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                                                     Calendar No. 402


116th Congress   }                                            {  Report
                                 SENATE                          
 2d Session      }                                            {  116-193
_______________________________________________________________________

                                     

                                                       


                LUKE AND ALEX SCHOOL SAFETY ACT OF 2019

                               __________

                              R E P O R T

                                 of the

                   COMMITTEE ON HOMELAND SECURITY AND

                          GOVERNMENTAL AFFAIRS

                          UNITED STATES SENATE

                              to accompany

                                S. 2779

TO ESTABLISH THE FEDERAL CLEARINGHOUSE ON SCHOOL SAFETY BEST PRACTICES, 
                         AND FOR OTHER PURPOSES
                         
                         


[GRAPHIC(S) NOT AVAILABLE IN TIFF FORMAT]




                January 6, 2020.--Ordered to be printed
                
                
                
                           ______

              U.S. GOVERNMENT PUBLISHING OFFICE 
 99-010                 WASHINGTON : 2020                
 
 
                
                
                
        COMMITTEE ON HOMELAND SECURITY AND GOVERNMENTAL AFFAIRS

                    ROB JOHNSON, Wisconsin, Chairman
ROB PORTMAN, Ohio                    GARY C. PETERS, Michigan
RAND PAUL, Kentucky                  THOMAS R. CARPER, Delaware
JAMES LANKFORD, Oklahoma             MAGGIE HASSAN, New Hampshire
MITT ROMNEY, Utah                    KAMALA D. HARRIS, California
RICK SCOTT, Florida                  KYRSTEN SINEMA, Arizona
MICHAEL B. ENZI, Wyoming             JACKY ROSEN, Nevada
JOSH HAWLEY, Missouri
                Gabrielle D'Adamo Singer, Staff Director
                   Joseph C. Folio III, Chief Counsel
 Courtney Allen Rutland, Deputy Chief Counsel for Governmental Affairs
               William W. Sacripanti, Research Assistant
               David M. Weinberg, Minority Staff Director
               Zachary I. Schram, Minority Chief Counsel
                    Roy S. Awabdeh, Minority Counsel
     Jeffrey D. Rothblum, Minority Senior Professional Staff Member
                     Laura W. Kilbride, Chief Clerk
                     
                     
                     
                     
                     

                                                       Calendar No. 402
                                                       
                                                       
116th Congress  }                                             {    Report
                                 SENATE
 2nd Session    }                                             {   116-193

======================================================================



 
                LUKE AND ALEX SCHOOL SAFETY ACT OF 2019

                                _______
                                

                January 6, 2020.--Ordered to be printed

                                _______
                                

 Mr. Johnson, from the Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental 
                    Affairs, submitted the following

                              R E P O R T

                         [To accompany S. 2779]

      [Including cost estimate of the Congressional Budget Office]

    The Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental 
Affairs, to which was referred the bill (S. 2779) to establish 
the Federal Clearinghouse on School Safety Best Practices, and 
for other purposes, having considered the same, reports 
favorably thereon with amendments and recommends that the bill, 
as amended, do pass.

                                CONTENTS

                                                                   Page
  I. Purpose and Summary..............................................1
 II. Background and Need for the Legislation..........................2
III. Legislative History..............................................5
 IV. Section-by-Section Analysis......................................6
  V. Evaluation of Regulatory Impact..................................7
 VI. Congressional Budget Office Cost Estimate........................7
VII. Changes in Existing Law Made by the Bill, as Reported............8

                         I. Purpose and Summary

    The purpose of S. 2779, the Luke and Alex School Safety Act 
of 2019 (LASSA), is to codify the Federal Clearinghouse on 
School Safety Best Practices (``Clearinghouse''). The 
Clearinghouse will help inform school and community officials 
and parents on the best practices for school safety measures, 
as well as available resources for implementing such measures 
in their schools and specify criteria for best practices and a 
process for the clearinghouse. Specifically this bill would 
create a codified structure for the Clearinghouse, which would 
``be the primary resource of the Federal Government to identify 
and publish the best practices and recommendations for school 
safety for use by State and local educational agencies, 
institutions of higher education, State and local law 
enforcement agencies, health professionals, and the general 
public.''\1\ The bill also requires the Federal agencies 
involved in the development of the Clearinghouse--the 
Department of Homeland Security (DHS), Department of Justice 
(DOJ), the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), and 
the Department of Education (Education)--to notify their state 
counterparts of the Clearinghouse and to identify available 
Federal and state grant programs for implementing Clearinghouse 
best practices.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    \1\S. 2779, 116th Cong. (2019).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

