Links from the "Article or Amendment of the Constitution" column open PDF files.

The complete Constitution Annotated PDF provides interactive links from the table of contents, index, and table of cases. The complete document is large (15185 KB PDF), and may take several minutes to download. Save the file, then open it in a PDF reader. All articles, amendments, and sections of the Constitution Annotated are available as separate PDF files.

Decision Date Case Article or Amendment of the Constitution Topic
06/26/2017 Trinity Lutheran Church of Columbia, Inc. v. Comer (whether a Missouri policy excluding an otherwise eligible applicant from a grant program because of the applicant's religious status violated the Free Exercise Clause) First Amendment (pp. 1123-24) Free Exercise of Religion
06/19/2017 Matal v. Tam (whether a a 70-year old law allowing the government to refuse to register "disparaging" trademarks violates the Free Speech Clause) First Amendment (pp. 1299) Group Libel, Hate Speech
06/19/2017 Packingham v. North Carolina (whether a law making it a felony for a registered sex offender "to access a commercial social networking Web site where the sex offender knows that the site permits minor children to become members or to create or maintain personal Web pages" impermissibly restricts lawful speech in violation of the First Amendment) First Amendment (pp. 1342-43) Speech Plus—The Constitutional Law of Leafletting, Picketing, and Demonstrating
06/12/2017 Sessions v. Morales-Santana (whether a provision of a derivative citizenship statute applicable to certain persons born abroad and out of wedlock violates the equal protection component of the Fifth Amendment's Due Process Clause) Fourteenth Amendment (pp. 2188-2190) The New Equal Protection: Classifications Meriting Close Scrutiny: Sex
05/22/2017 Cooper v. Harris (whether race furnished the predominant rationale for North Carolina's redistricting plan) Fourteenth Amendment (pp. 2212-13) Apportionment and Redistricting
03/06/2017 Pena-Rodriguez v. Colorado (whether the Sixth Amendment requires that the no-impeachment rule—which recognizes that a verdict, once entered, cannot be challenged based on comments the jurors made during deliberations—must give way in order for the trial court to assess the possible denial of the jury trial guarantee where compelling evidence indicates that a juror relied on racial stereotypes or animus to convict a criminal defendant) Sixth Amendment (pp. 1647-48) Impartial Jury