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                                                     Calendar No. 304
116th Congress     }                                   {       Report
                                 SENATE
 1st Session       }                                   {      116-158
_______________________________________________________________________

                                     


                 GOVERNMENT SHUTDOWN ACCOUNTABILITY ACT

                               __________

                              R E P O R T

                                 of the

                   COMMITTEE ON HOMELAND SECURITY AND

                          GOVERNMENTAL AFFAIRS

                          UNITED STATES SENATE

                              to accompany

                                S. 1877

         TO ESTABLISH PROCEDURES AND CONSEQUENCES IN THE EVENT
            OF A FAILURE TO COMPLETE REGULAR APPROPRIATIONS




              [GRAPHIC(S) NOT AVAILABLE IN TIFF FORMAT]






               November 12, 2019.--Ordered to be printed
                               __________

                      U.S. GOVERNMENT PUBLISHING OFFICE
                      
99-010                     WASHINGTON : 2019 





















        COMMITTEE ON HOMELAND SECURITY AND GOVERNMENTAL AFFAIRS

                    RON JOHNSON, Wisconsin, Chairman
ROB PORTMAN, Ohio                    GARY C. PETERS, Michigan
RAND PAUL, Kentucky                  THOMAS R. CARPER, Delaware
JAMES LANKFORD, Oklahoma             MAGGIE HASSAN, New Hampshire
MITT ROMNEY, Utah                    KAMALA D. HARRIS, California
RICK SCOTT, Florida                  KYRSTEN SINEMA, Arizona
MICHAEL B. ENZI, Wyoming             JACKY ROSEN, Nevada
JOSH HAWLEY, Missouri

                Gabrielle D'Adamo Singer, Staff Director
                   Joseph C. Folio III, Chief Counsel
       Patrick J. Bailey, Chief Counsel for Governmental Affairs
               David M. Weinberg, Minority Staff Director
               Zachary I. Schram, Minority Chief Counsel
              Michelle M. Benecke, Minority Senior Counsel
                     Laura W. Kilbride, Chief Clerk




















                                                     Calendar No. 304
116th Congress     }                                   {       Report
                                 SENATE
 1st Session       }                                   {      116-158

======================================================================



 
                 GOVERNMENT SHUTDOWN ACCOUNTABILITY ACT

                                _______
                                

                November 12, 2019.--Ordered to be printed

                                _______
                                

 Mr. Johnson, from the Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental 
                    Affairs, submitted the following

                              R E P O R T

                         [To accompany S. 1877]

      [Including cost estimate of the Congressional Budget Office]

    The Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental 
Affairs, to which was referred the bill (S. 1877) to establish 
procedures and consequences in the event of a failure to 
complete regular appropriations, and for other purposes, having 
considered the same, reports favorably thereon with an 
amendment (in the nature of a substitute) and recommends that 
the bill, as amended, do pass.

                                CONTENTS

                                                                   Page
  I. Purpose and Summary..............................................1
 II. Background and Need for the Legislation..........................2
III. Legislative History..............................................3
 IV. Section-by-Section Analysis......................................4
  V. Evaluation of Regulatory Impact..................................5
 VI. Congressional Budget Office Cost Estimate........................6
VII. Changes in Existing Law Made by the Bill, as Reported............7

                         I. Purpose and Summary

    S. 1877, the Prevent Government Shutdowns Act of 2019, 
seeks to end government shutdowns during a lapse in 
appropriations by providing for an automatic appropriation at 
current levels and providing incentives for Congress to pass 
regular appropriations while automatic appropriations are in 
place. The legislation limits official travel of Members of 
Congress and senior Executive Branch officials and holds 
Members' pay in escrow during a period of automatic 
appropriations. It also requires daily quorum calls and 
prohibits business from being in order on the Senate and House 
floor other than appropriations bills.