              II. Background and the Need for Legislation

    On February 14, 2018, a former student entered Marjory 
Stoneman Douglas High School (MSDHS) in Parkland, Florida and 
killed 17 teachers and students and injured 17 others.\2\ After 
the attack, then-Florida Governor Rick Scott signed the Marjory 
Stoneman Douglas High School Public Safety Act. The Act 
established the Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School Public 
Safety Commission (the Florida commission).\3\ The Florida 
commission was tasked to ``analyze information from the MSDHS 
shooting and other mass violence incidents, and provide 
recommendations and system improvements to help mitigate the 
impacts from and prevent future school shootings.''\4\
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    \2\Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School Public Safety Comm'n, 
Initial Report 7 (2019), available at http://www.fdle.state.fl.us/
MSDHS/CommissionReport.pdf [hereinafter ``January 2019 Report''].
    \3\Id.
    \4\Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School Public Safety Comm'n, 
Second Report 4 (2019), available at http://www.fdle.state.fl.us/MSDHS/
MSD-Report-2-Public-Version.pdf [hereinafter ``November 2019 Report''].
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    The Florida commission issued an initial report on January 
2, 2019,\5\ followed by a second report on November 1, 2019.\6\ 
The 439-page initial report found many causes that contributed 
to the magnitude of the MSDHS shooting:
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    \5\January 2019 Report, supra note 2.
    \6\November 2019 Report, supra note 4 at 2.

          The causes include [the shooter's] mental and 
        behavioral health issues, people not reporting warning 
        signs or reporting signs that were not acted on by 
        those whom actionable information was reported, and how 
        [the shooter's] behavioral and discipline issues were 
        addressed (or not addressed) by Broward County Public 
        Schools. Also contributing, was the overall lack of 
        adequate or effective physical site security and 
        unenforced or non-existent security measures and 
        policies at MSDHS, as well as the ineffective 
        behavioral threat assessment process at MSDHS.\7\
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    \7\January 2019 Report, supra note 2 at 4.

    In both reports, the Florida Commission recommended a wide 
range of safety measures to be implemented in Florida 
schools.\8\ These recommendations include physical security 
improvements, as well as best practices on community engagement 
and threat assessment that, had they been in place at MSDHS, 
could have prevented or mitigated the harm of the tragic 
attack.\9\
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    \8\Id. See also November 2019 Report, supra note 4.
    \9\Id.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Operating concurrently with the Florida commission was the 
Federal Commission on School Safety (Federal commission). 
President Trump established the Federal commission on March 12, 
2018, to ``review safety practices and make meaningful and 
actionable recommendations of best practices to keep students 
safe.''\10\ The Federal commission was led by Education, HHS, 
DHS, and DOJ.\11\ The commission held public field visits, 
listening sessions, and full commission meetings in Washington, 
D.C., and across the nation.\12\
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    \10\Fed. Comm'n on School Safety, Final Report of the Fed. Comm'n 
on School Safety 6 (2018), https://www2.ed.gov/documents/school-safety/
school-safety-report.pdf.
    \11\Id.
    \12\Id. at 6-7.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    The Federal commission released its final report on 
December 18, 2018. Like the Florida commission report, the 
Federal commission reported its findings and made dozens of 
recommendations for school safety measures ranging from 
improved mental health services to school building security to 
law enforcement training.\13\ Among these findings, the Federal 
commission reported:
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    \13\Id.

          One of the biggest concerns raised by schools and 
        school districts since the Parkland shooting has been 
        their inability to easily sift through the multitude of 
        security options, equipment, technologies, etc., that 
        are available to their schools. As a way to address 
        this, many individuals in the school security community 
        have suggested the establishment of a federal 
        clearinghouse that could assess, identify, and share 
        best practices on school security. The federal 
        government should develop a clearinghouse to assess, 
        identify, and share best practices related to school 
        security measures, technologies, and innovations.\14\
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    \14\Id. at 126.

