
Forces Command operational and administrative control of United 
States Navy forces assigned to the Pacific fleet.
    Section 8068 has been amended and requires notification for 
the rapid acquisition and deployment of supplies and associated 
support services.
    Section 8069 has been amended and provides funding and 
transfer authority for the Israeli Cooperative Programs.
    Section 8070 has been amended and provides for the funding 
of prior year shipbuilding cost increases.
    Section 8071 has been amended and provides that funds made 
available in this Act for intelligence activities are deemed to 
be specifically authorized by Congress for purposes of section 
504 of the National Security Act of 1947 until the enactment of 
the Intelligence Authorization Act for the current fiscal year.
    Section 8072 has been amended and prohibits funding from 
being used to initiate a new start program without prior 
written notification.
    Section 8073 has been amended and provides that the budget 
of the President for the subsequent fiscal year shall include 
separate budget justification documents for costs of the United 
States Armed Forces' participation in contingency operations.
    Section 8074 prohibits funding from being used for the 
research, development, test, evaluation, procurement, or 
deployment of nuclear armed interceptors of a missile defense 
system.
    Section 8075 has been amended and makes funds available for 
transfer for the purposes of rapid acquisition and deployment 
of supplies and associated support services.
    Section 8076 prohibits funding from being used to reduce or 
disestablish the operation of the 53rd Weather Reconnaissance 
Squadron of the Air Force Reserve.
    Section 8077 prohibits funding from being used for the 
integration of foreign intelligence information unless the 
information has been lawfully collected and processed during 
conduct of authorized foreign intelligence activities.
    Section 8078 prohibits funding from being used to transfer 
program authority relating to current tactical unmanned aerial 
vehicles from the Army and requires the Army to retain 
responsibility for and operational control of the MQ-1C 
Unmanned Aerial Vehicle.
    Section 8079 has been amended and limits the availability 
of funding provided for the Office of the Director of National 
Intelligence beyond the current fiscal year, except for funds 
appropriated for research and technology, which shall remain 
available for the current and the following fiscal years.
    Section 8080 provides limitations on the Shipbuilding and 
Conversion, Navy appropriation.
    Section 8081 has been amended and provides for the 
establishment of a baseline for application of reprogramming 
and transfer authorities for the Office of the Director of 
National Intelligence for the current fiscal year.
    Section 8082 provides that certain support to friendly 
foreign countries be made in accordance with section 8005 or 
9002 of this Act.
    Section 8083 has been amended and places limitations on the 
reprogramming of funds from the Department of Defense 
Acquisition Workforce Development Account.
    Section 8084 prohibits funding from being used in violation 
the Child Soldiers Prevention Act of 2008.
    Section 8085 provides for limitations on funding provided 
for the National Intelligence Program to be available for 
obligation or expenditure through a reprogramming or transfer 
of funds in accordance with section 102A(d) of the National 
Security Act of 1947 (50 U.S.C. 3024(d)).
    Section 8086 defines the congressional intelligence 
committees as being the Permanent Select Committee on 
Intelligence of the House, the Select Committee on Intelligence 
of the Senate, and the Subcommittees on Defense of the 
Committees on Appropriations of the House and Senate.
    Section 8087 provides the authority to transfer funding 
from operation and maintenance accounts for the Army, Navy, and 
Air Force to the central fund for Fisher Houses and Suites.
    Section 8088 has been amended and prohibits the use of 
funds for the purpose of making remittances to the Department 
of Defense Acquisition Workforce Development Account.
    Section 8089 provides that any agency receiving funds made 
available in this Act shall post on a public website any report 
required to be submitted to Congress with certain exceptions.
    Section 8090 prohibits the use of funds for federal 
contracts in excess of $1,000,000 unless the contractor meets 
certain conditions.
    Section 8091 has been amended and provides funds for 
transfer to the Joint Department of Defense--Department of 
Veterans Affairs Medical Facility Demonstration Fund.
    Section 8092 prohibits the use of funds providing certain 
missile defense information to certain entities.
    Section 8093 provides for the purchase of heavy and light 
armed vehicles for the physical security of personnel or for 
force protection purposes up to a limit of $450,000 per 
vehicle.
    Section 8094 has been amended and provides the Director of 
National Intelligence with general transfer authority with 
certain limitations.
    Section 8095 prohibits funding from being used in 
contravention of the War Powers Resolution.
    Section 8096 has been amended and prohibits funds from 
being used to enter into a contract, memorandum of 
understanding, or cooperative agreement with, make a grant to, 
or provide a loan or loan guarantee to Rosoboronexport, except 
under certain conditions.
    Section 8097 prohibits the use of funds for the purchase or 
manufacture of a United States flag unless such flags are 
treated as covered items under section 2533a(b) of title 10, 
United States Code.
    Section 8098 directs the Secretary of Defense to post grant 
awards on a public website in a searchable format.
    Section 8099 places restrictions on transfer amounts 
available in the Rapid Prototyping Fund.
    Section 8100 prohibits the use of funds by the National 
Security Agency targeting United States persons under 
authorities granted in the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance 
Act.
    Section 8101 prohibits the transfer of administrative or 
budgetary resources to the jurisdiction of another Federal 
agency not financed by this Act without the express 
authorization of Congress.
    Section 8102 has been amended and provides that operation 
and maintenance funds may be used for any purposes related to 
the National Defense Reserve Fleet.
    Section 8103 prohibits the use of funds to provide 
counterterrorism support to foreign partners unless the 
congressional defense committees are notified accordingly.
    Section 8104 prohibits the use of funds to award a new TAO 
Fleet Oiler or FFG Frigate program contract for the acquisition 
of certain components unless those components are manufactured 
in the United States.
    Section 8105 has been amended and prohibits certain 
transfers from the Department of Defense Acquisition Workforce 
Development Account.
    Section 8106 prohibits the use of funds for gaming or 
entertainment that involves nude entertainers.
    Section 8107 prohibits the use of funding for information 
technology systems that do not have pornographic content 
filters.
    Section 8108 has been amended and prohibits funds to 
deliver F-35 aircraft to the Republic of Turkey.
    Section 8109 has been amended and places certain 
limitations on the transfer of funds for the Global Engagement 
Center.
    Section 8110 has been amended and makes funds available 
through the Office of Economic Adjustment for transfer to the 
Secretary of Education, to make grants to construct, renovate, 
repair, or expand elementary and secondary public schools on 
military installations.
    Section 8111 provides guidance on the implementation of the 
Policy for Assisted Reproductive Services for the Benefit of 
Seriously or Severely Ill/Injured Active Duty Service Members.
    Section 8112 has been amended and places restrictions on 
the use of funding for military parades.
    Section 8113 has been amended and provides for the use of 
funds to modify two F-35 Joint Strike Fighters per variant to a 
test configuration.
    Section 8114 provides for funding available in the Defense 
Health Program for death gratuity payments.
    Section 8115 prohibits funds in the Act from being used to 
enter into a contract or provide a loan to any corporation that 
has any unpaid Federal tax liability.
    Section 8116 has been amended and provides that any advance 
billing for background investigation services and related 
services purchased from activities financed using the Defense 
Working Capital Fund shall be excluded from the calculation of 
cumulative advance billings.
    Section 8117 has been amended and prohibits funds from 
being used to transfer the National Reconnaissance Office to 
the Space Force.
    Section 8118 is new and requires the Secretary of Defense 
to make a certification prior to the transfer of any element to 
the Space Force.
    Section 8119 is new and provides funds appropriated under 
military personnel may be used for expenses for members of the 
Space Force.
    Section 8120 is new and requires the Director of the 
Defense Security Cooperation Agency to submit a spend plan.
    Section 8121 has been amended and reduces funding due to 
favorable foreign exchange rates.
    Section 8122 is new and reduces funding due to favorable 
fuel costs.
    Section 8123 is new and prohibits funds from being used to 
exclude or implement the exclusion of the Department of Defense 
from cover under the Federal Service Labor Management Relations 
Statute.
    Section 8124 is new and requires the Secretary of Defense 
to provide information and documents regarding the December 
1981 massacre in El Mozote.
    Section 8125 is new and provides funds for agile 
development, test and evaluation, procurement, production and 
modification, and the operation and maintenance for certain 
software pilot programs.
    Section 8126 is new and requires the Secretary of Defense 
to report on deployed personnel by each geographic combatant 
command.
    Section 8127 is new and requires the Secretary of Defense 
to provide notification before the deployment of security force 
assistance brigades.
    Section 8128 is new and provides funds for the purposes of 
public healthcare professionals and public health laboratory 
staff, laboratory and medical equipment, and medical supplies.
    Section 8129 is new and prohibits funds for the development 
and design of certain future naval ships unless any contract 
specifies that all hull, mechanical, and electrical components 
are manufactured in the United States.
    Section 8130 is new and prohibits funds for the 
decommissioning of any Littoral Combat Ships.
    Section 8131 is new and requires the Secretary of Defense 
provide notification of deployments of armed forces to 
locations outside the United States.
    Section 8132 is new and prohibits funding from being 
obligated or expended in a manner that does not comply with the 
requirements in section 365 of H.R. 7120 limiting the transfer 
of Department of Defense personal property to state or local 
law enforcement agencies.
    Section 8133 is new and prohibits the use of funds to 
conduct, or prepare to conduct, any explosive nuclear weapons 
test that produces any yield. This section does not limit 
science-based stockpile stewardship activities consistent with 
the zero-yield standard or requirements under other provisions 
of law, such as sections 2401, 2523 and 2525 of title 50, 
United States Code.
    Section 8134 is new and prohibits funds to construct a 
wall, fence, border barriers, or border security infrastructure 
along the southern land border of the United States.
    Section 8135 is new and requires funds provided for the 
Department of Defense for fiscal year 2020 that were 
transferred by the Department and remain unobligated be 
returned to the original accounts.
    Section 8136 is new and limits the use of active armed 
forces on the southern border unless the costs are reimbursed 
by the requesting agency.
    Section 8137 is new and provides $50,000,000 for a new 
program that will assist communities that surround military 
installations with excessive decibel noise caused by military 
aircraft.
    Section 8138 is new and prohibits the use of funds to 
provide guidance on, review, prepare, approve, or recommend 
budget request funding levels or initiatives for the Department 
of Energy.
    Section 8139 is new and provides funding for renaming Army 
installations, facilities, roads, and streets named after 
confederate leaders and officers.

                                TITLE IX

        OVERSEAS CONTINGENCY OPERATIONS/GLOBAL WAR ON TERRORISM

                        COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION

    In title IX, the Committee recommends additional 
appropriations totaling $68,435,000,000 for overseas 
contingency operations/global war on terrorism pursuant to 
section 251(b)(2)(A)(ii) of the Balanced Budget and Emergency 
Deficit Control Act of 1985. A detailed review of the Committee 
recommendation for programs funded in this title is provided in 
the following pages.

