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116th Congress    }                                    {        Report
                        HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES
 2d Session       }                                    {       116-686

======================================================================



 
                 HOUSING IS INFRASTRUCTURE ACT OF 2020

                                _______
                                

 December 24, 2020.--Committed to the Committee of the Whole House on 
            the State of the Union and ordered to be printed

                                _______
                                

  Ms. Waters, from the Committee on Financial Services, submitted the 
                               following

                              R E P O R T

                             together with

                             MINORITY VIEWS

                        [To accompany H.R. 5187]

      [Including cost estimate of the Congressional Budget Office]

    The Committee on Financial Services, to whom was referred 
the bill (H.R. 5187) to facilitate the development of 
affordable housing, and for other purposes, having considered 
the same, reports favorably thereon with an amendment and 
recommends that the bill as amended do pass.

                                CONTENTS

                                                                   Page
Purpose and Summary..............................................     6
Background and Need for Legislation..............................     6
Section-by-Section Analysis......................................     9
Hearings.........................................................    12
Committee Consideration..........................................    12
Committee Votes..................................................    12
Statement of Oversight Findings and Recommendations of the 
  Committee......................................................    17
Statement of Performance Goals and Objectives....................    17
New Budget Authority and CBO Cost Estimate.......................    17
Committee Cost Estimate..........................................    21
Unfunded Mandate Statement.......................................    21
Advisory Committee...............................................    21
Application of Law to the Legislative Branch.....................    22
Earmark Statement................................................    22
Duplication of Federal Programs..................................    22
Changes to Existing Law..........................................    22
Minority Views...................................................    23

    The amendment is as follows:
  Strike all after the enacting clause and insert the 
following:

SECTION 1. SHORT TITLE.

  This Act may be cited as the ``Housing is Infrastructure Act of 
2020''.

SEC. 2. FINDINGS.

  The Congress finds the following:
          (1) Affordable housing is a critical part of the national 
        infrastructure of the United States but there is a severe 
        shortage of affordable housing in the United States and the 
        existing stock is badly in need of repair.
          (2) According to a 2010 study sponsored by the Department of 
        Housing and Urban Development, there was a $26 billion backlog 
        of capital needs for public housing; that figure is likely 
        higher today, with some groups estimating the backlog of 
        capital needs for public housing to be as high as $70 billion.
          (3) There are 14,000 units supported by Rural Rental Housing 
        Loans under section 515 of the Housing Act of 1949 and Farm 
        Labor Housing Loans under section 514 of the Housing Act of 
        1949. According to National Rural Housing Coalition, it would 
        take an estimated $1 billion in the Multi-Family Housing 
        Revitalization Demonstration Program (MPR) funding to fully 
        address the capital backlog for rural housing properties.
          (4) Federal investment in housing helps to create jobs and 
        stimulate the economy.
          (5) When the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 
        (Public Law 111-5) was enacted, which included funding for 
        public housing, researchers found that for each $1.00 in direct 
        spending on public housing, there was an additional $2.12 of 
        indirect and induced economic activity nationwide for a total 
        economic impact of $3.12 for each $1.00 in direct spending on 
        public housing.
          (6) According to the National Association of Home Builders, 
        building 100 affordable rental homes generates $11.7 million in 
        local income, $2,200,000 in taxes and revenue for local 
        governments, and 161 local jobs.
          (7) Researchers estimate that the growth in the gross 
        domestic product from 1964-2009 would have been 13.5 percent 
        higher if families had better access to affordable housing, 
        which in turn could have led to an additional $1.7 trillion 
        increase in income, equivalent to $8,775 in additional wages 
        for each worker.

SEC. 3. PUBLIC HOUSING CAPITAL FUND.

  (a) In General.--There is authorized to be appropriated for the 
Capital Fund under section 9(d) of the United States Housing Act of 
1937 (42 U.S.C. 1437g(d)) $70,000,000,000 and any amounts appropriated 
pursuant to this subsection shall remain available until the expiration 
of the 5-year period beginning upon the date of such appropriation.
  (b) Requirements.--The Secretary of Housing and Urban Development (in 
this Act referred to as the ``Secretary'') shall--
          (1) distribute not less than 35 percent and not more than 75 
        percent of any amounts appropriated pursuant to subsection (a) 
        under the same formula used for amounts made available for the 
        Capital Fund for fiscal year 2020; and
          (2) make available all remaining amounts by competition for 
        priority investments, including investments that address lead 
        hazards, other urgent health and safety concerns, and such 
        other priorities as the Secretary may identify.
  (c) Timing.--The Secretary shall obligate amounts--
          (1) made available under subsection (b)(1) within 30 days of 
        enactment of the Act appropriating such funds; and
          (2) made available under subsection (b)(2) within 12 months 
        of enactment of the Act appropriating such funds.
  (d) Limitation.--Amounts provided pursuant to this section may not be 
used for operating costs or rental assistance.
  (e) Use of Funds.--Not more than 0.5 percent of any amount 
appropriated pursuant to this section shall be used by the Secretary 
for costs associated with staff, training, technical assistance, 
technology, monitoring, travel, enforcement, research, and evaluation.
  (f) Supplement Not Supplant.--The Secretary shall ensure that amounts 
provided pursuant to this section shall serve to supplement and not 
supplant other amounts generated by a recipient of such amounts or 
amounts provided by other Federal, State, or local sources.
  (g) Water and Energy Efficiency.--In distributing any amounts 
pursuant to subsection (b), the Secretary shall give priority to public 
housing agencies located in States and localities that have a plan to 
increase water and energy efficiency when developing or rehabilitating 
public housing using any amounts distributed.

SEC. 4. RURAL MULTIFAMILY PRESERVATION AND REVITALIZATION DEMONSTRATION 
                    PROGRAM.

  (a) In General.--There is authorized to be appropriated for carrying 
out the Multifamily Preservation and Revitalization Demonstration 
program of the Rural Housing Service (as authorized under sections 514, 
515, and 516 of the Housing Act of 1949 (42 U.S.C. 1484; 1485; 1486)) 
$1,000,000,000 and any amounts appropriated pursuant to this section 
shall remain available until expended.
  (b) Water and Energy Efficiency.--Not less than 10 percent of all 
amounts made available pursuant to this section shall be used only for 
activities relating to water and energy efficiency and, at the 
Secretary's discretion, other strategies to enhance the environmental 
sustainability of housing production and design.

SEC. 5. FLOOD MITIGATION ASSISTANCE GRANT PROGRAM.