    The Federal commission report emphasized that local 
communities must decide what school safety measures work for 
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
them:

          While Washington has an important role to play, it 
        can play that role more successfully by acknowledging a 
        truth understood by people across the country: What 
        works in Wyoming may not work in New York, and what is 
        effective in an urban setting may not be effective in 
        rural communities. One size does not fit all.\15\
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    \15\Id. at 155.

    On July 25, 2019, the Committee held a hearing titled 
``Examining State and Federal Recommendations for Enhancing 
School Safety Against Targeted Violence.''\16\ The Committee 
heard testimony from three members of the Florida Commission--
Max Schachter, Tom Hoyer, and Sheriff Bob Gualtieri, chair of 
the Florida Commission--as well as Dr. Deborah Temkin of 
Education Child Trends.\17\ Mr. Schachter's son, Alex, and Mr. 
Hoyer's son, Luke, were killed in the MSDHS attack. During the 
hearing, Sheriff Gualtieri stated:
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    \16\Examining State and Federal Recommendations for Enhancing 
School Safety Against Targeted Violence: Hearing before the S. Comm. On 
Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs, 116th Cong. (2019).
    \17\Id. (statement of Sheriff Gualtieri, Chairman, Marjory Stoneman 
Douglas High School Public Safety Commission).

          It is debatable whether the incident at [MSDHS] was 
        entirely avoidable, but what is not debatable, in my 
        view, based on the evidence, is whether the harm could 
        have been mitigated. Simply put, the shooting did not 
        have to be as bad as it was . . . . Missed intervention 
        opportunities, ineffective safety on the part of the 
        school, and an ineffective law enforcement response 
        contributed to the magnitude of this tragedy. At the 
        time of the shooting, the Broward County Public Schools 
        did not have an active shooter response policy. There 
        had been no active shooter drills on the [MSDHS] campus 
        in the year before the shooting. There had been only 
        one minimal one hour of training for school staff, and 
        that occurred just a few weeks before the shooting. 
        There had been no formal training for the students. 
        Gates at [MSDHS] campus were left open and unattended, 
        building and classroom doors unlocked, and teachers and 
        staff lacked adequate communication infrastructure . . 
        . . People simply did not know what to do or how to do 
        it because there were no policies, no drills, and 
        little to no training. Please keep in mind that this 
        was the state of school security in Broward County, 
        Florida, the second largest school district in the 
        third largest State, 19 years after Columbine and 6 
        years after Sandy Hook.\18\
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    \18\Id. (statement of Sheriff Gualtieri, Chairman, Marjory Stoneman 
Douglas High School Public Safety Commission).

---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Mr. Schachter shared during his testimony:

          After I buried my son, my next priority was to make 
        sure my other three children were safe in their 
        schools. I traveled the country and came to realize 
        that in all of the 139,000 K-12 schools in this 
        country, each principal has to now become an expert in 
        door locks, access control, cameras, et cetera. It made 
        no sense to me that each school had to go and reinvent 
        the wheel. The idea that crystallized for me was the 
        need to create National School Safety Best Practices at 
        the Federal level. Those best practices would be housed 
        on a clearinghouse website so that all schools had a 
        one-stop shop for all of the most relevant and 
        important school safety information.\19\
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    \19\Id. (statement of Max Schachter, Founder and Chief Executive 
Officer, Safe Schools for Alex).

    Mr. Hoyer emphasized the need for a best practices 
clearinghouse, stating ``[o]ur schools need a clearinghouse of 
best practices that they can use as a tool, and our country 
needs Federal minimum school safety standards such as a single 
point of entry on a school campus.''\20\ During the hearing, 
Ranking Member Gary Peters asked Mr. Schachter what ``specific 
aspects that you believe are most critical for us to use as a 
tool and you are hoping to see in the best practices.'' Mr. 
Schachter answered:
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    \20\Id. (statement of Tom Hoyer, Treasurer, Stand with Parkland).

          All the stakeholders [mental health, law enforcement, 
        superintendents] need to be at the table so that we can 
        sit down and come up with national school safety best 
        practices. There are common-sense solutions that--you 
        know lessons learned that came out of Columbine, Sandy 
        Hook, and now Parkland that need to be implemented. And 
        so if we have everybody agreeing and have buy-in, I am 
        hoping that, you know, once we establish these best 
        practices, it will be put up on a Federal website, and 
        then that will be implemented through all States and 
        into school districts across the country.\21\
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    \21\Id. (testimony of Max Schachter, Founder and Chief Executive 
Officer, Safe Schools for Alex).