                         REPORTING REQUIREMENTS

    The Committee recommendation includes a number of reporting 
requirements related to overseas contingency operations and 
building capacity efforts. The Committee directs the Secretary 
of Defense to continue to report to the House and Senate 
Appropriations Committees the incremental costs for all named 
operations in the Central Command area of responsibility on a 
quarterly basis and to submit, also on a quarterly basis, 
commitment, obligation, and expenditure data for the 
Afghanistan Security Forces Fund and the Counter-Islamic State 
of Iraq and Syria Train and Equip Fund.
    The Committee directs the Secretary of Defense to submit an 
updated report to the congressional defense committees not 
later than 60 days after the enactment of this Act on military 
actions being conducted pursuant to Public Law 107-40 and 
Public Law 107-243.
    The Committee directs the Secretary of Defense to update 
the report required by House Report 115-769 under the heading 
``Report on U.S. Defense Assistance to Saudi Arabia and United 
Arab Emirates Coalition in Yemen'' not later than 60 days after 
the enactment of this Act. Such report shall include an 
assessment of the current conflict and a detailed description 
of any United States assistance provided to or involvement with 
the operations of the coalition; a description of United States 
military, Department of Defense civilian employees, and defense 
contractor employees involved in such matters; and the specific 
legal authority under which such personnel are involved.
    The Committee recognizes the strategic partnership between 
the United States and Iraq and supports efforts to normalize 
the security relationship after more than 17 years. 
Accordingly, the Committee directs the Secretary of Defense, in 
coordination with the Secretary of State, to undertake a 
comprehensive review and assessment of United States security 
assistance programs with Iraq, including the current 
management, personnel, funding, and goals associated with such 
assistance. The review shall examine the delivery and 
management of such assistance, including through Office of 
Security Cooperation-Iraq. The results of the review and 
assessment along with recommendations shall be submitted in a 
report to the congressional defense committees not later than 
60 days after the enactment of this Act.
    The Committee expects the Secretary of Defense to comply 
with section 1090 of Public Law 114-328 regarding the cost of 
wars in Afghanistan, Iraq, and Syria, and to post this 
information on the Department's public website in a timely 
manner.

        OVERSEAS CONTINGENCY OPERATIONS JUSTIFICATION DOCUMENTS

    The Committee is concerned with the lack of detailed 
information provided in the budget justification documents 
associated with programs and activities supported by overseas 
contingency operations (OCO) funding. Such documents do not 
accurately depict how funds will be obligated and expended. 
Moreover, different operations within combatant commands are 
often combined and described as named operations, when they 
should be requested separately. The Committee rejects the 
notion that if the overall level for the sub-activity group 
remains level from one year into the next, that funding changes 
between named operations do not require further justification 
or budget documentation. All changes within sub-activity groups 
should be justified.
    The Committee directs the Secretary of Defense and the 
Service Secretaries to include in the fiscal year budget 2022 
request for OCO funding a breakout for each named operation, 
including a comparison of funds for such operations for the 
previous two fiscal years; the number of personnel associated 
with such funds; and a description of the direct war, enduring, 
or base funding being requested. Such information should be 
included in unclassified form but may be accompanied by a 
classified annex to the budget submission. The Secretary of 
Defense is also directed to consult with the House and Senate 
Appropriations Committees not later than 30 days after the 
enactment of this Act and prior to the submission of the budget 
request.

                           MILITARY PERSONNEL

    The Committee recommends an additional appropriation of 
$4,602,593,000 for Military Personnel. The Committee 
recommendation for each military personnel account is as 
follows:


                       OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE

    The Committee recommends an additional appropriation of 
$57,824,499,000 for Operation and Maintenance. The Committee 
recommendation for each operation and maintenance account is as 
follows:


                   GUANTANAMO BAY DETENTION FACILITY

    The Committee is concerned with the extraordinary costs 
associated with the Guantanamo Bay detention facility, which 
amounts to millions of dollars annually per detainee, and 
encourages a focus on reducing such costs in a responsible 
manner. The Committee directs the Secretary of Defense to 
submit a report to the House and Senate Appropriations 
Committees not later than 60 days after the enactment of this 
Act on the current number of detainees; their legal status; a 
description of all Department Defense costs associated with the 
facility during the last two fiscal years and planned for 
fiscal year 2021, by program, account, and activity; and 
recommendations to reduce such costs over the next three fiscal 
years. The Committee directs that the fiscal year 2022 budget 
request include a similar description of such costs and any 
associated cost savings measures planned for that fiscal year.

                 COMMANDERS' EMERGENCY RESPONSE PROGRAM

    The Committee recommendation provides that not more than 
$2,000,000 under Operation and Maintenance, Army may be used 
for the Commanders' Emergency Response Program. The Committee 
believes that after nearly two decades the time has come to 
wind down this program. The Committee directs the Secretary of 
Defense to transition program activities to the Afghanistan 
Security Forces and other agencies of the United States 
government, as appropriate, and to phase out this program 
during fiscal year 2021.

                EFFORTS TO MINIMIZE CIVILIAN CASUALTIES

    The Committee supports efforts by the Department of Defense 
to minimize civilian casualties and fully funds the request for 
resources to improve tracking of civilian casualties.

                           EX GRATIA PAYMENTS

    The Committee recommendation includes sufficient funding 
for the Office of the Secretary of Defense under Operation and 
Maintenance, Defense-Wide, for payments made to redress injury 
and loss pursuant to section 1213 of the National Defense 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2020.

                    AFGHANISTAN SECURITY FORCES FUND

    The Committee recommendation includes $3,047,612,000 for 
the Afghanistan Security Forces Fund and notes the significant 
unobligated balances from prior year appropriations.
    The Committee recognizes the sacrifices made by the members 
of the Afghanistan Security Forces and the recommendation 
provides the support necessary for such forces to continue to 
defend their country. The Committee notes the gains made in 
Afghanistan and the significant investments made by the United 
States and coalition partners in the Afghanistan Security 
Forces over nearly two decades.
    The Committee supports efforts to bring peace to 
Afghanistan but notes the considerable uncertainty associated 
with the conflict, including the current level of violence and 
with respect to intra-Afghan negotiations. Irrespective of the 
outcome of these efforts, the Committee believes that certain 
conditions must be in place for United States assistance under 
this heading to continue. Accordingly, the Committee 
recommendation provides that funds appropriated under this 
heading for the Afghanistan Security Forces may only be 
obligated if the Secretary of Defense, in consultation with the 
Secretary of State, certifies in writing to the congressional 
defense committees that such forces are controlled by a 
civilian, representative government that is protecting human 
rights and women's rights and preventing terrorists and 
terrorist groups from using the territory of Afghanistan to 
threaten the security of the United States and United States 
allies.
    The Committee recommendation does not include funding for 
major capital projects, major upgrades, or the procurement of 
new systems, including the procurement of ten CH-47 
helicopters. The recommendation also includes modified language 
prohibiting funds for the transfer of additional C-130 cargo 
aircraft to the Afghanistan National Security Forces or the 
Afghanistan Air Force.
    The Committee recommendation includes funding for 
Afghanistan security personnel at their current levels, rather 
than authorized levels. The recommendation fully funds the 
request for the Afghanistan Personnel and Pay System and 
provides funding only for personnel who are enrolled in the 
system. The Committee also supports the use of identification 
cards, biometrics, and other measures to prevent fraud. The 
Committee directs the Secretary of Defense to submit a report 
to the congressional defense committees not later than 90 days 
after the enactment of this Act on efforts to reduce corruption 
in the Afghanistan Security Forces, including through programs 
and technologies supported under this heading.
    The Committee recommendation provides not less than 
$20,000,000 for the recruitment and retention of women in the 
Afghanistan National Security Forces, and the recruitment and 
training of female security personnel, which is twice the 
amount specified in the Department of Defense Appropriations 
Act, 2020. The Committee directs the Secretary of Defense to 
submit a report to the congressional defense committees not 
later than 45 days after the enactment of this Act describing 
the proposed use of such funds, including programmatic details, 
personnel targets, and other goals and objectives to be 
achieved with this funding.
    The Committee recommendation includes funding for items to 
reduce Afghanistan Security Forces casualties, including 
equipment for explosive ordnance disposal and to counter 
improvised explosive devices.
    The Committee supports the efforts of the Combined Security 
Transition Command-Afghanistan to transition costs of items 
such as fuel from the United States to the Government of 
Afghanistan. The Committee recommendation assumes the 
transition of additional items, including funding requested for 
civilian pay for the Ministry of Defense not funded during 
fiscal year 2020; funding for sustainment/general operations 
not funded during fiscal year 2020; and a portion of funding 
for facilities sustainment, restoration, and modernization.
    The Committee remains interested in the details of the 
conditions-based withdrawal of United States and coalition 
forces from Afghanistan. Not later than 30 days after the 
enactment of this Act and quarterly thereafter, the Committee 
directs the Secretary of Defense, in coordination with the 
Director of National Intelligence, to submit a report to the 
congressional defense committees on United States coalition 
personnel in Afghanistan and the current conditions of the 
conflict, including metrics related to the peace agreement and 
an assessment of whether the Taliban is adhering to its 
commitments under the agreement.
    The Committee recommendation continues language prohibiting 
funds for any member of the Taliban except to support a 
reconciliation activity that includes the participation of 
members of the Government of Afghanistan, does not restrict the 
participation of women, and is authorized by section 1218 of 
the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2020.
    The Committee is concerned about reports that Russian 
military intelligence units secretly offered bounties to 
Taliban-linked militants for killing United States and 
coalition forces in Afghanistan. The Committee directs the 
Secretary of Defense, in coordination with the Director of 
National Intelligence, to submit an assessment and report to 
the congressional defense committees not later than 30 days 
after the enactment of this Act, on Russia's malign activities 
in Afghanistan, including activities specifically directed 
against United States and coalition forces in Afghanistan; any 
damage done by such activities; and measures taken or planned 
by the Administration in response.
    The Committee notes the recent statements made by the 
Administration to reduce funding previously appropriated by 
Congress for Afghanistan due to the political situation in that 
country. The Committee is not aware of any specific statutory 
authority that would allow the withholding of funding provided 
under this heading for such purposes. The Committee notes the 
January 2020 decision by the Government Accountability Office 
regarding the withholding of funds in violation of the 
Impoundment Control Act.

                   COUNTER-ISIS TRAIN AND EQUIP FUND

    The Committee recommendation includes $700,000,000 for the 
Counter-ISIS Train and Equip Fund. The Committee notes the 
significant unobligated balances from prior appropriations and 
the disruption of programs due to the COVID-19 pandemic.
    The Committee recognizes the gains made by the Global 
Coalition to Defeat the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria (ISIS) 
to liberate the territory once controlled by that terrorist 
organization. Nevertheless, the Committee is concerned by the 
continued threat of ISIS and the potential for ISIS to 
regenerate. The Committee recommendation continues support 
under this heading for the Iraqi Security Forces, Kurdish 
Peshmerga, and the Syrian Democratic Forces to participate in 
activities to counter ISIS. The Committee recommendation also 
continues the requirement that the Secretary of Defense ensure 
that elements are appropriately vetted and have made 
commitments to promote respect for human rights and the rule of 
law.
    The Committee recommendation continues enhanced 
notification and reporting requirements for funds provided 
under this heading, including the requirement for the Secretary 
of Defense to notify the congressional defense committees not 
fewer than 15 days prior to obligating funds. The Committee 
directs that such notifications include a description of the 
amount, type, and purpose of assistance to be funded and the 
recipient of the assistance; the budget and implementation 
timeline, with milestones and anticipated delivery schedule for 
such assistance; and a description of any material misuse of 
such assistance since the last notification was submitted, 
along with a description of any remedies taken by the 
Department of Defense. The first notification submitted for 
funds provided under this heading shall also include an 
explanation of how such funds will build security force 
capabilities, professionalize partner security forces, provide 
wide-area security, and promote long-term stability in the 
region.
    The Committee recommendation includes $500,000,000 to 
counter ISIS in Iraq, including support for units of the Iraqi 
Security Forces directly engaged in such efforts. The Committee 
recommendation also supports the Kurdish Peshmerga. In 
conjunction with the central government of Iraq, the Department 
of Defense should continue to provide the Peshmerga with the 
security capabilities necessary to help secure territory 
liberated from ISIS and to counter ISIS threats. Such support 
should include training, equipment, and operational support 
tailored to conditions on the ground. The Committee also notes 
that continued insecurity in northern Iraq has hindered the 
return of religious minorities and encourages a focus on 
programs that will increase security in these areas.
    The Committee recommendation includes $200,000,000 to 
counter ISIS in Syria, including support for units of the 
Syrian Democratic Forces directly engaged in such efforts.
    The Committee directs the Secretary of Defense to submit a 
report to the congressional defense committees not later than 
90 days after the enactment of this Act on measures taken to 
minimize civilian casualties and mitigate any negative impacts 
on the civilian population from the defeat ISIS campaign, 
including through training programs supported under this 
heading.
    The Committee notes that the mission of the Combined Joint 
Task Force Operation Inherent Resolve is to work by, with, and 
through regional partners to militarily defeat ISIS, not to 
guard oil fields. The Committee recommendation includes 
modified language in section 9007 prohibiting funds to exercise 
United States control over any oil resource of Iraq or Syria.
    The Committee recommendation continues the authority for 
the Secretary of Defense to provide infrastructure repair and 
renovation, and construction for facility fortification and 
humane treatment. The recommendation also allows the Secretary 
to accept and retain contributions from foreign governments and 
requires the Secretary to prioritize such contributions when 
providing any assistance for construction for facility 
fortification. The Committee directs that any congressional 
notification submitted for facility fortification include 
detailed information on the scope of proposed projects and 
information on contributions from partner nations, which should 
reflect no less than $3 for every $1 from the United States. 
The Committee directs the Secretary of Defense to consult with 
the House and Senate Appropriations Committees prior to 
submitting a notification for such projects.