  (a) In General.--There is authorized to be appropriated for carrying 
out the Flood Mitigation Assistance Grant Program under section 1366 of 
the National Flood Insurance Act of 1968 (42 U.S.C. 4104c) 
$1,000,000,000 and any amounts appropriated pursuant to this section 
shall remain available until expended.
  (b) Multifamily Residences and Attached and Semi-Attached Homes.--
With regard to any structure that is a multifamily residence or an 
attached or semi-attached residence, the Administrator shall consult 
with the Secretary of Housing and Urban Development and establish 
alternative forms of mitigation.
  (c) Definitions.--For the purposes of this section, the term 
``multifamily residence'' has the same meaning as in the Flood Disaster 
Protection Act of 1973 and the National Flood Insurance Act of 1968.

SEC. 6. HOUSING TRUST FUND.

  (a) In General.--There is authorized to be appropriated for the 
Housing Trust Fund under section 1338 of the Housing and Urban 
Development Act of 1992 (12 U.S.C. 4568) $5,000,000,000 and any amounts 
appropriated pursuant to this subsection shall remain available until 
expended. The Secretary shall ensure that priority for occupancy in 
dwelling units assisted with amounts made available pursuant to this 
section that become available for occupancy shall be given to persons 
and households who are homeless (as such term is defined in section 103 
of the McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Act (42 U.S.C. 11302)) or at 
risk of homelessness (as such term is defined in section 401 of such 
Act (42 U.S.C. 11360)).
  (b) Water and Energy Efficiency.--Not less than 10 percent of all 
amounts made available pursuant to this section shall be used only for 
activities relating to water and energy efficiency and, at the 
Secretary's discretion, other strategies to enhance the environmental 
sustainability of housing production and design.

SEC. 7. SINGLE-FAMILY HOUSING REPAIR LOANS AND GRANTS.

  (a) In General.--There is authorized to be appropriated for carrying 
out single family housing repair loans and grants under section 504 of 
the Housing Act of 1949 (42 U.S.C. 1474) $100,000,000 and any amounts 
appropriated pursuant to this section shall remain available until 
expended.
  (b) Water and Energy Efficiency.--Not less than 10 percent of all 
amounts made available pursuant to this section shall be used only for 
activities relating to water and energy efficiency and, at the 
Secretary's discretion, other strategies to enhance the environmental 
sustainability of housing production and design.

SEC. 8. NATIVE AMERICAN HOUSING BLOCK GRANT PROGRAM.

  (a) In General.--There is authorized to be appropriated for carrying 
out the Native American housing block grant program under title I of 
the Native American Housing Assistance and Self-Determination Act of 
1996 (25 U.S.C. 4111 et seq.) $1,000,000,000 and any amounts 
appropriated pursuant to this section shall remain available until 
expended.
  (b) Water and Energy Efficiency.--Not less than 10 percent of all 
amounts made available pursuant to this section shall be used only for 
activities relating to water and energy efficiency and, at the 
Secretary's discretion, other strategies to enhance the environmental 
sustainability of housing production and design.

SEC. 9. HOME INVESTMENT PARTNERSHIPS PROGRAM.

  (a) In General.--There is authorized to be appropriated for carrying 
out the HOME Investment Partnership Program under title II of the 
Cranston-Gonzalez National Affordable Housing Act (42 U.S.C. 12721 et 
seq.) $5,000,000,000 and any amounts appropriated pursuant to this 
section shall remain available until expended.
  (b) Water and Energy Efficiency.--Not less than 10 percent of all 
amounts made available pursuant to this section shall be used only for 
activities relating to water and energy efficiency and, at the 
Secretary's discretion, other strategies to enhance the environmental 
sustainability of housing production and design.

SEC. 10. PROGRAM FOR SUPPORTIVE HOUSING FOR PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES.

  (a) In General.--There is authorized to be appropriated 
$2,500,000,000 for project rental assistance under the program for 
supportive housing for persons with disabilities under section 
811(b)(3) of the Cranston-Gonzalez National Affordable Housing Act (42 
U.S.C. 8013(b)(3)) for State housing finance agencies and any amounts 
appropriated pursuant to this section shall remain available until 
expended.
  (b) Water and Energy Efficiency.--Not less than 10 percent of all 
amounts made available pursuant to this section shall be used only for 
activities relating to water and energy efficiency and, at the 
Secretary's discretion, other strategies to enhance the environmental 
sustainability of housing production and design.

SEC. 11. PROGRAM FOR SUPPORTIVE HOUSING FOR THE ELDERLY.

  (a) In General.--There is authorized to be appropriated 
$2,500,000,000 for--
          (1) capital advances pursuant to section 202(c)(1) of the 
        Housing Act of 1959 (12 U.S.C. 1701q(c)(1)), including 
        amendments to capital advance contracts for housing for the 
        elderly as authorized by section 202 of such Act;
          (2) project rental assistance for the elderly under section 
        202(c)(2) of such Act, including amendments to contracts for 
        such assistance and renewal of expiring contracts for such 
        assistance for up to a 1-year term;
          (3) senior preservation rental assistance contracts, 
        including renewals, as authorized by section 811(e) of the 
        American Housing and Economic Opportunity Act of 2000 (12 
        U.S.C. 1701g note); and
          (4) supportive services associated with housing assisted 
        under paragraph (1), (2), or (3).
  (b) Availability of Amounts.--Any amounts appropriated pursuant to 
this section shall remain available until September 30, 2023.
  (c) Water and Energy Efficiency.--Not less than 10 percent of all 
amounts made available pursuant to this section shall be used only for 
activities relating to water and energy efficiency and, at the 
Secretary's discretion, other strategies to enhance the environmental 
sustainability of housing production and design.

SEC. 12. CAPITAL MAGNET FUND.

  (a) There is authorized to be appropriated for the Capital Magnet 
Fund under section 1339 of the Federal Housing Enterprises Financial 
Safety and Soundness Act of 1992 (12 U.S.C. 4569) $2,500,000,000 and 
any amounts appropriated pursuant to this subsection shall remain 
available until expended.
  (b) Water and Energy Efficiency.--Not less than 10 percent of all 
amounts made available pursuant to this section shall be used only for 
activities relating to water and energy efficiency and, at the 
Secretary's discretion, other strategies to enhance the environmental 
sustainability of housing production and design.

SEC. 13. COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT BLOCK GRANT FUNDING FOR AFFORDABLE 
                    HOUSING AND INFRASTRUCTURE.