    This bill acts on the recommendations of the Federal 
Commission on School Safety, Mr. Schachter, and Stand with 
Parkland by establishing the Federal Clearinghouse on School 
Safety Best Practices. The bill requires Education, HHS, DHS, 
and DOJ to coordinate in establishing and maintaining the 
Clearinghouse to inform the public on the best practices for 
school safety measures, as well as ensure the Clearinghouse 
contents remain current and responsive to evolving best 
practices. The bill also requires the agencies to notify their 
state and local level partners about the Clearinghouse and to 
survey existing grant programs or resources which can be used 
to improve school safety. The Clearinghouse is further required 
to develop materials to assist parents seeking to identify the 
best practices in place in their schools and how to engage with 
appropriate school and community officials for implementing 
best practices.

                        III. Legislative History

    Chairman Ron Johnson introduced S. 2779, the Luke and Alex 
School Safety Act, on November 5, 2019, with Senators Marco 
Rubio and Rick Scott as co-sponsors. The bill was referred to 
the Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental 
Affairs, and the Committee considered S. 2779 at a business 
meeting on November 6, 2019.
    At the business meeting, Senator Johnson offered an 
amendment that clarified the Clearinghouse did not create, 
satisfy, or waive any Federal civil rights laws as they apply 
to schools.
    Senator Hassan and Ranking Member Peters offered an 
amendment to require the Clearinghouse publish only evidence- 
or research-based best practices. Chairman Johnson offered a 
second degree amendment to the Hassan amendment that does not 
restrict the best practices the Clearinghouse can publish, but 
does require the Clearinghouse to publish any evidence- or 
research-based rationales supporting the Clearinghouse's 
determination that a safety measure is a best practice.
    S. 2779, as amended by the Johnson Amendment 1 and the 
Hassan-Peters Amendment as modified by the Johnson Second 
Degree Amendment, was approved en bloc by voice vote with 
Senators Johnson, Portman, Paul, Lankford, Romney, Scott, Enzi, 
Hawley, Peters, Carper, Hassan, Sinema, and Rosen present. 
Consistent with Committee rules, the bill is reported with a 
technical amendment.

        IV. Section-by-Section Analysis of the Bill, as Reported


Section 1. Short title

    This section establishes the short title of the bill as the 
``Luke and Alex School Safety Act of 2019.''

Section 2. Federal Clearinghouse on school safety best practices

    This section establishes the Clearinghouse in the Homeland 
Security Act of 2002. The Clearinghouse is required to be 
developed by DHS, in coordination with Education, DOJ, HHS, and 
will serve as the primary resource of the Federal Government to 
identify and publish the best practices and recommendations for 
school safety. The Clearinghouse best practices and 
recommendations must involve comprehensive school safety 
measures to improve the safety posture of a school if 
implemented, include any evidence or research supporting how 
the best practice will improve the safety posture of a school, 
and include information on available Federal grants or 
resources to help implement the best practice. This section 
exempts the Clearinghouse from the Paperwork Reduction Act and 
the Federal Advisory Committee Act to increase and facilitate 
engagement with non-governmental entities.
    The bill allows the Clearinghouse to consult with a variety 
of officials, experts, and stakeholders in developing the 
Clearinghouse, such as parents, state, local, and Tribal 
officials, school security officers, security industry 
professionals, psychologists and mental health professionals, 
and architects and design professionals. The Clearinghouse is 
also required to consider recommendations of past commissions 
on school safety.
    This section requires the Clearinghouse to continuously 
update and improve its contents. To accomplish this, the 
Clearinghouse is required to establish an external advisory 
board consisting of government, private sector, and 
nongovernmental organizations, including school parents. This 
board will provide feedback on the implementation of 
Clearinghouse best practices, as well as challenges faced in 
implementation, and propose additional safety measures for 
potential inclusion as a Clearinghouse best practice. This 
section also requires the Clearinghouse to create materials 
specifically for parents to identify Clearinghouse best 
practices in their schools and to engage with relevant school 
and government officials on implementation of best practices.