                              PROCUREMENT

    The Committee recommends an additional appropriation of 
$6,473,543,000 for Procurement. The Committee recommendation 
for each procurement account is as follows:


              NATIONAL GUARD AND RESERVE EQUIPMENT ACCOUNT

    The Committee recommends $1,000,000,000 for the National 
Guard and Reserve Equipment Account. Of that amount, 
$300,000,000 is for the Army National Guard; $300,000,000 is 
for the Air National Guard; $160,000,000 is for the Army 
Reserve; $65,000,000 is for the Navy Reserve; $15,000,000 is 
for the Marine Corps Reserve; and $160,000,000 is for the Air 
Force Reserve to meet urgent equipment needs in the coming 
fiscal year.
    This funding will allow the National Guard and reserve 
components to procure high priority equipment used by these 
components for both their military missions and missions in 
support of State governors. The funding within this account is 
not to be used to procure equipment designated as high-density 
critical equipment, major weapon systems, aircraft, and other 
equipment central to a unit's ability to perform its doctrinal 
mission. The funding within this account is not to be used to 
procure equipment purchased by the senior Service, to expand or 
accelerate current Service procurement plans, to purchase 
expendable items, or to purchase facilities or equipment for 
any requirement able to be satisfied elsewhere.
    The Committee directs the Secretary of Defense to ensure 
that the National Guard and Reserve Equipment Account is 
executed by the Chiefs of the National Guard and reserve 
components with priority consideration given to the following 
items: acoustic hailing devices; airborne and ground detect and 
avoid systems; containerized ice making systems; crash-worthy, 
ballistically tolerant auxiliary fuel systems; counter-UAS 
systems; gamma radiation protection; helmet-mounted display 
system; hypervisor-based cross domain access solution; modular 
small arms ranges and small arms training simulators and tools; 
radiological screening portals; training systems and 
simulators; and virtual language training systems.

               RESEARCH, DEVELOPMENT, TEST AND EVALUATION

    The Committee recommends an additional appropriation of 
$321,508,000 for Research, Development, Test and Evaluation. 
The Committee recommendation for each research, development, 
test and evaluation account is as follows:


                     REVOLVING AND MANAGEMENT FUNDS


                     DEFENSE WORKING CAPITAL FUNDS

    The Committee recommends an additional appropriation of 
$20,090,000 for Defense Working Capital Funds.

                  OTHER DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE PROGRAMS


                         DEFENSE HEALTH PROGRAM

    The Committee recommends an additional appropriation of 
$365,098,000 for the Defense Health Program. The Committee 
recommendation is as follows:

                                    EXPLANATION OF PROJECT LEVEL ADJUSTMENTS
                                            [In thousands of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                        Budget       Committee      Change from
                                                                       Request      Recommended       Request
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
IN-HOUSE CARE......................................................       65,072          65,072               0
PRIVATE SECTOR CARE................................................      296,828         296,828               0
CONSOLIDATED HEALTH SUPPORT........................................        3,198           3,198               0
                                                                    --------------------------------------------
    TOTAL, OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE...............................      365,098         365,098               0
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

                    OFFICE OF THE INSPECTOR GENERAL

    The Committee recommends an additional appropriation of 
$24,069,000 for the Office of the Inspector General.

                           GENERAL PROVISIONS

    Title IX of the accompanying bill includes 30 general 
provisions, many of which extend or modify war-related 
authorities included in previous Acts. A brief description of 
each provision follows:
    Section 9001 has been amended and provides that funds made 
available in this title are in addition to funds appropriated 
or otherwise made available for the Department of Defense for 
fiscal year 2021.
    Section 9002 has been amended and provides for general 
transfer authority within title IX.
    Section 9003 provides that supervision and administration 
costs associated with a construction project funded with 
appropriations available for operation and maintenance or the 
Afghanistan Security Forces Fund may be obligated at the time a 
construction contract is awarded.
    Section 9004 provides for the procurement of passenger 
motor vehicles and heavy and light armored vehicles for use by 
military and civilian employees of the Department of Defense in 
the United States Central Command area.
    Section 9005 has been amended and provides funding for the 
Commanders' Emergency Response Program, with certain 
limitations.
    Section 9006 provides lift and sustainment to coalition 
forces supporting military and stability operations in Iraq and 
Afghanistan.
    Section 9007 has been amended and prohibits the 
establishment of permanent bases in Iraq or Afghanistan or 
United States control over Iraq or Syria oil resources.
    Section 9008 prohibits the use of funding in contravention 
of the United Nations Convention Against Torture and Other 
Cruel, Inhuman or Degrading Treatment or Punishment.
    Section 9009 limits the obligation of funding for the 
Afghanistan Security Forces Fund until certain conditions have 
been met.
    Section 9010 provides for the purchase of items of a 
particular investment unit cost from funding made available for 
operation and maintenance.
    Section 9011 provides security assistance to the Government 
of Jordan.
    Section 9012 has been amended and prohibits the use of 
funding under certain headings to procure or transfer man-
portable air defense systems.
    Section 9013 has been amended and provides assistance to 
the military and national security forces of Ukraine.
    Section 9014 provides replacement funds for items provided 
to the Government of Ukraine from the inventory of the United 
States.
    Section 9015 prohibits the use of funds to provide arms, 
training, or other assistance to the Azov Battalion.
    Section 9016 has been amended and provides for the transfer 
of excess equipment to foreign forces receiving equipment 
through the Counter-ISIS Train and Equip Fund.
    Section 9017 has been amended and restricts funds provided 
for reimbursement to the Government of Pakistan for border 
security operations until certain conditions are met.
    Section 9018 prohibits the use of funds with respect to 
Iraq in contravention of the War Powers Resolution.
    Section 9019 prohibits the use of funds with respect to 
Syria in contravention of the War Powers Resolution.
    Section 9020 has been amended and prohibits the transfer of 
additional C-130 cargo aircraft to the Afghanistan National 
Security Forces or Afghanistan Air Force.
    Section 9021 has been amended and requires the Secretary of 
Defense to certify the use of funds in the Afghanistan Security 
Forces Fund under certain conditions.
    Section 9022 has been amended and restricts funds provided 
in this Act for any member of the Taliban.
    Section 9023 provides that nothing in this Act may be 
construed as authorizing the use of force against Iran.
    Section 9024 is new and requires the Secretary to provide a 
notification when a foreign base is open or closed.
    Section 9025 has been amended and provides funds to the 
Department of Defense to improve near-term intelligence, 
surveillance, and reconnaissance capabilities.

                             (RESCISSIONS)

    Section 9026 has been amended and provides for the 
rescission of $1,446,400,000 from the following programs:

 
 
 
2019 Appropriations:
    Aircraft Procurement, Air Force:
        B-52 infrared threat defense UON..............       $16,400,000
2020 Appropriations:
    Operation and Maintenance, Defense-Wide:
        Defense Security Cooperation Account..........        80,000,000
    Afghanistan Security Forces Fund:
        Afghanistan Security Forces Fund..............     1,100,000,000
    Counter-ISIS Train and Equip Fund:
        Counter-ISIS Train and Equip Fund.............       250,000,000
 

    Section 9027 requires the President to designate overseas 
contingency operations/global war on terrorism funds.
    Section 9028 is new and repeals the 2001 Authorization for 
Use of Military Force (P.L. 107-40) 240 days after the date of 
the enactment of this Act.
    Section 9029 is new and repeals the Authorization for Use 
of Military Force Against Iraq Resolution of 2002 (Public Law 
107-243).
    Section 9030 is new and prohibits funds in the Act for any 
use of military force in or against Iran, with certain 
exceptions.

            HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES REPORTING REQUIREMENTS

    The following items are included in accordance with various 
requirements of the Rules of the House of Representatives:

         STATEMENT OF GENERAL PERFORMANCE GOALS AND OBJECTIVES

    Pursuant to clause 3(c)(4) of rule XIII of the Rules of the 
House of Representatives, the following is a statement of 
general performance goals and objectives for which this measure 
authorizes funding:
    The Committee on Appropriations considers program 
performance, including a program's success in developing and 
attaining outcome-related goals and objectives, in developing 
funding recommendations.

                              RESCISSIONS

    Pursuant to clause 3(f)(2) of rule XIII of the Rules of the 
House or Representatives, the following table is submitted 
describing the rescissions recommended in the accompanying 
bill:

------------------------------------------------------------------------
 
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Procurement of Weapons and Tracked Combat                    $14,250,000
 Vehicles, Army, 2019/2021.....................
Other Procurement, Army, 2019/2021.............               12,953,000
Aircraft Procurement, Navy, 2019/2021..........                7,983,000
Other Procurement, Navy, 2019/2021.............                2,226,000
Aircraft Procurement, Air Force, 2019/2021.....              236,624,000
Other Procurement, Air Force, 2019/2021........               12,400,000
Operation and Maintenance, Defense-Wide: DSCA                 20,000,000
 Security Cooperation Account, 2020/2021.......
Procurement of Weapons and Tracked Combat                     93,840,000
 Vehicles, Army, 2020/2022.....................
Other Procurement, Army, 2020/2022.............               10,878,000
Aircraft Procurement, Navy, 2020/2022..........              351,009,000
Shipbuilding and Conversion, Navy: TAO Fleet                  73,000,000
 Oiler AP, 2020/2024...........................
Shipbuilding and Conversion, Navy: CVN                        13,100,000
 Refueling Overhauls, 2020/2024................
Other Procurement, Navy, 2020/2022.............               60,920,000
Procurement, Marine Corps, 2020/2022...........               33,539,000
Aircraft Procurement, Air Force, 2020/2022.....              439,458,000
Missile Procurement, Air Force, 2020/2022......               24,500,000
Other Procurement, Air Force, 2020/2022........               11,226,000
Research, Development, Test and Evaluation,                  310,622,000
 Army, 2020/2021...............................
Research, Development, Test and Evaluation,                   70,000,000
 Navy, 2020/2021...............................
Research, Development, Test and Evaluation, Air              219,341,000
 Force, 2020/2021..............................
Research, Development, Test and Evaluation,                  323,231,000
 Defense-Wide, 2020/2021.......................
Defense Working Capital Fund: Defense                        150,000,000
 Counterintelligence and Security Agency
 Working Capital Fund, 2020/20XX...............
Overseas Contingency Operations/Global War on
 Terrorism:
Aircraft Procurement, Air Force, 2019/2021.....              $16,400,000
Operation and Maintenance, Defense-Wide:                      80,000,000
 Defense Security Cooperation Account, 2020/
 2021..........................................
Afghanistan Security Forces Fund, 2020/2021....            1,100,000,000
Counter-ISIS Train and Equip Fund, 2020/2021...              250,000,000
------------------------------------------------------------------------