  (a) Authorization of Appropriations.--
          (1) In general.--Subject to the provisions of this section, 
        there is authorized to be appropriated for assistance under the 
        community development block grant program under title I of the 
        Housing and Community Development Act of 1974 (42 U.S.C. 5301 
        et seq.) $10,000,000,000 and any amounts appropriated pursuant 
        to this section shall remain available until expended.
          (2) Administrative and planning costs.--Not more than 15 
        percent of any amounts appropriated pursuant to paragraph (1) 
        may be used for administrative and planning costs.
  (b) Eligible Activities.--Amounts made available for assistance under 
this section may be used only for--
          (1) the development and preservation of qualified affordable 
        housing, including the construction of such housing;
          (2) the responsible elimination or waiving of zoning 
        requirements and other requirements that limit affordable 
        housing development, including high density and multifamily 
        development restrictions, off-street parking requirements, and 
        height limitations; or
          (3) any project or entity eligible for a discretionary grant 
        provided by the Department of Transportation.
  (c) Limitation.--With respect to amounts used pursuant to subsection 
(b)(2), the Secretary shall ensure that recipients of amounts provided 
pursuant to this section are not incentivized or otherwise rewarded for 
eliminating or undermining the intent of the zoning regulations or 
other regulations or policies that--
          (1) establish fair wages for labors;
          (2) ensure the health and safety of buildings for residents 
        and the general public;
          (3) protect fair housing;
          (4) provide environmental protections;
          (5) prevent tenant displacement; or
          (6) protect any other interest that the Secretary determines 
        is in the public interest to preserve.
  (d) Competition.--Amounts made available for assistance under this 
section shall be awarded to States, units of general local government, 
and Indian tribes on a competitive basis, based on the extent to which 
the applicant--
          (1) demonstrates that the applicant is responsibly 
        streamlining the process for development of qualified 
        affordable housing;
          (2) is eliminating or reducing impact fees for housing within 
        boundaries of the State, unit of local government, or Indian 
        tribe, as applicable, and other assessments by State or local 
        governments upon the owners of new housing development projects 
        that offset governmental capital expenditures for 
        infrastructure required to serve or made necessary by the new 
        housing developments, except for fees that are invested 
        exclusively for housing; and
          (3) provides assurances that the applicant will supplement 
        assistance provided under this section with amounts from non-
        Federal sources for costs of the qualified affordable housing 
        or infrastructure eligible under subsection (b) to be funded 
        with assistance under this section, and the extent of such 
        supplemental assistance to be provided.
  (e) Water and Energy Efficiency.--Not less than 10 percent of all 
amounts made available for assistance pursuant to this section shall be 
used only for eligible activities relating to water and energy 
efficiency and, at the Secretary's discretion, other strategies to 
enhance the environmental sustainability of housing production and 
design.
  (f) Qualified Affordable Housing.--For purposes of this section, the 
term ``qualified affordable housing'' means a housing development 
that--
          (1) is either--
                  (A) funded in any part by assistance provided by the 
                Department of Housing and Urban Development or the 
                Rural Housing Service of the Department of Agriculture; 
                or
                  (B) includes a qualified low income building as such 
                term is defined in section 42 of the Internal Revenue 
                Code of 1986; or
          (2) consists of 5 or more dwelling units of which 20 percent 
        or more are made available--
                  (A) for rental only by a low-income family (as 
                defined in section 3(b) of the United States Housing 
                Act of 1937 (42 U.S.C. 1437a(b)));
                  (B) at a monthly rent amount that does not exceed 30 
                percent of the monthly adjusted income (as defined in 
                such section 3(b)) of the tenant low-income family; and
                  (C) maintains affordability for residents who are 
                low-income families for a period of not less than 30 
                years.

SEC. 14. INCLUSION OF MINORITY AND WOMEN'S BUSINESS ENTERPRISES.

  (a) Duty.--It shall be the duty of each relevant agency head--
          (1) to consult and cooperate with grantees and recipients, 
        when utilizing funds made available pursuant to this Act, to 
        promote the inclusion of minority and women's business 
        enterprises, as defined in subsection (b) including to 
        establish--
                  (A) special consideration to increasing grantee and 
                recipient outreach to minority and women's business 
                enterprises to inform such businesses of hiring 
                opportunities created through such funds; and
                  (B) procurement goals for the utilization of minority 
                and women's business enterprises; and
          (2) to convene meetings with leaders and officials of State 
        and local governments, tribal entities, and public housing 
        authorities for the purpose of recommending and promoting 
        funding opportunities and initiatives needed to advance the 
        position of minority and women's business enterprises when 
        competing for funds provided in this Act.
  (b) Definitions.--For the purposes of this section, the following 
definitions shall apply:
          (1) Minority.--The term ``minority'' has the meaning given 
        such term in section 308(b) of the Financial Institutions 
        Reform, Recovery, and Enforcement Act of 1989 (12 U.S.C. 1463 
        note) and also includes any indigenous person in the United 
        States or its territories.
          (2) Minority and women's business enterprise.--The term 
        ``minority and women's business enterprise'' means a business 
        at least 51 percent owned and controlled by minority group 
        members or women.
          (3) Relevant agency head.--The term ``relevant agency head'' 
        means, with respect to funds made available pursuant to any 
        section of this Act, the head of the Federal agency responsible 
        for administering the program under which such funds are to be 
        expended.

                          Purpose and Summary

    On November 20, 2019, Rep. Maxine Waters introduced H.R. 
5187, the ``Housing Is Infrastructure Act of 2019,'' which 
would authorize $100 billion in federal investments for the 
nation's affordable housing infrastructure, including public 
housing, supportive housing for seniors and people with 
disabilities, housing affordable to the lowest-income people, 
and rural and Native American housing.