              II. Background and the Need for Legislation

    According to the Antideficiency Act, Federal agencies are 
unable to spend funds in the absence of appropriations except 
for activities involving ``the safety of human life or the 
protection of property.''\1\ Therefore, when Congress and the 
President fail to agree on any one of twelve appropriations 
bills or enact a continuing resolution, agencies are forced to 
cease certain activities, resulting in what is known as a 
``government shutdown.''\2\ Since 2011, the United States has 
experienced three government shutdowns and passed 34 continuing 
resolutions to avoid a shutdown.\3\
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    \1\31 U.S.C. 1341-1342, 1511-1519.
    \2\Cong. Research Serv., RS20348, Federal Funding Gaps: A Brief 
Overview (Feb. 4, 2019), https://crsreports.congress.gov/product/pdf/
RS/RS20348.
    \3\Cong. Research Serv., R42647, Continuing Resolutions: Overview 
of Components and Practices (Apr. 19, 2019).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Government shutdowns result in furloughs for Federal 
employees who do not perform duties excepted under the 
Antideficiency Act, and the withholding of pay from excepted 
employees while they work until Congress appropriates funds.\4\ 
The lack of funding has an irreversible impact on economic 
activity, government revenue, and homeland security.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    \4\Id.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Government shutdowns are harmful to the economy. The 
Congressional Budget Office recently estimated that the most 
recent shutdown--December 2018 to February 2019--cost the 
economy $11 billion, including reducing the United States' real 
gross domestic product (GDP).\5\ This is due to the 
unavailability of some government services, the temporary 
decrease in Federal spending on goods and services, and 
decreased output in the private sector due to temporary 
reduction in aggregate demand.\6\ Although a portion of the 
reduction in GDP is offset when the Federal Government resumes 
operations, the most recent government shutdown resulted in an 
estimated $3 billion of forgone economic activity will never be 
recovered.\7\
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    \5\Cong. Budget Office, The Effects of the Partial Shutdown Ending 
in January 2019, at 6 (Jan. 2019), https://www.cbo.gov/system/
files?file=2019-01/54937-PartialShutdownEffects.pdf [hereinafter CBO 
Report].
    \6\Id.
    \7\Id. at 6-7.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Government shutdowns affect the collection of some fees and 
fines.\8\ In most cases, uncollected fees are eventually 
recovered upon resumption of funding. Some collections, 
however, are permanently lost due to their association with 
lack of economic activity during the shutdown.\9\ For example, 
the National Park Service reported that national parks lost 
about $400,000 per day in fees during the 2018-19 government 
shutdown.\10\
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    \8\Id. at 5.
    \9\Id. at 5-6.
    \10\Denise Lu and Anjali Singhvi, Government Shutdown Timeline: See 
how the Effects are Piling Up, N.Y. TIMES (Jan. 28, 2019), https://
www.nytimes.com/interactive/2019/01/08/us/politics/government-shutdown-
calendar.html.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Government shutdowns also pose a national security risk due 
to the lack of funding for agencies tasked with minimizing 
those risks.\11\ Although most employees involved in the 
protection of the nation are excepted under the Antideficiency 
Act and therefore expected to work without pay, during the 
2018-19 government shutdown, a number of Transportation 
Security Administration (TSA) agents called out sick causing 
understaffing and security checkpoint closures.\12\ In 
addition, a shortage of airport traffic controllers not only 
resulted in flight cancelations, plane rerouting and airport 
delays, it also exposed our nation to potential safety issues 
and threats.\13\
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    \11\CBO Report at 11.
    \12\Patrick McGeehan, Government Shutdown Forces Airports to Rely 
on Backup Security Screeners, N.Y. Times (Jan. 22, 2019), https://
www.nytimes.com/2019/01/22/nyregion/shutdown-airports-security.html.
    \13\Id.; Patrick McGeehan, Shutdown Sets Off Airport Delays as 
F.A.A. Announces Staffing Shortages, N.Y. Times (Jan. 25, 2019), 
https://www.nytimes.com/2019/01/25/nyregion/airports-shutdown-
laguardia-faa.html.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Government shutdowns have other indirect negative effects, 
such as the cancellation of thousands of immigration hearings, 
adding thousands of cases to an active case backlog.\14\
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    \14\CBO Report at 8-9; TRAC Report, Inc. at Syracuse Univ., 
Cancelled Immigration Court Hearings Grow as Shutdown Continues (Jan. 
14, 2019), https://trac.syr.edu/immigration/reports/543/ (last visited 
Sept. 17, 2019).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    The Prevent Government Shutdowns Act of 2019 addresses the 
negative consequences of government shutdowns by preventing 
them altogether. The legislation provides that, in the event of 
a lapse in appropriations, Federal programs and activities are 
automatically appropriated at the most recent funding level. 
This ensures that the Federal Government can continue to 
operate until Congress passes and the President signs 
appropriations bills for the activities or a continuing 
resolution is enacted.
    In order to ensure that Congress does not rely on automatic 
appropriations for an extended period of time, the legislation 
bans expenditures for official travel for Members of Congress 
and certain Executive Branch employees when an automatic 
appropriation is in place, holds Members' pay in escrow, and 
makes all business other than appropriations out of order in 
the House and Senate, except certain emergency legislation. The 
bill allows for waiver of this requirement with a two-thirds 
vote in order to proceed to any legislation or nomination in 
the event of a true emergency. The legislation also requires 
daily quorum calls to ensure Members are available to end the 
automatic appropriation and fund government through a regular 
appropriations measure.