                           TRANSFER OF FUNDS

    Pursuant to clause 3(f)(2) of rule XIII of the Rules of the 
House of Representatives, the following is submitted describing 
the transfer of funds provided in the accompanying bill.
    Language has been included under ``Operation and 
Maintenance, Defense-Wide'' which provides for the transfer of 
funds for certain classified activities.
    Language has been included under ``Environmental 
Restoration, Army'' which provides for the transfer of funds 
for environmental restoration, reduction and recycling of 
hazardous waste, removal of unsafe buildings and debris, or for 
similar purposes.
    Language has been included under ``Environmental 
Restoration, Navy'' which provides for the transfer of funds 
for environmental restoration, reduction and recycling of 
hazardous waste, removal of unsafe buildings and debris, or for 
similar purposes.
    Language has been included under ``Environmental 
Restoration, Air Force'' which provides for the transfer of 
funds for environmental restoration, reduction and recycling of 
hazardous waste, removal of unsafe buildings and debris, or for 
similar purposes.
    Language has been included under ``Environmental 
Restoration, Defense-Wide'' which provides for the transfer of 
funds for environmental restoration, reduction and recycling of 
hazardous waste, removal of unsafe buildings and debris, or for 
similar purposes.
    Language has been included under ``Environmental 
Restoration, Formerly Used Defense Sites'' which provides for 
the transfer of funds for environmental restoration, reduction 
and recycling of hazardous waste, removal of unsafe buildings 
and debris, or for similar purposes.
    Language has been included under ``Drug Interdiction and 
Counter-Drug Activities, Defense'' which provides for the 
transfer of funds to appropriations available to the Department 
of Defense for military personnel of the reserve components; 
for operation and maintenance; for procurement; and for 
research, development, test and evaluation for drug 
interdiction and counter-drug activities of the Department of 
Defense.
    Language has been included under ``General Provisions, Sec. 
8005'' which provides for the transfer of working capital funds 
to other appropriations accounts of the Department of Defense 
for military functions.
    Language has been included under ``General Provisions, Sec. 
8008'' which provides for the transfer of funds between working 
capital funds and the ``Foreign Currency Fluctuations, 
Defense'' appropriation and the operation and maintenance 
appropriation accounts.
    Language has been included under ``General Provisions, Sec. 
8015'' which provides for the transfer of funds from the 
Department of Defense Pilot Mentor-Protege Program to any other 
appropriation for the purposes of implementing a Mentor-Protege 
Program development assistance agreement.
    Language has been included under ``General Provisions, Sec. 
8051'' which provides for the transfer of funds from 
``Operation and Maintenance, Defense-Wide'' to appropriations 
available for the pay of military personnel in connection with 
support and services of eligible organizations and activities 
outside the Department of Defense.
    Language has been included under ``General Provisions, Sec. 
8054'' which provides for the transfer of funds from 
``Operation and Maintenance, Defense-Wide'' to the Department 
of the Army, the Department of the Navy, and the Department of 
the Air Force to support the Sexual Assault Special Victims' 
Counsel Program.
    Language has been included under ``General Provisions, Sec. 
8063'' which provides for the transfer of funds from 
``Operation and Maintenance, Army'' to other activities of the 
federal government.
    Language has been included under ``General Provisions, Sec. 
8066'' which provides for the transfer of funds from 
``Operation and Maintenance, Navy'' to the John C. Stennis 
Center for Public Service Development Trust Fund.
    Language has been included under ``General Provisions, Sec. 
8069'' which provides for the transfer of funds from 
``Procurement, Defense-Wide'' and ``Research, Development, Test 
and Evaluation, Defense-Wide'' for the Israeli Cooperative 
Programs.
    Language has been included under ``General Provisions, Sec. 
8070'' which provides for the transfer of funds from 
``Shipbuilding and Conversion, Navy'' to fund prior year 
shipbuilding cost increases.
    Language has been included under ``General Provisions, Sec. 
8087'' which provides for the transfer of funds from 
``Operation and Maintenance, Army'', ``Operation and 
Maintenance, Navy'', and ``Operation and Maintenance, Air 
Force'' to the central fund established for Fisher Houses and 
Suites.
    Language has been included under ``General Provisions, Sec. 
8091'' which provides for the transfer of funds appropriated 
for operation and maintenance for the Defense Health Program to 
the Joint Department of Defense-Department of Veterans Affairs 
Medical Facility Demonstration Fund.
    Language has been included under ``General Provisions, Sec. 
8094'' which provides for the transfer of funds for the 
National Intelligence Program.
    Language has been included under ``General Provisions, Sec. 
8110'' which provides for the transfer of funds from 
``Operation and Maintenance, Defense-Wide'' for elementary and 
secondary public schools on military installations.
    Language has been included under title IX ``General 
Provisions, Sec. 9002'' which provides for the authority to 
transfer funds between the appropriations or funds made 
available to the Department of Defense in title IX, subject to 
certain conditions.
    Language has been included under title IX ``General 
Provisions, Sec. 9025'' which provides for the transfer of 
funds to the operation and maintenance, military personnel, and 
procurement accounts, to improve the intelligence, 
surveillance, and reconnaissance capabilities of the Department 
of Defense.

                      EARMARK DISCLOSURE STATEMENT

    Neither the bill nor the report contains any congressional 
earmarks, limited tax benefits, or limited tariff benefits as 
defined in Clause 9 of rule XXI.

          Compliance With Rule XIII, Cl. 3(e) (Ramseyer Rule)

    In compliance with clause 3(e) of rule XIII of the Rules of 
the House of Representatives, changes in existing law made by 
the bill, as reported, is shown as follows (existing law 
proposed to be omitted is enclosed in black brackets):

                AUTHORIZATION FOR USE OF MILITARY FORCE

    Joint Resolution To authorize the use of United States Armed Forces 
against those responsible for the recent attacks launched against the 
United States.

[Whereas, on September 11, 2001, acts of treacherous violence 
        were committed against the United States and its 
        citizens; and
[Whereas, such acts render it both necessary and appropriate 
        that the United States exercise its rights to self-
        defense and to protect United States citizens both at 
        home and abroad; and
[Whereas, in light of the threat to the national security and 
        foreign policy of the United States posed by these 
        grave acts of violence; and
[Whereas, such acts continue to pose an unusual and 
        extraordinary threat to the national security and 
        foreign policy of the United States; and
[Whereas, the President has authority under the Constitution to 
        take action to deter and prevent acts of international 
        terrorism against the United States: Now, therefore, be 
        it
    [Resolved by the Senate and House of Representatives of the 
United States of America in Congress assembled,

[SECTION 1. SHORT TITLE.

    [This joint resolution may be cited as the ``Authorization 
for Use of Military Force''.

[SEC. 2. AUTHORIZATION FOR USE OF UNITED STATES ARMED FORCES.

    [(a) In General.--That the President is authorized to use 
all necessary and appropriate force against those nations, 
organizations, or persons he determines planned, authorized, 
committed, or aided the terrorist attacks that occurred on 
September 11, 2001, or harbored such organizations or persons, 
in order to prevent any future acts of international terrorism 
against the United States by such nations, organizations or 
persons.
    [(b) War Powers Resolution Requirements.--
          [(1) Specific statutory authorization.--Consistent 
        with section 8(a)(1) of the War Powers Resolution, the 
        Congress declares that this section is intended to 
        constitute specific statutory authorization within the 
        meaning of section 5(b) of the War Powers Resolution.
          [(2) Applicability of other requirements.--Nothing in 
        this resolution supercedes any requirement of the War 
        Powers Resolution.]
                              ----------                              


AUTHORIZATION FOR USE OF MILITARY FORCE AGAINST IRAQ RESOLUTION OF 2002

    Joint Resolution To authorize the use of United States Armed Forces 
against Iraq.

[Whereas in 1990 in response to Iraq's war of aggression 
        against and illegal occupation of Kuwait, the United 
        States forged a coalition of nations to liberate Kuwait 
        and its people in order to defend the national security 
        of the United States and enforce United Nations 
        Security Council resolutions relating to Iraq;
[Whereas after the liberation of Kuwait in 1991, Iraq entered 
        into a United Nations sponsored cease-fire agreement 
        pursuant to which Iraq unequivocally agreed, among 
        other things, to eliminate its nuclear, biological, and 
        chemical weapons programs and the means to deliver and 
        develop them, and to end its support for international 
        terrorism;
[Whereas the efforts of international weapons inspectors, 
        United States intelligence agencies, and Iraqi 
        defectors led to the discovery that Iraq had large 
        stockpiles of chemical weapons and a large scale 
        biological weapons program, and that Iraq had an 
        advanced nuclear weapons development program that was 
        much closer to producing a nuclear weapon than 
        intelligence reporting had previously indicated;
[Whereas Iraq, in direct and flagrant violation of the cease-
        fire, attempted to thwart the efforts of weapons 
        inspectors to identify and destroy Iraq's weapons of 
        mass destruction stockpiles and development 
        capabilities, which finally resulted in the withdrawal 
        of inspectors from Iraq on October 31, 1998;
[Whereas in Public Law 105-235 (August 14, 1998), Congress 
        concluded that Iraq's continuing weapons of mass 
        destruction programs threatened vital United States 
        interests and international peace and security, 
        declared Iraq to be in ``material and unacceptable 
        breach of its international obligations'' and urged the 
        President ``to take appropriate action, in accordance 
        with the Constitution and relevant laws of the United 
        States, to bring Iraq into compliance with its 
        international obligations'';
[Whereas Iraq both poses a continuing threat to the national 
        security of the United States and international peace 
        and security in the Persian Gulf region and remains in 
        material and unacceptable breach of its international 
        obligations by, among other things, continuing to 
        possess and develop a significant chemical and 
        biological weapons capability, actively seeking a 
        nuclear weapons capability, and supporting and 
        harboring terrorist organizations;
[Whereas Iraq persists in violating resolution of the United 
        Nations Security Council by continuing to engage in 
        brutal repression of its civilian population thereby 
        threatening international peace and security in the 
        region, by refusing to release, repatriate, or account 
        for non-Iraqi citizens wrongfully detained by Iraq, 
        including an American serviceman, and by failing to 
        return property wrongfully seized by Iraq from Kuwait;
[Whereas the current Iraqi regime has demonstrated its 
        capability and willingness to use weapons of mass 
        destruction against other nations and its own people;
[Whereas the current Iraqi regime has demonstrated its 
        continuing hostility toward, and willingness to attack, 
        the United States, including by attempting in 1993 to 
        assassinate former President Bush and by firing on many 
        thousands of occasions on United States and Coalition 
        Armed Forces engaged in enforcing the resolutions of 
        the United Nations Security Council;
[Whereas members of al Qaida, an organization bearing 
        responsibility for attacks on the United States, its 
        citizens, and interests, including the attacks that 
        occurred on September 11, 2001, are known to be in 
        Iraq;
[Whereas Iraq continues to aid and harbor other international 
        terrorist organizations, including organizations that 
        threaten the lives and safety of United States 
        citizens;
[Whereas the attacks on the United States of September 11, 
        2001, underscored the gravity of the threat posed by 
        the acquisition of weapons of mass destruction by 
        international terrorist organizations;
[Whereas Iraq's demonstrated capability and willingness to use 
        weapons of mass destruction, the risk that the current 
        Iraqi regime will either employ those weapons to launch 
        a surprise attack against the United States or its 
        Armed Forces or provide them to international 
        terrorists who would do so, and the extreme magnitude 
        of harm that would result to the United States and its 
        citizens from such an attack, combine to justify action 
        by the United States to defend itself;
[Whereas United Nations Security Council Resolution 678 (1990) 
        authorizes the use of all necessary means to enforce 
        United Nations Security Council Resolution 660 (1990) 
        and subsequent relevant resolutions and to compel Iraq 
        to cease certain activities that threaten international 
        peace and security, including the development of 
        weapons of mass destruction and refusal or obstruction 
        of United Nations weapons inspections in violation of 
        United Nations Security Council Resolution 687 (1991), 
        repression of its civilian population in violation of 
        United Nations Security Council Resolution 688 (1991), 
        and threatening its neighbors or United Nations 
        operations in Iraq in violation of United Nations 
        Security Council Resolution 949 (1994);
[Whereas in the Authorization for Use of Military Force Against 
        Iraq Resolution (Public Law 102-1), Congress has 
        authorized the President ``to use United States Armed 
        Forces pursuant to United Nations Security Council 
        Resolution 678 (1990) in order to achieve 
        implementation of Security Council Resolution 660, 661, 
        662, 664, 665, 666, 667, 669, 670, 674, and 677'';
[Whereas in December 1991, Congress expressed its sense that it 
        ``supports the use of all necessary means to achieve 
        the goals of United Nations Security Council Resolution 
        687 as being consistent with the Authorization of Use 
        of Military Force Against Iraq Resolution (Public Law 
        102-1),'' that Iraq's repression of its civilian 
        population violates United Nations Security Council 
        Resolution 688 and ``constitutes a continuing threat to 
        the peace, security, and stability of the Persian Gulf 
        region,'' and that Congress, ``supports the use of all 
        necessary means to achieve the goals of United Nations 
        Security Council Resolution 688'';
[Whereas the Iraq Liberation Act of 1998 (Public Law 105-338) 
        expressed the sense of Congress that it should be the 
        policy of the United States to support efforts to 
        remove from power the current Iraqi regime and promote 
        the emergence of a democratic government to replace 
        that regime;
[Whereas on September 12, 2002, President Bush committed the 
        United States to ``work with the United Nations 
        Security Council to meet our common challenge'' posed 
        by Iraq and to ``work for the necessary resolutions,'' 
        while also making clear that ``the Security Council 
        resolutions will be enforced, and the just demands of 
        peace and security will be met, or action will be 
        unavoidable'';
[Whereas the United States is determined to prosecute the war 
        on terrorism and Iraq's ongoing support for 
        international terrorist groups combined with its 
        development of weapons of mass destruction in direct 
        violation of its obligations under the 1991 cease-fire 
        and other United Nations Security Council resolutions 
        make clear that it is in the national security 
        interests of the United States and in furtherance of 
        the war on terrorism that all relevant United Nations 
        Security Council resolutions be enforced, including 
        through the use of force if necessary;
[Whereas Congress has taken steps to pursue vigorously the war 
        on terrorism through the provision of authorities and 
        funding requested by the President to take the 
        necessary actions against international terrorists and 
        terrorist organizations, including those nations, 
        organizations, or persons who planned, authorized, 
        committed, or aided the terrorist attacks that occurred 
        on September 11, 2001, or harbored such persons or 
        organizations;
[Whereas the President and Congress are determined to continue 
        to take all appropriate actions against international 
        terrorists and terrorist organizations, including those 
        nations, organizations, or persons who planned, 
        authorized, committed, or aided the terrorist attacks 
        that occurred on September 11, 2001, or harbored such 
        persons or organizations;
[Whereas the President has authority under the Constitution to 
        take action in order to deter and prevent acts of 
        international terrorism against the United States, as 
        Congress recognized in the joint resolution on 
        Authorization for Use of Military Force (Public Law 
        107-40); and
[Whereas it is in the national security interests of the United 
        States to restore international peace and security to 
        the Persian Gulf region: Now, therefore, be it
    [Resolved by the Senate and House of Representatives of the 
United States of America in Congress assembled,

[SECTION 1. SHORT TITLE.

    [This joint resolution may be cited as the ``Authorization 
for Use of Military Force Against Iraq Resolution of 2002''.

[SEC. 2. SUPPORT FOR UNITED STATES DIPLOMATIC EFFORTS.

    [The Congress of the United States supports the efforts by 
the President to--
          [(1) strictly enforce through the United Nations 
        Security Council all relevant Security Council 
        resolutions regarding Iraq and encourages him in those 
        efforts; and
          [(2) obtain prompt and decisive action by the 
        Security Council to ensure that Iraq abandons its 
        strategy of delay, evasion and noncompliance and 
        promptly and strictly complies with all relevant 
        Security Council resolutions regarding Iraq.

[SEC. 3. AUTHORIZATION FOR USE OF UNITED STATES ARMED FORCES.

    [(a) Authorization.--The President is authorized to use the 
Armed Forces of the United States as he determines to be 
necessary and appropriate in order to--
          [(1) defend the national security of the United 
        States against the continuing threat posed by Iraq; and
          [(2) enforce all relevant United Nations Security 
        Council resolutions regarding Iraq.
    [(b) Presidential Determination.--In connection with the 
exercise of the authority granted in subsection (a) to use 
force the President shall, prior to such exercise or as soon 
thereafter as may be feasible, but no later than 48 hours after 
exercising such authority, make available to the Speaker of the 
House of Representatives and the President pro tempore of the 
Senate his determination that--
          [(1) reliance by the United States on further 
        diplomatic or other peaceful means alone either (A) 
        will not adequately protect the national security of 
        the United States against the continuing threat posed 
        by Iraq or (B) is not likely to lead to enforcement of 
        all relevant United Nations Security Council 
        resolutions regarding Iraq; and
          [(2) acting pursuant to this joint resolution is 
        consistent with the United States and other countries 
        continuing to take the necessary actions against 
        international terrorist and terrorist organizations, 
        including those nations, organizations, or persons who 
        planned, authorized, committed or aided the terrorist 
        attacks that occurred on September 11, 2001.
    [(c) War Powers Resolution Requirements.--
          [(1) Specific statutory authorization.--Consistent 
        with section 8(a)(1) of the War Powers Resolution, the 
        Congress declares that this section is intended to 
        constitute specific statutory authorization within the 
        meaning of section 5(b) of the War Powers Resolution.
          [(2) Applicability of other requirements.--Nothing in 
        this joint resolution supersedes any requirement of the 
        War Powers Resolution.

[SEC. 4. REPORTS TO CONGRESS.

        [(a) Reports.--The President shall, at least once every 
        60 days, submit to the Congress a report on matters 
        relevant to this joint resolution, including actions 
        taken pursuant to the exercise of authority granted in 
        section 3 and the status of planning for efforts that 
        are expected to be required after such actions are 
        completed, including those actions described in section 
        7 of the Iraq Liberation Act of 1998 (Public Law 105-
        338).
    [(b) Single Consolidated Report.--To the extent that the 
submission of any report described in subsection (a) coincides 
with the submission of any other report on matters relevant to 
this joint resolution otherwise required to be submitted to 
Congress pursuant to the reporting requirements of the War 
Powers Resolution (Public Law 93-148), all such reports may be 
submitted as a single consolidated report to the Congress.
    [(c) Rule of Construction.--To the extent that the 
information required by section 3 of the Authorization for Use 
of Military Force Against Iraq Resolution (Public Law 102-1) is 
included in the report required by this section, such report 
shall be considered as meeting the requirements of section 3 of 
such resolution.]

               CHANGES IN THE APPLICATION OF EXISTING LAW

    Pursuant to clause 3(f)(1)(A) of rule XIII of the Rules of 
the House of Representatives, the following statements are 
submitted describing the effect of provisions in the 
accompanying bill which directly or indirectly change the 
application of existing law.
    Language is included in various parts of the bill to 
continue ongoing activities which require annual authorization 
or additional legislation, which to date has not been enacted.
    The bill includes a number of provisions which place 
limitations on the use of funds in the bill or change existing 
limitations and which might, under some circumstances, be 
construed as changing the application of law.
    The bill includes a number of provisions which provide for 
the transfer of funds and which might, under some 
circumstances, be construed as changing the application of law.
    The bill includes a number of provisions, which have been 
virtually unchanged for many years that are technically 
considered legislation.
    The bill provides that appropriations shall remain 
available for more than one year for some programs for which 
the basic authorizing legislation does not presently authorize 
each extended availability.
    In various places in the bill, the Committee has allocated 
funds within appropriation accounts in order to fund specific 
programs.
    Language is included in various accounts placing a 
limitation on funds for emergencies and extraordinary expenses.
    Language is included that provides not more than $6,859,000 
for the Combatant Commander Initiative Fund.
    Language is included that provides not less than 
$48,000,000 for the Procurement Technical Assistance 
Cooperative Agreement Program, of which not less than 
$4,500,000 shall be available for centers.
    Language is included that prohibits the consolidation of 
certain legislative affairs or liaison offices.
    Language is included that makes available $17,732,000 for 
certain classified activities, allows such funds to be 
transferred between certain accounts, and exempts such funds 
from the investment item unit cost ceiling.
    Language is included that makes funds available to provide 
support to foreign security forces and other groups, and makes 
a portion of the funds available for two years.
    Language is included that limits the use of funds for 
official representation purposes under the heading ``United 
States Court of Appeals for the Armed Forces''.
    Language is included that limits funds credited or 
transferred to the Department of Defense Acquisition Workforce 
Development Account.
    Language is included that provides for specific 
construction, acquisition, or conversion of vessels under the 
heading ``Shipbuilding and Conversion, Navy''.
    Language is included that provides for the incurring of 
additional obligations for certain activities under the heading 
``Shipbuilding and Conversion, Navy''.
    Language is included that prohibits the use of funds 
provided under the heading ``Shipbuilding and Conversion, 
Navy'' for the construction of any naval vessel, or the 
construction of major components for the construction or 
conversion of any naval vessel, in foreign facilities or 
shipyards.
    Language is included under the heading ``Shipbuilding and 
Conversion, Navy'' that allows funds to be available for 
multiyear procurement of critical components to support the 
common missile compartment of nuclear-powered vessels.
    Language is included under the heading ``National Guard and 
Reserve Equipment Account'' providing for the procurement of 
certain items and the submission of modernization priority 
assessments.
    Language is included under the heading ``Research, 
Development, Test and Evaluation, Navy'' that provides funds 
for certain activities related to the V-22.
    Language is included that specifies the use of certain 
funds provided under the heading ``Defense Health Program''.
    Language is included that provides that not less than 
$8,000,000 of funds provided under the heading ``Defense Health 
Program'' shall be available for HIV/AIDS prevention 
educational activities.
    Language is included that provides for the carry-over of no 
more than one percent of operation and maintenance funds 
provided under the heading ``Defense Health Program''.
    Language is included under the heading ``Defense Health 
Program'' that provides that not less than $1,020,500,000 shall 
be made available to the U.S. Army Medical Research and 
Materiel Command to carry out congressionally directed medical 
research programs.
    Language is included that specifies the use of certain 
funds provided under the heading ``Chemical Agents and 
Munitions Destruction, Defense''.
    Language is included that specifies the use of certain 
funds provided under the heading ``Drug-Interdiction and 
Counter-Drug Activities, Defense''.
    Language is included that provides that no funds made 
available in this Act may be used for publicity or propaganda 
purposes not authorized by Congress.
    Language is included that provides for conditions and 
limitations on the payment of compensation to, or employment 
of, foreign nationals.
    Language is included that provides that no funds made 
available in this Act may be obligated beyond the end of the 
fiscal year unless expressly provided for a greater period of 
availability elsewhere in this Act.
    Language is included that limits the obligation of certain 
funds provided in this Act during the last two months of the 
fiscal year.
    Language is included that provides for the general transfer 
authority of funds to other military functions.
    Language is included that the tables titled ``Explanation 
of Project Level Adjustments'' in this report and classified 
annex shall be carried out in the manner provided by the tables 
to the same extent as if the tables were included in the text 
of this Act.
    Language is included that provides for the establishment of 
a baseline for application of reprogramming and transfer 
authorities for fiscal year 2021.
    Language is included that provides for limitations on the 
use and transfer of working capital fund cash balances.
    Language is included that prohibits the use of funds 
appropriated by this Act to initiate a special access program 
without prior notification to the congressional defense 
committees.
    Language is included that provides limitations and 
conditions on the use of funds provided in this Act to initiate 
multi-year procurement contracts.
    Language is included that provides for the use and 
obligation of funds for humanitarian and civic assistance 
costs.
    Language is included that provides that civilian personnel 
of the Department of Defense may not be managed on the basis of 
end strength or be subject to end strength limitations and sets 
forth certain requirements related to end strength for the 
budget submission.
    Language is included that prohibits funds made available in 
this Act from being used to influence congressional action on 
matters pending before the Congress.
    Language is included that prohibits the use of funds to pay 
compensation to any member of the Army participating as a full-
time student and receiving benefits from the Education Benefits 
Fund when time spent as a full-time student is counted toward 
that member's service commitment, with certain exceptions.
    Language is included that provides for the transfer of 
funds appropriated in title III of this Act for the Department 
of Defense Pilot Mentor-Protege Program.
    Language is included that provides for the Department of 
Defense to purchase anchor and mooring chains manufactured only 
in the United States.
    Language is included that provides that no funds made 
available in this Act shall be used for the support of any 
nonappropriated funds activity of the Department of Defense 
that procures malt beverages and wine.
    Language is included that prohibits the use of funds made 
available to the Department of Defense to demilitarize or 
destroy surplus firearms or small arms ammunition except under 
certain circumstances.
    Language is included that provides a limitation on the use 
of funds for the relocation of any Department of Defense entity 
into or within the National Capital Region.
    Language is included that provides for incentive payments 
authorized by section 504 of the Indian Financing Act of 1974 
(25 U.S.C. 1544).
    Language is included that provides that no funds made 
available by this Act for the Defense Media Activity may be 
used for national or international political or psychological 
activities.
    Language is included that provides for the obligation of 
funds for purposes specified in section 2350j(c) of title 10, 
United States Code, in anticipation of receipt of contributions 
from the Government of Kuwait.
    Language is included that requires notification of the 
receipt of contributions from foreign governments.
    Language is included that provides funding for the Civil 
Air Patrol Corporation.
    Language is included that prohibits funding from being used 
to establish new Department of Defense Federally Funded 
Research and Development Centers (FFRDC), with certain 
limitations, and increases funding provided for FFRDCs.
    Language is included that provides for the Department of 
Defense to procure carbon, alloy, or armor steel plate melted 
and rolled only in the United States or Canada.
    Language is included that defines congressional defense 
committees for the purposes of this Act.
    Language is included that provides for competitions between 
private firms and Department of Defense Depot Maintenance 
Activities for modification, depot maintenance, and repair of 
aircraft, vehicles, and vessels, as well as the production of 
components and other Defense-related articles.
    Language is included that provides for revocation of 
blanket waivers of the Buy America Act upon a finding that a 
country has violated a reciprocal trade agreement by 
discriminating against products produced in the United States 
that are covered by the agreement.
    Language is included that provides for the availability of 
funds for the Department of Defense Overseas Military Facility 
Investment Recovery Account established by section 2921(c)(1) 
of the 1991 National Defense Authorization Act.
    Language is included that provides for the conveyance, 
without consideration, of excess relocatable housing units 
located at Grand Forks, Malmstrom, Mountain Home, Ellsworth, 
and Minot Air Force Bases to Indian tribes.
    Language is included that provides for the availability of 
operation and maintenance appropriations to purchase items 
having an investment item unit cost of not more than $250,000.
    Language is included that provides authority to use 
operation and maintenance appropriations for the Asia Pacific 
Regional Initiative Program.
    Language is included that provides for the issuance of 
regulations placing certain limitations on the sale of tobacco 
products in military resale outlets.
    Language is included that limits the purchase of specified 
investment items with Working Capital Funds.
    Language is included that provides that none of the funds 
appropriated for the Central Intelligence Agency shall remain 
available for obligation beyond the current fiscal year except 
for funds appropriated for the Reserve for Contingencies, the 
Central Services Working Capital Fund, or other certain 
programs authorized under section 503 of the National Security 
Act of 1947.
    Language is included that provides that not less than 
$12,000,000 appropriated under the heading ``Operation and 
Maintenance, Defense-Wide'' shall be for mitigation of 
environmental impacts on Indian lands resulting from Department 
of Defense activities.
    Language is included that provides for the Department of 
Defense to comply with the Buy American Act (chapter 83 of 
title 41, United States Code).
    Language is included that limits the use of funds made 
available in this Act to establish or support field operating 
agencies.
    Language is included that limits the use of funds 
appropriated by this Act for the conversion of an activity or 
function of the Department of Defense to contractor 
performance.
    Language is included in title VIII and title IX that 
provides for the rescission of previously appropriated funds.
    Language is included that prohibits the use of funds made 
available in this Act from being used to reduce authorized 
positions for military technicians (dual status) of the Army 
National Guard, Air National Guard, Army Reserve, and Air Force 
Reserve unless such reductions are a direct result of a 
reduction in military force structure.
    Language is included that prohibits the use of funds made 
available in this Act for assistance to the Democratic People's 
Republic of Korea unless specifically appropriated for that 
purpose.
    Language is included that provides for the use of operation 
and maintenance funds appropriated in this Act for 
reimbursement to the National Guard and reserve when members of 
the National Guard and reserve provide intelligence or 
counterintelligence support to the Combatant Commands, Defense 
Agencies, and Joint Intelligence Activities.
    Language is included that provides that funds made 
available to the Department of Defense and Central Intelligence 
Agency for drug interdiction and counter-drug activities may 
not be transferred to other agencies.
    Language is included that prohibits the use of funds 
appropriated by this Act for the procurement of ball and roller 
bearings other than those produced by a domestic source and of 
domestic origin.
    Language is included to provide funding to make grants to 
specified entities upon determination by the Secretary of 
Defense that such grants serve the national interest.
    Language is included that provides for the Department of 
Defense to purchase supercomputers manufactured only in the 
United States with an exception for certain circumstances.
    Language is included to allow for Small Business Innovation 
Research program and Small Business Technology Transfer program 
setasides.
    Language is included that prohibits the use of funds made 
available in this Act to pay contractor bonuses arising from a 
business restructuring.
    Language is included that provides for the transfer of 
funds to be used in support of personnel supporting approved 
organizations and activities outside the Department of Defense.
    Language is included that provides for the Department of 
Defense to dispose of negative unliquidated or unexpended 
balances for expired or closed accounts.
    Language is included that provides conditions for the use 
of equipment of the National Guard Distance Learning Project on 
a spaceavailable, reimbursable basis.
    Language is included that provides for the use of funds 
made available under the heading ``Operation and Maintenance, 
Defense-Wide'' for high priority Sexual Assault Prevention and 
Response program requirements, including the transfer of funds.
    Language is included that provides a limitation on the use 
of funds appropriated in title IV to procure end-items for 
delivery to military forces for operational training, 
operational use, or inventory requirements.
    Language is included that provides for a waiver by the 
Secretary of Defense of ``Buy America'' provisions for certain 
cooperative programs.
    Language is included that prohibits the use of funds made 
available in this Act for repairs or maintenance to military 
family housing units, for which funds are provided in other 
appropriations acts.
    Language is included that provides that funds for new 
starts for advanced concept technology demonstration projects 
may be obligated or expended only after notification to the 
congressional defense committees.
    Language is included that provides that the Secretary of 
Defense shall continue to provide a classified quarterly report 
on certain matters as directed in the classified annex 
accompanying this Act.
    Language is included that provides for the use of National 
Guard personnel to support ground-based elements of the 
National Ballistic Missile Defense System.
    Language is included that prohibits the use of funds 
provided in this Act to transfer to any nongovernmental entity 
ammunition held by the Department of Defense that has a center-
fire cartridge and is designated as ``armor piercing'' except 
for demilitarization purposes.
    Language is included that provides for a waiver by the 
Chief of the National Guard Bureau or his designee for all or 
part of consideration in cases of personal property leases of 
one year or less to certain organizations specified by section 
508(d) of title 32, United States Code.
    Language is included that provides for the transfer of 
funds made available in this Act under the heading ``Operation 
and Maintenance, Army'' to other activities of the Federal 
Government for certain purposes.
    Language is included that prohibits the modification of the 
appropriations account structure or presentation of the budget 
request for the National Intelligence Program, or modification 
of the process by which National Intelligence Program 
appropriations are apportioned, allotted, obligated, and 
disbursed.
    Language is included that provides grant authority for the 
construction and furnishing of additional Fisher Houses to meet 
the needs of military family members when confronted with the 
illness or hospitalization of an eligible military beneficiary.
    Language is included that provides for the transfer of 
funds made available in this Act under Operation and 
Maintenance, Navy to the John C. Stennis Center for Public 
Service Development Trust Fund.
    Language is included that prohibits the modification of 
command and control relationships to give Fleet Forces Command 
operational and administrative control of United States Navy 
forces assigned to the Pacific fleet.
    Language is included that requires notification for the 
rapid acquisition and deployment of supplies and associated 
support services to be submitted to congressional defense 
committees.
    Language is included that provides funding and transfer 
authority for the Israeli Cooperative missile defense programs.