                  Background and Need for Legislation

    According to the National Low Income Housing Coalition, 
nationwide there is a shortage of more than 7 million rental 
housing units that are affordable and available to the lowest 
income families.\1\ In fact, no state in America has an 
adequate supply of affordable housing for the lowest income 
renters. Further, our limited stock of existing affordable 
housing is aging and in need of repairs. For example, our 
public housing stock, which houses 1.9 million Americans, has 
an estimated capital needs backlog of $70 billion.\2\
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    \1\National Low-Income Housing Coalition, ``The Gap: A Shortage of 
Affordable Homes,'' March 2020.
    \2\Public Housing Authority Directors Association, ``The 
Advocate,'' Spring 2019.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Other federally assisted housing is also facing significant 
capital investment needs that have been exacerbated by 
decreased federal funding or lack of new federal funding for 
key programs like the Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) 
program, the Native American Housing Block Grant (NAHBG) 
program, and the rural Multifamily Housing Preservation and 
Rehabilitation (MPR) demonstration program. For example, the 
U.S. Department of Agriculture's multifamily housing portfolio, 
which provides much needed affordable rental housing for low 
income rural residents, has an estimated reserves deficit of 
$5.6 billion over the next 20 years.\3\ According to a report 
from the National Congress of American Indians, of the 60,000 
homes being maintained by federal housing assistance programs 
serving Native Americans, it is estimated that 70 percent, or 
42,000 homes are in need of retrofitting (including windows, 
insulation, efficient furnaces/air, elder/handicap conversion, 
etc.).\4\
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    \3\USDA Rural Development, ``Multi-family Housing Comprehensive 
Property Assessment,'' March 1, 2016.
    \4\National Congress of American Indians, Policy Research Center, 
``Investing in Tribal Governments: An Analysis of Impact and Remaining 
Need under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act,'' March 2010.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    As a result of the lack of investment into the affordable 
housing infrastructure, many families pay unaffordable rents or 
live in substandard conditions. Nearly 50 percent of all U.S. 
renters are cost burdened and spend 30 percent or more of their 
income on housing.\5\ The share of renter households that were 
severely rent burdened--spending 50 percent or more of monthly 
income on rent--increased by 42 percent between 2001 and 
2015.\6\ 71 percent, or 7.8 million of the nation's extremely 
low-income renter households are now severely housing cost-
burdened and spend more than half of their incomes on rent and 
utilities.\7\ Additionally, only one in four households who 
qualify for federal housing assistance receive it.\8\ According 
to HUD's most recent report to Congress on ``worst case housing 
needs''--which are defined as households that are very low-
income renter households who receive no housing assistance and 
pay more than 50 percent of their income for rent or live in 
severely inadequate units--the number of households in the 
United States experiencing worst case needs was 8.3 million in 
2015, up from 7.7 million in 2013 and nearly as many as the 
record high of 8.5 million in 2011.\9\ Low income American 
Indians and Alaska Natives face some of the worst housing 
conditions in the United States with disproportionately high 
rates of overcrowding and substandard housing conditions.\10\
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    \5\Chris Salvati, ``2018 Cost Burden Report: Despite Improvements, 
Affordability Issues Are Immense,'' Renteconomics, September 21, 2018.
    \6\Pew Charitable Trust, ``American Families Face a Growing a Rent 
Burden,'' April 2018.
    \7\National Low Income Housing Coalition, ``The Gap, A Shortage of 
Affordable Homes,'' March 2019.
    \8\See e.g. Urban Institute, ``One in four: America's housing 
assistance lottery'' May 28, 2014.
    \9\HUD, ``Worst Case Housing Needs: 2017 Report to Congress''
    \10\See e.g. HUD Office of Policy Development and Research, 
``Housing Needs of American Indians and Alaska Natives in Tribal Areas: 
A Report from the Assessment of American Indian, Alaska Native, and 
Native Hawaiian Housing Needs,'' January 2017, citing Urban Institute 
Household Survey 2013-2015, American Housing Survey 2013.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    H.R. 5187 represents substantial new investment into our 
affordable housing infrastructure in order to address this 
ongoing affordable housing crisis. Like roads and bridges, 
affordable housing is a component of the nation's 
infrastructure and a long-term asset that helps communities and 
families by connecting them to resources and opportunities.\11\ 
Similar to investments into other infrastructure projects, 
investments into affordable housing infrastructure generate 
construction activity and jobs that stimulate the economy.\12\ 
For example, according to the National Association of Home 
Builders, building 100 affordable rental homes generates 297 
jobs, $28 million in wages and business income, and $11 million 
in taxes and revenue for state, local, and federal 
governments.\13\ According to the Council of Large Public 
Housing Authorities (CLPHA), every $1 million spent on capital 
investments into public housing generates $1.89 million in 
economic activity and supports 11 full-time jobs.\14\ Further, 
similar to disinvestment in other infrastructure, disinvestment 
in affordable housing infrastructure can hamper economic 
growth.\15\ For example, one study found that the shortage of 
affordable housing in major metropolitan areas costs the 
American economy about $2 trillion a year in lower wages and 
productivity.\16\ Another study estimated that the growth in 
GDP between 1964 and 2009 would have been 13.5 percent higher 
if families had better access to affordable housing, and\17\ 
would have led to a $1.7 trillion increase in total income, or 
$8,775 in additional wages per worker.\18\
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    \11\See e.g. the Campaign for Housing and Community Development 
Funding (CHCDF) 1-pager entitled ``Affordable Housing Infrastructure''
    \12\http://www.nahbhousingportal.org/.
    \13\Id.
    \14\CLPHA, ``The Economic Impact of Public Housing,'' October 2018.
    \15\Chicago Policy Review, ``All Growth is Local: Housing Supply 
and the Economics of Mobility,'' February 2, 2016.
    \16\Id.
    \17\Chang-Tai Hsieh & Enrico Moretti, ``Housing Constraints and 
Spatial Misallocation,'' American Economic Journal: Macroeconomics, 
2019.
    \18\Id. 
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    H.R. 5187 would authorize the following investments into 
our affordable housing infrastructure:
           $70 billion to fully address the public 
        housing capital backlog.\19\
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    \19\Public Housing Authority Directors Association, ``The 
Advocate,'' Spring 2019.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
           $1 billion to fully fund the backlog of 
        capital needs for the Section 515 and 514 rural housing 
        stock;\20\
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    \20\The National Rural Housing Coalition estimates that it would 
take $1 billion in Multifamily Housing Preservation & Revitalization 
(MPR) program funding to fully address the capital backlog for Section 
515 and 514 properties, which are USDA-backed affordable multifamily 
properties.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
           $1 billion to support mitigation efforts 
        that can protect communities from future disasters and 
        reduce post-disaster federal spending;\21\
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    \21\According to the CBO, every dollar of pre-disaster mitigation 
spending saves an average of $3.00 in future losses. Since the 2017 
hurricane season, Congress has provided more than $25 billion in CDBG-
DR funding to help people recover their losses and rebuild after 
natural disasters.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
           $5 billion for the Housing Trust Fund to 
        support the creation of new units of housing that would 
        be affordable to the lowest income households;\22\
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    \22\FSC staff estimate that $5 billion in new funding for the HTF 
would result in nearly 60,000 new units.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
           $100 million to help low income elderly 
        households in rural areas age in place;
           $1 billion for the Native American Housing 
        Block Grant Program to address substandard housing 
        conditions on tribal lands;\23\
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    \23\According to a report from the National Congress of American 
Indians, the Indian Housing Block Grant Program (IHBG) would have 
received nearly $1 billion if funding had it kept pace with inflation 
since 1996.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
           $10 billion for a CDBG set-aside to 
        incentivize states and cities to eliminate impact fees 
        and responsibly streamline the process for development 
        of affordable housing;\24\
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    \24\According to the CDBG Coalition, every $1.00 of CDBG funding 
leverages another $4.09 in public and private funding. The CDBG set-
aside funding in the bill includes new incentives that would help 
reduce the regulatory barriers and cost in producing affordable housing 
beyond the units that are directly funded by this bill. This responds 
to research from the National Home Builders Association, regulations 
account for 30 percent of the cost for the development of multifamily 
housing.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
           $5 billion for the HOME Investment 
        Partnership Program to fund affordable housing 
        activities such as building, buying, and rehabilitating 
        affordable homes for low-income people;\25\
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    \25\According to the HOME Coalition, every $1 of HOME leverages 
$4.38 in additional investments. FSC staff estimate that $5 billion in 
new HOME funds would produce 136,653 new affordable housing units.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
           $2.5 billion for the Supporting Housing for 
        Elderly (Section 202 Program);\26\
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    \26\According to a 2019 report from the Harvard Joint Center for 
Housing Studies, the number of cost-burdened households age 65 and over 
grew to a new high of nearly 10 million in 2017, an increase of 200,000 
households from the year before. About half of these households are 
severely cost burdened, meaning they are spending more than 50 percent 
of their income on rent. However, only one in three seniors who are 
eligible for housing assistance receive it. FSC staff estimate that 
$2.5 billion in new funds for the Section 202 Program would produce an 
additional new 54,850 units.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
           $2.5 billion for Supportive Housing for 
        persons with disabilities (811 Program); and\27\
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    \27\According to the Technical Assistance Collaborative, nearly 
five million non-elderly adults with significant and long-term 
disabilities have Supplemental Security Income levels equal to only 20% 
of AMI and cannot afford housing in the community without federal 
housing assistance. FSC staff estimate that $2.5 billion in new Section 
811 funds would produce 27,000 new units.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
           $2.5 billion to the Capital Magnet Fund for 
        competitive grants to Community Development Financial 
        Institutions to finance affordable housing and 
        community revitalization efforts.\28\
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    \28\According to the Community Development Financial Institution 
Fund, the Capital Magnet Fund (CMF) generated $20 of additional 
investment for every $1 of award funding. FSC staff estimate that $2.5 
billion in new funding for CMF would produce an additional 449,615 new 
units. FSC staff estimate that $2.5 billion in new funding for CMF 
would produce an additional 449,615 new units.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    H.R. 5187 is supported by the Association of State 
Floodplain Managers, Capital Magnet Fund Coalition, Consortium 
for Citizens With Disabilities Housing Task Force, Corporation 
for Supportive Housing, Council of Large Public Housing 
Authorities, Council of State Community Development Agencies, 
Enterprise Community Partners, Housing Assistance Council, 
LeadingAge, Local Initiatives Support Corporation, Mayors and 
CEOs for U.S. Housing Investment, National Alliance on Mental 
Illness, National Apartment Association, National Association 
for County Community and Economic Development, National 
Association of Counties, National Association of Home Builders, 
National Association of Housing and Redevelopment Officials, 
National Coalition for Asian Pacific American Community 
Development, National Community Development Association, 
National Housing Conference, National Housing Law Project, 
National Housing Trust, National Low Income Housing Coalition, 
National Multifamily Housing Council, National Community 
Reinvestment Coalition, National Urban League, PolicyLink, 
Public Housing Authorities Directors Association, UnidosUS, and 
Up for Growth Action.