                        III. Legislative History

    S. 1877, the Prevent Government Shutdowns Act of 2019, was 
introduced on June 18, 2019, by Senators James Lankford (R-OK), 
Maggie Hassan (D-NH) and Ron Johnson (R-WI). Senator Mike Braun 
later joined as a cosponsor. The bill was referred to the 
Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs.
    The Committee considered S. 1877 at a business meeting on 
June 19, 2019. Senators Lankford, Hassan, Johnson, Rosen, and 
Sinema offered a modified substitute amendment that changed the 
short title of the legislation and added a section imposing an 
automatic continuing appropriation in the event of a lapse in 
regular appropriations. The amendment was adopted, as modified, 
by unanimous consent.
    Sen. Rand Paul offered an amendment to strike the text of 
S. 1877 and replace it with language that would, in the event 
of a lapse of any regular appropriations, provide for an 
immediate one percent reduction in spending, and an additional 
one percent reduction every 90 days thereafter during the 
lapse. Paul Amendment 1 was not adopted by roll call vote (2 
Yeas, 12 Nays). Senators Paul and Enzi voted yea. Senators 
Johnson, Portman, Lankford, Romney, Scott, Hawley, Peters, 
Carper, Hassan, Sinema, and Rosen voted nay. Senator Harris 
voted nay by proxy.
    Senator Rick Scott offered an amendment to restrict the pay 
of Members of Congress during a failure of Congress to pass a 
budget resolution or any regular appropriations bill. Senator 
Sinema offered a second degree amendment to Scott Amendment 1 
to replace the Scott text with language that would instead hold 
the pay of Members of Congress in escrow during only a lapse in 
regular appropriations, to be returned to Members of Congress 
at the end of the lapse or the end of the Congress, whichever 
is earlier. The Sinema second degree amendment was adopted by 
voice vote with Senators Johnson, Portman, Paul, Lankford, 
Romney, Scott, Enzi, Hawley, Peters, Hassan, Sinema, and Rosen 
present. Scott Amendment 1, as amended by the Sinema second 
degree amendment, was adopted by roll call vote (9 Yeas, 5 
Nays). Senators voting in the affirmative were Scott, Enzi, 
Hawley, Peters, Hassan, Sinema, Rosen, Carper (by proxy), and 
Harris (by proxy). Senators voting in the negative were 
Johnson, Portman, Paul, Lankford, and Romney.
    The Committee ordered the bill, as amended, reported 
favorably by a roll call vote (10 Yeas, 2 Nays). Senators 
voting in the affirmative were Johnson, Lankford, Romney, 
Scott, Enzi, Hawley, Peters, Hassan, Sinema, and Rosen. 
Senators voting in the negative were Portman and Paul. For the 
record only, Senators Carper and Harris voted Yea by proxy.

        IV. Section-by-Section Analysis of the Bill, as Reported


Section 1. Short title

    This section designates the short title of the bill as the 
``Prevent Government Shutdowns Act of 2019.''

Section 2. Automatic continuing appropriations

    This section effectively ends government shutdowns. It 
imposes automatic continuing funding at the rate of the 
previous fiscal year's funding in the event of a failure to 
pass one or more appropriation bills or a continuing 
resolution. This section also includes language to ensure that 
sequester is not inadvertently triggered in the case of an 
automatic continuing resolution.
    This section makes clear that any funds made available by 
this section (during the lapse in regular appropriations) are 
subject to the terms and conditions imposed on such funds for 
the previous fiscal year or other authority grants for such 
program under current law, and charged to the appropriate 
appropriation or fund whenever a regular appropriation is 
enacted or a continuing appropriation resolution is passed.
    Finally, this section clarifies that an automatic 
appropriation under this section will not occur with respect to 
any program, project or activity if any other provision of law 
has made funds available or granted authority for the program 
to continue, or specifically provided that no funds shall be 
made available.

Section 3. Timely enactment of regular appropriation acts

    This section provides incentives to ensure Members of 
Congress work toward passing all regular appropriation bills 
during any lapse. Subsection (a) of this section includes 
definitions of the terms ``covered officer or employee,'' 
``covered period,'' ``emergency legislation,'' ``Member of 
Congress,'' and ``National Capital Region.''
    Subsection (b) of this section limits official travel 
expenditures for Members of Congress and senior Executive 
Branch officials during a lapse in regular appropriations, to 
expenditures for return trips to Washington, D.C. and travel in 
the National Capital Region. This includes the use of campaign 
funds for official travel during a lapse in regular 
appropriations.
    Subsection (c) of this section states that, during a lapse 
of regular appropriations, it shall be out of order to: proceed 
to any business on the House or Senate floor during a lapse in 
regular appropriations except for (1) a measure making 
appropriations for the fiscal year during which the lapse in 
regular appropriations begins; (2) certain emergency 
legislation; or (3) a motion to determine or obtain the 
presence of a quorum; and to move to recess or adjourn for more 
than 23 hours. It also requires the Presiding Officer to direct 
the clerk to determine whether a quorum is present at noon each 
day during a lapse in regular appropriations. Finally, 
subsection (c) provides for a waiver of these rules for not 
more than seven days with a two-thirds vote of the House or 
Senate.

Section 4. Prohibiting paying Members of Congress if automatic 
        continuing appropriations are in effect

    This section defines the terms ``lapse in normal 
appropriations,'' ``Member of Congress,'' and ``payroll 
administrator.''
    This section directs the payroll administrator of each 
House of Congress to hold the salary of each Member of Congress 
in an escrow account during the period of lapse in regular 
appropriations. Salary pay shall be released to Members of 
Congress on the earlier of the date on which the lapse of 
regular appropriations ends or the last day of the Congress 
during which the lapse began.

                   V. Evaluation of Regulatory Impact

    Pursuant to the requirements of paragraph 11(b) of rule 
XXVI of the Standing Rules of the Senate, the Committee has 
considered the regulatory impact of this bill and determined 
that the bill will have no regulatory impact within the meaning 
of the rules. The Committee agrees with the Congressional 
Budget Office's statement that the bill contains no 
intergovernmental or private-sector mandates as defined in the 
Unfunded Mandates Reform Act and would not affect the budgets 
of state, local, or tribal governments.

             VI. Congressional Budget Office Cost Estimate

                                     U.S. Congress,
                               Congressional Budget Office,
                                     Washington, DC, July 25, 2019.
Hon. Ron Johnson,
Chairman, Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs, U.S. 
        Senate, Washington, DC.
    Dear Mr. Chairman: The Congressional Budget Office has 
prepared the enclosed cost estimate for S. 1877, the Prevent 
Government Shutdowns Act of 2019.
    If you wish further details on this estimate, we will be 
pleased to provide them. The CBO staff contact is Matthew 
Pickford.
            Sincerely,
                                         Phillip L. Swagel,
                                                          Director.
    Enclosure.

              [GRAPHIC(S) NOT AVAILABLE IN TIFF FORMAT]
    

    In the event that annual appropriation acts are not enacted 
by October 1 of each fiscal year, S. 1877 would provide 
mandatory appropriations to continue federal government 
operations at the same rate as in the previous fiscal year. For 
this estimate, CBO assumes that under S. 1877 each agency would 
automatically receive an appropriation of the same amount as in 
the previous fiscal year.
    In addition, official travel by certain individuals in the 
executive and legislative branch would be prohibited while 
automatic appropriations are in effect, except for travel to 
return to Washington, DC; the bill also would direct that 
salaries of Members of Congress not be paid (placed in escrow) 
until all annual appropriation acts are enacted.
    S. 1877 would appropriate funds, and thus would increase 
direct spending. For fiscal year 2019, the Congress 
appropriated about $1.4 trillion for federal agency operations 
and activities; the Congress has also appropriated about $0.1 
trillion for fiscal year 2020 for those purposes. Thus, to 
maintain the same spending level as in 2019, S. 1877 would 
provide appropriations totaling $1.3 trillion in 2020 and $1.4 
trillion in each subsequent year, CBO estimates. Based on 
historical spending patterns, CBO estimates that new direct 
spending from those appropriations would total $0.7 trillion in 
2020 and $12.2 trillion over the 2020-2029 period.
    S. 1877 also would increase spending from contract 
authority (a mandatory form of budget authority provided to 
certain transportation programs). Outlays from that contact 
authority are generally considered discretionary because they 
are controlled by obligation limitations set in annual 
appropriation acts. In addition, pursuant to provisions of law 
that govern CBO's baseline projections, funding for certain 
expiring programs--such as contract authority for 
transportation grants--is assumed to continue beyond the 
scheduled expiration date for purposes of budget projections. 
Consistent with that practice, CBO's baseline incorporates the 
assumption that contract authority in 2020 and later years will 
continue beyond 2020. CBO estimates that the spending of this 
contract authority would total $0.4 trillion over the 2020 
through 2029 period.

                                             TABLE 1.--ESTIMATED INCREASES IN DIRECT SPENDING UNDER S. 1877
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                     By fiscal year, trillions of dollars--
                                                      --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                        2019   2020   2021   2022   2023   2024   2025   2026   2027   2028   2029  2019-2024  2019-2029
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Regular Appropriations:
    Estimated Budget Authority.......................      0    1.3    1.4    1.4    1.4    1.4    1.4    1.4    1.4    1.4    1.4       6.7       13.5
    Estimated Outlays................................      0    0.7    1.1    1.2    1.3    1.3    1.3    1.3    1.3    1.3    1.3       5.6       12.2
Obligation Limitation:
    Estimated Budget Authority.......................      0      0      0      0      0      0      0      0      0      0      0         0          0
    Estimated Outlays................................      0      *      *      *      *      *      *      *    0.1    0.1    0.1       0.2        0.4
    Total:
        Estimated Budget Authority...................      0    1.3    1.4    1.4    1.4    1.4    1.4    1.4    1.4    1.4    1.4       6.7       13.5
    Estimated Outlays................................      0    0.7    1.1    1.3    1.3    1.4    1.4    1.4    1.4    1.4    1.4       5.8       12.6
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Components may not sum to totals because of rounding; * = between zero and $50 billion.

    Whether the authority provided under S. 1877 were triggered 
in the future, and the timing and magnitude of the resulting 
direct spending, would depend on future decisions of the 
Congress. As a result, CBO's estimate of direct spending under 
S. 1877 is uncertain. If the Congress were to provide some or 
all of the normal discretionary appropriations in future years, 
total direct spending under S. 1877 would be less than 
indicated in this estimate. Historically, lapses in 
discretionary appropriations have been relatively infrequent 
and short-lived. However, CBO has no basis for predicting the 
timing or duration of future lapses in discretionary funding.
    CBO estimates that enacting S. 1877 would increase on-
budget deficits by more than $5 billion in all of the four 
consecutive 10-year periods beginning in 2030.
    The CBO staff contact for this estimate is Matthew 
Pickford. The estimate was reviewed by H. Samuel Papenfuss, 
Deputy Assistant Director for Budget Analysis.

       VII. Changes in Existing Law Made by the Bill, as Reported

    In compliance with paragraph 12 of rule XXVI of the 
Standing Rules of the Senate, changes in existing law made by 
S. 1877 as reported are shown as follows (existing law proposed 
to be omitted is enclosed in brackets, new matter is printed in 
italic, and existing law in which no change is proposed is 
shown in roman):

UNITED STATES CODE

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


TITLE 31--MONEY AND FINANCE

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


Subtitle II--The Budget Process

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


CHAPTER 13--APPROPRIATIONS

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *



Subchapter I--General

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *



SEC. 1311. AUTOMATIC CONTINUING APPROPRIATIONS.

    (a)
          (1)
                  (A) On and after the first day of each fiscal 
                year, if an appropriation Act for Such fiscal 
                year with respect to the account for a program, 
                project, or activity has not been enacted and 
                continuing appropriations are not in effect 
                with respect to the program, project, or 
                activity, there are appropriated such sums as 
                may be necessary to continue, at the rate for 
                operations specified in subparagraph (B), the 
                program, project, or activity if funds were 
                provided for the program, project, or activity 
                during the preceding fiscal year.
                  (B)
                          (i) Except as provided in clause 
                        (ii), the rate for operations specified 
                        in this subparagraph with respect to a 
                        program, project, or activity is the 
                        rate for operations for the preceding 
                        fiscal year for the program, project, 
                        or activity--
                                  (I) provided in the 
                                corresponding appropriation Act 
                                for such preceding fiscal year;
                                  (II) if the corresponding 
                                appropriation bill for such 
                                preceding fiscal year was not 
                                enacted, provided in the law 
                                providing for continuing 
                                appropriations for such 
                                preceding fiscal year; or
                                  (III) if the corresponding 
                                appropriations bill and a law 
                                providing continuing 
                                appropriations for such 
                                preceding fiscal year were not 
                                enacted, provided under this 
                                section for such preceding 
                                fiscal year.
                          (ii) For entitlements and other 
                        mandatory payments whose budget 
                        authority was provided for the previous 
                        fiscal year in appropriations Acts, 
                        under a law other than this section 
                        providing continuing appropriations for 
                        such previous year, or under this 
                        section, and for activities under the 
                        Food and Nutrition Act of 2008, 
                        appropriations and funds made available 
                        during a fiscal year under this section 
                        shall be at the rate necessary to 
                        maintain program levels under current 
                        law, under the authority and conditions 
                        provided in the applicable 
                        appropriations Act.
          (2) Appropriations and funds made available, and 
        authority granted, for any fiscal year pursuant to this 
        section for a program, project, or activity shall be 
        available for the period beginning with the first day 
        of any lapse in appropriations during such fiscal year 
        and ending with the date on which the applicable 
        regular appropriation bill for such fiscal year is 
        enacted (whether or not such law provides 
        appropriations for such program, project, or activity) 
        or a law making continuing appropriations for the 
        program, project, or activity is enacted, as the case 
        may be.
          (3) Notwithstanding section 251(a)(1) of the Balanced 
        Budget and Emergency Deficit Control Act of 1985 (2 
        U.S.C. 901(a)(1) and the timetable in section 254(a) of 
        such Act (2 U.S.C. 904(1)), for any fiscal year for 
        which appropriations and funds are made available under 
        this section, the final sequestration report for such 
        fiscal year pursuant to section 254(f)(1) of such Act 
        (2 U.S.C. 904(f)(1)) and any order for such fiscal year 
        pursuant to section 254(f)(5) of such Act (2 U.S.C. 
        901(f)(5)) shall be issued--
                  (A) for the Congressional Budget Office, 10 
                days after the date on which all regular 
                appropriations Acts for such fiscal year or 
                continuing appropriations through the end of 
                such fiscal year or continuing appropriations 
                through the end of such fiscal year have been 
                enacted; and
                  (B) for the Office of Management and Budget, 
                15 days after the date on which all regular 
                appropriations Acts for such fiscal year or 
                continuing appropriations through the end of 
                such fiscal year have been enacted.
    (b) An appropriation or funds made available, or authority 
granted, for a program, project, or activity, for any fiscal 
year pursuant to this section shall be subject to the terms and 
conditions imposed with respect to the appropriation made or 
funds made available for the preceding fiscal year, or 
authority granted for such program, project or activity under 
current law.
    (c) Expenditures made for a program, project, or activity 
for any fiscal year pursuant to this section shall be charged 
to the applicable appropriation, fund, or authorization 
whenever a regular appropriation Act, or a law making 
continuing appropriations until the end of such fiscal year, 
for such program, project, or activity is enacted.
    (d) This section shall not apply to a program, project, or 
activity during a fiscal year if any other provision of law 
(other than an authorization of appropriations)--
          (1) makes an appropriation, makes funds available, or 
        grants authority for such program, project, or activity 
        to continue for such period; or
          (2) specifically provides that no appropriation shall 
        be made, no funds shall be made available, or no 
        authority shall be granted for such program, project, 
        or activity to continue for such period.

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


TITLE 52--VOTING AND ELECTIONS

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


Subtitle III--Federal Campaign Finance

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


CHAPTER 301--FEDERAL ELECTION CAMPAIGNS

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *



Subchapter I--Disclosure of Federal Campaign Funds

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *



SEC. 30114. USE OF CONTRIBUTED AMOUNTS FOR CERTAIN PURPOSES.

    (a) * * *
          (1) * * *
          (2) [for ordinary] except as provided in subsection 
        (d), for ordinary and necessary expenses incurred in 
        connection with duties of the individual as a holder of 
        Federal office;

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

    (d) Restriction on Use of Campaign Funds for Official 
Travel During Lapse in Appropriations.--
          (1) In general.--Except as provided in paragraph (2), 
        during a covered period (as defined in section 3 of the 
        Prevent Government Shutdowns Act of 2019), a 
        contribution or donation described in subsection (a) 
        may not be obligated or expended for travel in 
        connection with duties of the individual as a holder of 
        Federal office.
          (2) Return to dc.--If the individual is away from the 
        seat of Government on the date on which a covered 
        period (as so defined) begins, a contribution or 
        donation described in subsection (a) may be obligated 
        and expended for travel by the individual to return to 
        the seat of Government.

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


                                  [all]