    Language is included that provides for the availability and 
transfer of funds to properly complete prior year shipbuilding 
programs.
    Language is included that provides that funds made 
available by this Act are deemed to be specifically authorized 
by Congress for purposes of section 504 of the National 
Security Act of 1947 until enactment of the Intelligence 
Authorization Act.
    Language is included that prohibits the use of funds 
provided in this Act to initiate a new start program without 
prior written notification.
    Language is included that provides that the budget of the 
President for fiscal year 2022 shall include separate budget 
justification documents for costs of the United States Armed 
Forces' participation in contingency operations that contain 
certain budget exhibits as defined in the Department of Defense 
Financial Management Regulation.
    Language is included that prohibits the use of funds made 
available in this Act for the research, development, test, 
evaluation, procurement, or deployment of nuclear armed 
interceptors of a missile defense system.
    Language is included that provides for prompt notification 
of the use of funds for rapid acquisition and deployment of 
supplies and support services.
    Language is included that prohibits the use of funds made 
available in this Act to reduce or disestablish the operation 
of the 53rd Weather Reconnaissance Squadron of the Air Force 
Reserve.
    Language is included that prohibits the use of funds made 
available in this Act for the integration of foreign 
intelligence information unless the information has been 
lawfully collected and processed during conduct of authorized 
foreign intelligence activities.
    Language is included that prohibits the transfer of program 
authorities related to tactical unmanned aerial vehicles from 
the Army.
    Language is included that limits the obligation authority 
of funds provided for the Office of the Director of National 
Intelligence to the current fiscal year except for research and 
technology which shall remain available for the current and the 
following fiscal years.
    Language is included that provides for the adjustment of 
obligations within the ``Shipbuilding and Conversion, Navy'' 
appropriation.
    Language is included that provides for the establishment of 
a baseline for application of reprogramming and transfer 
authorities for the Office of the Director of National 
Intelligence for the current fiscal year.
    Language is included that requires notification to the 
congressional defense committees prior to the use of funds for 
support to foreign countries in connection with the conduct of 
certain operations.
    Language is included that requires certain transfers of 
funds from the Defense Acquisition Workforce Development 
Account be made in accordance with reprogramming and transfer 
procedures.
    Language is included that prohibits the use of funds made 
available by this Act for excess defense articles, assistance, 
or peacekeeping operations for countries designated to be in 
violation of the standards of the Child Soldiers Prevention Act 
of 2008.
    Language is included that sets forth reprogramming and 
transfer procedures for the National Intelligence Program.
    Language is included that defines the congressional 
intelligence committees for the purposes of this Act.
    Language is included that provides that funds from certain 
operation and maintenance accounts may be transferred to a 
central fund established for Fisher Houses and Suites pursuant 
to section 2493(d) of title 10, United States Code.
    Language is included that prohibits funds appropriated by 
this Act from being used to make remittances to the Defense 
Acquisition Workforce Development Account.
    Language is included that provides that agencies post 
congressionally directed reports on a public website.
    Language is included that provides limitations on the award 
of contracts to contractors that require mandatory arbitration 
for certain claims as a condition of employment or a 
contractual relationship. The Secretary of Defense is 
authorized to waive the applicability of these limitations for 
national security interests.
    Language is included that provides for the availability and 
transfer of funds for the Joint Department of Defense-
Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Facility Demonstration 
Fund.
    Language is included that prohibits the use of funds in 
contravention of section 130h of title 10, United States Code.
    Language is included that provides for the purchase of 
heavy and light armored vehicles for physical security or force 
protection purposes.
    Language is included that provides transfer authority for 
the Director of National Intelligence for the National 
Intelligence Program subject to certain limitations.
    Language is included that prohibits the use of funds in 
contravention of the War Powers Resolution (50 U.S.C. 1541).
    Language is included that prohibits the Department of 
Defense from entering into certain agreements with 
Rosoboronexport with certain waiver authorities.
    Language is included that prohibits the use of funds for 
the purchase or manufacture of a United States flag unless such 
flag is treated as a covered item under section 2533a(b) of 
title 10, United States Code.
    Language is included that requires grant awards to be 
posted on a public website in a searchable format.
    Language is included that places restrictions on transfer 
amounts available in the Rapid Prototyping Fund.
    Language is included that prohibits the use of funds by the 
National Security Agency for certain activities.
    Language is included that prohibits the use of funds made 
available in this or any other Act to pay the salary of any 
officer or employee who approves or implements the transfer of 
certain administrative responsibilities or budgetary resources 
unless expressly provided for in Defense Appropriations Acts.
    Language is included that makes available certain funds 
provided under the heading ``Operation and Maintenance, Navy'' 
may be used for any purposes related to the National Defense 
Reserve Fleet.
    Language is included that prohibits the use of funds to 
provide counterterrorism support to foreign partners unless the 
congressional defense committees are notified accordingly.
    Language is included that prohibits the use of funds to 
award a new TAO Fleet Oiler or FFG Frigate program contract for 
the acquisition of certain components unless those components 
are manufactured in the United States.
    Language is included that prohibits certain transfers from 
the Department of Defense Acquisition Workforce Development 
Account.
    Language is included that prohibits the use of funds made 
available by this Act to pay Government Travel Charge Card 
expenses for gaming or certain entertainment activities.
    Language is included that prohibits funding for computer 
networks that do not block pornography, subject to certain law 
enforcement and national defense exceptions.
    Language is included that prohibits funds to deliver F-35 
aircraft to the Republic of Turkey.
    Language is included that prohibits the transfer of 
Department of Defense funds for certain purposes except in 
accordance with reprogramming and transfer procedures.
    Language is included that provides additional funds for 
purposes of repairing schools on military installations subject 
to certain requirements.
    Language is included that changes certain time limitations 
on embryo cryopreservation and storage.
    Language is included that places restrictions on the use of 
funding for military parades.
    Language is included that provides for the use of funds to 
modify two F-35 Joint Strike Fighters per variant to a test 
configuration.
    Language is included that allows certain funds to be 
obligated to make death gratuity payments if appropriations for 
``Military Personnel'' are not available for obligation of such 
payments.
    Language is included that prohibits funds in the Act from 
being used to enter into a contract or provide a loan to any 
corporation that has any unpaid Federal tax liability.
    Language is included that provides that any advance billing 
for background investigation services and related services 
purchased from activities financed using the Defense Working 
Capital Fund shall be excluded from the calculation of 
cumulative advance billings.
    Language is included that prohibits funds from being used 
to transfer the National Reconnaissance Office to the Space 
Force.
    Language is included that requires the Secretary of Defense 
to make a certification prior to the transfer of any element to 
the Space Force.
    Language is included that provides funds appropriated under 
military personnel accounts may be used for expenses for 
members of the Space Force.
    Language is included that requires the Director of the 
Defense Security Cooperation Agency to submit a spend plan.
    Language is included that reduces funding due to favorable 
foreign exchange rates.
    Language is included that reduces funding due to favorable 
fuel costs.
    Language is included that prohibits funds from being used 
to exclude or implement the exclusion of the Department of 
Defense from cover under the Federal Service Labor Management 
Relations Statute.
    Language is included that requires the Secretary of Defense 
to provide information and documents regarding the December 
1981 massacre in El Mozote.
    Language is included that provides funds for agile 
development, test and evaluation, procurement, production and 
modification, and the operation and maintenance for certain 
software pilot programs.
    Language is included that requires the Secretary of Defense 
to report on deployed personnel by each geographic combatant 
command.
    Language is included that requires the Secretary of Defense 
to provide notification before the deployment of security force 
assistance brigades.
    Language is included that provides funds for the purposes 
of public healthcare professionals and public health laboratory 
staff, laboratory and medical equipment, and medical supplies.
    Language is included that prohibits funds for the 
development and design of certain future naval ships unless any 
contract specifies that all hull, mechanical, and electrical 
components are manufactured in the United States.
    Language is included that prohibits funds for the 
decommissioning of any Littoral Combat Ships.
    Language is included that requires the Secretary of Defense 
provide notification of deployments of armed forces to 
locations outside the United States.
    Language is included that requires any personal property 
provided by the Department of Defense to State or local 
entities must follow the direction outlined in the 
``Recommendations Pursuant to Executive Order 13688, Federal 
Support for Local Law Enforcement Equipment Acquisition'', 
dated May 2015.
    Language is included that prohibits the use of funds to 
conduct, or prepare to conduct, any explosive nuclear weapons 
test that produces any yield. This section does not limit 
science-based stockpile stewardship activities consistent with 
the zero-yield standard or requirements under other provisions 
of law, such as sections 2523 and 2525 of title 50, United 
States Code.
    Language is included that prohibits funds to construct a 
wall, fence, border barriers, or border security infrastructure 
along the southern land border of the United States.
    Language is included that requires funds provided for the 
Department of Defense for fiscal year 2020 that were 
transferred by the Department and remain unobligated be 
returned to the original accounts.
    Language is included that limits the use of active armed 
forces on the southern border unless the costs are reimbursed 
by the requesting agency.
    Language is included that provides $50,000,000 for a new 
program that will assist communities that surround military 
installations with excessive decibel noise caused by military 
aircraft.
    Language is included that prohibits the use of funds to 
provide guidance on, review, prepare, approve, or recommend 
budget request funding levels or initiatives for the Department 
of Energy.
    Language is included that provides funding for renaming 
Army installations, facilities, roads, and streets named after 
confederate leaders and officers.
    Language is included under the heading ``Operation and 
Maintenance, Defense-Wide'' that provides for the use of funds 
for certain purposes subject to certain requirements and 
requires the submission of certain reports.
    Language is included under the heading ``Afghanistan 
Security Forces Fund'' that provides for the use of funds for 
certain purposes and the management of contributions and 
returned items.
    Language is included under the heading ``Counter-ISIS Train 
and Equip Fund'' that provides for the use of funds for certain 
purposes, compliance with vetting standards, management of 
contributions, and the submission of certain reports.
    Language is included that provides that funds made 
available in title IX are in addition to amounts appropriated 
or otherwise made available for the Department of Defense for 
the current fiscal year.
    Language is included that provides for general transfer 
authority within title IX.
    Language is included that provides that supervision and 
administration costs associated with a construction project 
funded with appropriations available for operation and 
maintenance or the Afghanistan Security Forces Fund may be 
obligated at the time a construction contract is awarded.
    Language is included that provides for the availability of 
funds to purchase passenger, heavy, and light armored vehicles 
notwithstanding price or other limitations on the purchase of 
passenger carrying vehicles for use in the U.S. Central Command 
area of responsibility.
    Language is included that provides funds and authority for 
the Commanders' Emergency Response Program and establishes 
certain reporting requirements.
    Language is included that authorizes the use of funds to 
provide certain assistance to coalition forces supporting 
military and stability operations in Iraq and Afghanistan and 
to counter the Islamic State of Iraq and the Syria; and 
establishes certain reporting requirements.
    Language is included that prohibits the use of funds to 
establish permanent bases in Iraq or Afghanistan or United 
States control over Iraq or Syria oil resources.
    Language is included that prohibits the use of funds in 
contravention of certain laws or regulations promulgated to 
implement the United Nations Convention Against Torture and 
Other Cruel, Inhuman or Degrading Treatment or Punishment.
    Language is included that places limitations on the use of 
Afghanistan Security Forces Funds and requires certain 
certifications.
    Language is included that provides for the availability of 
funds appropriated in title IX of this Act for the purchase of 
items having an investment unit cost of up to $500,000, subject 
to certain conditions.
    Language is included that provides for up to $500,000,000 
of funds appropriated by this Act under the heading ``Operation 
and Maintenance, Defense-Wide'' to be used for assistance to 
the Government of Jordan for certain purposes.
    Language is included prohibiting the use of funds made 
available by this Act under certain headings to procure or 
transfer man-portable air defense systems.
    Language is included that provides for $275,000,000 for 
assistance to the military and national security forces of 
Ukraine for certain purposes and under certain conditions.
    Language is included providing for the availability of 
funds appropriated in title IX for replacement of items 
provided to the Government of Ukraine from the inventory of the 
United States to the extent provided for in this Act.
    Language is included that prohibits the use of funds to 
provide arms, training, or other assistance to the Azov 
Battalion.
    Language is included that provides for the transfer of 
excess equipment to foreign forces receiving equipment through 
the Counter-ISIS Train and Equip Fund.
    Language is included that restricts funds provided for 
reimbursement to the Government of Pakistan for border security 
operations until certain conditions are met.
    Language is included that prohibits the use of funds with 
respect to Iraq in contravention of the War Powers Resolution.
    Language is included that prohibits the use of funds with 
respect to Syria in contravention of the War Powers Resolution.
    Language is included that prohibits the transfer of 
additional C-130 cargo aircraft to the Afghanistan National 
Security Forces or Afghanistan Air Force.
    Language is included that requires the Secretary of Defense 
to certify the use of funds in the Afghanistan Security Forces 
Fund under certain conditions.
    Language is included that restricts funds provided in this 
Act for any member of the Taliban.
    Language is included that provides that nothing in this Act 
may be construed as authorizing the use of force against Iran.
    Language is included that requires the Secretary to provide 
a notification when a foreign bases is open or closed.
    Language is included that provides for additional funds and 
transfer authority to improve the intelligence, surveillance, 
and reconnaissance capabilities of the Department of Defense, 
subject to reporting requirements.
    Language is included that rescinds certain funds made 
available in prior years in title IX.
    Language is included that provides that amounts designed in 
this Act as Overseas Contingency Operations/Global War on 
Terrorism shall be available only if the President subsequently 
so designates all such amounts and transmits such designations 
to the Congress.
    Language is included that repeals the Authorization for Use 
of Military Force 240 days after the date of enactment of this 
Act.
    Language is included that repeals the Authorization for Use 
of Military Force Against Iraq Resolution of 2002.
    Language is included that prohibits funds in the Act for 
any use of military force in or against Iran, with certain 
exceptions.