Section 3. Notification of Clearinghouse

    This section requires DHS, DOJ, HHS, and Education to issue 
written notification to their state and local government 
counterparts about the Clearinghouse, as well as to every 
appropriate partner that serves a role in school safety.

Section 4. Grant program review

    This section requires Education, HHS, DHS, and the Attorney 
General to review and report to Congress on all Federal grant 
programs that could be used to implement any best practices of 
the Clearinghouse. The agencies must also try to identify such 
grant programs administered by each state. Additionally, the 
Clearinghouse must identify any recommendations for which there 
is not a Federal grant program that could be used to implement 
a best practice.

Section 5. Rule of construction

    This section clarifies that nothing in this bill creates, 
satisfies, or waives any requirement under title II of the 
Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, the Rehabilitation Act 
of 1973, title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, title IX of 
the Education Amendments of 1972, and the Age Discrimination 
Act of 1975.

                   V. Evaluation of Regulatory Impact

    Pursuant to the requirements of paragraph 11(b) of rule 
XXVI of the Standing Rules of the Senate, the Committee has 
considered the regulatory impact of this bill and determined 
that the bill will have no regulatory impact within the meaning 
of the rules. The Committee agrees with the Congressional 
Budget Office's statement that the bill contains no 
intergovernmental or private-sector mandates as defined in the 
Unfunded Mandates Reform Act (UMRA) and would impose no costs 
on state, local, or tribal governments.

             VI. Congressional Budget Office Cost Estimate

                                     U.S. Congress,
                               Congressional Budget Office,
                                 Washington, DC, November 19, 2019.
Hon. Ron Johnson,
Chairman, Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs, U.S. 
        Senate, Washington, DC.
    Dear Mr. Chairman: The Congressional Budget Office has 
prepared the enclosed cost estimate for S. 2779, the Luke and 
Alex School Safety Act of 2019.
    If you wish further details on this estimate, we will be 
pleased to provide them. The CBO staff contact is Aldo 
Prosperi.
            Sincerely,
                                         Phillip L. Swagel,
                                                          Director.
    Enclosure.

    
    

    S. 2779 would require the Department of Homeland Security 
(DHS), in coordination with other federal agencies, to 
disseminate information on school safety measures to state and 
local education agencies. The bill would direct DHS to work 
with other federal agencies to identify existing grant programs 
that can support school safety improvements.
    The bill also would require DHS to establish an advisory 
board to provide external feedback and recommendations for 
additional school safety resources.
    On the basis of information from DHS about the costs of 
similar activities, CBO estimates that staff salaries, travel 
costs, and other expenses would be about $1 million each year 
and $5 million over the 2020-2024 period; such spending would 
be subject to the availability of appropriations.
    The CBO staff contact for this estimate is Aldo Prosperi. 
The estimate was reviewed by Leo Lex, Deputy Assistant Director 
for Budget Analysis.

       VII. Changes in Existing Law Made by the Bill, as Reported

    In compliance with paragraph 12 of rule XXVI of the 
Standing Rules of the Senate, changes in existing law made by 
the bill, as reported, are shown as follows: (existing law 
proposed to be omitted is enclosed in brackets, new matter is 
printed in italic, and existing law in which no change is 
proposed is shown in roman):

HOMELAND SECURITY ACT OF 2002

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


SEC. 1. SHORT TITLE; TABLE OF CONTENTS.

    (a) * * *
    (b) Table of Contents.--The table of contents for this Act 
is as follows:
Sec. 1. * * *
     * * * * * * *

      Title XXII--Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency

     * * * * * * *
2215. Federal Clearinghouse on School Safety and Best Practices.

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


TITLE XXII--CYBERSECURITY AND INFRASTRUCTURE SECURITY AGENCY

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


Subtitle A--Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


SEC. 2215. FEDERAL CLEARINGHOUSE ON SCHOOL SAFETY BEST PRACTICES.