                      SECTION-BY-SECTION ANALYSIS

Section 1. Short title

    This section provides that H.R. 5187 may be cited as the 
``Housing is Infrastructure Act of 2019.''

Section 2. Findings

    This section highlights the most recent data on the capital 
needs of federally-subsidized housing and the positive effects 
affordable housing construction has on the U.S. economy.

Section 3. Public Housing Capital Fund

    Subsection (a) of this section authorizes $70 billion over 
five years for the Public Housing Capital Fund.
    Subsection (b) provides that the HUD Secretary distribute 
not less than 35 percent and not more than 75 percent of funds 
provided under this section using the same formula used to 
distribute amounts made available for the Capital Fund for 
fiscal year 2019. It also provides that the Secretary shall 
make all remaining amounts available by competition for 
priority investments, including investments to address lead 
hazards, other urgent health and safety concerns, and other 
priorities identified by the Secretary.
    Subsection (c) requires that funds be expeditiously spent. 
Subsection (d) provides that funds may not be used for 
operating costs or rental assistance, and subsection (e) 
provides for use of funds for administrative purposes. The 
Committee intends that for public housing agencies that are 
designated as troubled and who receive funds provided under 
this section, the Secretary shall provide additional oversight 
and monitoring of those agencies.
    Subsection (f) provides that the Secretary shall ensure 
that amounts provided pursuant to this section supplement and 
not supplant other sources of funding, including Federal, 
State, or local sources. Subsection (g) provides that in 
distributing funding made available under this section, the 
Secretary shall give priority to public housing agencies 
located in States and localities that have a plan to increase 
water and energy efficiency when developing or rehabilitating 
public housing using any amounts distributed.

Section 4. Rural Multifamily Preservation and Revitalization 
        Demonstration Program

    This section authorizes $1 billion for the Multifamily 
Preservation and Revitalization Demonstration program of the 
Rural Housing Service to remain available until expended. This 
section provides that not less than 10 percent of all amounts 
made available under this section must be used only for 
activities related to water and energy efficiency and other 
strategies to reduce emissions.

Section 5. Flood Mitigation Assistance Grant Program

    This section authorizes $1 billion for the Flood Mitigation 
Assistance Grant Program to remain available until expended. 
For multifamily residences and attached and semi-attached 
homes, this section provides that the FEMA Administrator shall 
consult with the HUD Secretary and establish alternative forms 
of mitigation.

Section 6. Housing Trust Fund

    This section authorizes $5 billion for the national Housing 
Trust Fund to remain available until expended. This section 
provides that the HUD Secretary shall ensure that people at 
risk of or experiencing homelessness are given priority to move 
into units assisted with funds made available under this 
section. This section also provides that not less than 10 
percent of all amounts made available under this section must 
be used only for activities related to water and energy 
efficiency and other strategies to reduce emissions.

Section 7. Single-Family Housing Repair Loans and Grants

    This section authorizes $100 million for the Section 504 
Single-Family Housing Repair Loans and Grants program to remain 
available until expended. It also provides that not less than 
10 percent of all amounts made available under this section 
must be used only for activities related to water and energy 
efficiency and other strategies to reduce emissions.

Section 8. Native American Housing Block Grant Program

    This section authorizes $1 billion for the Native American 
Housing Block Grant program to remain available until expended. 
It also provides that not less than 10 percent of all amounts 
made available under this section must be used only for 
activities related to water and energy efficiency and other 
strategies to reduce emissions.

Section 9. HOME Investment Partnerships Program

    This section authorizes $5 billion for the HOME Investment 
Partnerships program to remain available until expended. It 
also provides that not less than 10 percent of all amounts made 
available under this section must be used only for activities 
related to water and energy efficiency and other strategies to 
reduce emissions.

Section 10. Program for Supportive Housing for Persons with 
        Disabilities

    This section authorizes $2.5 billion for Section 811 
Supportive Housing for People with Disabilities program for 
state housing finance agencies to remain available until 
expended. Not less than 10 percent of all amounts made 
available under this section must be used only for activities 
related to water and energy efficiency and other strategies to 
reduce emissions.

Section 11. Program for Supportive Housing for the Elderly

    This section authorizes $2.5 billion for the Section 202 
Supportive Housing for the Elderly program for capital advances 
for new construction, project rental assistance, and supportive 
services. Funds authorized under this section are to remain 
available until 2023. It also provides that not less than 10 
percent of all amounts made available under this section must 
be used only for activities related to water and energy 
efficiency and other strategies to reduce emissions.

Section 12. Capital Magnet Fund

    This section authorizes $2.5 billion for the Capital Magnet 
Fund to remain available until expended. It also provides that 
not less than 10 percent of all amounts made available under 
this section must be used only for activities related to water 
and energy efficiency and other strategies to reduce emissions.

Section 13. Community Development Block Grant funding for affordable 
        housing and infrastructure

    Subsection (a) authorizes $10 billion for the Community 
Development Block Grant (CDBG) program to remain available 
until expended. Subsection (b) provides that amounts made 
available under this section may be used only for: (1) 
developing or preserving qualified affordable housing, 
including construction; (2) the responsible elimination or 
waiving of zoning requirements and other requirements that 
limit affordable housing development; or (3) any project or 
entity eligible for a discretionary grant provided by the 
Department of Transportation.
    Subsection (c) provides that the HUD Secretary shall ensure 
recipients of funds made available under this section are not 
incentivized or rewarded for eliminating or undermining 
regulations that establish fair labor wages, ensure the health 
and safety of buildings for residents and the general public, 
protect fair housing, provide environmental protections, 
prevent tenant displacement, or protect any other public 
interests as determined by the HUD Secretary.
    Subsection (d) provides that CDBG funds be awarded to 
States, units of general local government, and Indian tribes on 
a competitive basis, based on the extent to which the applicant 
(1) demonstrates that the applicant is responsibly streamlining 
the process for development for qualified housing; (2) is 
eliminating or reducing impact fees for housing or other 
assessments, except fees that invested exclusively for housing; 
and (3) provides assurances the applicant will supplement 
assistance provided under this section with non-Federal 
sources.
    Subsection (e) provides that not less than 10 percent of 
all amounts made available under this section must be used only 
for activities related to water and energy efficiency and other 
strategies to reduce emissions. Subsection (f) defines 
``qualified affordable housing'' for purposes of this bill.

Section 14. Inclusion of minority and women's business enterprises

    This section requires each relevant agency head to consult 
and cooperate with grantees when utilizing funds made available 
the Act to promote the inclusion of minority and women's 
business enterprises, and convene meetings with leaders and 
officials of State and local governments, tribal entities, an 
public housing agencies to recommend and promote funding 
opportunities and initiatives needed to advance the position of 
minority and women's business enterprises when competing for 
funds provided by the Act.

                                HEARINGS

    For the purposes of section 103(i) of H. Res. 6 for the 
116th Congress, the Committee on Financial Services held a 
hearing on April 30, 2019, entitled ``Housing in America: 
Assessing the Infrastructure Needs of America's Housing Stock'' 
to consider a discussion draft of H.R. 5187. Testifying before 
the Committee were: Diane Yentel, President and CEO of the 
National Low Income Housing Coalition; Adrianne Todman, CEO of 
the National Association of Housing and Redevelopment 
Officials; Steven Lawson, Chairman of The Lawson Companies and 
representative from the National Association of Home Builders; 
and Daryl Carter, Founder, Chairman and CEO of Avantha Capital, 
on behalf of the National Multifamily Housing Council and the 
National Apartment Association.

                        COMMITTEE CONSIDERATION

    The Committee on Financial Services met in open session on 
February 27, 2020 and ordered H.R 5187 to be reported favorably 
to the House with an amendment in the nature of a substitute by 
a vote of 33 ayes and 25 nays, a quorum being present.

                  COMMITTEE VOTES AND ROLL CALL VOTES

    In compliance with clause 3(b) of rule XIII of the Rules of 
the House of Representatives, the Committee advises that the 
following roll call votes occurred during the Committee's 
consideration of H.R. 5187:

[GRAPHIC(S) NOT AVAILABLE IN TIFF FORMAT]

  STATEMENT OF OVERSIGHT FINDINGS AND RECOMMENDATIONS OF THE COMMITTEE

    In compliance with clause 3(c)(1) of rule XIII and clause 
2(b)(1) of rule X of the Rules of the House of Representatives, 
the Committee's oversight findings and recommendations are 
reflected in the descriptive portions of this report.

             STATEMENT OF PERFORMANCE GOALS AND OBJECTIVES

    Pursuant to clause (3)(c) of rule XIII of the Rules of the 
House of Representatives, the goals of H.R. 5187 are to address 
the shortage of affordable housing in the US by providing 
substantial new federal investments in our country's housing 
infrastructure.

               NEW BUDGET AUTHORITY AND CBO COST ESTIMATE

    Pursuant to clause 3(c)(2) of rule XIII of the Rules of the 
House of Representatives and section 308(a) of the 
Congressional Budget Act of 1974, and pursuant to clause 
3(c)(3) of Rule XIII of the Rules of the House of 
Representatives and section 402 of the Congressional Budget Act 
of 1974, the Committee has received the following estimate for 
H.R. 5187 from the Director of the Congressional Budget Office:

                                     U.S. Congress,
                               Congressional Budget Office,
                                 Washington, DC, December 22, 2020.
Hon. Maxine Waters,
Chairwoman, Committee on Financial Services,
House of Representatives, Washington, DC.
    Dear Madam Chairwoman: The Congressional Budget Office has 
prepared the enclosed cost estimate for H.R. 5187, the Housing 
is Infrastructure Act of 2020.
    If you wish further details on this estimate, we will be 
pleased to provide them. The CBO staff contact is Elizabeth 
Cove Delisle.
            Sincerely,
                                         Phillip L. Swagel,
                                                          Director.
    Enclosure.

[GRAPHIC(S) NOT AVAILABLE IN TIFF FORMAT]
    

    The bill would
           Authorize the appropriation of funds for 
        housing and community development programs
    Estimated budgetary effects would primarily stem from
           Spending of appropriations authorized for 
        existing housing programs
    Areas of significant uncertainty include
           Predicting the types of activities that 
        grantees would carry out with the authorized funds
           Estimating the pace at which housing 
        providers would renovate, build, or acquire housing
    Bill summary: H.R. 5187 would authorize the appropriation 
of $100.6 billion for fiscal year 2021 for housing and 
community development programs. In addition, the bill would 
authorize the appropriation of whatever amounts are necessary 
for capital and operating subsidies for new housing, which CBO 
estimates would total $855 million over the 2021-2025 period. 
CBO estimates that H.R. 5187 would authorize appropriations 
totaling $100.7 billion in 2021 and $101.5 billion over the 
2021-2025 period. The Congress appropriated $20.8 billion for 
those programs in 2020.
    The amounts specifically authorized by the bill for housing 
and community development programs include:
           $70 billion for the Public Housing Capital 
        Fund to improve, finance, or construct public housing;
           $10 billion for the Community Development 
        Block Grant Program to construct and maintain 
        affordable housing, support changes to zoning 
        requirements, and support transportation infrastructure 
        projects;
           $5 billion for the Housing Trust Fund to 
        construct or repair housing that is affordable for low-
        income households;
           $5 billion for the HOME Investment 
        Partnerships program to build, buy, or rehabilitate 
        housing, or to provide rental assistance for low-income 
        households;
           $2.5 billion for the Supportive Housing for 
        Persons with Disabilities program to provide rental 
        subsidies to property owners who make housing and 
        supportive services available to low-income people with 
        disabilities;
           $2.5 billion for the Supportive Housing for 
        the Elderly program to fund housing and supportive 
        services for low-income elderly people;
           $2.5 billion for the Capital Magnet Fund to 
        make grants to financial institutions to incentivize 
        private investment in affordable housing and related 
        economic development activities;
           $1 billion for the Multifamily Preservation 
        and Revitalization Demonstration Program to provide 
        grants and loans to preserve and revitalize multifamily 
        rental housing;
           $1 billion for the Native American Housing 
        Block Grant Program to provide funding for tribes to 
        acquire, construct, rehabilitate, or manage affordable 
        housing for low-income Native American families;
           $1 billion for the Flood Mitigation 
        Assistance Grant Program to reduce the risk of flood 
        damage to communities participating in the National 
        Flood Insurance Program; and
           $100 million for the Department of 
        Agriculture to provide loans or grants to low-income 
        homeowners in rural areas to repair or improve their 
        homes.
    Based on historical spending for those activities, CBO 
estimates that implementing H.R. 5187 would cost $87.8 billion 
over the 2021-2025 period, assuming appropriation of the 
estimated and authorized amounts. The remainder of the amounts 
authorized over that period would be spent after 2025.
    Estimated Federal cost: The estimated budgetary effect of 
H.R. 5187 is shown in Table 1. The costs of the legislation 
fall within budget functions 450 (community and regional 
development) and 600 (education, training, employment, and 
social services).

               TABLE 1.--ESTIMATED INCREASES IN SPENDING SUBJECT TO APPROPRIATION UNDER H.R. 5187
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                  By fiscal year, millions of dollars--
                                                       ---------------------------------------------------------
                                                           2021      2022     2023     2024     2025   2021-2025
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Public Housing Capital Fund:
    Authorization.....................................     70,000        0        0        0        0     70,000
    Estimated Outlays.................................      1,400   14,000   21,000   18,900    7,000     62,300
Community Development Block Grant:
    Authorization.....................................     10,000        0        0        0        0     10,000
    Estimated Outlays.................................         50      500    1,500    2,000    2,500      6,550
Housing Trust Fund:
    Authorization.....................................      5,000        0        0        0        0      5,000
    Estimated Outlays.................................         50      600    1,400    1,250      750      4,050
HOME Program:
    Authorization.....................................      5,000        0        0        0        0      5,000
    Estimated Outlays.................................          0      550    1,100    1,400    1,050      4,100
Housing for Persons With Disabilities:
    Authorization.....................................      2,500        0        0        0        0      2,500
    Estimated Outlays.................................        450    1,250      175       50       75      2,000
Housing for the Elderly:
    Authorization.....................................      2,500        0        0        0        0      2,500
    Estimated Outlays.................................        525    1,575      225       75       50      2,450
Capital Magnet Fund:
    Authorization.....................................      2,500        0        0        0        0      2,500
    Estimated Outlays.................................         75      150      625      825      825      2,500
Multifamily Preservation and Revitalization
 Demonstration:
    Authorization.....................................      1,000        0        0        0        0      1,000
    Estimated Outlays.................................        100      500      400        0        0      1,000
Native American Housing Block Grants:
    Authorization.....................................      1,000        0        0        0        0      1,000
    Estimated Outlays.................................        380      280      140      170       20        990
Flood Mitigation Assistance:
    Authorization.....................................      1,000        0        0        0        0      1,000
    Estimated Outlays.................................         50      100      200      250      300        900
Loans for Repairs of Single-Family Housing:
    Authorization.....................................        100        0        0        0        0        100
    Estimated Outlays.................................         55       30       14        0        0         99
Operating Funds for New Units:
    Estimated Authorization...........................         38       78      120      163      208        607
    Estimated Outlays.................................         38       78      120      163      208        607
Capital Funds for New Units:
    Estimated Authorization...........................         16       32       49       66       85        248
    Estimated Outlays.................................         16       32       49       66       85        248
    Total Changes:....................................
        Estimated Authorization.......................    100,654      110      169      229      293    101,455
        Estimated Outlays.............................      3,189   19,645   26,948   25,149   12,863     87,794
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Basis of estimate: For this estimate, CBO assumes that H.R. 
5187 will be enacted near the start of fiscal year 2021 and 
that the authorized and estimated amounts will be appropriated 
in each year. Except as noted below, estimated outlays are 
based on historical spending patterns for each program.
    Public Housing Capital Fund: The bill would authorize the 
appropriation of $70 billion for 2021 to improve, finance, or 
construct public housing. The Congress appropriated $2.9 
billion for that purpose in 2020. Using information from a 
study by Abt Associates and accounting for capital needs that 
have accumulated since 2010 and for inflation, CBO expects that 
about $60 billion of the amount authorized for capital grants 
would be used to rehabilitate public housing units; the 
remaining $10 billion would be used to build or acquire new 
public housing units.
    Operating and capital funds for new units: CBO expects that 
public housing agencies would be eligible to receive funds from 
the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) for 
operating and capital needs for the new units; those estimated 
authorizations are shown in Table 1. A study by Abt Associates 
found that the average cost to develop a unit funded by the 
Low-Income Housing Tax Credit Program--a program used to 
develop housing for low- and moderate-income households--was 
about $182,000 in 2016. After accounting for inflation, CBO 
estimates that the cost to develop or acquire a public housing 
unit would be about $230,000 in 2021. CBO expects that public 
housing agencies would develop the units over a five-year 
period; therefore, CBO estimates that HUD would provide 
operating and capital funds for about 8,000 new units in 2021 
and a total of 40,000 new units in 2025.
    In 2017, outlays for the operating and capital subsidies 
were $4.3 billion and $1.8 billion, respectively. According to 
data on public housing households from HUD, about 980,000 
households lived in public housing in an average month in the 
same year. Based on that information and after accounting for 
inflation, CBO estimates that HUD would provide an operating 
subsidy of $4,400 and a capital subsidy of $1,800 for each new 
public housing unit in 2021. CBO estimates that spending 
subject to appropriation would increase by a total of $607 
million and $248 million for operating and capital costs, 
respectively, over the 2021-2025 period.
    Uncertainty: CBO's estimate of spending for this bill is 
based on costs and historical spending patterns for similar 
programs or types of assistance. However, CBO cannot precisely 
predict the pace of program implementation. Spending under H.R. 
5187 could be faster or slower than CBO's estimate for two 
reasons:
           Grantees could carry out different 
        activities than they have historically. For example, if 
        a larger share of grantees than expected uses funds to 
        provide rental assistance directly to households or 
        property owners, funds will probably be spent faster 
        than CBO projects.
           Grantees might take longer than expected to 
        renovate, acquire, or build housing. CBO's estimate 
        reflects the expectation that grantees will renovate 
        public housing, and build new housing, at a pace that 
        is consistent with historical spending patterns. 
        However, if grantees expand their programs more slowly 
        than CBO expects, total spending could be slower.
    The cost of implementing the bill could be higher or lower 
than CBO estimates depending on the number of units that 
grantees build or acquire using funds authorized in the bill.
    Pay-As-You-Go considerations: None.
    Increase in long-term deficits: None.
    Mandates: None.
    Estimate prepared by: Federal costs: Elizabeth Cove Delisle 
(housing assistance provisions), Jon Sperl (community 
development provisions); Mandates: Rachel Austin.
    Estimate reviewed by: Sheila Dacey, Chief, Income Security 
and Education Cost Estimates Unit; H. Samuel Papenfuss, Deputy 
Director of Budget Analysis; Theresa Gullo, Director of Budget 
Analysis.

                        COMMITTEE COST ESTIMATE

    Clause 3(d)(1) of rule XIII of the Rules of the House of 
Representatives requires an estimate and a comparison of the 
costs that would be incurred in carrying out H.R. 5187. 
However, clause 3(d)(2)(B) of that rule provides that this 
requirement does not apply when the committee has included in 
its report a timely submitted cost estimate of the bill 
prepared by the Director of the Congressional Budget Office 
under section 402 of the Congressional Budget Act.

                       UNFUNDED MANDATE STATEMENT

    Pursuant to Section 423 of the Congressional Budget and 
Impoundment Control Act (as amended by Section 101(a)(2) of the 
Unfunded Mandates Reform Act, Pub. L. 104-4), the Committee 
adopts as its own the estimate of federal mandates regarding 
H.R. 5187, as amended, prepared by the Director of the 
Congressional Budget Office.

                           ADVISORY COMMITTEE

    No advisory committees within the meaning of section 5(b) 
of the Federal Advisory Committee Act were created by this 
legislation

              APPLICATION OF LAW TO THE LEGISLATIVE BRANCH

    Pursuant to section 102(b)(3) of the Congressional 
Accountability Act, Pub. L. No. 104-1, H.R. 5187, as amended, 
does not apply to terms and conditions of employment or to 
access to public services or accommodations within the 
legislative branch.

                           EARMARK STATEMENT

    In accordance with clause 9 of rule XXI of the Rules of the 
House of Representatives, H.R. 5187 does not contain any 
congressional earmarks, limited tax benefits, or limited tariff 
benefits as described in clauses 9(e), 9(f), and 9(g) of rule 
XXI.

                    DUPLICATION OF FEDERAL PROGRAMS

    Pursuant to clause 3(c)(5) of rule XIII of the Rules of the 
House of Representatives, the Committee states that no 
provision of H.R. 5187 establishes or reauthorizes a program of 
the Federal Government known to be duplicative of another 
federal program, a program that was included in any report from 
the Government Accountability Office to Congress pursuant to 
section 21 of Public Law 111-139, or a program related to a 
program identified in the most recent Catalog of Federal 
Domestic Assistance.

                        CHANGES TO EXISTING LAW

    H.R. 5187 does not make any changes to existing law, so no 
document is required in order to comply with clause 3(e) of 
rule XIII of the Rules of the House of Representatives,

                             MINORITY VIEWS

    Democrats want to throw hundreds of billions of dollars at 
outdated and ineffective public housing programs, while 
Republicans believe modernizing and improving these programs 
will be necessary to address Americans' housing needs.
    The Department of Housing and Urban Development's (HUD) 
public housing programs require significant reforms to 
strengthen America's housing supply. Committee Republicans want 
to bring HUD's programs into the 21st century to help 
households move toward a model of opportunity and self-
sufficiency, instead of keeping low-income families in areas of 
concentrated poverty.
    Democrats' H.R. 5187 authorizes approximately $100 billion 
but fails to modernize any of the housing programs--trapping 
struggling Americans in outdated low-income housing programs. 
The COVID-19 pandemic has only proven the inefficiency of these 
programs as millions of families struggle with housing 
insecurity, unsafe conditions, and even homelessness.
    HUD's housing programs should be modernized with proven 
solutions. Republicans offered three commonsense amendments 
during Committee markup that would have addressed the 
shortfalls of H.R. 5187--every amendment was rejected by 
Democrats:
           Rep. Budd offered an amendment to require 
        states or localities to provide non-federal matching 
        funds to increase the impact and local oversight of 
        these funds. The cost of repairs to aging local housing 
        stock cannot be the responsibility of the federal 
        government alone.
           Rep. Huizenga offered an amendment to stop 
        funds under the bill from going to any housing 
        authority that has committed fraud with federal funds 
        or has used federal funding to violate fair housing 
        laws. Without enhanced oversight and accountability 
        measures, taxpayers are at risk of bailing out the same 
        troubled housing authorities whose mismanagement wasted 
        previous spending. In fact, two of the nation's largest 
        housing authorities--NYCHA and the City of Los 
        Angeles--were each sued by and settled with HUD for 
        fraud, failure to enforce federal laws, and repeated 
        tenant safety violations.
           Rep. Stivers offered an amendment that would 
        increase the utilization of the bipartisan Rental 
        Assistance Demonstration, which injects private capital 
        into public housing.
    Each of these amendments would have dramatically improved 
H.R. 5187 by increasing local accountability and flexibility in 
how best to meet the 21st century housing needs of individuals.
    History has repeatedly shown increasing funding alone will 
not solve our housing challenges. Republicans remain ready to 
work on bipartisan reforms to modernize the ineffective and 
outdated programs of HUD.
    For these reasons, Committee Republicans oppose H.R. 5187.

                                   Patrick T. McHenry.
                                   Bill Posey.
                                   Bill Huizenga.
                                   Ann Wagner.
                                   Scott R. Tipton.
                                   J. French Hill.
                                   Lee M. Zeldin.
                                   Alexander X. Mooney.
                                   Ted Budd.
                                   Trey Hollingsworth.
                                   John W. Rose.
                                   Lance Gooden.
                                   William R. Timmons IV.
                                   Frank D. Lucas.
                                   Blaine Luetkemeyer.
                                   Steve Stivers.
                                   Andy Barr.
                                   Roger Williams.
                                   Tom Emmer.
                                   Barry Loudermilk.
                                   Warren Davidson.
                                   David Kustoff.
                                   Anthony Gonzalez.
                                   Bryan Steil.
                                   Denver Riggleman.
                                   Van Taylor.

                                  [all]