                 COMPARISON WITH THE BUDGET RESOLUTION

    Section 308(a)(1)(A) of the Congressional Budget Act 
requires the report accompanying a bill providing new budget 
authority to contain a statement comparing the levels in the 
bill to the suballocations submitted under section 302(b) of 
the Act for the most recently agreed to concurrent resolution 
on the budget for the applicable fiscal year.

                                            [In millions of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                             302(b) Allocation
                                                       ---------------------------------------------------------
                                                            Budget                       Budget
                                                           Authority      Outlays       Authority      Outlays
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Comparison of amounts in the bill with Committee
 allocations to its subcommittees: Subcommittee on
 Defense
Discretionary.........................................         626,190      646,172      \1\694,625      685,207
Mandatory.............................................             514          514          \1\514          514
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
\1\Includes outlays from prior-year budget authority.
NOTE.--Consistent with the funding recommended in the bill for overseas contingency operations/global war on
  terrorism, in accordance with section 251(b)(2) of the Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit Control Act of
  1985, and after the bill is reported to the House, the Chairman of the Committee on the Budget will provide a
  revised section 302(a) allocation reflecting an additional $XX,XXX million in discretionary budget authority
  and $XX,XXX million in associated outlays. That new allocation will eliminate the technical difference prior
  to Floor consideration.
In addition, the amounts in this report do not include $3,942 million in discretionary outlays from funding
  provided by the Families First Coronavirus Response Act (Public Law 116-127) and the CARES Act (Public Law 116-
  136), that was designated as being for emergency requirements pursuant to section 251 of the Balanced Budget
  Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit Control Act of 1985. Consistent with the Congressional Budget Act of
  1974, in the House of Representatives such amounts do not count against the Committee's allocation.

                      FIVE-YEAR OUTLAY PROJECTIONS

    In compliance with section 308(a)(1)(B) of the 
Congressional Budget and Impoundment Control Act of 1974 
(Public Law 93-344), as amended, the following table contains 
five-year projections associated with the budget authority 
provided in the accompanying bill.

                        [In millions of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                               Outlays
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Projection of outlays associated with the recommendation:
    2021...................................................   \1\416,516
    2022...................................................      167,019
    2023...................................................       52,985
    2024...................................................       27,350
    2025 and future years..................................       19,918
------------------------------------------------------------------------
\1\Excludes outlays from prior-year budget authority.

          FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE TO STATE AND LOCAL GOVERNMENTS

    In accordance with section 308(a)(1)(C) of the 
Congressional Budget and Impoundment Act of 1974 (Public Law 
93-344), as amended, no new budget or outlays are provided by 
the accompanying bill for financial assistance to State and 
local governments.

                          PROGRAM DUPLICATION

    No provision of this bill establishes or reauthorizes a 
program of the Federal Government known to be duplicative of 
another Federal program, a program that was included in any 
report from the Government Accountability Office to Congress 
pursuant to section 21 of Public Law 111-139, or a program 
related to a program identified in the most recent Catalog of 
Federal Domestic Assistance.

                           COMMITTEE HEARINGS

    For the purposes of section 103(i) of H. Res. 6 of the 
116thCongress--
    The following hearings were used to develop or consider the 
Departments of Defense Appropriations Act, 2021:
    The Subcommittee on Defense held a closed oversight hearing 
on February 6, 2020, entitled ``U.S. Strategic Command.'' The 
Subcommittee received testimony from:
    Admiral Charles A. Richard, Commander, United States 
Strategic Command
    The Subcommittee on Defense held a closed oversight hearing 
on February 27, 2020, entitled ``U.S. European Command.'' The 
Subcommittee received testimony from:
    General Tod D. Wolters, General, United States Air Force, 
U.S. European Command and NATO Supreme Allied Commander
    The Subcommittee on Defense held a closed oversight hearing 
on February 27, 2020, entitled ``World-Wide Threat.'' The 
Subcommittee received testimony from:
    Lieutenant General Robert P. Ashley, Jr., Director, Defense 
Intelligence Agency
    The Honorable Joseph D. Kernan, Under Secretary of Defense 
for Intelligence and Security, Office of the Under Secretary of 
Defense for Intelligence and Security
    The Subcommittee on Defense held an oversight hearing on 
March 3, 2020, entitled ``National Guard/Reserves.'' The 
Subcommittee received testimony from:
    Lieutenant General David G. Bellon, Commander, Marine 
Forces Reserve
    General Joseph L. Lengyel, Chief, National Guard Bureau
    General Joseph L. Luckey, Chief, Army Reserve
    Vice Admiral Luke McCollum, Chief, Navy Reserve
    Lieutenant General Richard W. Scobee, Chief, Air Force 
Reserve
    The Subcommittee on Defense held an oversight hearing on 
March 4, 2020, entitled ``U.S. Navy/Marine Corps Budget Request 
for FY2021.'' The Subcommittee received testimony from:
    General David H. Berger, Commandant, United States Marine 
Corps.
    Admiral Michael M. Gilday, Chief, Naval Operations
    Thomas B. Modly, Acting Secretary, United States Navy
    The Subcommittee on Defense held an oversight hearing on 
March 4, 2020, entitled ``U.S. Space Force Organizational 
Plan'' The Subcommittee received testimony from:
    Major General Clinton E. Crosier, Director, Space Force 
Planning, Office of the Chief of Space Operations
    Lieutenant General David D. Thompson, Vice Commander, 
United States Space Force
    The Subcommittee on Defense held an oversight hearing on 
March 5, 2020, entitled ``Defense Health Program.'' The 
Subcommittee received testimony from:
    Lieutenant General R. Scott Dingle, Surgeon General, United 
States Army
    Rear Admiral Bruce L. Gillingham, Surgeon General, United 
States Navy
    Lieutenant General Dorothy A. Hogg, Surgeon General, United 
States Air Force
    Mr. Thomas McCaffery, Assistant Secretary of Defense for 
Health Affairs
    Lieutenant General Ronald J. Place, Director, Defense 
Health Agency
    Mr. Bill Tinston, Program Executive Officer, Defense 
Healthcare Management Systems
    The Subcommittee on Defense held a closed oversight hearing 
on March 10, 2020, entitled ``U.S. Southern Command.'' The 
Subcommittee received testimony from:
    Admiral Craig S. Faller, Commander, United States Southern 
Command
    The Subcommittee on Defense held an oversight hearing on 
March 10, 2020, entitled ``U.S. Army Budget Request for 
FY2021.'' The Subcommittee received testimony from:
    Ryan McCarthy, Secretary, United States Army
    General James McConville, Chief of Staff, United States 
Army
    The Subcommittee on Defense held a closed oversight hearing 
on March 11, 2020 entitled ``U.S. Central Command.'' The 
Subcommittee received testimony from:
    General Kenneth F. McKenzie, Jr., Commander, United States 
Central Command
    The Subcommittee on Defense held a closed oversight hearing 
on March 11, 2020 entitled ``U.S. Africa Command.'' The 
Subcommittee received testimony from:
    General Stephen J. Townsend, Commander, United States 
Africa Command
    The Subcommittee on Defense held an oversight hearing on 
March 12, 2020, entitled ``Member Day.'' The Subcommittee 
received testimony from:
    The Honorable Rodger Williams, Member of Congress
    The Honorable George McGovern, Member of Congress
    The Honorable Scott Perry, Member of Congress
    The Honorable French Hill, Member of Congress
    The Honorable Richard Hudson, Member of Congress
    The Honorable Brian Fitzpatrick, Member of Congress
    The Honorable Tom Suozzi, Member of Congress
    The Honorable Glen (GT) Thompson, Member of Congress
    The Honorable Jodey Arrington, Member of Congress
    The Honorable Sheila Jackson Lee, Member of Congress
    The Honorable Jenniffer Gonzalez-Colon, Member of Congress
    The Honorable Brad Wenstrup, Member of Congress
    The Honorable Denny Heck, Member of Congress
    
    

                             MINORITY VIEWS

    We appreciate the collegial and collaborative efforts of 
Full Committee Chairwoman Lowey and Subcommittee Chairman 
Visclosky in producing the fiscal year 2021 Defense 
Appropriations bill. The bill includes many bipartisan 
priorities that support our Nation's defense, which is one of 
the most fundamental and important responsibilities enumerated 
in the Constitution.
    The bill provides funding for many key programs that are 
essential to our security, consistent with the National Defense 
Strategy and its focus on great power competition with China 
and Russia. The bill will enhance our national security 
capabilities by funding procurement for critical platforms 
while also continuing to invest in research and development of 
new technologies essential to maintaining U.S. military 
superiority.
    We appreciate that the Chairman has prioritized the 
healthcare and quality of life of our service members. These 
issues have a significant impact on our military's readiness. 
We are also pleased to see strong and steady support for our 
partners and allies, including Israel and Jordan.
    The impact of the COVID-19 Pandemic has been felt 
throughout the Department of Defense (DOD). We are very 
concerned about the impact of the pandemic on our second, third 
and fourth tier defense suppliers. We appreciate the Chairman 
including funds to help mitigate that damage to these 
suppliers. Their work is vital to our national security and we 
must do everything within our power to protect these jobs.
    Unfortunately, we are not able to support this bill as 
currently drafted. There are provisions in the bill that will 
prevent it from becoming law. We cannot overstate the 
importance of getting this bill signed into law by the end of 
this fiscal year. According to estimates from the DOD Office of 
the Comptroller, a Continuing Resolution wastes roughly $1.7 
billion a month through the inability to sign contracts, delays 
in production, and other downstream effects. We object to the 
language prohibiting funds to construct a wall, fence, border 
barriers, or border security infrastructure along the southern 
land border of the United States. This funding is essential to 
impeding the flow of both people and drugs across the border. 
We also object to language preventing the use of the National 
Guard at the border unless the Department of Homeland Security 
reimburses DOD. These prohibitions place dangerous restrictions 
on the DOD's responsibility and authorities. It is short-
sighted to take away DOD's ability to provide assistance and 
expertise to other agencies when our national security is at 
risk.
    We object to the language that repeals the 2001 
Authorization for Use of Military Force (AUMF) 240 days after 
enactment; immediately repeals the 2002 AUMF; and prohibits 
funding for any use of military force in or against Iran unless 
Congress has declared war, a new AUMF is enacted, or a 
``national emergency'' is created by an attack upon the United 
States. The first two provisions repeal essential 
counterterrorism authorities and would be deeply harmful. The 
United States has, and must safeguard, our right to defend 
ourselves and our allies from Iranian hostility. This provision 
simply emboldens Iran and its proxies.
    Unfortunately, the Majority rejected Republican amendments 
offered in the Committee, which if passed, would have 
significantly improved the bill by: prohibiting Federal tax 
dollars from being provided to an abortion provider if, in the 
case of an abortion or attempted abortion that results in a 
child born alive, a health care practitioner does not act to 
preserve the life of the child; and striking the language 
prohibiting DOD's ability to transfer excess property to state 
and local law enforcement agencies. We are also disappointed 
that the Majority chose not to support an amendment that would 
have added back four long-standing provisions related to the 
terrorists located at the Guantanamo Bay detention camp. The 
amendment would have prevented Khalid Sheikh Mohammed or any 
other detainee from being brought to the United States; 
prevented detainees from being transferred to their home 
country or any other country in accordance with previous 
National Defense Authorization Act provisions; prevented any 
facility in the United States from being used to house these 
terrorists; and prevented the closure of the Guantanamo Bay 
detention camp.
    Despite our disagreements over the issues discussed above, 
we appreciate the Majority's willingness to address Member 
priorities in the bill and report. We will continue to work in 
good faith with our colleagues as we proceed through the 
appropriations process in order to produce a final bill that 
Congress can pass and President Trump can sign into law.

                                   Kay Granger.
                                   Ken Calvert.