    (a) Establishment.--
          (1) In general.--The Secretary, in coordination with 
        the Secretary of Education, the Attorney General, and 
        the Secretary of Health and Human Services, shall 
        establish a Federal Clearinghouse on School Safety Best 
        Practices (in this section referred to as the 
        ``Clearinghouse'') within the Department.
          (2) Purpose.--The Clearinghouse shall be the primary 
        resource of the Federal Government to identify and 
        publish the best practices and recommendations for 
        school safety for use by State and local educational 
        agencies, institutions of higher education, State and 
        local law enforcement agencies, health professionals, 
        and the general public.
          (3) Personnel.--
                  (A) Assignments.--The Clearinghouse shall be 
                assigned such personnel and resources as the 
                Secretary considers appropriate to carry out 
                this section.
                  (B) Detailees.--The Secretary of Education, 
                the Attorney General, and the Secretary of 
                Health and Human Services may detail personnel 
                to the Clearinghouse.
          (4) Exemptions.--
                  (A) Paperwork reduction act.--Chapter 35 of 
                title 44, United States Code (commonly known as 
                the `Paperwork Reduction Act') shall not apply 
                to any rulemaking or information collection 
                required under this section.
                  (B) Federal advisory committee act.--The 
                Federal Advisory Committee Act (5 U.S.C. App.) 
                shall not apply for the purposes of carrying 
                out this section.
    (b) Clearinghouse Contents.--
          (1) Consultation.--In identifying the best practices 
        and recommendations for the Clearinghouse, the 
        Secretary may consult with appropriate Federal, State, 
        local, Tribal, private sector, and nongovernmental 
        organizations.
          (2) Criteria for best practices and 
        recommendations.--The best practices and 
        recommendations of the Clearinghouse shall, at a 
        minimum--
                  (A) involve comprehensive school safety 
                measures, including threat prevention, 
                preparedness, protection, mitigation, incident 
                response, and recovery to improve the safety 
                posture of a school upon implementation;
                  (B) include any evidence or research 
                rationale supporting the determination of the 
                Clearinghouse that the best practice or 
                recommendation has been shown to have a 
                significant effect on improving the health, 
                safety, and welfare of persons in school 
                settings, including--
                          (i) evidence from an experimental or 
                        quasi-experimental study;
                          (ii) high-quality research findings 
                        or a positive evaluation that such 
                        activity, strategy, or intervention is 
                        likely to improve the health, safety, 
                        and welfare of persons in school 
                        settings;
                          (iii) findings and data from previous 
                        Federal or State commissions relating 
                        to school climate, health, safety, and 
                        welfare; and
                          (iv) any other supporting evidence or 
                        findings relied upon by the 
                        Clearinghouse in determining best 
                        practices and recommendations; and
                  (C) include information on Federal grant 
                programs for which implementation of each best 
                practice or recommendation is an eligible use 
                for the program.
          (3) Past commission recommendations.--To the greatest 
        extent practicable, the Clearinghouse shall present, as 
        appropriate, Federal, State, local, Tribal, private 
        sector, and nongovernmental organization issued best 
        practices and recommendations and identify any best 
        practice or recommendation of the Clearinghouse that 
        was previously issued by any such organization or 
        commission.
    (c) Assistance and Training.--The Secretary may produce and 
publish materials on the Clearinghouse to assist and train 
educational agencies and law enforcement agencies on the 
implementation of the best practices and recommendations.
    (d) Continuous Improvement.--The Secretary shall--
          (1) collect for the purpose of continuous improvement 
        of the Clearinghouse--
                  (A) Clearinghouse data analytics;
                  (B) user feedback on the implementation of 
                resources, best practices, and recommendations 
                identified by the Clearinghouse; and
                  (C) any evaluations conducted on the best 
                practices and recommendations of the 
                Clearinghouse; and
          (2) in coordination with the Secretary of Education, 
        the Secretary of Health and Human Services, and the 
        Attorney General--
                  (A) regularly assess and identify 
                Clearinghouse best practices and 
                recommendations for which there are no 
                resources provided by Federal Government 
                programs for implementation; and
                  (B) establish an external advisory board, 
                which shall be comprised of appropriate State, 
                local, private sector, and nongovernmental 
                organizations, including organizations 
                representing parents of elementary and 
                secondary school students, to--
                          (i) provide feedback on the 
                        implementation of best practices and 
                        recommendations of the Clearinghouse; 
                        and
                          (ii) propose additional 
                        recommendations for best practices for 
                        inclusion in the Clearinghouse.
    (e) Parental Assistance.--The Clearinghouse shall produce 
materials to assist parents and legal guardians of students 
with identifying relevant Clearinghouse resources and engaging 
with appropriate officials to support the implementation of 
Clearinghouse best practices and recommendations.

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *